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Title 40

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PART 180 - TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD
Authority:

21 U.S.C. 321(q), 346a and 371.

Source:

36 FR 22540, Nov. 25, 1971, unless otherwise noted.

GLOSSARY

Note:

The items in this glossary were compiled as an aid to the users of the Code of Federal Regulations. Inclusion or exclusion from this glossary has no legal significance.

APPLI = APPLICATION

C-I MET = CHOLINESTERASE-INHIBITING METABOLITES

CARB = CARBAMATES

EPWRR = EDIBLE PORTION WITH RIND REMOVED

EXC = EXCEPT

I (IN PPM COLUMN) = INTERIM TOLERANCE

INC = INCLUDING

K = CWHR = KERNEL PLUS COB WITH HUSK REMOVED

MBYP = MEAT BYPRODUCTS

MIN = MINIMUM

N (IN PPM COLUMN) = NEGLIGIBLE RESIDUES

NMT = NOT MORE THAN

NON-PER BAG/PKGD RAC = NON-PERISHABLE PACKAGED OR BAGGED RAW AGRICULTURAL COMMODITY

PPM = PART(S) PER MILLION

POST-H = POSTHARVEST APPLICATION

PRE-H = PREHARVEST APPLICATION

PRE-S = PRESLAUGHTER APPLICATION

PRODS = PRODUCTS rollert

T (IN PPM COLUMN) = TEMPORARY TOLERANCE

[41 FR 4537, Jan. 30, 1976]

Subpart A - Definitions and Interpretative Regulations
§ 180.1 Definitions and interpretations.

(a) Administrator, without qualification, means the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency.

(b) Agency, without qualification, means the Environmental Protection Agency.

(c) FFDCA means the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, as amended, 21 U.S.C. 301-392.

(d) Raw agricultural commodities include, among other things, fresh fruits, whether or not they have been washed and colored or otherwise treated in their unpeeled natural form; vegetables in their raw or natural state, whether or not they have been stripped of their outer leaves, waxed, prepared into fresh green salads, etc.; grains, nuts, eggs, raw milk, meats, and similar agricultural produce. It does not include foods that have been processed, fabricated, or manufactured by cooking, freezing, dehydrating, or milling.

(e) Where a raw agricultural commodity bearing a pesticide chemical residue that has been exempted from the requirement of a tolerance, or which is within a tolerance permitted under FFDCA section 408, is used in preparing a processed food, the processed food will not be considered unsafe within the meaning of FFDCA sections 402 and 408(a), despite the lack of a tolerance or exemption for the pesticide chemical residue in the processed food, if:

(1) The pesticide chemical has been used in or on the raw agricultural commodity in conformity with a tolerance under this section;

(2) The pesticide chemical residue has been removed to the extent possible in good manufacturing practice; and

(3) The concentration of the pesticide chemical residue in the processed food is not greater than the tolerance prescribed for the pesticide chemical residue on the raw agricultural commodity.

(f) For the purpose of computing fees as required by § 180.33, each group of related crops listed in § 180.34(e) and each crop group or subgroup listed in § 180.41 is counted as a single raw agricultural commodity in a petition or request for tolerances or exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

(g) Tolerances and exemptions established for pesticide chemicals in or on the general category of raw agricultural commodities listed in column A apply to the corresponding specific raw agricultural commodities listed in column B. However, a tolerance or exemption for a specific commodity in column B does not apply to the general category in column A.

A B
Alfalfa Medicago sativa L. Subsp. sativa, (alfalfa, lucerne); Onobrychis viciifolia Scop. (sainfoin, holy clover, esparcet); and Lotus corniculatus L. (trefoil); and varieties and/or hybrids of these.
Banana Banana, plantain.
Basil (Ocimum spp.) Basil (Ocimum basilicum L.); Basil, American (Ocimum americanum L.); Basil, Greek (Ocimum minimum L.); Basil, holy (Ocimum tenuiflorum L.); Basil, lemon (Ocimum x citriodorum Vis.); Basil, Russian (Ocimum gratissimum L.)
Bean Cicer arietinum (chickpea, garbanzo bean); Lupinus spp. (including sweet lupine, white sweet lupine, white lupine, and grain lupine). Phaseolus spp. (including kidney bean, lima bean, mung bean, navy bean, pinto bean, snap bean, and waxbean; Vicia faba (broad bean, fava bean); Vigna spp. (including asparagus bean, blackeyed pea and cowpea).
Bean, dry All beans above in dry form only.
Bean, succulent All beans above in succulent form only.
Blackberry Rubus eubatus (including bingleberry, black satin berry, boysenberry Cherokee blackberry, Chesterberry, Cheyenne blackberry, coryberry, darrowberry, dewberry, Dirksen thornless berry, Himalayaberry, hullberry, Lavacaberry, lowberry, Lucretiaberry, mammoth blackberry, marionberry, nectarberry, olallieberry, Oregon evergreen berry, phenomenalberry, rangerberry, ravenberry, rossberry, Shawnee blackberry, and varieties and/or hybrids of these).
Broccoli Broccoli, Chinese broccoli (gai lon, white flowering broccoli).
Cabbage Cabbage, Chinese cabbage (tight-heading varieties only).
Caneberry Rubus spp. (including blackberry);
Rubus caesius (youngberry);
Rubus loganbaccus (loganberry);
Rubus idaeus (red and black raspberry); cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Celery Celery, Florence fennel (sweet anise, sweet fennel, finochio) (fresh leaves and stalks only).
Cherry Cherry, sweet, and cherry, tart.
Endive Endive, escarole.
Fern, edible, fiddlehead Fern, edible, fiddlehead including: Black lady fern, Deparia japonica (Thunb.) M. Kato; Bracken fern, Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kuhn; Broad buckler fern, Dryopteris dilatata (Hoffm.) A. Gray; Cinnamon fern, Osmundastrum cinnamomeum (L.) C. Presl; Lady fern, Athyrium filix-femina (L.) Roth ex Mert.; Leather fern, Acrostichum aureum L.; Mother fern, Diplazium proliferum (Lam.) Thouars; Ostrich fern, Matteuccia struthiopteris (L.) Tod.; Vegetable fern, Diplazium esculentum (Retz.) Sw.; Zenmai fern, Osmuda japonica Thunb.
Flowers, edible, multiple species Acacia blossoms (Acacia senegal (L.) Willd.); Alyssum, sweet (Lobularia maritima (L.) Desv.); Anchusa, garden (Anchusa azurea Mill.); Angelica (Angelica archangelica L.); Apricot, Japanese (Prunus mume Siebold & Zucc.); Arnica (Arnica montana L.); Arugula (Eruca sativa Mill.); Balm (Melissa officinalis L.); Banana (Musa spp.); Basil (Ocimum spp.); Begonia, tuberous (Begonia x tuberhybrida Voss); Bilimbi (Averrhoa bilimbi L.); Bisnaga (Ammi visnaga (L.) Lam.); Blue thistle (Centaurea benedicta (L.) L.); Borage (Borago officinalis L.); Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica Plenck); Bugelweed (Lycopus spp.); Burnet (Sanguisorba spp.); Calendula (Calendula officinalis L.); Canadian goldenrod (Solidago canadensis L.); Caper (Capparis spinosa L.); Carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.); Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.); Celandine, greater (Chelidonium majus L.); Chamomile (Chamaemelum spp. and Matricaria spp.); Chaparral (Larrea tridentata (DC.) Coville); Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm.); Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.); Chive, Chinese (Allium tuberosum Rottler ex Spreng.); Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum spp.); Clary (Salvia sclarea L.); Cleavers (Galium aparine L); Clove (Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & L. M. Perry); Clover, red (Trifolium pratense L.); Coriander/Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum L.); Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus L.); Costmary (Tanacetum balsamita L. subsp. balsamita); Daisy, English (Bellis perennis L.); Dames rocket (Hesperis matronalis L.); Damiana (Turnera diffusa Willd); Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale F. H. Wigg. aggr.); Daylily (Hemerocallis fulva (L.) L.); Dill (Anethum graveolens L.); Elder (Sambucus nigra L.); Eyebright (Euphrasia spp.); Feijoa (Acca sellowiana (O. Berg) Burret); Fennel (common) (Foeniculum vulgare Mill. subsp. vulgare var. vulgare); Frangipani (Plumeria rubra L.); Fuchsia (Fuchsia spp.); Gardenia (Gardenia jasminoides J. Ellis); Geranium (Pelargonium spp.); Geranium, lemon (Pelargonium crispum (P.J. Bergius) L'Her.); Geranium, rose (Pelargonium graveolens L'Hér.); Ginger, white (Hedychium coronarium J. Koenig); Gladiolus (Gladiolus spp.); Greater periwinkle (Vinca major L.); Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna Jacq. Crataegus spp.); Hibiscus (Hibiscus spp.); Hibiscus, Chinese (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L.); Hollyhock (Alcea rosea L.); Honeysuckle, Japanese (Lonicera japonica Thunb.); Horehound (Marrubium vulgare L.); Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L.); Hyssop, anise (Agastache foeniculum (Pursh) Kuntze); Impatiens (Impatiens walleriana Hook. f.); Jasmine, Arabian (Jasminum sambac (L.) Aiton); Kewra (Pandanus fascicularis Lam.); Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill.); Lemon (Citrus limon (L.) Burm. f.); Lilac (Syringa vulgaris L.); Lily (Lilium spp.); Lily, mariposa (Calochortus gunnisonii S. Watson); Lily, sego (Calochortus nuttallii Torr. & A. Gray); Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.); Lovage (Levisticum officinale W. D. J. Koch); Mallow, high (Malva sylvestris L.); Marigold (Tagetes spp.); Marjoram (Origanum spp.); Meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim.); Mint (Mentha spp.); Mioga (Zingiber mioga (Thunb.) Roscoe); Monarda (Monarda spp.); Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca L.); Mullein (Verbascum thapsus L., Verbascum spp.); Mustard (Brassica spp. and Sinapis spp.); Nasturtium (Tropaeolum spp.); Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench); Orange, bitter (Citrus aurantium L.); Passion flower (Passiflora spp.); Pea blossoms (Pisum sativum L. subsp. sativum var. sativum); Peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch var. persica); Peony, common (Paeonia officinalis L.); Perilla (Perilla frutescens (L.) Britton); Petunia (Petunia x hybrida hort. ex E. Vilm.); Primrose (Primula vulgaris Huds.); Puget sound gumweed (Grindelia integrifolia DC.); Purslane, winter (Claytonia perfoliata Donn ex Willd.); Radish (Raphanus sativus L.); Redbud (Cercis canadensis L.); Rose (Rosa spp.); Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.); Rose-of-Sharon ((Hibiscus syriacus L.); Runner bean, scarlet (Phaseolus coccineus L.); Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.); Sage (Salvia officinalis L.); Sage, pineapple (Salvia elegans); Savory, summer (Satureja hortensis L.); Saxifrage, burnet (Pimpinella saxifraga L.); Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius (L.) Link ); Shepherd's purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik.); Snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.); Sorrel, garden (Rumex acetosa L.); Sorrel, wood (Oxalis acetosella L.); Spilanthes (Blainvillea acmella (L.) Philipson); Squash (Cucurbita spp.); Stock, gillyflower (Matthiola incana (L.) W. T. Aiton); Stoneroot (Collinsonia canadensis L.); Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.); Sweet william (Dianthus barbatus L.); Sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua L.); Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.); Tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa L.); Tulip (Tulipa spp.); Verbena, blue (Verbena hastate L.); Verbena, lemon (Aloysia citrodora Palau); Violet (Viola spp.); Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium L); Yarrow (Achillea millefolium L.); Yucca (Yucca spp.); and other edible flowers.
Flowers, edible, multiple species Acacia blossoms (Acacia senegal (L.) Willd.); Alyssum, sweet (Lobularia maritima (L.) Desv.); Anchusa, garden (Anchusa azurea Mill.); Angelica (Angelica archangelica L.); Apricot, Japanese (Prunus mume Siebold & Zucc.); Arnica (Arnica montana L.); Arugula (Eruca sativa Mill.); Balm (Melissa officinalis L.); Banana (Musa spp.); Basil (Ocimum spp.); Begonia, tuberous (Begonia x tuberhybrida Voss); Bilimbi (Averrhoa bilimbi L.); Bisnaga (Ammi visnaga (L.) Lam.); Blue thistle (Centaurea benedicta (L.) L.); Borage (Borago officinalis L.); Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica Plenck); Bugelweed (Lycopus spp.); Burnet (Sanguisorba spp.); Calendula (Calendula officinalis L.); Canadian goldenrod (Solidago canadensis L.); Caper (Capparis spinosa L.); Carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.); Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.); Celandine, greater (Chelidonium majus L.); Chamomile (Chamaemelum spp. and Matricaria spp.); Chaparral (Larrea tridentata (DC.) Coville); Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm.); Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.); Chive, Chinese (Allium tuberosum Rottler ex Spreng.); Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum spp.); Clary (Salvia sclarea L.); Cleavers (Galium aparine L); Clove (Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & L. M. Perry); Clover, red (Trifolium pratense L.); Coriander/Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum L.); Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus L.); Costmary (Tanacetum balsamita L. subsp. balsamita); Daisy, English (Bellis perennis L.); Dames rocket (Hesperis matronalis L.); Damiana (Turnera diffusa Willd); Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale F. H. Wigg. aggr.); Daylily (Hemerocallis fulva (L.) L.); Dill (Anethum graveolens L.); Elder (Sambucus nigra L.); Eyebright (Euphrasia spp.); Feijoa (Acca sellowiana (O. Berg) Burret); Fennel (common) (Foeniculum vulgare Mill. subsp. vulgare var. vulgare); Frangipani (Plumeria rubra L.); Fuchsia (Fuchsia spp.); Gardenia (Gardenia jasminoides J. Ellis); Geranium (Pelargonium spp.); Geranium, lemon (Pelargonium crispum (P.J. Bergius) L'Her.); Geranium, rose (Pelargonium graveolens L'Hér.); Ginger, white (Hedychium coronarium J. Koenig); Gladiolus (Gladiolus spp.); Greater periwinkle (Vinca major L.); Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna Jacq. Crataegus spp.); Hibiscus (Hibiscus spp.); Hibiscus, Chinese (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L.); Hollyhock (Alcea rosea L.); Honeysuckle, Japanese (Lonicera japonica Thunb.); Horehound (Marrubium vulgare L.); Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L.); Hyssop, anise (Agastache foeniculum (Pursh) Kuntze); Impatiens (Impatiens walleriana Hook. f.); Jasmine, Arabian (Jasminum sambac (L.) Aiton); Kewra (Pandanus fascicularis Lam.); Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill.); Lemon (Citrus limon (L.) Burm. f.); Lilac (Syringa vulgaris L.); Lily (Lilium spp.); Lily, mariposa (Calochortus gunnisonii S. Watson); Lily, sego (Calochortus nuttallii Torr. & A. Gray); Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.); Lovage (Levisticum officinale W. D. J. Koch); Mallow, high (Malva sylvestris L.); Marigold (Tagetes spp.); Marjoram (Origanum spp.); Meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim.); Mint (Mentha spp.); Mioga (Zingiber mioga (Thunb.) Roscoe); Monarda (Monarda spp.); Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca L.); Mullein (Verbascum thapsus L., Verbascum spp.); Mustard (Brassica spp. and Sinapis spp.); Nasturtium (Tropaeolum spp.); Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench); Orange, bitter (Citrus aurantium L.); Passion flower (Passiflora spp.); Pea blossoms (Pisum sativum L. subsp. sativum var. sativum); Peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch var. persica); Peony, common (Paeonia officinalis L.); Perilla (Perilla frutescens (L.) Britton); Petunia (Petunia x hybrida hort. ex E. Vilm.); Primrose (Primula vulgaris Huds.); Puget sound gumweed (Grindelia integrifolia DC.); Purslane, winter (Claytonia perfoliata Donn ex Willd.); Radish (Raphanus sativus L.); Redbud (Cercis canadensis L.); Rose (Rosa spp.); Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.); Rose-of-Sharon ((Hibiscus syriacus L.); Runner bean, scarlet (Phaseolus coccineus L.); Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.); Sage (Salvia officinalis L.); Sage, pineapple (Salvia elegans); Savory, summer (Satureja hortensis L.); Saxifrage, burnet (Pimpinella saxifraga L.); Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius (L.) Link ); Shepherd's purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik.); Snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.); Sorrel, garden (Rumex acetosa L.); Sorrel, wood (Oxalis acetosella L.); Spilanthes (Blainvillea acmella (L.) Philipson); Squash (Cucurbita spp.); Stock, gillyflower (Matthiola incana (L.) W. T. Aiton); Stoneroot (Collinsonia canadensis L.); Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.); Sweet william (Dianthus barbatus L.); Sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua L.); Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.); Tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa L.); Tulip (Tulipa spp.); Verbena, blue (Verbena hastate L.); Verbena, lemon (Aloysia citrodora Palau); Violet (Viola spp.); Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium L); Yarrow (Achillea millefolium L.); Yucca (Yucca spp.); and other edible flowers.
Fruit, citrus Grapefruit, lemon, lime, orange, tangelo, tangerine, citrus citron, kumquat, and hybrids of these.
Garlic Garlic, great headed; garlic, and serpent garlic.
Guava Guava (Psidium guajava L.); Guava, cattley (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine); Guava, Para (Psidium acutangulum DC.); Guava, purple strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine var. cattleyanum); Guava, strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine var. littorale (Raddi) Fosberg); Guava, yellow strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine var. cattleyanum forma lucidum O. Deg.)
Lettuce Lettuce, head; and lettuce, leaf
Lettuce, head Lettuce, head; crisphead varieties only
Lettuce, leaf Lettuce, leaf; cos (romaine), butterhead varieties
Marjoram (Origanum spp.); Marjoram, pot (Origanum onites L.); Marjoram, sweet (Origanum majorana L.); Oregano (Origanum vulgare L.) Origanum spp. (includes sweet or annual marjoram, wild marjoram or oregano, and pot marjoram).
Melon Muskmelon, including hybrids and/or varieties of Cucumis melo (including true cantaloupe, cantaloupe, casaba, Santa Claus melon, crenshaw melon, honeydew melon, honey balls, Persian melon, golden pershaw melon, mango melon, pineapple melon, snake melon); and watermelon, including hybrids and/or varieties of (Citrullus spp.).
Mint (Mentha spp.) Mint (Mentha spp.); Applemint (Mentha suaveolens Ehrh.); Horsemint (Mentha longifolia (L.) Huds.); Mint, corn (Mentha arvensis L.); Peppermint (Mentha. x piperita L.); Spearmint, (Mentha spicata L.); Spearmint, Scotch (Mentha x gracilis Sole); Watermint (Mentha aquatica L.); Pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium L.)
Muskmelon Cucumis melo (includes true cantaloupe, cantaloupe, casaba, Santa Claus melon, crenshaw melon, honeydew melon, honey balls, Persian melon, golden pershaw melon, mango melon, pineapple melon, snake melon, and other varieties and/or hybrids of these.)
Onion Bulb onion; green onion; and garlic.
Onion, bulb Bulb onion; garlic; great headed garlic; serpent garlic; Chinese onion; pearl onion; potato onion; and shallot, bulb.
Onion, green Green onion; lady's leek; leek; wild leek; Beltsville bunching onion; fresh onion; tree onion, tops; Welsh onion; and shallot, fresh leaves.
Palm hearts Palm hearts, various species, including: African fan palm, Borassus aethiopum Mart.; Cabbage palm, Euterpe oleracea Mart.; Cabbage palmetto, Sabal palmetto (Walter) Schult. & Schult. f.; Coconut, Cocos nucifera L.; Palmyra palm, Borassus flabellifera L.; Peach Palm, Bactris gasipaes Kunth; Royal palm, Roystonea oleracea (Jacq.) O.F. Cook; Salak palm, Salacca zalacca (Gaertn.) Voss; Saw palmetto, Serenoa repens (W. Bartram) Small; Wine palm, Raphia spp.
Peach Peach, nectarine
Pea Cajanus cajan (includes pigeon pea); Cicer spp. (includes chickpea and garbanzo bean); Lens culinaris (lentil); Pisum spp. (includes dwarf pea, garden pea, green pea, English pea, field pea, and edible pod pea). [Note: A variety of pesticide tolerances have been previously established for pea and/or bean. Chickpea/garbanzo bean is now classified in both the bean and the pea categories. For garbanzo bean/chickpea only, the highest established pea or bean tolerance will apply to pesticide residues found in this commodity.]
Pea, dry All peas in dry form only.
Pea, succulent All peas in succulent form only.
Pepper All varieties of pepper including pimento and bell, hot, and sweet pepper.
Radish, oriental, roots Raphanus sativus var. longipinnatus (roots and tops), including Chinese or Japanese radish (both white and red), winter radish, daikon, lobok, lo pak, and other cultivars and/or hybrids of these.
Radish, oriental, tops) Raphanus sativus var. longipinnatus (roots and tops), including Chinese or Japanese radish (both white and red), winter radish, daikon, lobok, lo pak, and other cultivars and/or hybrids of these.
Rapeseed Brassica napus, B. campestris, and Crambe abyssinica (oilseed-producing varieties only which include canola and crambe.)
Raspberry Rubus spp. (including bababerry; black raspberry; blackcap; caneberry; framboise; frambueso; himbeere; keriberry; mayberry; red raspberry; thimbleberry; tulameen; yellow raspberry; and cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these).
Sorghum, grain, grain Sorghum spp. [sorghum, grain, sudangrass (seed crop), and hybrids of these grown for its seed].
Sorghum, forage, stover Sorghum spp. [sorghum, forage; sorghum, stover; sudangrass, and hybrids of these grown for forage and/or stover.
Squash Pumpkin, summer squash, and winter squash.
Sugar apple Annona squamosa L. and its hybrid atemoya (Annona cherimola Mill X A. squamosa L.) Also includes true custard apple (Annona reticulata L.).
Squash, summer Fruits of the gourd (Cucurbitaceae) family that are consumed when immature, 100% of the fruit is edible either cooked or raw, once picked it cannot be stored, has a soft rind which is easily penetrated, and if seeds were harvested they would not germinate; e.g., Cucurbita pepo (i.e., crookneck squash, straightneck squash, scallop squash, and vegetable marrow); Lagenaria spp. (i.e., spaghetti squash, hyotan, cucuzza); Luffa spp. (i.e., hechima, Chinese okra); Momordica spp. (i.e., bitter melon, balsam pear, balsam apple, Chinese cucumber); Sechium edule (chayote); and other cultivars and/or hybrids of these.
Sweet potato Sweet potato, yam.
Tangerine Tangerine (mandarin or mandarin orange); clementine; Mediterranean mandarin; satsuma mandarin; tangelo; tangor; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Tomato Tomato, tomatillo.
Turnip tops or turnip greens Broccoli raab (raab, raab salad), hanover salad, turnip tops (turnip greens).
Wheat Wheat, triticale.

