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Title 46

Displaying title 46, up to date as of 9/20/2021. Title 46 was last amended 9/10/2021.

Title 46

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§ 151.15-1 Tank types.

This section lists the definitions of the various tank types required for cargo containment by Table 151.05.

(a) Integral. A cargo containment envelope which forms a part of the vessel's hull in which it is built, and may be stressed in the same manner and by the same loads which stress the contiguous hull structure. An integral tank is essential to the structural completeness of its vessel's hull.

(b) Independent. A cargo containment envelope which is not a contiguous part of the hull structure. An independent tank is built and installed so as to eliminate, wherever possible (or, in any event, to minimize) its stressing as a result of stressing or motion of the adjacent hull structure. In general, therefore, motion of parts of the tank relative to the adjacent hull structure is possible. An independent tank is not essential to the structural completeness of its carrying vessel's hull.

(c) Gravity. Tanks having a design pressure (as described in Part 54 of this chapter) not greater than 10 pounds per square inch gauge and of prismatic shape or other geometry where stress analysis is neither readily nor completely determinate. (Integral tanks are of the gravity type.)

(d) Pressure. Independent tanks whose design pressure (as described in Part 54 of this chapter) is above 10 pounds per square inch gauge and fabricated in accordance with part 54, of this chapter. Independent gravity tanks which are of normal pressure vessel configuration (i.e., bodies of revolution, in which the stresses are readily determinate) shall be classed as pressure vessel type tanks even though their maximum allowable working pressure is less than 10 pounds per square inch gauge. Pressure vessel tanks shall be of Classes I, I-L, II, II-L, or III, as defined in subchapter F of this chapter.