(h) Unless otherwise specified in this paragraph or in tolerance regulations prescribed in this part for specific pesticide chemicals, the raw agricultural commodity or processed food to be examined for pesticide residues, shall consist of the whole raw agricultural commodity or processed food.

(1) The raw agricultural commodity bananas, when examined for pesticide residues, shall not include any crown tissue or stalk.

(2) Shell shall be removed and discarded from nuts before examination for pesticide residues.

(3) Caps (hulls) shall be removed and discarded from strawberries before examination for pesticide residues.

(4) Stems shall be removed and discarded from melons before examination for pesticide residues.

(5) Roots, stems, and outer sheaths (or husks) shall be removed and discarded from garlic bulbs and dry bulb onions, and only the garlic cloves and onion bulbs shall be examined for pesticide residues.

(6) Where a tolerance is established on a root vegetable including tops and/or with tops, and the tops and the roots are marketed together, they shall be analyzed separately and neither the pesticide residue on the roots nor the pesticide residue on the tops shall exceed the tolerance level, except that in the case of carrots, parsnips, and rutabagas, the tops shall be removed and discarded before analyzing roots for pesticide residues.

(7) The crowns (leaves at the top of the fruit) shall be removed and discarded from pineapples before examination for pesticide residues.

(8) The term lima beans means the beans and the pod.

(9) The term peanuts means the peanut meat after removal of the hulls.

(10) For processed foods consisting primarily of one ingredient and sold in a form requiring further preparation prior to consumption (e.g., fruit juice concentrates, dehydrated vegetables, and powdered potatoes), the processed food to be examined for residues shall be the whole processed commodity after compensating for or reconstituting to the commodity's normal moisture content, unless a tolerance for the concentrated or dehydrated food form is included in this part. If there exists a tolerance for a specific pesticide on the processed food in its concentrated or dehydrated food form, for the purpose of determining whether the food is in compliance with that tolerance, the processed food to be examined for residues shall be the whole processed commodity on an “as is” basis.

(i) The term pesticide chemical shall have the meaning specified in FFDCA section 201(q)(1), as amended, except as provided in § 180.4.

(j) The term negligible residue means any amount of a pesticide chemical remaining in or on a raw agricultural commodity or group of raw agricultural commodities that would result in a daily intake regarded as toxicologically insignificant on the basis of scientific judgment of adequate safety data. Ordinarily this will add to the diet an amount which will be less than 1/2,000th of the amount that has been demonstrated to have no effect from feeding studies on the most sensitive animal species tested. Such toxicity studies shall usually include at least 90-day feeding studies in two species of mammals.

(k) The term nonperishable raw agricultural commodity means any raw agricultural commodity not subject to rapid decay or deterioration that would render it unfit for consumption. Examples are cocoa beans, coffee beans, field-dried beans, field-dried peas, grains, and nuts. Not included are eggs, milk, meat, poultry, fresh fruits, and vegetables such as onions, parsnips, potatoes, and carrots.

(l) The term tolerance with regional registration means any tolerance which is established for pesticide residues resulting from the use of the pesticide pursuant to a regional registration. Such a tolerance is supported by residue data from specific growing regions for a raw agricultural commodity. Individual tolerances with regional registration are designated in separate subsections in 40 CFR 180.101 through 180.999, as appropriate. Additional residue data which are representative of the proposed use area are required to expand the geographical area of usage of a pesticide on a raw agricultural commodity having an established “tolerance with regional registration.” Persons seeking geographically broader registration of a crop having a “tolerance with regional registration” should contact the appropriate EPA product manager concerning additional residue data required to expand the use area.

(m) The term pesticide chemical residue shall have the meaning specified in FFDCA section 201(q)(2), as amended, except as provided in § 180.4.

(n) The term food commodity means:

(1) Any raw agricultural commodity (food or feed) as defined in section 201(r) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA); and

(2) Any processed food or feed as defined in section 201(gg) of the FFDCA.

[36 FR 22540, Nov. 25, 1971]

§ 180.3 Tolerances for related pesticide chemicals.

(a) Pesticide chemicals that cause related pharmacological effects will be regarded, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, as having an additive deleterious action. (For example, many pesticide chemicals within each of the following groups have related pharmacological effects: Chlorinated organic pesticides, arsenic-containing chemicals, metallic dithiocarbamates, cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides.)

(b) Tolerances established for such related pesticide chemicals may limit the amount of a common component (such as As2O3) that may be present, or may limit the amount of biological activity (such as cholinesterase inhibition) that may be present, or may limit the total amount of related pesticide chemicals (such as chlorinated organic pesticides) that may be present.

(c)

(1) Where tolerances for inorganic bromide in or on the same raw agricultural commodity are set in two or more sections in this part (example: §§ 180.123 and 180.199), the overall quantity of inorganic bromide to be tolerated from use of the same pesticide in different modes of application or from two or more pesticide chemicals for which tolerances are established is the highest of the separate applicable tolerances. For example, where the bromide tolerance on asparagus from methyl bromide commodity fumigation is 100 parts per million (40 CFR 180.123) and on asparagus from methyl bromide soil treatment is 300 parts per million (40 CFR 180.199), the overall inorganic bromide tolerance for asparagus grown on methyl bromide-treated soil and also fumigated with methyl bromide after harvest is 300 parts per million.

(2) Where tolerances are established in terms of inorganic bromide residues only from use of organic bromide fumigants on raw agricutural commodities, such tolerances are sufficient to protect the public health, and no additional concurrent tolerances for the organic pesticide chemicals from such use are necessary. This conclusion is based on evidence of the dissipation of the organic pesticide or its conversion to inorganic bromide residues in the food when ready to eat.

(d)

(1) Where tolerances are established for both calcium cyanide and hydrogen cyanide on the same raw agricultural commodity, the total amount of such pesticides shall not yield more residue than that permitted by the larger of the two tolerances, calculated as hydrogen cyanide.

(2) Where tolerances are established for residues of both O,O-diethyl S-[2-(ethylthio)ethyl] phosphorodithioate and demeton (a mixture of O,O-diethyl O-(and S-) [2-(ethylthio)ethyl] phosphorothioates) on the same raw agricultural commodity, the total amount of such pesticides shall not yield more residue than that permitted by the larger of the two tolerances, calculated as demeton.

(3) Where tolerances are established for both terpene polychlorinates (chlorinated mixture of camphene, pinene, and related terpenes, containing 65-66 percent chlorine) and toxaphene (chlorinated camphene containing 67-69 percent chlorine) on the same raw agricultural commodities, the total amount of such pesticides shall not yield more residue than that permitted by the larger of the two tolerances, calculated as a chlorinated terpene of molecular weight 396.6 containing 67 percent chlorine.

(4) Where a tolerance is established for more than one pesticide containing arsenic found in, or on a raw agricultural commodity, the total amount of such pesticide shall not exceed the highest established tolerance calculated as As2O3.

(5) Where tolerances are established for more than one member of the class of dithiocarbamates listed in paragraph (e)(3) of this section on the same raw agricultural commodity, the total residue of such pesticides shall not exceed that permitted by the highest tolerance established for any one member of the class, calculated both as zinc ethylenebisdithiocarbamate and carbon disulfide. The tolerance based on zinc ethylenebisdithiocarbamate shall first be multiplied by 0.6 to convert it to the equivalent carbon disulfide tolerance, and then the carbon disulfide tolerance levels will be compared to determine the highest tolerance level per raw agricultural commodity.

(6) Where tolerances are established for residues of both S,S,S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate and tributyl phosphorotrithioite in or on the same raw agricultural commodity, the total amount of such pesticides shall not yield more residue than that permitted by the higher of the two tolerances, calculated as S,S,S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate.

(7) Where tolerances are established for residues of O,S-dimethyl phosphoramidothioate, resulting from the use of acephate (O,S-dimethyl acetylphos-phoramidothioate) and/or O,S - dimethylphosphoramidothioate on the same agricultural commodity, the total amount of O,S-dimethyl-phosphoramidothioate shall not yield more residue than that permitted by the higher of the two tolerances.

(8) Where a tolerance is established for more than one pesticide having the metabolites 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-methylurea (DCPMU) and 3,4-dichlorophenylurea (DCPU) found in or on a raw agricultural commodity, the total amount of such residues shall not exceed the highest established tolerance for a pesticide having these metabolites.

(9) Where a tolerance is established for more than one pesticide having as metabolites compounds containing the benzimidazole moiety found in or on a raw agricultural commodity, the total amount of such residues shall not exceed the highest established tolerance for a pesticide having these metabolites.

(10) Where a tolerance is established for triclopyr, chloropyrifos, and chlorpyrifos-methyl having the common metabolite 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol on the same raw agricultural commodity, the total amount of such residues shall not exceed the highest established tolerance for any of the pesticides having the metabolites.

(11) Where tolerances are established for more than one pesticide having the metabolite 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol found in or on the raw agricultural commodity, the total amount of such residues shall not exceed the highest established tolerance for a pesticide having this metabolite.

(12) Where tolerances are established for residues of methomyl, resulting from the use of thiodicarb and/or methomyl on the same raw agricultural commodity, the total amount of methomyl shall not yield more residue than that permitted by the higher of the two tolerances.

(e) Except as noted in paragraphs (e)(1) and (2) of this section, where residues from two or more chemicals in the same class are present in or on a raw agricultural commodity the tolerance for the total of such residues shall be the same as that for the chemical having the lowest numerical tolerance in this class, unless a higher tolerance level is specifically provided for the combined residues by a regulation in this part.

(1) Where residues from two or more chemicals in the same class are present in or on a raw agricultural commodity and there are available methods that permit quantitative determination of each residue, the quantity of combined residues that are within the tolerance may be determined as follows:

(i) Determine the quantity of each residue present.

(ii) Divide the quantity of each residue by the tolerance that would apply if it occurred alone, and multiply by 100 to determine the percentage of the permitted amount of residue present.

(iii) Add the percentages so obtained for all residues present.

(iv) The sum of the percentages shall not exceed 100 percent.

(2) Where residues from two or more chemicals in the same class are present in or on a raw agricultural commodity and there are available methods that permit quantitative determinations of one or more, but not all, of the residues, the amounts of such residues as may be determinable shall be deducted from the total amount of residues present and the remainder shall have the same tolerance as that for the chemical having the lowest numerical tolerance in that class. The quantity of combined residues that are within the tolerance may be determined as follows:

(i) Determine the quantity of each determinable residue present.

(ii) Deduct the amounts of such residues from the total amount of residues present and consider the remainder to have the same tolerance as that for the chemical having the lowest numerical tolerance in that class.

(iii) Divide the quantity of each determinable residue by the tolerance that would apply if it occurred alone and the quantity of the remaining residue by the tolerance for the chemical having the lowest numerical tolerance in that class and multiply by 100 to determine the percentage of the permitted amount of residue present.

(iv) Add the percentages so obtained for all residues present.

(v) The sum of the percentages shall not exceed 100 percent.

(3) The following pesticides are members of the class of dithiocarbamates:

A mixture of 5.2 parts by weight of ammoniates of [ethylenebis (dithiocarbamato)] zinc with 1 part by weight ethylenebis [dithiocarbamic acid] bimolecular and trimolecular cyclic anhydrosulfides and disulfides.

2-Chloroallyl diethyldithiocarbamate.

Coordination product of zinc ion and maneb containing 20 percent manganese, 2.5 percent zinc, and 77.5 percent ethylenebisdithiocarbamate.

Ferbam.

Maneb.

Manganous dimethyldithiocarbamate.

Sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate.

Thiram.

Zineb.

Ziram.

(4) The following are members of the class of chlorinated organic pesticides:

Aldrin.

BHC (benzene hexachloride).

1,1-Bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethanol.

Chlorbenside (p-chlorobenzyl p-chlorophenyl sulfide).

Chlordane.

Chlorobenzilate (ethyl 4,4′-dichlorobenzilate).

p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid.

p-Chlorophenyl-2,4,5-trichlorophenyl sulfide.

2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid).

DDD (TDE).

DDT.

1,1-Dichloro-2,2-bis(p-ethylphenyl) ethane.

2,6-Dichloro-4-nitroaniline.

2,4-Dichlorophenyl p-nitrophenyl ether.

Dieldrin.

Dodecachlorooctahydro-1,3,4-metheno-2H-cyclobuta[cd]pentalene.

Endosulfan (6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a, 6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9-methano-2,4,3-benzodioxathiepin-3-oxide).

Endosulfan sulfate (6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9-methano-2,4,3-benzodioxathiepin-3,3-dioxide).

Heptachlor (1,4,5,6,7,8,8-heptachlor-3a,4,7, 7a-tetrahydro-4,7-methanoindene).

Heptachlor epoxide (1,4,5,6,7,8,8-heptachloro-2,3-epoxy-2,3,3a,4,7,7a-hexahydro-4,7-methanoindene).

Hexachlorophene (2,2′-methylenebis(3,4,6-trichlorophenol) and its monosodium salt.

Isopropyl 4,4′-dichlorobenzilate.

Lindane.

Methoxychlor.

Ovex (p-chlorophenyl p-chlorobenzenesulfonate).

Sesone (sodium 2,4-dichlorophenoxyethyl sulfate, SES).

Sodium 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate.

Sodium trichloroacetate.

Sulphenone (p-chlorophenyl phenyl sulfone).

Terpene polychlorinates (chlorinated mixture of camphene, pinene, and related terpenes 65-66 percent chlorine).

2,3,5,6-Tetrachloronitrobenzene.

Tetradifon (2,4,5,4′-tetrachlorodiphenyl sulfone).

Toxaphene (chlorinated camphene).

Trichlorobenzoic acid.

Trichlorobenzyl chloride.

(5) The following are members of the class of cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides:

Acephate (O,S-dimethyl acetyl-phosphoramidothioate) and its cholinesterase-inhibiting metabolite O,S-dimethyl phosphoramidothioate.

Aldicarb (2-methyl-2-(methylthio) propionaldehyde O-(methylcarbamoyl)oxime) and its chlorinesterase-inhibiting metabolites 2-methyl-2-(methylsulfinyl)propionaldehyde O-(methycarbamoyl) oxime and 2-methyl-2-(methylsulfonyl)propionaldehyde O-(methylcarbamoyl)oxime.

4-tert-Butyl-2-chlorophenyl methyl methyl phosphoramidate.

S-[(tert-Butylthio)methyl] O,O-diethyl phosphorodithioate and its cholinesterase-inhibiting metabolites.

Carbaryl (1-naphthyl N-methylcarbamate).

Carbofuran (2,3,-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyl-N-methylcarbamate).

Carbofuran metabolite (2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-7-benofuranyl N-methylcarbamate).

Carbophenothion (S-[(p-chlorophenyl) thiolmethyl] O,O-diethyl phosphorodithioate) and its cholinesterase-inhibiting metabolites.

Chlorpyrifos (O,O-diethyl O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl)phosphorothioate).

Chlorpyrifos-methyl (O,O-dimethyl-O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl) phosphorothioate.

2-Chloro-1-(2,4,5-trichlorophenyl)vinyl dimethyl phosphate.

2-Chloro-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl) vinyl diethyl phosphate.

Coumaphos (O,O-diethyl O-3-chloro-4-methyl-2-oxo-2H-1-benzopyran-7-yl phosran-7-yl phosphate).

Coumaphos oxygen analog (O,O-diethyl O-3-chloro-4-methyl-2-oxo-2H-1-benzopyphorothioate).

Dialifor (S-(2-chloro-1-phthalimidoethyl) O,O-diethyl phosphorodithioate).

Dialifor oxygen analog (S-(2-chloro-1-phthalimidoethyl) O,O-diethyl phosphorothioate).

Demeton (a mixture of O,O-diethyl O-(and S) [2-ethylthio)ethyl] phosphorothioates).

Ethiolate (S-ethyl diethylthiocarbamate).

2,2-Dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate.

O,O-Diethyl S-[2-(ethylthio)ethyl] phosphorodithioate and its cholinesterase-inhibiting metabolites.

O,O-Diethyl O-(2-diethylamino-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinyl) phosphorothioate and its oxygen analog diethyl 2-diethylamino-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinyl phosphate.

O,O-Diethyl O-(2-isoprophyl-4-methyl-6-pyrimidinyl) phosphorothioate.

O,O-Diethyl O-[p-(methylsulfinyl)phenyl] phosphorothioate and its cholinesterase-inhibiting metabolites.

Diethyl 2-pyrazinyl phosphate.

O,O-Diethyl O-2-pyrazinyl phosphorothioate.

S-(O,O-Diisopropyl phosphorodithioate) of N-(2-mercaptoethyl) benzenesulfonamide

S-(O,O-Diisopropyl phosphorodithioate) of N-(2-mercaptoethyl) benzenesulfonamide

2-(Dimethylamino)-5.6-dimethyl-4-pyrimidinyl dimethylcarbamate and its metabolites 5,6-dimethyl-2-(formylmethylamino)-4-pyrimidinyl dimethylcarbamate and 5,6-dimethyl-2-(methylamino)-4-pyrimidinyl dimethylcarbamate (both calculated as parent).

Dimethoate (O,O-dimethyl S-(N-methyl-carbamoylmethyl) phosphorodithioate).

Dimethoate oxygen analog (O,O-dimethyl S-(N-methylcarbamoylmethyl) phosphorothioate).

O,O-Dimethyl O-p-(dimethylsulfamoyl) phenyl phosphate.

O,O-Dimethyl O-p-(dimethylsulfamoyl) phenyl phosphorothioate.

3,5-Dimethyl-4-(methylthio) phenyl methylcarbamate.

O,O-Dimethyl S-[4-oxo-1,2,3-benzotriazin-3-(4H)-ylmethyl] phosphorodithioate.

Dimethyl phosphate of 3-hydroxy-N,N-dimethyl-cis-crotonamide.

Dimethyl phosphate of 3-hydroxy-N-methyl-cis-crotonamide.

Dimethyl phosphate of α-methylbenzyl 3-hydroxy-cis-crotonate.

O,O-Dimethyl 2,2,2-trichloro-1-hydroxyethyl phosphonate.

O,O-Dimethyl phosphorodithioate, S-ester with 4-(mercaptomethyl)-2-methozy-Δ2-1,3,4-thiadiazolin-5-one.

Dioxathion (2,3-p-dioxanedithiol S,S-bis (O,O-diethylphosphorodithioate)) containing approximately 70 percent cis and trans isomers and approximately 30 percent related compounds.

EPN.

Ethephon ((2- - chloroethyl) phosphonic acid).

Ethion.

Ethion oxygen analog (S-[[(diethoxyphosphinothioyl)thio] methyl] O,O-diethyl phosphorothioate).

O- Ethyl O-[4-(methylthio) phenyl] S-propyl phosphorodithioate and its cholinesterase-inhibiting metabolites.

O-Ethyl S,S-dipropylphosphorodithioate.

Ethyl 3-methyl-4-(methylthio)phenyl (1-methylethyl) phosphoramidate and its cholinesterase-inhibiting metabolites.

O-Ethyl S-phenyl ethylphosphonodithioate.

O-Ethyl S-phenyl ethylphosphonothiolate.

m-(1-Ethylpropyl)phenyl methylcarbamate.

S-[2-Ethylsulfinyl)ethyl] O,O-dimethyl phosphorothioate and its cholinesterase-inhibiting metabolites, (primarily S-[2-(ethyl-sulfonyl)ethyl] O,O-dimethyl phosphorothioate).

Fenthion (O,O-dimethyl O-[3-methyl-4-(methylthio)phenyl]phosphorothioate and its cholinesterase-inhibiting metabolites.

Malathion.

N-(Mercaptomethyl)phthalimide S-(O,O-dimethyl phosphorodithioate).

N-(Mercaptomethyl)phthalimide S-(O,O-dimethyl phosphorothioate).

Methomyl (S-methyl N-[(methylcarbamoyl)oxy]thioacetimidate).

1-Methoxycarbonyl-1-propen-2-yl dimethyl phosphate and its beta isomer.

m-(1-Methylbutyl)phenyl methylcarbamate.

Methyl parathion.

Naled (1,2-dibromo-2,2-dichloroethyl dimethyl phosphate).

Oxamyl (methyl N′,N′-dimethyl-N-[(methylcarbamoyl)oxy]-1-thiooxamimidate)

Parathion.

Phorate (O,O-diethyl S-(ethylthio)methyl phosphorodithioate) and its cholinesterase-inhibiting metabolites.

Phosalone (S-(6-chloro-3-mercaptomethyl)-2-benzoxazolinone) O,O-diethyl phosphorodithioate).

Phosphamidon (2-chloro-2-diethylcarbamoyl-1-methylvinyl dimethyl phosphate) including all of its related cholinesterase-inhibiting compounds.

Pirimiphos-methyl O-[2-diethylamino-6-methyl-pyrimidinyl) O,O-dimethyl phosphorothioate

Ronnel.

Schradan (octamethylpyrophosphoramide).

Tetraethyl pyrophosphate.

O,O,O′,O′-Tetramethyl O,O′-sulfinyldi-p-phenylene phosphorothioate.

O,O,O′,O′-Tetramethyl O,O′-thiodi-p-phenylene phosphorothioate.

Tributyl phosphorotritlioite.

S,S,S-Tributyl phosphorothrithioate.

3,4,5-Trimethylphenyl methylcarbamate and its isomer 2,3,5-trimethylphenyl methylcarbamate.

(6) The following pesticides are members of the class of dinitrophenols:

2,4-Dinitro-6-octylphenyl crotonate and 2,6-dinitro-4-octylphenyl crotonate, mixture of.

4,6-Dinitro-o-cresol and its sodium salt.

Dinoseb (2-sec-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol) and its alkanolamine, ammonium, and sodium salts.

[41 FR 8969, Mar. 2, 1976]

§ 180.4 Exceptions.

The substances listed in this section are excepted from the definitions of “pesticide chemical” and “pesticide chemical residue” under FFDCA section 201(q)(3) and are therefore exempt from regulation under FFDCA section 402(a)(2)(B) and 408. These substances are subject to regulation by the Food and Drug Administration as food additives under FFDCA section 409.

(a) Inert ingredients in food packaging treated with a pesticide, when such inert ingredients are the components of the food packaging material (e.g. paper and paperboard, coatings, adhesives, and polymers).

(b) [Reserved]

[63 FR 10720, Mar. 4, 1998, as amended at 73 FR 54976, Sept. 24, 2008]

§ 180.5 Zero tolerances.

A zero tolerance means that no amount of the pesticide chemical may remain on the raw agricultural commodity when it is offered for shipment. A zero tolerance for a pesticide chemical in or on a raw agricultural commodity may be established because, among other reasons:

(a) A safe level of the pesticide chemical in the diet of two different species of warm-blooded animals has not been reliably determined.

(b) The chemical is carcinogenic to or has other alarming physiological effects upon one or more of the species of the test animals used, when fed in the diet of such animals.

(c) The pesticide chemical is toxic, but is normally used at times when, or in such manner that, fruit, vegetables, or other raw agricultural commodities will not bear or contain it.

(d) All residue of the pesticide chemical is normally removed through good agricultural practice such as washing or brushing or through weathering or other changes in the chemical itself, prior to introduction of the raw agricultural commodity into interstate commerce.

§ 180.6 Pesticide tolerances regarding milk, eggs, meat, and/or poultry; statement of policy.

(a) When establishing tolerances for pesticide residues in or on raw agricultural commodities, consideration is always given to possible residues of those pesticide chemicals or their conversion products entering the diet of man through the ingestion of milk, eggs, meat, and/or poultry produced by animals fed agricultural products bearing such pesticide residues. In each instance an evaluation of all available data will result in a conclusion either:

(1) That finite residues will actually be incurred in these foods from feed use of the raw agricultural commodity including its byproducts; or

(2) That it is not possible to establish with certainty whether finite residues will be incurred, but there is a reasonable expectation of finite residues; or

(3) That it is not possible to establish with certainty whether finite residues will be incurred, but there is no reasonable expectation of finite residues.

(b) When the data show that finite residues will actually be incurred in milk, eggs, meat, and/or poultry, a tolerance will be established on the raw agricultural commodity used as feed provided that tolerances can be established at the same time, on the basis of the toxicological and other data available, for the finite residues incurred in milk, eggs, meat, and/or poultry. When it is not possible to determine with certainty whether finite residues will be incurred in milk, eggs, meat, and/or poultry but there is a reasonable expectation of finite residues in light of data reflecting exaggerated pesticides levels in feeding studies, a tolerance will be established on the raw agricultural commodity provided that appropriate tolerances can be established at the same time, on the basis of the toxicological and other data available, for the finite residues likely to be incurred in these foods through the feed use of the raw agricultural commodity or its byproducts. When it is not possible to determine with certainty whether finite residues will be incurred in milk, eggs, meat, and/or poultry but there is no reasonable expectation of finite residues in light of data such as those reflecting exaggerated pesticide levels in feeding studies and those elucidating the biochemistry of the pesticide chemical in the animal, a tolerance may be established on the raw agricultural commodity without the necessity of a tolerance on food products derived from the animal.

(c) The principles outlined in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section will also be followed with respect to tolerances for residues which will actually be incurred or are reasonably to be expected in milk, eggs, meat, and/or poultry by the use of pesticides directly on the animal or administered purposely in the feed or drinking water.

(d) Tolerances contemplated by paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section will in addition to toxicological considerations be conditioned on the availability of a practicable analytical method to determine the pesticide residue; that is, the method must be sensitive and reliable at the tolerance level or in special cases at a higher level where such level is deemed satisfactory and safe in light of the toxicity of the pesticide residue and of the unlikelihood of such residue exceeding the tolerance. The analytical methods to be used for enforcement purposes will be those set forth in the “Pesticide Analytical Manual” (see § 180.101(c)). The sensitivities of these methods are expressed in that manual.

Subpart B - Procedural Regulations
§ 180.7 Petitions proposing tolerances or exemptions for pesticide residues in or on raw agricultural commodities or processed foods.

(a) Petitions to be filed with the Agency under the provisions of FFDCA section 408(d) shall be submitted in duplicate. If any part of the material submitted is in a foreign language, it shall be accompanied by an accurate and complete English translation. The petition shall be accompanied by an advance deposit for fees described in § 180.33. The petition shall state the petitioner's mail address to which notice of objection under FFDCA section 408(g)(2) may be sent. The petition must be signed by the petitioner or by his attorney or agent, or (if a corporation) by an authorized official.

(b) Petitions shall include the following information:

(1) An informative summary of the petition and of the data, information, and arguments submitted or cited in support of the petition. Both a paper and electronic copy of the summary should be submitted. The electronic copy should be formatted according to the Office of Pesticide Programs' current standard for electronic data submission as specified at http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/regulating/registering/submissions/index.htm.

(2) A statement that the petitioner agrees that such summary or any information it contains may be published as a part of the notice of filing of the petition to be published under FFDCA section 408(d)(3) and as a part of a proposed or final regulation issued under FFDCA section 408.

(3) The name, chemical identity, and composition of the pesticide chemical residue and of the pesticide chemical that produces the residue.

(4) Data showing the recommended amount, frequency, method, and time of application of the pesticide chemical.

(5) Full reports of tests and investigations made with respect to the safety of the pesticide chemical, including full information as to the methods and controls used in conducting those tests and investigations.

(6) Full reports of tests and investigations made with respect to the nature and amount of the pesticide chemical residue that is likely to remain in or on the food, including a description of the analytical methods used. (See § 180.34 for further information about residue tests.)

(7) Proposed tolerances for the pesticide chemical residue if tolerances are proposed.

(8) Practicable methods for removing any amount of the residue that would exceed any proposed tolerance.

(9) A practical method for detecting and measuring the levels of the pesticide chemical residue in or on the food, or for exemptions, a statement why such a method is not needed.

(10) If the petition relates to a tolerance for a processed food, reports of investigations conducted using the processing method(s) used to produce that food.

(11) Such information as the Administrator may require to make the determination under FFDCA section 408(b)(2)(C).

(12) Such information as the Administrator may require on whether the pesticide chemical may have an effect in humans that is similar to an effect produced by a naturally occurring estrogen or other endocrine effects.

(13) Information regarding exposure to the pesticide chemical residue due to any tolerance or exemption already granted for such residue.

(14) Information concerning any maximum residue level established by the Codex Alimentarius Commission for the pesticide chemical residue addressed in the petition. If a Codex maximum residue level has been established for the pesticide chemical residue and the petitioner does not propose that this level be adopted, a statement explaining the reasons for this departure from the Codex level.

(15) Such other data and information as the Administrator requires by regulation to support the petition.

(16) Reasonable grounds in support of the petition.

(c) The data specified under paragraphs (b)(1) through (b)(16) of this section should be on separate sheets or sets of sheets, suitably identified. If such data have already been submitted with an earlier application, the present petition may incorporate it by reference to the earlier one.

(d) Except as noted in paragraph (e) of this section, a petition shall not be accepted for filing if any of the data prescribed by FFDCA section 408(d) are lacking or are not set forth so as to be readily understood. The availability to the public of information provided to, or otherwise obtained by, the Agency under this part shall be governed by part 2 of this chapter. The Administrator shall make the full text of the summary referenced in paragraph (b)(1) of this section available to the public in the public docket at http://www.regulations.gov no later than publication in the Federal Register of the notice of the petition filing.

(e) The Administrator shall notify the petitioner within 15 days after its receipt of acceptance or nonacceptance of a petition, and if not accepted the reasons therefor. If petitioner desires, the petitioner may supplement a deficient petition after notification as to deficiencies. If the petitioner does not wish to supplement or explain the petition and requests in writing that it be filed as submitted, the petition shall be filed and the petitioner so notified.

(f) A notice of the filing of a petition for a pesticide chemical residue tolerance that the Administrator determines has met the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section shall be published in the Federal Register by the Administrator within 30 days after such determination. The notice shall state the name of the pesticide chemical residue and the commodities for which a tolerance is sought and announce the availability of a description of the analytical methods available to the Administrator for the detection and measurement of the pesticide chemical residue with respect to which the petition is filed or shall set forth the petitioner's statement of why such a method is not needed. The notice shall explicitly reference the specific docket identification number in the public docket at http://www.regulations.gov where the full text of the summary required in paragraph (b) of this section is located, and refer interested parties to this document for further information on the petition. The full text of the summary may be omitted from the notice.

(g) The Administrator may request a sample of the pesticide chemical at any time while a petition is under consideration. The Administrator shall specify in its request for a sample of the pesticide chemical, a quantity which it deems adequate to permit tests of analytical methods used to determine residues of the pesticide chemical and of methods proposed by the petitioner for removing any residues of the chemical that exceed the tolerance proposed.

(h) The Administrator shall determine, in accordance with the Act, whether to issue an order that establishes, modifies, or revokes a tolerance regulation (whether or not in accord with the action proposed by the petitioner), whether to publish a proposed tolerance regulation and request public comment thereon under § 180.29, or whether to deny the petition. The Administrator shall publish in the Federal Register such order or proposed regulation. After receiving comments on any proposed regulation, the Administrator may issue an order that establishes, modifies, or revokes a tolerance regulation. An order published under this section shall describe briefly how to submit objections and requests for a hearing under part 178 of this chapter. A regulation issued under this section shall be effective on the date of publication in the Federal Register unless otherwise provided in the regulation.

[70 FR 33360, June 8, 2005, as amended at 73 FR 75600, Dec. 12, 2008]

§ 180.8 Withdrawal of petitions without prejudice.

In some cases the Administrator will notify the petitioner that the petition, while technically complete, is inadequate to justify the establishment of a tolerance or the tolerance requested by petitioner. This may be due to the fact that the data are not sufficiently clear or complete. In such cases, the petitioner may withdraw the petition pending its clarification or the obtaining of additional data. This withdrawal may be without prejudice to a future filing. A deposit for fees as specified in § 180.33 shall accompany the resubmission of the petition.

[70 FR 33361, June 8, 2005]

§ 180.9 Substantive amendments to petitions.

After a petition has been filed, the petitioner may submit additional information or data in support thereof, but in such cases the petition will be given a new filing date.

[70 FR 33361, June 8, 2005]

§ 180.29 Establishment, modification, and revocation of tolerance on initiative of Administrator.

(a) Upon the Administrator's own initiative, the Administrator may propose, under FFDCA section 408(e), the issuance of a regulation establishing a tolerance for a pesticide chemical or exempting it from the necessity of a tolerance, or a regulation modifying or revoking an existing tolerance or exemption.

(b) The Administrator shall provide a period of not less than 60 days for persons to comment on the proposed regulation, except that a shorter period for comment may be provided if the Administrator for good cause finds that it would be in the public interest to do so and states the reasons for the finding in the notice of proposed rulemaking.

(c) After reviewing any timely comments received, the Administrator may by order establish, modify, or revoke a tolerance regulation, which order and regulation shall be published in the Federal Register. An order published under this section shall state that persons may submit objections and requests for a hearing in the manner described in part 178 of this chapter.

(d) Any final regulation issued under this section shall be effective on the date of publication in the Federal Register unless otherwise provided in the regulation.

[70 FR 33361, June 8, 2005]

§ 180.30 Judicial review.

(a) Under FFDCA section 408(h), judicial review is available in the United States Courts of Appeal as to the following actions:

(1) Regulations establishing general procedures and requirements under FFDCA section 408(e)(1)(C).

(2) Orders issued under FFDCA section 408(f)(1)(C) requiring the submission of data.

(3) Orders issued under FFDCA section 408(g)(2)(C) ruling on objections to establishment, modification, or revocation of a tolerance or exemption under FFDCA section 408(d)(4), or any regulation that is the subject of such an order. The underlying action here is Agency disposition of a petition seeking the establishment, modification, or revocation of a tolerance or exemption.

(4) Orders issued under FFDCA section 408(g)(2)(C) ruling on objections to the denial of a petition under FFDCA section 408(d)(4).

(5) Orders issued under FFDCA section 408(g)(2)(C) ruling on objections to the establishment, modification, suspension, or revocation of a tolerance or exemption under FFDCA section 408(e)(1)(A) or (e)(1)(B). The underlying action here is the establishment, modification, suspension, or revocation of a tolerance or exemption upon the initiative of EPA including EPA actions pursuant to FFDCA sections 408(b)(2)(B)(v), 408(b)(2)(E)(ii), 408(d)(4)(C)(ii), 408(l)(4), and 408(q)(1).

(6) Orders issued under FFDCA section 408(g)(2)(C) ruling on objections to the revocation or modification of a tolerance or exemption under FFDCA section 408(f)(2) for noncompliance with requirements for the submission of data.

(7) Orders issued under FFDCA section 408(g)(2)(C) ruling on objections to rules issued under FFDCA sections 408(n)(3) and 408(d) or (e) regarding determinations pertaining to State authority to establish regulatory limits on pesticide chemical residues.

(8) Orders issued under FFDCA section 408(g)(2)(C) ruling on objections to orders issued under FFDCA section 408(n)(5)(C) authorizing States to establish regulatory limits not identical to certain tolerances or exemptions.

(b) Any issue as to which review is or was obtainable under paragraph (a) of this section shall not be the subject of judicial review under any other provision of law. In part, this means that, for the Agency actions subject to the objection procedure in FFDCA section 408(g)(2), judicial review is not available unless an adversely affected party exhausts these objection procedures, and any petition procedures preliminary thereto.

[70 FR 33362, June 8, 2005]

§ 180.31 Temporary tolerances.

(a) A temporary tolerance (or exemption from a tolerance) established under the authority of FFDCA section 408(r) shall be deemed to be a tolerance (or exemption from the requirement of a tolerance) for the purposes of FFDCA section 408(a)(1) or (a)(2) and for the purposes of § 180.30.

(b) A request for a temporary tolerance or a temporary exemption from a tolerance by a person who has obtained or is seeking an experimental permit for a pesticide chemical under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act shall be accompanied by such data as are available on subjects outlined in § 180.7(b) and an advance deposit to cover fees as provided in § 180.33.

(c) To obtain a temporary tolerance, a requestor must comply with the petition procedures specified in FFDCA section 408(d) and § 180.7 except as provided in this section.

(d) A temporary tolerance or exemption from a tolerance may be issued for a period designed to allow the orderly marketing of the raw agricultural commodities produced while testing a pesticide chemical under an experimental permit issued under authority of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act if the Administrator concludes that the safety standard in FFDCA section 408(b)(2) or (c), as applicable, is met. Subject to the requirements of FFDCA section 408(e), a temporary tolerance or exemption from a tolerance may be revoked if the experimental permit is revoked, or may be revoked at any time if it develops that the application for a temporary tolerance contains a misstatement of a material fact or that new scientific data or experience with the pesticide chemical indicates that it does not meet the safety standard in FFDCA section 408(b)(2) or (c), as applicable.

(e) Conditions under which a temporary tolerance is established shall include:

(1) A limitation on the amount of the chemical to be used on the designated crops permitted under the experimental permit.

(2) A limitation for the use of the chemical on the designated crops to bona fide experimental use by qualified persons as indicated in the experimental permit.

(3) A requirement that the person or firm which obtains the experimental permit for which the temporary tolerance is established will immediately inform the Environmental Protection Agency of any reports on findings from the experimental use that have a bearing on safety.

(4) A requirement that the person or firm which obtained the experimental permit for which the temporary tolerance is established will keep records of production, distribution, and performance for a period of 2 years and, on request, at any reasonable time, make these records available to any authorized officer or employee of the Environmental Protection Agency.

[70 FR 33362, June 8, 2005]

§ 180.32 Procedure for modifying and revoking tolerances or exemptions from tolerances.

(a) The Administrator on his/her own initiative may propose the issuance of a regulation modifying or revoking a tolerance for a pesticide chemical residue on raw agricultural commodities or processed foods or modifying or revoking an exemption from tolerance for such residue.

(b) Any person may file with the Administrator a petition proposing the issuance of a regulation modifying or revoking a tolerance or exemption from a tolerance for a pesticide chemical residue. The petition shall furnish reasonable grounds for the action sought. Reasonable grounds shall include an explanation showing wherein the person has a substantial interest in such tolerance or exemption from tolerance and an assertion of facts (supported by data if available) showing that new uses for the pesticide chemical have been developed or old uses abandoned, that new data are available as to toxicity of the chemical, or that experience with the application of the tolerance or exemption from tolerance may justify its modification or revocation. Evidence that a person has registered or has submitted an application for the registration of a pesticide under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act will be regarded as evidence that the person has a substantial interest in a tolerance or exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for a pesticide chemical that consists in whole or in part of the pesticide. New data should be furnished in the form specified in § 180.7(b) for submitting petitions, as applicable.

(c) The procedures for completing action on an Administrator initiated proposal or a petition shall be those specified in §§ 180.29 and 180.7, as applicable.

[70 FR 33362, June 8, 2005]

§ 180.33 Fees.

(a) Each petition for the establishment of a new tolerance or a tolerance higher than already established, shall be accompanied by a fee of $80,950, plus $2,025 for each raw agricultural commodity more than nine on which the establishment of a tolerance is requested, except as provided in paragraphs (b), (d), and (h) of this section.

(b) Each petition for the establishment of a tolerance at a lower numerical level or levels than a tolerance already established for the same pesticide chemical, or for the establishment of a tolerance on additional raw agricultural commodities at the same numerical level as a tolerance already established for the same pesticide chemical, shall be accompanied by a fee of $18,500 plus $1,225 for each raw agricultural commodity on which a tolerance is requested.

(c) Each petition for an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance or repeal of an exemption shall be accompanied by a fee of $14,925.

(d) Each petition or request for a temporary tolerance or a temporary exemption from the requirement of a tolerance shall be accompanied by a fee of $32,325 except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section. A petition or request to renew or extend such temporary tolerance or temporary exemption shall be accompanied by a fee of $4,600.

(e) A petition or request for a temporary tolerance for a pesticide chemical which has a tolerance for other uses at the same numerical level or a higher numerical level shall be accompanied by a fee of $16,075, plus $1,225 for each raw agricultural commodity on which the temporary tolerance is sought.

(f) Each petition for revocation of a tolerance shall be accompanied by a fee of $10,125. Such fee is not required when, in connection with the change sought under this paragraph, a petition is filed for the establishment of new tolerances to take the place of those sought to be revoked and a fee is paid as required by paragraph (a) of this section.

(g) If a petition or a request is not accepted for processing because it is technically incomplete, the fee, less $2,025 for handling and initial review, shall be returned. If a petition is withdrawn by the petitioner after initial processing, but before significant Agency scientific review has begun, the fee, less $2,025 for handling and initial review, shall be returned. If an unacceptable or withdrawn petition is resubmitted, it shall be accompanied by the fee that would be required if it were being submitted for the first time.

(h) Each petition for a crop group tolerance, regardless of the number of raw agricultural commodities involved, shall be accompanied by a fee equal to the fee required by the analogous category for a single tolerance that is not a crop group tolerance, i.e., paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, without a charge for each commodity where that would otherwise apply.

(i) Objections under section 408(d)(5) of the Act shall be accompanied by a filing fee of $4,050.

(j) The person who files a petition for judicial review of an order under section 408(h) of the Act shall pay the costs of preparing the record on which the order is based unless the person has no financial interest in the petition for judicial review.

(k) No fee under this section will be imposed on the Interregional Research Project Number 4 (IR-4 Program).

(l) The Administrator may waive or refund part or all of any fee imposed by this section if the Administrator determines in his or her sole discretion that such a waiver or refund will promote the public interest or that payment of the fee would work an unreasonable hardship on the person on whom the fee is imposed. A request for waiver or refund of a fee shall be submitted to the Office of Pesticide Programs' Document Processing Desk at the appropriate address as set forth in 40 CFR 150.17(a) or (b). A fee of $2,025 shall accompany every request for a waiver or refund, as specified in paragraph (m) of this section, except that the fee under this paragraph shall not be imposed on any person who has no financial interest in any action requested by such person under paragraphs (a) through (j) of this section. The fee for requesting a waiver or refund shall be refunded if the request is granted.

(m) All deposits and fees required by the regulations in this part shall be paid by money order, bank draft, or certified check drawn to the order of the Environmental Protection Agency. All deposits and fees shall be forwarded to the Environmental Protection Agency, Headquarters Accounting Operations Branch, Office of Pesticide Programs (Tolerance Fees), P.O. Box 360277M, Pittsburgh, PA 15251. The payments should be specifically labeled “Tolerance Petition Fees” and should be accompanied only by a copy of the letter or petition requesting the tolerance. The actual letter or petition, along with supporting data, shall be forwarded within 30 days of payment to the Office of Pesticide Programs' Document Processing Desk at the appropriate address as set forth in 40 CFR 150.17(a) or (b). A petition will not be accepted for processing until the required fees have been submitted. A petition for which a waiver of fees has been requested will not be accepted for processing until the fee has been waived or, if the waiver has been denied, the proper fee is submitted after notice of denial. A request for waiver or refund will not be accepted after scientific review has begun on a petition.

(n) This fee schedule will be changed annually by the same percentage as the percent change in the Federal General Schedule (GS) pay scale. In addition, processing costs and fees will periodically be reviewed and changes will be made to the schedule as necessary. When automatic adjustments are made based on the GS pay scale, the new fee schedule will be published in the Federal Register as a final rule to become effective 30 days or more after publication, as specified in the rule. When changes are made based on periodic reviews, the changes will be subject to public comment.

(o) No fee required by this section shall be levied during the period beginning on October 1, 2003, and ending September 30, 2008.

[68 FR 24371, May 7, 2003, as amended at 69 FR 12544, Mar. 17, 2004; 70 FR 33363, June 8, 2005; 71 FR 35547, June 21, 2006]

§ 180.34 Tests on the amount of residue remaining.

(a) Data in a petition on the amount of residue remaining in or on a raw agricultural commodity should establish the residue that may remain when the pesticide chemical is applied according to directions registered under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, or according to directions contained in an application for registration. These data should establish the residues that may remain under conditions most likely to result in high residues on the commodity.

(b) The petition should establish the reliability of the residue data reported in it. Sufficient information should be submitted about the analytical method to permit competent analysts to apply it successfully.

(c) If the pesticide chemical is absorbed into a living plant or animal when applied (is systemic), residue data may be needed on each plant or animal on which a tolerance or exemption is requested.

(d) If the pesticide chemical is not absorbed into the living plant or animal when applied (is not systemic), it may be possible to make a reliable estimate of the residues to be expected on each commodity in a group of related commodities on the basis of less data than would be required for each commodity in the group, considered separately.

(e) Each of the following groups of crops lists raw agricultural commodities that are considered to be related for the purpose of paragraph (d) of this section. Commodities not listed in this paragraph are not considered to be related for the purpose of paragraph (d) of this section.

(1) Apples, crabapples, pears, quinces.

(2) Avocados, papayas.

(3) Blackberries, boysenberries, dewberries, loganberries, raspberries.

(4) Blueberries, currants, gooseberries, huckleberries.

(5) Cherries, plums, prunes.

(6) Oranges, citrus citron, grapefruit, kumquats, lemons, limes, tangelos, tangerines.

(7) Mangoes, persimmons.

(8) Peaches, apricots, nectarines.

(9) Beans, peas, soybeans (each in dry form).

(10) Beans, peas, soybeans (each in succulent form).

(11) Broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kohlrabi.

(12) Cantaloups, honeydew melons, muskmelons, pumpkins, watermelons, winter squash.

(13) Carrots, garden beets, sugar beets, horseradish, parsnips, radishes, rutabagas, salsify roots, turnips.

(14) Celery, fennel.

(15) Cucumbers, summer squash.

(16) Lettuce, endive (escarole), Chinese cabbage, salsify tops.

(17) Onions, garlic, leeks, shallots (green, or in dry bulb form).

(18) Potatoes, Jerusalem-artichokes, sweetpotatoes, yams.

(19) Spinach, beet tops, collards, dandelion, kale, mustard greens, parsley, Swiss chard, turnip tops, watercress.

(20) Tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, pimentos.

(21) Pecans, almonds, brazil nuts, bush nuts, butternuts, chestnuts, filberts, hazelnuts, hickory nuts, walnuts.

(22) Field corn, popcorn, sweet corn (each in grain form).

(23) Milo, sorghum (each in grain form).

(24) Wheat, barley, oats, rice, rye (each in grain form).

(25) Alfalfa, Bermuda grass, bluegrass, brome grass, clovers, cowpea hay, fescue, lespedeza, lupines, orchard grass, peanut hay, peavine hay, rye grass, soybean hay, sudan grass, timothy, and vetch.

(26) Corn forage, sorghum forage.

(27) Sugarcane, cane sorghum.

[36 FR 22540, Nov. 25, 1971, as amended at 39 FR 28286, Aug. 6, 1974; 39 FR 28977, Aug. 13, 1974; 40 FR 6972, Feb. 18, 1975; 45 FR 82928, Dec. 17, 1980; 48 FR 29860, June 29, 1983; 60 FR 26635, May 17, 1995; 73 FR 75600, Dec. 12, 2008]

§ 180.35 Tests for potentiation.

Experiments have shown that certain cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides when fed together to test animals are more toxic than the sum of their individual toxicities when fed separately. One substance potentiates the toxicity of the other. Important toxicological interactions also have been observed between pesticides and other substances. Wherever there is reason to believe that a pesticide chemical for which a tolerance is proposed may interact with other pesticide chemicals or other substances to which man is exposed, it may be necessary to require special experimental data regarding potentiation capacities to evaluate the safety of the proposed tolerance. This necessarily will be determined on a case-by-case basis.

§ 180.40 Tolerances for crop groups.

(a) Group or subgroup tolerances may be established as a result of:

(1) A petition from a person who has submitted an application for the registration of a pesticide under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act.

(2) On the initiative of the Administrator.

(3) A petition by an interested person.

(b) The tables in § 180.41 are to be used in conjunction with this section for the establishment of crop group tolerances. Each table in § 180.41 lists a group of raw agricultural commodities that are considered to be related for the purposes of this section. Refer also to § 180.1(g) for a listing of commodities for which established tolerances may be applied to certain other related and similar commodities.

(c) When there is an established or proposed tolerance for all of the representative commodities for a specific group or subgroup of related commodities, a tolerance may be established for all commodities in the associated group or subgroup. Tolerances may be established for a crop group or, alternatively, tolerances may be established for one or more of the subgroups of a crop group.

(d) The representative crops are given as an indication of the minimum residue chemistry data base acceptable to the Agency for the purposes of establishing a group tolerance. The Agency may, at its discretion, allow group tolerances when data on suitable substitutes for the representative crops are available (e.g., limes instead of lemons).

(e) Since a group tolerance reflects maximum residues likely to occur on all individual crops within a group, the proposed or registered patterns of use for all crops in the group or subgroup must be similar before a group tolerance is established. The pattern of use consists of the amount of pesticide applied, the number of times applied, the timing of the first application, the interval between applications, and the interval between the last application and harvest. The pattern of use will also include the type of application; for example, soil or foliar application, or application by ground or aerial equipment. Additionally, since a group tolerance reflects maximum residues likely to occur on all individual foods within a group, food processing practices must be similar for all crops in the group or subgroup if the processing practice has the potential to result in residues in a processed commodity at a higher concentration than the raw agricultural commodity.

(f)

(1) General. EPA will not establish a crop group for a pesticide unless all tolerances made necessary by the presence of pesticide residues in the crop group commodities have been issued or are being issued simultaneously with the crop group tolerance. For purposes of paragraph (f)(1):

(i) Necessary tolerances for residues resulting from crop group tolerances include:

(A) Tolerances for processed food, including processed animal feed, to the extent needed under FFDCA section 408(a)(2).

(B) Tolerances for raw commodities not covered by the crop group tolerance that are derivative of commodities in the group.

(C) Tolerances for meat, milk, or egg products that may contain residues as a result of livestock's consumption of animal feed containing pesticide residues to the extent needed under § 180.6(b).

(ii) Notwithstanding the foregoing, a tolerance is not considered necessary for processed food, derivative raw commodities, or meat, milk, and eggs if the precursor raw commodities are grown solely for sale as raw commodities and are completely segregated from commodities grown for the purpose of producing processed foods, derivative raw commodities, and commodities, or fractions thereof, that are used as animal feed.

(2) Processed commodity and related raw commodity crop group tolerances. EPA may establish crop group tolerances for processed commodities or fractions of commodities (e.g., bran and flour from the Cereal Grains Group), including processed fractions used as animal feed (e.g., pomace from the Pome Fruit Group), produced from crops in the crop groups in § 180.41. EPA may establish crop group tolerances for raw commodities or fractions of commodities, including fractions used as animal feed, derived from commodities covered by the crop groups in § 180.41 (e.g., aspirated grain dust associated with the Cereal Grains Group). Crop group tolerances on processed foods and derivative raw commodities may be based on data on representative commodities for associated crop group. Paragraphs (c), (d), (e), (g), and (h) of § 180.40 apply to group tolerances authorized by paragraph (f)(2).

(3) Representative crops. Unless indicated otherwise in §§ 180.40 and 180.41, the processed food and feed forms of the representative crops for a crop group are considered to be representative of the processed food and feed forms and any derivative raw commodities not covered by the crop group, that are produced from any of the raw agricultural commodities covered by the crop group tolerance. Additionally, unless indicated otherwise in §§ 180.40 and 180.41, representative commodities for such crop groups are selected taking into consideration whether their use as animal feed will result in residues in or on meat, milk, and/or eggs at a level representative of the residues that would result from use of the other commodities or byproducts in the crop group as an animal feed.

(4) Data. Processing data on representative crops are required prior to establishment of a group tolerance if the processing of the representative commodity has the potential to result in residues in a processed commodity at a higher concentration than in the representative commodity. Residue data are required on raw commodities derived from the crops in the crop group tolerance but not directly covered by the tolerance. Animal feeding studies with a representative crop are required if the representative crop is used as a significant animal feed.

(g) If maximum residues (tolerances) for the representative crops vary by more than a factor of 5 from the maximum value observed for any crop in the group, a group or subgroup tolerance will ordinarily not be established. In this case individual crop tolerances, rather than group tolerances, will normally be established.

(h) Alternatively, a commodity with a residue level significantly higher or lower than the other commodities in a group may be excluded from the group tolerance (e.g., cereal grains, except corn). In this case an individual tolerance at the appropriate level for the unique commodity would be established, if necessary. The alternative approach of excluding a commodity with a significantly higher or lower residue level will not be used to establish a tolerance for a commodity subgroup. Most subgroups have only two representative commodities; to exclude one such commodity and its related residue data would likely provide insufficient residue information to support the remainder of the subgroup. Residue data from crops additional to those representative crops in a grouping may be required for systemic pesticides.

(i) The commodities included in the groups will be updated periodically either at the initiative of the Agency or at the request of an interested party. Persons interested in updating this section should contact the Registration Division of the Office of Pesticide Programs.

(j)

(1) When EPA amends a crop group in a manner that expands or contracts the commodities that are covered by the group, EPA will initially retain the pre-existing as well as the revised crop group in the CFR.

(2) Where the revised crop group has the same number as the pre-existing crop group, the revised crop group number will be followed by a hyphen and the final two digits of the year in which it was established (e.g., if Crop Group 1 is amended in 2007, the revised group will be designated as Crop Group 1-07). If the pre-existing crop group had crop subgroups, these subgroups will be numbered in a similar fashion in the revised crop group. The name of the revised crop group will not be changed from the pre-existing crop group unless the revision so changes the composition of the crop group that the pre-existing name is no longer accurate.

(3) Where EPA amends a crop group by creating one or more different crop groups, the revised crop groups will have different numbers and names (e.g., the amendment of Crop Group 19 through the creation of Crop Groups 25 and 26). The pre-existing crop group will be amended to identify the revised crop group(s).

(4) Once a revised crop group is established, EPA will no longer establish tolerances under the pre-existing crop group. At appropriate times, EPA will amend tolerances for crop groups that have been superseded by revised crop groups to conform the pre-existing crop group to the revised crop group. Once all of the tolerances for the pre-existing crop group have been updated, the pre-existing crop group will be removed from the CFR.

(k) Establishment of a tolerance does not substitute for the additional need to register the pesticide under a companion law, the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act. The Registration Division of the Office of Pesticide Programs should be contacted concerning procedures for registration of new uses of a pesticide.

[60 FR 26635, May 17, 1995, as amended at 70 FR 33363, June 8, 2005; 72 FR 69155, Dec. 7, 2007; 75 FR 56014, Sept. 15, 2010; 81 FR 26476, May 3, 2016; 85 FR 70984, Nov. 6, 2020]

§ 180.41 Crop group tables.

(a) The tables in this section are to be used in conjunction with § 180.40 to establish crop group tolerances.

(b) Commodities not listed are not considered as included in the groups for the purposes of paragraph (b), and individual tolerances must be established. Miscellaneous commodities intentionally not included in any group include globe artichoke, hops, peanut, and water chestnut.

(c) Each group is identified by a group name and consists of a list of representative commodities followed by a list of all commodity members for the group. If the group includes subgroups, each subgroup lists the subgroup name, the representative commodity or commodities, and the member commodities for the subgroup. Subgroups, which are a subset of their associated crop group, are established for some but not all crops groups.

(1) Crop Group 1: Root and Tuber Vegetables Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Carrot, potato, radish, and sugar beet.

(ii) Table. The following table 1 lists all the commodities included in Crop Group 1 and identifies the related crop subgroups.

Table 1 - Crop Group 1: Root and Tuber Vegetables

Commodities Related crop subgroups
Arracacha (Arracacia xanthorrhiza) 1C, 1D
Arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea) 1C, 1D
Artichoke, Chinese (Stachys affinis) 1C, 1D
Artichoke, Jerusalem (Helianthus tuberosus) 1C, 1D
Beet, garden (Beta vulgaris) 1A, 1B
Beet, sugar (Beta vulgaris) 1A
Burdock, edible (Arctium lappa) 1A, 1B
Canna, edible (Queensland arrowroot) (Canna indica) 1C, 1D
Carrot (Daucus carota) 1A, 1B
Cassava, bitter and sweet (Manihot esculenta) 1C, 1D
Celeriac (celery root) (Apium graveolens var. rapaceum) 1A, 1B
Chayote (root) (Sechium edule) 1C, 1D
Chervil, turnip-rooted (Chaerophyllum bulbosum). 1A, 1B
Chicory (Cichorium intybus) 1A, 1B
Chufa (Cyperus esculentus) 1C, 1D
Dasheen (taro) (Colocasia esculenta) 1C, 1D
Ginger (Zingiber officinale) 1C, 1D
Ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) 1A, 1B
Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) 1A, 1B
Leren (Calathea allouia) 1C, 1D
Parsley, turnip-rooted (Petroselinum crispum var. tuberosum) 1A, 1B
Parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) 1A, 1B
Potato (Solanum tuberosum) 1C
Radish (Raphanus sativus) 1A, 1B
Radish, oriental (daikon) (Raphanus sativus subvar. longipinnatus) 1A, 1B
Rutabaga (Brassica campestris var. napobrassica) 1A, 1B
Salsify (oyster plant) (Tragopogon porrifolius). 1A, 1B
Salsify, black (Scorzonera hispanica) 1A, 1B
Salsify, Spanish (Scolymus hispanicus) 1A, 1B
Skirret (Sium sisarum) 1A, 1B
Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) 1C, 1D
Tanier (cocoyam) (Xanthosoma sagittifolium) 1C, 1D
Turmeric (Curcuma longa) 1C, 1D
Turnip (Brassica rapa var. rapa) 1A, 1B
Yam bean (jicama, manoic pea) (Pachyrhizus spp.) 1C, 1D
Yam, true (Dioscorea spp.) 1C, 1D

(iii) Table. The following table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 1, specifies the representative commodity(ies) for each subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 1 Subgroup Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop Subgroup 1A. Root vegetables subgroup.
Carrot, radish, and sugar beet. Beet, garden; beet, sugar; burdock, edible; carrot; celeriac; chervil, turnip-rooted; chicory; ginseng; horseradish; parsley, turnip-rooted; parsnip; radish; radish, oriental; rutabaga; salsify; salsify, black; salsify, Spanish; skirret; turnip.
Crop Subgroup 1B. Root vegetables (except sugar beet) subgroup.
Carrot and radish. Beet, garden; burdock, edible; carrot; celeriac; chervil, turnip-rooted; chicory; ginseng; horseradish; parsley, turnip-rooted; parsnip; radish; radish, oriental; rutabaga; salsify; salsify, black; salsify, Spanish; skirret; turnip.
Crop Subgroup 1C. Tuberous and corm vegetables subgroup.
Potato. Arracacha; arrowroot; artichoke, Chinese; artichoke, Jerusalem; canna, edible; cassava, bitter and sweet; chayote (root); chufa; dasheen; ginger; leren; potato; sweet potato; tanier; turmeric; yam bean; yam, true.
Crop Subgroup 1D. Tuberous and corm vegetables (except potato) subgroup.
Sweet potato. Arracacha; arrowroot; artichoke, Chinese; artichoke, Jerusalem; canna, edible; cassava, bitter and sweet; chayote (root); chufa; dasheen; ginger; leren; sweet potato; tanier; turmeric; yam bean; yam, true.

(2) Crop Group 2. Leaves of Root and Tuber Vegetables (Human Food or Animal Feed) Group (Human Food or Animal Feed) Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Turnip and garden beet or sugar beet.

(ii) Commodities. The following is a list of all the commodities included in Crop Group 2:

Crop Group 2: Leaves of Root and Tuber Vegetables (Human Food or Animal Feed) Group - Commodities

Beet, garden (Beta vulgaris)

Beet, sugar (Beta vulgaris)

Burdock, edible (Arctium lappa)

Carrot (Daucus carota)

Cassava, bitter and sweet (Manihot esculenta)

Celeriac (celery root) (Apium graveolens var. rapaceum)

Chervil, turnip-rooted (Chaerophyllum bulbosum)

Chicory (Cichorium intybus)

Dasheen (taro) (Colocasia esculenta)

Parsnip (Pastinaca sativa)

Radish (Raphanus sativus)

Radish, oriental (daikon) (Raphanus sativus subvar. longipinnatus)

Rutabaga (Brassica campestris var. napobrassica)

Salsify, black (Scorzonera hispanica)

Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas)

Tanier (cocoyam) (Xanthosoma sagittifolium)

Turnip (Brassica rapa var. rapa)

Yam, true (Dioscorea spp.)

(3) Crop Group 3. Bulb Vegetables (Allium spp.) Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Onion, green; and onion, dry bulb.

(ii) Commodities. The following is a list of all the commodities in Crop Group 3.

Crop Group 3: Bulb Vegetable (Allium spp.) Group - Commodities

Garlic, bulb (Allium sativum)
Garlic, great headed, (elephant) (Allium ampeloprasum var. ampeloprasum)
Leek (Allium ampeloprasum, A. porrum, A. tricoccum)
Onion, dry bulb and green (Allium cepa, A. fistulosum)
Onion, Welsh, (Allium fistulosum)
Shallot (Allium cepa var. cepa)

(4) Crop Group 3-07. Bulb Vegetable Group.

(i) Representative Commodities. Onion, bulb and onion, green.

(ii) Table. The following Table 1 lists all the commodities listed in Crop Group 3-07 and identifies the related crop subgroups.

Table 1 - Crop Group 3-07: Bulb Vegetable Group

Commodities Related crop subgroups
Chive, fresh leaves (Allium schoenoprasum L.) 3-07B
Chive, Chinese, fresh leaves (Allium tuberosum Rottler ex Spreng) 3-07B
Daylily, bulb (Hemerocallis fulva (L.) L. var. fulva) 3-07A
Elegans hosta (Hosta Sieboldiana (Hook.) Engl) 3-07B
Fritillaria, bulb (Fritillaria L. fritillary) 3-07A
Fritillaria, leaves (Fritillaria L. fritillary) 3-07B
Garlic, bulb (Allium sativum L. var. sativum) (A. sativum Common Garlic Group) 3-07A
Garlic, great headed, bulb (Allium ampeloprasum L. var. ampeloprasum) (A. ampeloprasum Great Headed Garlic Group) 3-07A
Garlic, Serpent, bulb (Allium sativum var. ophioscorodon or A. sativum Ophioscorodon Group) 3-07A
Kurrat (Allium kurrat Schweinf. Ex. K. Krause or A. ampeloprasum Kurrat Group) 3-07B
Lady's leek (Allium cernuum Roth) 3-07B
Leek Allium porrum L. (syn: A. ampeloprasum L. var. porrum (L.) J. Gay) (A.ampeloprasum Leek Group) 3-07B
Leek, wild (Allium tricoccum Aiton) 3-07B
Lily, bulb (Lilium spp. (Lilium Leichtlinii var. maximowiczii, Lilium lancifolium)) 3-07A
Onion, Beltsville bunching (Allium x proliferum (Moench) Schrad.) (syn: Allium fistulosum L. x A. cepa L.) 3-07B
Onion, bulb (Allium cepa L. var. cepa) (A. cepa Common Onion Group) 3-07A
Onion, Chinese, bulb (Allium chinense G. Don.) (syn: A. bakeri Regel) 3-07A
Onion, fresh (Allium fistulosum L. var. caespitosum Makino) 3-07B
Onion, green (Allium cepa L. var. cepa) (A. cepa Common Onion Group) 3-07B
Onion, macrostem (Allium macrostemom Bunge) 3-07B
Onion, pearl (Allium porrum var. sectivum or A. ampeloprasum Pearl Onion Group) 3-07A
Onion, potato, bulb (Allium cepa L. var. aggregatum G. Don.) (A. cepa Aggregatum Group) 3-07A
Onion, tree, tops (Allium x proliferum (Moench) Schrad. ex Willd.) (syn: A. cepa var. proliferum (Moench) Regel; A. cepa L. var. bulbiferum L.H. Bailey; A. cepa L. var. viviparum (Metz.) Alef.) 3-07B
Onion, Welsh, tops (Allium fistulosum L.) 3-07B
Shallot, bulb (Allium cepa var. aggregatum G. Don.) 3-07A
Shallot, fresh leaves (Allium cepa var. aggregatum G. Don.) 3-07B
Cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.

(iii) Table. The following Table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 3-07, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 3-07: Subgroup Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop subgroup 3-07A. Onion, bulb, subgroup.
Onion, bulb.
Daylily, bulb; fritillaria, bulb; garlic, bulb; garlic, great-headed, bulb; garlic, serpent, bulb; lily, bulb; onion, bulb; onion, Chinese, bulb; onion, pearl; onion, potato, bulb; shallot, bulb; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Crop subgroup 3-07B. Onion, green, subgroup.
Onion, green.
Chive, fresh leaves; chive, Chinese, fresh leaves; elegans hosta; fritillaria, leaves; kurrat; lady's leek; leek; leek, wild; Onion, Beltsville bunching; onion, fresh; onion, green; onion, macrostem; onion, tree, tops; onion, Welsh, tops; shallot, fresh leaves; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.

(5) Crop Group 4. Leafy Vegetables (Except Brassica Vegetables) Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Celery, head lettuce, leaf lettuce, and spinach (Spinacia oleracea).

(ii) Table. The following table 1 lists all the commodities included in Crop Group 4 and identifies the related crop subgroups.

Table 1 - Crop Group 4: Leafy Vegetables (Except BRASSICA Vegetables) Group

Commodities Related crop subgroups
Amaranth (leafy amaranth, Chinese spinach, tampala) (Amaranthus spp.) 4A
Arugula (Roquette) (Eruca sativa) 4A
Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus) 4B
Celery (Apium graveolens var. dulce) 4B
Celery, Chinese (Apium graveolens var. secalinum) 4B
Celtuce (Lactuca sativa var. angustana) 4B
Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium) 4A
Chrysanthemum, edible-leaved (Chrysanthemum coronarium var. coronarium) 4A
Chrysanthemum, garland (Chrysanthemum coronarium var. spatiosum) 4A
Corn salad (Valerianella locusta) 4A
Cress, garden (Lepidium sativum) 4A
Cress, upland (yellow rocket, winter cress) (Barbarea vulgaris) 4A
Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) 4A
Dock (sorrel) (Rumex spp.) 4A
Endive (escarole) (Cichorium endivia) 4A
Fennel, Florence (finochio) (Foeniculum vulgare Azoricum Group) 4B
Lettuce, head and leaf (Lactuca sativa) 4A
Orach (Atriplex hortensis) 4A
Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) 4A
Purslane, garden (Portulaca oleracea) 4A
Purslane, winter (Montia perfoliata) 4A
Radicchio (red chicory) (Cichorium intybus) 4A
Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum) 4B
Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) 4A
Spinach, New Zealand (Tetragonia tetragonioides, T. expansa) 4A
Spinach, vine (Malabar spinach, Indian spinach) (Basella alba) 4A
Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris var. cicla) 4B

(iii) Table. The following table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 4, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 4 Subgroup Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop Subgroup 4A. Leafy greens subgroup.
Head lettuce and leaf lettuce, and spinach (Spinacia oleracea) Amaranth; arugula; chervil; chrysanthemum, edible-leaved; chrysanthemum, garland; corn salad; cress, garden; cress, upland; dandelion; dock; endive; lettuce; orach; parsley; purslane, garden; purslane, winter; radicchio (red chicory); spinach; spinach, New Zealand; spinach, vine.
Crop Subgroup 4B. Leaf petioles subgroup.
Celery. Cardoon; celery; celery, Chinese; celtuce; fennel, Florence; rhubarb; Swiss chard.

(6) Crop Group 4-16. Leafy Vegetable Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Head lettuce, leaf lettuce, mustard greens, and spinach.

(ii) Commodities. The following Table 1 lists all commodities included in Crop Group 4-16.

Table 1 - Crop Group 4-16: Leafy Vegetable Group

Commodities Related crop subgroups
Amaranth, Chinese (Amaranthus tricolor L.) 4-16A
Amaranth, leafy (Amaranthus spp.) 4-16A
Arugula (Eruca sativa Mill.) 4-16B
Aster, Indian (Kalimeris indica (L.) Sch. Bip.) 4-16A
Blackjack (Bidens pilosa L.) 4-16A
Broccoli, Chinese (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra (L.H. Bailey) Musil) 4-16B
Broccoli raab (Brassica ruvo L.H. Bailey) 4-16B
Cabbage, abyssinian (Brassica carinata A. Braun) 4-16B
Cabbage, Chinese, bok choy (Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis (L.) Hanelt) 4-16B
Cabbage, seakale (Brassica oleracea L. var. costata DC.) 4-16B
Cat's whiskers (Cleome gynandra L.) 4-16A
Cham-chwi (Doellingeria scabra (Thunb.) Nees) 4-16A
Cham-na-mul (Pimpinella calycina Maxim) 4-16A
Chervil, fresh leaves (Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm.) 4-16A
Chipilin (Crotalaria longirostrata Hook & Arn) 4-16A
Chrysanthemum, garland (Glebionis coronaria (L.) Cass. ex Spach. Glebionis spp.) 4-16A
Cilantro, fresh leaves (Coriandrum sativum L.) 4-16A
Collards (Brassica oleracea L. var. viridis L.) 4-16B
Corn salad (Valerianella spp.) 4-16A
Cosmos (Cosmos caudatus Kunth) 4-16A
Cress, garden (Lepidium sativum L.) 4-16B
Cress, upland (Barbarea vulgaris W.T. Aiton) 4-16B
Dandelion, leaves (Taraxacum officinale F.H. Wigg. Aggr.) 4-16A
Dang-gwi, leaves (Angelica gigas Nakai) 4-16A
Dillweed (Anethum graveolens L.) 4-16A
Dock (Rumex patientia L.) 4-16A
Dol-nam-mul (Sedum sarmentosum Bunge) 4-16A
Ebolo (Crassocephalum crepidioides (Benth.) S. Moore) 4-16A
Endive (Cichorium endivia L.) 4-16A
Escarole (Cichorium endivia L.) 4-16A
Fameflower (Talinum fruticosum (L.) Juss.) 4-16A
Feather cockscomb (Glinus oppositifolius (L.) Aug. DC.) 4-16A
Good King Henry (Chenopodium bonus-henricus L.) 4-16A
Hanover salad (Brassica napus var. pabularia (DC.) Rchb.) 4-16B
Huauzontle (Chenopodium berlandieri Moq.) 4-16A
Jute, leaves (Corchorus spp.) 4-16A
Kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. Sabellica L.) 4-16B
Lettuce, bitter (Launaea cornuta (Hochst. ex Oliv. & Hiern) C. Jeffrey) 4-16A
Lettuce, head (Lactuca sativa L.; including Lactuca sativa var. capitata L.) 4-16A
Lettuce, leaf (Lactuca sativa L.; including Lactuca sativa var. longifolia Lam.; Lactuca sativa var. crispa L.) 4-16A
Maca, leaves (Lepidium meyenii Walp.) 4-16B
Mizuna (Brassica rapa L. subsp. nipposinica (L.H. Bailey) Hanelt) 4-16B
Mustard greens (Brassica juncea subsp., including Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. subsp. integrifolia (H. West) Thell., Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. var. tsatsai (T.L. Mao) Gladis) 4-16B
Orach (Atriplex hortensis L.) 4-16A
Parsley, fresh leaves (Petroselinum crispum (Mill.) Fuss; Petroselinum crispum var. neapolitanum Danert) 4-16A
Plantain, buckthorn (Plantago lanceolata L.) 4-16A
Primrose, English (Primula vulgaris Huds.) 4-16A
Purslane, garden (Portulaca oleracea L.) 4-16A
Purslane, winter (Claytonia perfoliata Donn ex Willd.) 4-16A
Radicchio (Cichorium intybus L.) 4-16A
Radish, leaves (Raphanus sativus L. var sativus, including Raphanus sativus L. var. mougri H. W. J. Helm (Raphanus sativus L. var. oleiformis Pers) 4-16B
Rape greens (Brassica napus L. var. napus, including Brassica rapa subsp. trilocularis (Roxb.) Hanelt; Brassica rapa subsp. dichotoma (Roxb.) Hanelt; Brassica rapa subsp. oleifera Met) 4-16B
Rocket, wild (Diplotaxis tenuifolia (L.) DC.) 4-16B
Shepherd's purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik) 4-16B
Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) 4-16A
Spinach, Malabar (Basella alba L.) 4-16A
Spinach, New Zealand (Tetragonia tetragonioides (Pall.) Kuntze) 4-16A
Spinach, tanier (Xanthosoma brasiliense (Desf.) Engl.) 4-16A
Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris) 4-16A
Turnip greens (Brassica rapa L. ssp. rapa) 4-16B
Violet, Chinese, leaves (Asystasia gangetica (L.) T. Anderson) 4-16A
Watercress (Nasturtium officinale W.T. Aiton) 4-16B
Cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities

(iii) Crop subgroups. The following Table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 4-16, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 4-16: Subgroup Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop Subgroup 4-16A. Leafy greens subgroup
Head lettuce, leaf lettuce, and spinach Amaranth, Chinese; amaranth, leafy; aster, Indian; blackjack; cat's whiskers; cham-chwi; cham-na-mul; chervil, fresh leaves; chipilin; chrysanthemum, garland; cilantro, fresh leaves; corn salad; cosmos; dandelion, leaves; dang-gwi, leaves; dillweed; dock; dol-nam-mul; ebolo; endive; escarole; fameflower; feather cockscomb; Good King Henry; huauzontle; jute, leaves; lettuce, bitter; lettuce, head; lettuce, leaf; orach; parsley, fresh leaves; plantain, buckhorn; primrose, English; purslane, garden; purslane, winter; radicchio; spinach; spinach, Malabar; spinach, New Zealand; spinach, tanier; Swiss chard; violet, Chinese, leaves; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities.
Crop Subgroup 4-16B. Brassica leafy greens subgroup
Mustard greens Arugula; broccoli, Chinese; broccoli raab; cabbage, abyssinian; cabbage, Chinese, bok choy; cabbage, seakale; collards; cress, garden; cress, upland; hanover salad; kale; maca, leaves; mizuna; mustard greens; radish, leaves; rape greens; rocket, wild; shepherd's purse; turnip greens; watercress; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities.

(7) Crop Group 5. Brassica (Cole) Leafy Vegetables Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Broccoli or cauliflower; cabbage; and mustard greens.

(ii) Table. The following table 1 lists all the commodities included in Crop Group 5 and identifies the related crop subgroups.

Table 1 - Crop Group 5: Brassica (Cole) Leafy Vegetables

Commodities Related crop subgroups
Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) 5A
Broccoli, Chinese (gai lon) (Brassica alboglabra) 5A
Broccoli raab (rapini) (Brassica campestris) 5B
Brussels sprouts (Brassica oleracea var. gemmifera) 5A
Cabbage (Brassica oleracea) 5A
Cabbage, Chinese (bok choy) (Brassica chinensis) 5B
Cabbage, Chinese (napa) (Brassica pekinensis) 5A
Cabbage, Chinese mustard (gai choy) (Brassica campestris) 5A
Cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) 5A
Cavalo broccolo (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) 5A
Collards (Brassica oleracea var. acephala) 5B
Kale (Brassica oleracea var. acephala) 5B
Kohlrabi (Brassica oleracea var. gongylodes) 5A
Mizuna (Brassica rapa Japonica Group) 5B
Mustard greens (Brassica juncea) 5B
Mustard spinach (Brassica rapa Perviridis Group) 5B
Rape greens (Brassica napus) 5B

(iii) Table. The following table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 5, specifies the representative commodity(ies) for each subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 5 Subgroup Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop Subgroup 5A. Head and stem Brassica subgroup
Broccoli or cauliflower; and cabbage Broccoli; broccoli, Chinese; brussels sprouts; cabbage; cabbage, Chinese (napa); cabbage, Chinese mustard; cauliflower; cavalo broccolo; kohlrabi
Crop Subgroup 5B. Leafy Brassica greens subgroup.
Mustard greens Broccoli raab; cabbage, Chinese (bok choy); collards; kale; mizuna; mustard greens; mustard spinach; rape greens

(8) Crop Group 5-16. Brassica Head and Stem Vegetable Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Broccoli or cauliflower and cabbage.

(ii) Commodities. The following List 1 contains all commodities included in Crop Group 5-16.

List 1 - Crop Group 5-16: Brassica Head and Stem Vegetable Group

Commodities
Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica Plenck)
Brussels sprouts (Brassica oleracea L. var. gemmifera (DC.) Zenker)
Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.)
Cabbage, Chinese, napa (Brassica rapa L. subsp. pekinensis (Lour.) Hanelt)
Cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L)
Cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities.

(9) Crop Group 6. Legume Vegetables (Succulent or Dried) Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Bean (Phaseolus spp.; one succulent cultivar and one dried cultivar); pea (Pisum spp.; one succulent cultivar and one dried cultivar); and soybean.

(ii) Table. The following table 1 lists all the commodities included in Crop Group 6 and identifies the related crop subgroups.

Table 1 - Crop Group 6: Legume Vegetables (Succulent or Dried)

Commodities Related crop subgroups
Bean (Lupinus spp.) (includes grain lupin, sweet lupin, white lupin, and white sweet lupin) 6C
Bean (Phaseolus spp.) (includes field bean, kidney bean, lima bean, navy bean, pinto bean, runner bean, snap bean, tepary bean, wax bean) 6A, 6B, 6C
Bean (Vigna spp.) (includes adzuki bean, asparagus bean, blackeyed pea, catjang, Chinese longbean, cowpea, Crowder pea, moth bean, mung bean, rice bean, southern pea, urd bean, yardlong bean) 6A, 6B, 6C
Broad bean (fava bean) (Vicia faba) 6B, 6C
Chickpea (garbanzo bean) (Cicer arietinum) 6C
Guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) 6C
Jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis) 6A
Lablab bean (hyacinth bean) (Lablab purpureus) 6C
Lentil (Lens esculenta) 6C
Pea (Pisum spp.) (includes dwarf pea, edible-pod pea, En glish pea, field pea, garden pea, green pea, snow pea, sugar snap pea) 6A, 6B, 6C
Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) 6A, 6B, 6C
Soybean (Glycine max) N/A
Soybean (immature seed) (Glycine max) 6A
Sword bean (Canavalia gladiata) 6A

(iii) Table. The following table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 6, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 6 Subgroup Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop Subgroup 6A. Edible-podded legume vegetables subgroup.
Any one succulent cultivar of edible-podded bean (Phaseolus spp.) and any one succulent cultivar of edible-podded pea (Pisum spp.). Bean (Phaseolus spp.) (includes runner bean, snap bean, wax bean); bean (Vigna spp.) (includes asparagus bean, Chinese longbean, moth bean, yardlong bean); jackbean; pea (Pisum spp.) (includes dwarf pea, edible-pod pea, snow pea, sugar snap pea); pigeon pea; soybean (immature seed); sword bean.
Crop Subgroup 6B. Succulent shelled pea and bean subgroup.
Any succulent shelled cultivar of bean (Phaseolus spp.) and garden pea (Pisum spp.). Bean (Phaseolus spp.) (includes lima bean (green)); broad bean (succulent); bean (Vigna spp.) (includes blackeyed pea, cowpea, southern pea); pea (Pisum spp.) (includes English pea, garden pea, green pea); pigeon pea.
Crop Subgroup 6C. Dried shelled pea and bean (except soybean) subgroup
Any one dried cultivar of bean (Phaseolus spp.); and any one dried cultivar of pea (Pisum spp.) Dried cultivars of bean (Lupinus spp.) (includes grain lupin, sweet lupin, white lupin, and white sweet lupin); (Phaseolus spp.) (includes field bean, kidney bean, lima bean (dry), navy bean, pinto bean; tepary bean; bean (Vigna spp.) (includes adzuki bean, blackeyed pea, catjang, cowpea, Crowder pea, moth bean, mung bean, rice bean, southern pea, urd bean); broad bean (dry); chickpea; guar; lablab bean; lentil; pea (Pisum spp.) (includes field pea); pigeon pea.

(10) Crop Group 7. Foliage of Legume Vegetables Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Any cultivar of bean (Phaseolus spp.), field pea (Pisum spp.), and soybean.

(ii) Table. The following table 1 lists the commodities included in Crop Group 7.

Table 1 - Crop Group 7: Foliage of Legume Vegetables Group

Representative commodities Commodities
Any cultivar of bean (Phaseolus spp.) and field pea (Pisum spp.), and soybean (Glycine max) Plant parts of any legume vegetable included in the legume vegetables that will be used as animal feed.

(iii) Table. The following table 2 identifies the crop subgroup for Crop Group 7 and specifies the representative commodities for the subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in the subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 7 Subgroup Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop Subgroup 7A. Foliage of legume vegetables (except soybeans) subgroup
Any cultivar of bean (Phaseolus spp.), and field pea (Pisum spp.) Plant parts of any legume vegetable (except soybeans) included in the legume vegetables group that will be used as animal feed.

(11) Crop Group 8. Fruiting Vegetables Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Tomato, bell pepper, and one cultivar of non-bell pepper.

(ii) Commodities. The following is a list of all the commodities included in Crop Group 8:

Crop Group 8: Fruiting Vegetables (Except Cucurbits) - Commodities

Eggplant (Solanum melongena)

Groundcherry (Physalis spp.)

Pepino (Solanum muricatum)

Pepper (Capsicum spp.) (includes bell pepper, chili pepper, cooking pepper, pimento, sweet pepper)

Tomatillo (Physalis ixocarpa)

Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum)

(12) Crop Group 8-10. Fruiting Vegetable Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Tomato, standard size, and one cultivar of small tomato; bell pepper and one cultivar of small nonbell pepper.

(ii) Commodities. The following is a list of all commodities included in the Crop group 8-10.

Table 1 - Crop Group 8-10: Fruiting Vegetable Group

Commodities Related crop subgroups
African eggplant, Solanum macrocarpon L 8-10B, 8-10C
Bush tomato, Solanum centrale J.M. Black 8-10A
Cocona, Solanum sessiliflorum Dunal 8-10A
Currant tomato, Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium L 8-10A
Eggplant, Solanum melongena L 8-10B, 8-10C
Garden huckleberry, Solanum scabrum Mill 8-10A
Goji berry, Lycium barbarum L 8-10A
Groundcherry, Physalis alkekengi L., P. grisea (Waterf.) M. Martinez, P. peruviana L., P. pubescens L 8-10A
Martynia, Proboscidea louisianica (Mill.) Thell 8-10B, 8-10C
Naranjilla, Solanum quitoense Lam 8-10A
Okra, Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench 8-10B, 8-10C
Pea eggplant, Solanum torvum Sw. 8-10B, 8-10C
Pepino, Solanum muricatum Aiton 8-10B, 8-10C
Pepper, bell, Capsicum annuum L. var. annuum, Capsicum spp 8-10B
Pepper, nonbell, Capsicum chinese Jacq., C. annuum L. var. annuum, C. frutescens L., C. baccatum L., C. pubescens Ruiz & Pav., Capsicum spp 8-10B, 8-10C
Roselle, Hibiscus sabdariffa L 8-10B, 8-10C
Scarlet eggplant, Solanum aethiopicum L 8-10B, 8-10C
Sunberry, Solanum retroflexum Dunal 8-10A
Tomatillo, Physalis philadelphica Lam 8-10A
Tomato, Solanum lycopersicum L., Solanum lycopersicum L. var. lycopersicum 8-10A
Tree tomato, Solanum betaceum Cav 8-10A
Cultivars, varieties and/or hybrids of these

(iii) Table. The following Table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 8-10, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 8-10. Subgroup Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop subgroup 8-10A. Tomato subgroup
Tomato, standard size, and one cultivar of small tomato Bush tomato; cocona; currant tomato; garden huckleberry; goji berry; groundcherry; naranjilla; sunberry; tomatillo; tomato; tree tomato; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Crop subgroup 8-10B. Pepper/Eggplant subgroup
Bell pepper and one cultivar of small nonbell pepper African eggplant; bell pepper; eggplant; Martynia; nonbell pepper; okra; pea eggplant; pepino; roselle; scarlet eggplant; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Crop subgroup 8-10C. Nonbell pepper/Eggplant subgroup
One cultivar of small nonbell pepper or one cultivar of small eggplant African eggplant; eggplant; martynia; nonbell pepper; okra; pea eggplant; pepino; roselle; scarlet eggplant; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.

(13) Crop Group 9. Cucurbit Vegetables Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Cucumber, muskmelon, and summer squash.

(ii) Table. The following table 1 lists all the commodities included in Crop Group 9 and identifies the related subgroups.

Table 1 - Crop Group 9: Cucurbit Vegetables

Commodities Related crop subgroups
Chayote (fruit) (Sechium edule) 9B
Chinese waxgourd (Chinese preserving melon) (Benincasa hispida) 9B
Citron melon (Citrullus lanatus var. citroides) 9A
Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) 9B
Gherkin (Cucumis anguria) 9B
Gourd, edible (Lagenaria spp.) (includes hyotan, cucuzza); (Luffa acutangula, L. cylindrica) (includes hechima, Chinese okra) 9B
Momordica spp. (includes balsam apple, balsam pear, bitter melon, Chinese cucumber) 9B
Muskmelon (hybrids and/or cultivars of Cucumis melo) (includes true cantaloupe, cantaloupe, casaba, crenshaw melon, golden pershaw melon, honeydew melon, honey balls, mango melon, Persian melon, pineapple melon, Santa Claus melon, and snake melon) 9A
Pumpkin (Cucurbita spp.) 9B
Squash, summer (Cucurbita pepo var. melopepo) (includes crookneck squash, scallop squash, straightneck squash, vegetable marrow, zucchini) 9B
Squash, winter (Cucurbita maxima; C. moschata) (includes butternut squash, calabaza, hubbard squash); (C. mixta; C. pepo) (includes acorn squash, spaghetti squash) 9B
Watermelon (includes hybrids and/or varieties of Citrullus lanatus) 9A

(iii) Table. The following table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 9, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 9 Subgroup Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop Subgroup 9A. Melon subgroup
Cantaloupes Citron melon; muskmelon; watermelon
Crop Subgroup 9B. Squash/cucumber subgroup
One cultivar of summer squash and cucumber. Chayote (fruit); Chinese waxgourd; cucumber; gherkin; gourd, edible; Momordica spp.; pumpkin; squash, summer; squash, winter.

(14) Crop Group 10. Citrus Fruit Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Sweet orange; lemon and grapefruit.

(ii) Commodities. The following is a list of all the commodities in Crop Group 10:

Crop Group 10: Citrus Fruits (Citrus spp., Fortunella spp.) Group - Commodities

Calamondin (Citrus mitis × Citrofortunella mitis)

Citrus citron (Citrus medica)

Citrus hybrids (Citrus spp.) (includes chironja, tangelo, tangor)

Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi)

Kumquat (Fortunella spp.)

Lemon (Citrus jambhiri, Citrus limon)

Lime (Citrus aurantiifolia)

Mandarin (tangerine) (Citrus reticulata)

Orange, sour (Citrus aurantium)

Orange, sweet (Citrus sinensis)

Pummelo (Citrus grandis, Citrus maxima)

Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu)

(15) Crop Group 10-10. Citrus Fruit Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Orange or Tangerine/Mandarin, Lemon or Lime, and Grapefruit.

(ii) Commodities. The following is a list of all the commodities in Crop Group 10-10.

Table 1 - Crop Group 10-10: Citrus Fruit Group

Commodities Related crop subgroups
Australian desert lime, Eremocitrus glauca (Lindl.) Swingle 10-10B
Australian finger lime, Microcitrus australasica (F. Muell.) Swingle 10-10B
Australian round lime, Microcitrus australis (A. Cunn. Ex Mudie) Swingle 10-10B
Brown River finger lime, Microcitrus papuana Winters 10-10B
Calamondin, Citrofortunella microcarpa (Bunge) Wijnands 10-10A
Citron, Citrus medica L 10-10A
Citrus hybrids, Citrus spp. Eremocitrus spp., Fortunella spp., Microcitrus spp., and Poncirus spp 10-10A
Grapefruit, Citrus paradisi Macfad 10-10C
Japanese summer grapefruit, Citrus natsudaidai Hayata 10-10C
Kumquat, Fortunella spp 10-10B
Lemon, Citrus limon (L.) Burm. f 10-10B
Lime, Citrus aurantiifolia (Christm.) Swingle 10-10B
Mediterranean mandarin, Citrus deliciosa Ten 10-10A
Mount White lime, Microcitrus garrowayae (F.M. Bailey) Swingle 10-10B
New Guinea wild lime, Microcitrus warburgiana (F.M. Bailey) Tanaka 10-10B
Orange, sour, Citrus aurantium L 10-10A
Orange, sweet, Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck 10-10A
Pummelo, Citrus maxima (Burm.) Merr 10-10C
Russell River lime, Microcitrus inodora (F.M. Bailey) Swingle 10-10B
Satsuma mandarin, Citrus unshiu Marcow 10-10A
Sweet lime, Citrus limetta Risso 10-10B
Tachibana orange, Citrus tachibana (Makino) Tanaka 10-10A
Tahiti lime, Citrus latifolia (Yu. Tanaka) Tanaka 10-10B
Tangelo, Citrus xtangelo J.W. Ingram & H.E. Moore 10-10A, 10-10C
Tangerine (Mandarin), Citrus reticulata Blanco 10-10A
Tangor, Citrus nobilis Lour 10-10A
Trifoliate orange, Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf 10-10A
Uniq fruit, Citrus aurantium Tangelo group 10-10C
Cultivars, varieties and/or hybrids of these

(iii) Table. The following Table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 10-10, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 10-10: Subgroup Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop Subgroup 10-10A. Orange subgroup
Orange or tangerine/mandarin Calamondin; citron; citrus hybrids; mediterranean mandarin; orange, sour; orange, sweet; satsuma mandarin; tachibana orange; tangerine (mandarin); tangelo; tangor; trifoliate orange; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Crop Subgroup 10-10B. Lemon/Lime subgroup
Lemon or lime Australian desert lime; Australian finger lime; Australian round lime; brown river finger lime; kumquat; lemon; lime; mount white lime; New Guinea wild lime; Russell River lime; sweet lime; Tahiti lime; cultivars , varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Crop Subgroup 10-10C. Grapefruit subgroup
Grapefruit Grapefruit; Japanese summer grapefruit; pummelo; tangelo; uniq fruit; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.

(16) Crop Group 11: Pome Fruits Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Apple and pear.

(ii) Commodities. The following is a list of all the commodities included in Crop Group 11:

Crop Group 11: Pome Fruits Group - Commodities

Apple (Malus domestica)

Crabapple (Malus spp.)

Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica)

Mayhaw (Crataegus aestivalis, C. opaca, and C. rufula)

Pear (Pyrus communis)

Pear, oriental (Pyrus pyrifolia)

Quince (Cydonia oblonga)

(17) Crop group 11-10. Pome Fruit Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Apple and Pear

(ii) Commodities. The following is a list of all the commodities in Crop Group 11-10.

Crop Group 11-10: Pome Fruit Group - Commodities

Apple, Malus domestica Borkh.

Azarole, Crataegus azarolus L.

Crabapple, Malus sylvestris (L.) Mill., M. prunifolia (Willd.) Borkh.

Loquat, Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl.

Mayhaw, Crataegus aestivalis (Walter) Torr. & A. Gray, C. opaca

Hook. & Arn., and C. rufula Sarg.

Medlar, Mespilus germanica L.

Pear, Pyrus communis L.

Pear, Asian, Pyrus pyrifolia (Burm. f.) Nakai var. culta (Makino) Nakai

Pseudocydonia sinensis (Thouin) C.K. Schneid.

Quince, Cydonia oblonga Mill.

Quince, Chinese, Chaenomeles speciosa (Sweet) Nakai,

Quince, Japanese, Chaenomeles japonica (Thunb.) Lindl. ex Spach

Tejocote, Crataegus mexicana DC.

Cultivars, varieties and/or hybrids of these.

(18) Crop Group 12. Stone Fruits Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Sweet cherry or tart cherry; peach; and plum or fresh prune (Prunus domestica, Prunus spp.)

(ii) Commodities. The following is a list of all the commodities included in Crop Group 12:

Crop Group 12: Stone Fruits Group - Commodities

Apricot (Prunus armeniaca)

Cherry, sweet (Prunus avium),

Cherry, tart (Prunus cerasus)

Nectarine (Prunus persica)

Peach (Prunus persica)

Plum (Prunus domestica, Prunus spp.)

Plum, Chickasaw (Prunus angustifolia)

Plum, Damson (Prunus domestica spp. insititia)

Plum, Japanese (Prunus salicina)

Plumcot (Prunus. armeniaca × P. domestica)

Prune (fresh) (Prunus domestica, Prunus spp.)

(19) Crop Group 12-12: Stone Fruit Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Sweet cherry or Tart cherry; Peach; and Plum or Prune plum.

(ii) Commodities. The following Table 1 is a list of all commodities included in Crop Group 12-12.

Table 1 - Crop Group 12-12: Stone Fruit Group

Commodities Related crop subgroup
Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) 12-12C
Apricot, Japanese (Prunus mume Siebold & Zucc.) 12-12C
Capulin (Prunus serotina Ehrh. var. salicifolia (Kunth) Koehne) 12-12A
Cherry, black (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) 12-12A
Cherry, Nanking (Prunus tomentosa Thunb.) 12-12A
Cherry, sweet (Prunus avium (L.) L.) 12-12A
Cherry, tart (Prunus cerasus L.) 12-12A
Jujube, Chinese (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) 12-12C
Nectarine (Prunuspersica (L.) Batsch var. nucipersica (Suckow) C.K. Schneid) 12-12B
Peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch var. persica) 12-12B
Plum (Prunus domestica L. subsp. domestica) 12-12C
Plum, American (Prunus americana Marshall) 12-12C
Plum, beach (Prunus maritima Marshall) 12-12C
Plum, Canada (Prunus nigra Aiton) 12-12C
Plum, cherry (Prunus cerasifera Ehrh.) 12-12C
Plum, Chickasaw (Prunus angustifolia Marshall) 12-12C
Plum, Damson (Prunus domestica L. subsp. insititia (L.) C.K. Schneid.) 12-12C
Plum, Japanese (Prunus salicina Lindl.; P. salicina Lindl. var. salicina) 12-12C
Plum, Klamath (Prunus subcordata Benth.) 12-12C
Plum, prune (Prunus domestica L. subsp. domestica) 12-12C
Plumcot (Prunus hybr.) 12-12C
Sloe (Prunus spinosa L.) 12-12C
Cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these

(iii) Crop subgroups. The following Table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 12-12, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 12-12: Subgroup Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop subgroup 12-12A. Cherry subgroup
Cherry, sweet or Cherry, tart Capulin; Cherry, black; Cherry, Nanking; Cherry, sweet; Cherry, tart; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Crop subgroup 12-12B. Peach subgroup
Peach Peach; Nectarine; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Crop subgroup 12-12C. Plum subgroup
Plum or Prune plum Apricot; Apricot, Japanese; Jujube, Chinese; Plum; Plum, American; Plum, beach; Plum, Canada; Plum, cherry; Plum, Chickasaw; Plum, Damson; Plum, Japanese; Plum, Klamath; Plumcot; Plum, prune; Sloe; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.

(20) Crop Group 13. Berries Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Any one blackberry or any one raspberry; and blueberry.

(ii) Table. The following table 1 lists all the commodities included in Crop Group 13 and identifies the related subgroups.

Table 1 - Crop Group 13: Berries Group

Commodities Related crop subgroups
Blackberry (Rubus eubatus) (including bingleberry, black satin berry, boysenberry, Cherokee blackberry, Chesterberry, Cheyenne blackberry, coryberry, darrowberry, dewberry, Dirksen thornless berry, Himalayaberry, hullberry, Lavacaberry, lowberry, Lucretiaberry, mammoth blackberry, marionberry, nectarberry, olallieberry, Oregon evergreen berry, phenomenalberry, rangeberry, ravenberry, rossberry, Shawnee blackberry, youngberry, and varieties and/or hybrids of these) 13A
Blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) 13B
Currant (Ribes spp.) 13B
Elderberry (Sambucus spp.) 13B
Gooseberry (Ribes spp.) 13B
Huckleberry (Gaylussacia spp.) 13B
Loganberry (Rubus loganobaccus) 13A
Raspberry, black and red (Rubus occidentalis, Rubus strigosus, Rubus idaeus) 13A

(iii) Table. The following table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 13, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 13 Subgroups Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop Subgroup 13A. Caneberry (blackberry and raspberry) subgroup.
Any one blackberry or any one raspberry. Blackberry; loganberry; red and black raspberry; cultivars and/or hybrids of these.
Crop Subgroup 13B. Bushberry subgroup.
Blueberry, highbush. Blueberry, highbush and lowbush; currant; elderberry; gooseberry; huckleberry.

(21) Crop Group 13-07. Berry and Small Fruit Crop Group

(i) Representative commodities. Any one blackberry or any one raspberry; highbush blueberry; elderberry or mulberry; grape; fuzzy kiwifruit, and strawberry.

(ii) Table. The following Table 1 lists all the commodities listed in Crop Group 13-07 and identifies the related crop subgroups.

Table 1 - Crop Group 13-07: Berry and Small Fruit Crop Group

Commodities Related crop subgroups
Amur river grape (Vitis amurensis Rupr) 13-07D, 13-07E, 13-07F
Aronia berry (Aronia spp.) 13-07B
Bayberry (Myrica spp.) 13-07C
Bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) 13-07G, 13-07H
Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) 13-07G, 13-07H
Blackberry (Rubus spp.) (including Andean blackberry, arctic blackberry, bingleberry, black satin berry, boysenberry, brombeere, California blackberry, Chesterberry, Cherokee blackberry, Cheyenne blackberry, common blackberry, coryberry, darrowberry, dewberry, Dirksen thornless berry, evergreen blackberry, Himalayaberry, hullberry, lavacaberry, loganberry, lowberry, Lucretiaberry, mammoth blackberry, marionberry, mora, mures deronce, nectarberry, Northern dewberry, olallieberry, Oregon evergreen berry, phenomenalberry, rangeberry, ravenberry, rossberry, Shawnee blackberry, Southern dewberry, tayberry, youngberry, zarzamora, and cultivars, varieties and/or hybrids of these.) 13-07A
Blueberry, highbush (Vaccinium spp.) 13-07B
Blueberry, lowbush (Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton) 13-07B
Buffalo currant (Ribes aureum Pursh) 13-07B
Buffaloberry (Shepherdia argentea (Pursh) Nutt.) 13-07C
Che (Cudrania tricuspidata Bur. Ex Lavallee) 13-07C
Chilean guava (Myrtus ugni Mol.) 13-07B
Chokecherry (Prunus virginiana L.) 13-07C
Cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus L.) 13-07G, 13-07H
Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton) 13-07G, 13-07H
Currant, black (Ribes nigrum L.) 13-07B
Currant, red (Ribes rubrum L.) 13-07B
Elderberry (Sambucus spp.) 13-07B, 13-07C
European barberry (Berberis vulgaris L.) 13-07B
Gooseberry (Ribes spp.) 13-07B, 13-07D, 13-07E, 13-07F
Grape (Vitis spp.) 13-07D, 13-07F
Highbush cranberry (Viburnum opulus L. var. Americanum Aiton) 13-07B
Honeysuckle, edible (Lonicera caerula L. var. emphyllocalyx Nakai, Lonicera caerula L var . edulis Turcz. ex herder) 13-07B
Huckleberry (Gaylussacia spp.) 13-07B
Jostaberry (Ribes x nidigrolaria Rud. Bauer and A. Bauer) 13-07B
Juneberry (Saskatoon berry) (Amelanchier spp.) 13-07B, 13-07C
Kiwifruit, fuzzy (Actinidia deliciosa A. Chev.) (C.F. Liang and A.R. Fergusons, Actinida chinensis Planch.) 13-07D, 13-07E
Kiwifruit, hardy (Actinidia arguta (Siebold and Zucc.) Planch. ex Miq) 13-07D, 13-07E, 13-07F
Lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.) 13-07B, 13-07G 13-07H
Maypop (Passiflora incarnata L.) 13-07E, 13-07F
Mountain pepper berries (Tasmannia lanceolata)(Poir.) A.C.Sm. 13-07C
Mulberry (Morus spp.) 13-07C
Muntries (Kunzea pomifera F. Muell.) 13-07G, 13-07H
Native currant (Acrotriche depressa R. BR.) 13-07B
Partridgeberry (Mitchella repens L.) 13-07G, 13-07H
Phalsa (Grewia subinaequalis DC.) 13-07C
Pincherry (Prunus pensylvanica L.f.) 13-07C
Raspberry, black and red (Rubus spp.) 13-07A
Riberry (Syzygium luehmannii) 13-07C
Salal (Gaultheria shallon Pursh.) 13-07B, 13-07C
Schisandra berry (Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill.) 13-07D, 13-07E, 13-07F
Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) 13-07B
Serviceberry (Sorbus spp.) 13-07C
Strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duchesne) 13-07G
Wild raspberry (Rubus muelleri Lefevre ex P.J. Mull) 13-07A
Cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.

(iii) Table. The following Table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 13-07, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 13-07: Subgroup Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop Subgroup 13-07A. Caneberry subgroup
Any one blackberry or any one raspberry. Blackberry; loganberry; raspberry, red and black; wild raspberry; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Crop Subgroup 13-07B. Bushberry subgroup.
Blueberry, highbush. Aronia berry; blueberry, highbush; blueberry, lowbush; buffalo currant; Chilean guava; currant, black; currant, red; elderberry; European, barberry; gooseberry; cranberry, highbush; honeysuckle, edible; huckleberry; jostaberry; Juneberry; lingonberry; native currant; salal; sea buckthorn; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Crop Subgroup 13-07C. Large shrub/tree berry subgroup.
Elderberry or mulberry. Bayberry; buffaloberry; che; chokecherry; elderberry; Juneberry; mountain pepper berries; mulberry; phalsa; pincherry; riberry; salal; serviceberry; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Crop Subgroup 13-07D. Small fruit vine climbing subgroup.
Grape and fuzzy kiwifruit. Amur river grape; gooseberry; grape; kiwifruit, fuzzy; kiwifruit, hardy; Maypop; schisandra berry; cultivars, varieties, and /or hybrids of these.
Crop Subgroup 13-07E. Small fruit vine climbing subgroup, except grape.
Fuzzy kiwifruit. Amur river grape; gooseberry; kiwifruit, fuzzy; kiwifruit, hardy; Maypop; schisandra berry; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Crop Subgroup 13-07F. Small fruit vine climbing subgroup except fuzzy kiwifruit.
Grape. Amur river grape; gooseberry; grape; kiwifruit, hardy; Maypop; schisandra berry; cultivars varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Crop Subgroup 13-07G. Low growing berry subgroup.
Strawberry. Bearberry; bilberry; blueberry, lowbush; cloudberry; cranberry; lingonberry; muntries; partridgeberry; strawberry; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Crop Subgroup 13-07H. Low growing berry subgroup, except strawberry.
Cranberry Bearberry; bilberry; blueberry, lowbush; cloudberry; cranberry; lingonberry; muntries; partridgeberry; cultivars, varieties, and/or cultivars of these.

(22) Crop Group 14. Tree Nuts Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Almond and pecan.

(ii) Commodities. The following is a list of all the commodities included in Crop Group 14:

Crop Group 14: Tree Nuts - Commodities

Almond (Prunus dulcis)

Beech nut (Fagus spp.)

Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa)

Butternut (Juglans cinerea)

Cashew (Anacardium occidentale)

Chestnut (Castanea spp.)

Chinquapin (Castanea pumila)

Filbert (hazelnut) (Corylus spp.)

Hickory nut (Carya spp.)

Macadamia nut (bush nut) (Macadamia spp.)

Pecan (Carya illinoensis)

Walnut, black and English (Persian) (Juglans spp.)

(23) Crop Group 14-12. Tree Nut Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Almond and Pecan.

(ii) Commodities. The following is a list of all commodities included in Crop Group 14-12.

Crop Group 14-12: Tree Nut Group

African nut-tree (Ricinodendron heudelotii (Baill.) Heckel)

Almond (Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb)

Beechnut (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.; F. sylvatica L.)

Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa Humb. & Bonpl.)

Brazilian pine (Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol.) Kuntze)

Bunya (Araucaria bidwillii Hook.)

Bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.)

Butternut (Juglans cinerea L.)

Cajou nut (Anacardium giganteum Hance ex Engl.)

Candlenut (Aleurites moluccanus (L.) Willd.)

Cashew (Anacardium occidentale L.)

Chestnut (Castanea crenata Siebold & Zucc.; C. dentata (Marshall) Borkh.; C. mollissima Blume; C. sativa Mill.)

Chinquapin (Castaneapumila (L.) Mill.)

Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.)

Coquito nut (Jubaea chilensis (Molina) Baill.)

Dika nut (Irvingia gabonensis (Aubry-Lecomte ex O'Rorke) Baill.)

Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba L.)

Guiana chestnut (Pachira aquatica Aubl.)

Hazelnut (Filbert) (Corylus americana Marshall; C. avellana L.; C. californica (A. DC.) Rose; C. chinensis Franch.)

Heartnut (Juglans ailantifolia Carrière var. cordiformis (Makino) Rehder)

Hickory nut (Carya cathayensis Sarg.; C. glabra (Mill.) Sweet; C. laciniosa (F. Michx.) W. P. C. Barton; C. myristiciformis (F. Michx.) Elliott; C. ovata (Mill.) K. Koch; C. tomentosa (Lam.) Nutt.)

Japanese horse-chestnut (Aesculus turbinate Blume)

Macadamia nut (Macadamia integrifolia Maiden & Betche; M. tetraphylla L.A.S. Johnson)

Mongongo nut (Schinziophyton rautanenii (Schinz) Radcl.-Sm.)

Monkey-pot (Lecythis pisonis Cambess.)

Monkey puzzle nut (Araucaria araucana (Molina) K. Koch)

Okari nut (Terminalia kaernbachii Warb.)

Pachira nut (Pachira insignis (Sw.) Savigny)

Peach palm nut (Bactris gasipaes Kunth var. gasipaes)

Pecan (Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch)

Pequi (Caryocar brasiliense Cambess.; C. villosum (Aubl.) Pers; C. nuciferum L.)

Pili nut (Canarium ovatum Engl.; C. vulgare Leenh.)

Pine nut (Pinus edulis Engelm.; P. koraiensis Siebold & Zucc.; P. sibirica Du Tour; P. pumila (Pall.) Regel; P. gerardiana Wall. ex D. Don; P. monophylla Torr. & Frém.; P. quadrifolia Parl. ex Sudw.; P. pinea L.)

Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.)

Sapucaia nut (Lecythis zabucaja Aubl.)

Tropical almond (Terminalia catappa L.)

Walnut, black (Juglans nigra L.; J. hindsii Jeps. ex R. E. Sm.; J. microcarpa Berland.)

Walnut, English (Juglans regia L.)

Yellowhorn (Xanthoceras sorbifolium Bunge)

Cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these

(24) Crop Group 15. Cereal Grains Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Corn (fresh sweet corn and dried field corn), rice, sorghum, and wheat.

(ii) Commodities. The following is a list of all the commodities included in Crop Group 15:

Crop Group 15: Cereal Grains - Commodities

Barley (Hordeum spp.)

Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum)

Corn (Zea mays)

Millet, pearl (Pennisetum glaucum)

Millet, proso (Panicum milliaceum)

Oats (Avena spp.)

Popcorn (Zea mays var. everta)

Rice (Oryza sativa)

Rye (Secale cereale)

Sorghum (milo) (Sorghum spp.)

Teosinte (Euchlaena mexicana)

Triticale (Triticum-Secale hybrids)

Wheat (Triticum spp.)

Wild rice (Zizania aquatica)

(25) Crop Group 16. Forage, Fodder and Straw of Cereal Grains Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Corn, wheat, and any other cereal grain crop.

(ii) Commodities. The commodities included in Crop Group 16 are: Forage, fodder, stover, and straw of all commodities included in the group cereal grains group. EPA may establish separate group tolerances on forage, fodder, hay, stover, or straw, if data on the representative commodities indicate differences in the levels of residues on forage, fodder, stover, or straw.

(26) Crop Group 17. Grass Forage, Fodder, and Hay Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Bermuda grass; bluegrass; and bromegrass or fescue.

(ii) Commodities. The commodities included in Crop Group 17 are: Forage, fodder, stover, and hay of any grass, Gramineae/Poaceae family (either green or cured) except sugarcane and those included in the cereal grains group, that will be fed to or grazed by livestock, all pasture and range grasses and grasses grown for hay or silage. EPA may establish separate group tolerances on forage, fodder, stover, or hay, if data on the representative commodities indicate differences in the levels of residues on forage, fodder, stover, or hay.

(27) Crop Group 18. Nongrass Animal Feeds (Forage, Fodder, Straw, and Hay) Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Alfalfa and clover (Trifolium spp.)

(ii) Commodities. EPA may establish separate group tolerances on forage, fodder, straw, or hay, if data on the representative commodities indicate differences in the levels of residues on forage, fodder, straw, or hay. The following is a list of all the commodities included in Crop Group 18:

Crop Group 18: Nongrass Animal Feeds (Forage, Fodder, Straw, and Hay) Group - Commodities

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa)

Bean, velvet (Mucuna pruriens var. utilis)

Clover (Trifolium spp., Melilotus spp.)

Kudzu (Pueraria lobata)

Lespedeza (Lespedeza spp.)

Lupin (Lupinus spp.)

Sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia);

Trefoil (Lotus spp.)

Vetch (Vicia spp.)

Vetch, crown (Coronilla varia)

Vetch, milk (Astragalus spp).

(28) Crop Group 19. Herbs and Spices Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Basil (fresh and dried); black pepper; chive; and celery seed or dill seed.

(ii) Table. The following table 1 lists all the commodities included in Crop Group 19 and identifies the related subgroups.

Table 1 - Crop Group 19: Herbs and Spices Group

Commodities Related crop subgroups
Allspice (Pimenta dioica) 19B
Angelica (Angelica archangelica) 19A
Anise (anise seed) (Pimpinella anisum) 19B
Anise, star (Illicium verum) 19B
Annatto (seed) 19B
Balm (lemon balm) (Melissa officinalis) 19A
Basil (Ocimum basilicum) 19A
Borage (Borago officinalis) 19A
Burnet (Sanguisorba minor) 19A
Camomile (Anthemis nobilis) 19A
Caper buds (Capparis spinosa) 19B
Caraway (Carum carvi) 19B
Caraway, black (Nigella sativa) 19B
Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum) 19B
Cassia bark (Cinnamomum aromaticum) 19B
Cassia buds (Cinnamomum aromaticum) 19B
Catnip (Nepeta cataria) 19A
Celery seed (Apicum graveolens) 19B
Chervil (dried) (Anthriscus cerefolium) 19A
Chive (Allium schoenoprasum) 19A
Chive, Chinese (Allium tuberosum) 19A
Cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum) 19B
Clary (Salvia sclarea) 19A
Clove buds (Eugenia caryophyllata) 19B
Coriander (cilantro or Chinese parsley) (leaf) (Coriandrum sativum) 19A
Coriander (cilantro) (seed) (Coriandrum sativum) 19B
Costmary (Chrysanthemum balsamita) 19A
Culantro (leaf) (Eryngium foetidum) 19A
Culantro (seed) (Eryngium foetidum) 19B
Cumin (Cuminum cyminum) 19B
Curry (leaf) (Murraya koenigii) 19A
Dill (dillweed) (Anethum graveolens) 19A
Dill (seed) (Anethum graveolens) 19B
Fennel (common) (Foeniculum vulgare) 19B
Fennel, Florence (seed) (Foeniculum vulgare Azoricum Group) 19B
Fenugreek (Trigonella foenumgraecum) 19B
Grains of paradise (Aframomum melegueta) 19B
Horehound (Marrubium vulgare) 19A
Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) 19A
Juniper berry (Juniperus communis) 19B
Lavender (Lavandula officinalis) 19A
Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) 19A
Lovage (leaf) (Levisticum officinale) 19A
Lovage (seed) (Levisticum officinale) 19B
Mace (Myristica fragrans) 19B
Marigold (Calendula officinalis) 19A
Marjoram (Origanum spp.) (includes sweet or annual marjoram, wild marjoram or oregano, and pot marjoram) 19A
Mustard (seed) (Brassica juncea, B. hirta, B. nigra) 19B
Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus) 19A
Nutmeg (Myristica fragrans) 19B
Parsley (dried) (Petroselinum crispum) 19A
Pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium) 19A
Pepper, black (Piper nigrum) 19B
Pepper, white 19B
Poppy (seed) (Papaver somniferum) 19B
Rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis) 19A
Rue (Ruta graveolens) 19A
Saffron (Crocus sativus) 19B
Sage (Salvia officinalis) 19A
Savory, summer and winter (Satureja spp.) 19A
Sweet bay (bay leaf) (Laurus nobilis) 19A
Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) 19A
Tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus) 19A
Thyme (Thymus spp.) 19A
Vanilla (Vanilla planifolia) 19B
Wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens) 19A
Woodruff (Galium odorata) 19A
Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) 19A

(iii) Table. The following table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 19, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 19 Subgroups

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop Subgroup 19A. Herb subgroup.
Basil (fresh and dried) and chive. Angelica; balm; basil; borage; burnet; camomile; catnip; chervil (dried); chive; chive, Chinese, clary; coriander (leaf); costmary; culantro (leaf); curry (leaf); dillweed; horehound; hyssop; lavender; lemongrass; lovage (leaf); marigold; marjoram (Origanum spp.); nasturtium; parsley (dried); pennyroyal; rosemary; rue; sage; savory, summer and winter; sweet bay; tansy; tarragon; thyme; wintergreen; woodruff; and wormwood.
Crop Subgroup 19B. Spice subgroup.
Black pepper; and celery seed or dill seed. Allspice; anise (seed); anise, star; annatto (seed); caper (buds); caraway; caraway, black; cardamom; cassia (buds); celery (seed); cinnamon; clove (buds); coriander (seed); culantro (seed); cumin; dill (seed); fennel, common; fennel, Florence (seed); fenugreek; grains of paradise; juniper (berry); lovage (seed); mace; mustard (seed); nutmeg; pepper, black; pepper, white; poppy (seed); saffron; and vanilla.

(iv) After November 6, 2020, new herb crop group and subgroup tolerances will be established as Crop Group 25 or subgroups 25A and 25B, and new spice crop group tolerances will be established as Crop Group 26.

(29) Crop Group 20. Oilseed Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Rapeseed (canola varieties only); sunflower, seed and cottonseed.

(ii) Table. The following Table 1 lists all the commodities listed in Crop Group 20 and identifies the related crop subgroups and includes cultivars and/or varieties of these commodities.

Table 1 - Crop Group 20: Oilseed Group

Commodities Related crop subgroups
Borage, Borago officinalis L 20A
Calendula, Calendula officinalis L 20B
Castor oil plant, Ricinus communis L 20B
Chinese tallowtree, Triadica sebifera (L.) Small 20B
Cottonseed, Gossypium hirsutum L. Gossypium spp 20C
Crambe, Crambe hispanica L.; C. abyssinica Hochst. ex R.E. Fr 20A
Cuphea, Cuphea hyssopifolia Kunth 20A
Echium, Echium plantagineum L 20A
Euphorbia, Euphorbia esula L 20B
Evening primrose, Oenothera biennis L 20B
Flax seed, Linum usitatissimum L 20A
Gold of pleasure, Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz 20A
Hare's ear mustard, Conringia orientalis (L.) Dumort 20A
Jojoba, Simmondsia chinensis (Link) C.K. Schneid 20B
Lesquerella, Lesquerella recurvata (Engelm. ex A. Gray) S. Watson 20A
Lunaria, Lunaria annua L 20A
Meadowfoam, Limnanthes alba Hartw. ex Benth 20A
Milkweed, Asclepias spp 20A
Mustard seed, Brassica hirta Moench, Sinapis alba L. subsp. Alba.. 20A
Niger seed, Guizotia abyssinica (L.f.) Cass 20B
Oil radish, Raphanus sativus L. var. oleiformis Pers 20A
Poppy seed, Papaver somniferum L. subsp. Somniferum 20A
Rapeseed, Brassica spp.; B. napus L 20A
Rose hip, Rosa rubiginosa L 20B
Safflower, Carthamus tinctorious L 20B
Sesame, Sesamum indicum L., S. radiatum Schumach. & honn 20A
Stokes aster, Stokesia laevis (Hill) Greene 20B
Sunflower, Helianthus annuus L 20B
Sweet rocket, Hesperis matronalis L 20A
Tallowwood, Ximenia americana L 20B
Tea oil plant, Camellia oleifera C. Abel 20B
Vernonia, Vernonia galamensis (Cass.) Less 20B
Cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these

(iii) Table. The following Table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 20, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 20: Subgroup Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop subgroup 20A. Rapeseed subgroup
Rapeseed, canola varieties only Borage; crambe; cuphea; echium; flax seed; gold of pleasure; hare's ear mustard; lesquerella; lunaria; meadowfoam; milkweed; mustard seed; oil radish; poppy seed; rapeseed; sesame; sweet rocket cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Crop subgroup 20B. Sunflower subgroup
Sunflower, seed Calendula; castor oil plant; chinese tallowtree; euphorbia; evening primrose; jojoba; niger seed; rose hip; safflower; stokes aster; sunflower; tallowwood; tea oil plant; vernonia; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.
Crop subgroup 20C. Cottonseed subgroup
Cottonseed Cottonseed; cultivars, varieties, and/or hybrids of these.

(30) Crop Group 21. Edible fungi Group.

(i) Representative commodities. White button mushroom and any one oyster mushroom or any Shiitake mushroom.

(ii) Table. The following is a list of all the commodities in Crop Group 21. There are no related subgroups.

Crop Group 21 - Edible Fungi Group - Commodities

Blewitt (Lepista nuda)
Bunashimeji (Hypsizygus marrmoreus)
Chinese mushroom (Volvariella volvacea) (Bull.) Singer
Enoki (Flammulina velutipes) (Curt.) Singer
Hime-Matsutake (Agaricus blazei) Murill
Hirmeola (Auricularia auricular)
Maitake (Grifola frondosa)
Morel (Morchella spp.)
Nameko (Pholiota nameko)
Net Bearing (Dictyophora)
Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus spp.)
Pom Pom (Hericium erinaceus)
Reishi mushroom (Ganoderma lucidum (Leyss. Fr.) Karst.)
Rodman's agaricus (Agaricus bitorquis) (Quel.) Saccardo
Shiitake mushroom (Lentinula edodes (Berk.) Pegl.)
Shimeji (Tricholoma conglobatum)
Stropharia (Stropharia spp.)
Truffle (Tuber spp.)
White button mushroom (Agaricus bisporous (Lange) Imbach)
White Jelly Fungi (Tremella fuciformis)

(31) Crop Group 22. Stalk, Stem and Leaf Petiole Vegetable Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Asparagus and celery.

(ii) Commodities. The following Table 1 lists all commodities included in Crop Group 22.

Table 1 - Crop Group 22: Stalk, Stem and Leaf Petiole Vegetable Group

Commodities Related crop
subgroups
Agave (Agave spp.) 22A
Aloe vera (Aloe vera (L.) Burm.f.) 22A
Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) 22A
Bamboo, shoots (Arundinaria spp.; Bambusa spp., Chimonobambusa spp.; Dendrocalamus spp., Fargesia spp.; Gigantochloa spp., Nastus elatus; Phyllostachys spp.; Thyrsostachys spp.) 22A
Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus L.) 22B
Celery (Apium graveolens var. dulce (Mill.) Pers.) 22B
Celery, Chinese (Apium graveolens L. var. secalinum (Alef.) Mansf.) 22B
Celtuce (Lactuca sativa var. angustana L.H. Bailey) 22A
Fennel, Florence, fresh leaves and stalk (Foeniculum vulgare subsp. vulgare var. azoricum (Mill.) Thell.) 22A
Fern, edible, fiddlehead 22A
Fuki (Petasites japonicus (Siebold & Zucc.) Maxim.) 22B
Kale, sea (Crambe maritima L.) 22A
Kohlrabi (Brassica oleracea L. var gongylodes L.) 22A
Palm hearts (various species) 22A
Prickly pear, pads (Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill., Opuntia spp.) 22A
Prickly pear, Texas, pads (Opuntia engelmannii Salm-Dyck ex Engelm. var. lindheimeri (Engelm.) B.D. Parfitt & Pinkav) 22A
Rhubarb (Rheum x rhabarbarum L.) 22B
Udo (Aralia cordata Thunb. ) 22B
Zuiki (Colocasia gigantea (Blume) Hook. f.) 22B
Cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities

(iii) Crop subgroups. The following Table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 22, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 22: Subgroup Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop Subgroup 22A. Stalk and stem vegetable subgroup
Asparagus Agave; aloe vera; asparagus; bamboo, shoots; celtuce; fennel, florence, fresh leaves and stalk; fern, edible, fiddlehead; kale, sea; kohlrabi; palm hearts; prickly pear, pads; prickly pear, Texas, pads; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities.
Crop Subgroup 22B. Leaf petiole vegetable subgroup
Celery Cardoon; celery; celery, Chinese; fuki; rhubarb; udo; zuiki; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities.

(32) Crop Group 23. Tropical and Subtropical Fruit, Edible Peel Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Date, fig, guava, and olive.

(ii) Commodities. The following Table 1 lists all commodities included in Crop Group 23.

Table 1 - Crop Group 23: Tropical and Subtropical Fruit, Edible Peel Group

Commodities Related crop
subgroups
Açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) 23C
Acerola (Malpighia emarginata DC.) 23A
Achachairú (Garcinia gardneriana (Planch. & Triana) Zappi) 23B
African plum (Vitex doniana Sweet) 23A
Agritos (Berberis trifoliolata Moric.) 23A
Almondette (Buchanania lanzan Spreng.) 23A
Ambarella (Spondias dulcis Sol. ex Parkinson) 23B
Apak palm (Brahea dulcis (Kunth) Mart.) 23C
Appleberry (Billardiera scandens Sm.) 23A
Arazá (Eugenia stipitata McVaugh) 23B
Arbutus berry (Arbutus unedo L.) 23A
Babaco (Vasconcellea x heilbornii (V.M. Badillo) V.M. Badillo) 23B
Bacaba palm (Oenocarpus bacaba Mart.) 23C
Bacaba-de-leque (Oenocarpus distichus Mart.) 23C
Bayberry, red (Morella rubra Lour.) 23A
Bignay (Antidesma bunius (L.) Spreng.) 23A
Bilimbi (Averrhoa bilimbi L.) 23B
Borojó (Borojoa patinoi Cuatrec.) 23B
Breadnut (Brosimum alicastrum Sw.) 23A
Cabeluda (Plinia glomerata (O. Berg) Amshoff) 23A
Cajou, fruit (Anacardium giganteum Hance ex Engl.) 23B
Cambucá (Marlierea edulis Nied.) 23B
Carandas-plum (Carissa edulis Vahl) 23A
Carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) 23B
Cashew apple (Anacardium occidentale L.) 23B
Ceylon iron wood (Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard) 23A
Ceylon olive (Elaeocarpus serratus L.) 23A
Cherry-of-the-Rio-Grande (Eugenia aggregata (Vell.) Kiaersk.) 23A
Chinese olive, black (Canarium tramdenum C.D. Dai & Yakovlev) 23A
Chinese olive, white (Canarium album (Lour.) Raeusch.) 23A
Chirauli-nut (Buchanania latifolia Roxb.) 23A
Ciruela verde (Bunchosia armeniaca (Cav.) DC.) 23B
Cocoplum (Chrysobalanus icaco L.) 23A
Date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) 23C
Davidson's plum (Davidsonia pruriens F. Muell.) 23B
Desert-date (Balanites aegyptiacus (L.) Delile) 23A
Doum palm coconut (Hyphaene thebaica (L.) Mart.) 23C
False sandalwood (Ximenia americana L.) 23A
Feijoa (Acca sellowiana (O. Berg) Burret) 23B
Fig (Ficus carica L.) 23B
Fragrant manjack (Cordia dichotoma G. Forst.) 23A
Gooseberry, abyssinian (Dovyalis abyssinica (A. Rich.) Warb.) 23A
Gooseberry, Ceylon (Dovyalis hebecarpa (Gardner) Warb.) 23A
Gooseberry, Indian (Phyllanthus emblica L.) 23B
Gooseberry, otaheite (Phyllanthus acidus (L.) Skeels) 23A
Governor's plum (Flacourtia indica (Burm. F.) Merr.) 23A
Grumichama (Eugenia brasiliensis Lam) 23A
Guabiroba (Campomanesia xanthocarpa O. Berg) 23A
Guava (Psidium guajava L.) 23B
Guava berry (Myrciaria floribunda (H. West ex Willd.) O. Berg) 23A
Guava, Brazilian (Psidium guineense Sw.) 23A
Guava, cattley (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine) 23B
Guava, Costa Rican (Psidium friedrichsthalianum (O. Berg) Nied.) 23A
Guava, Para (Psidium acutangulum DC.) 23B
Guava, purple strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine var. cattleyanum) 23B
Guava, strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine var. littorale (Raddi) Fosberg) 23B
Guava, yellow strawberry (Psidium cattleyanum Sabine var. cattleyanum forma lucidum O. Deg.) 23B
Guayabillo (Psidium sartorianum (O. Berg) Nied.) 23A
Illawarra plum (Podocarpus elatus R. Br. Ex Endl.) 23A
Imbé (Garcinia livingstonei T. Anderson) 23B
Imbu (Spondias tuberosa Arruda ex Kost.) 23B
Indian-plum (Flacourtia jangomas (Lour.). basionym) 23A
Jaboticaba (Myrciaria cauliflora (Mart.) O. Berg) 23B
Jamaica-cherry (Muntingia calabura L.) 23A
Jambolan (Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels) 23A
Jelly palm (Butia capitata (Mart.) Becc.) 23C
Jujube, Indian (Ziziphus mauritiana Lam.) 23B
Kaffir-plum (Harpephyllum caffrum Bernh. Ex C. Krauss) 23A
Kakadu plum (Terminalia latipes Benth. subsp. psilocarpa Pedley) 23A
Kapundung (Baccaurea racemosa (Reinw.) Mull. Arg.) 23A
Karanda (Carissa carandas L.) 23A
Kwai muk (Artocarpus hypargyreus Hance ex Benth.) 23B
Lemon aspen (Acronychia acidula F. Muell) 23A
Mangaba (Hancornia speciosa Gomes) 23B
Marian plum (Bouea macrophylla Griff.) 23B
Mombin, malayan (Spondias pinnata (J. Koenig ex L. f.) Kurz) 23B
Mombin, purple (Spondias purpurea L.) 23B
Mombin, yellow (Spondias mombin L.) 23A
Monkeyfruit (Artocarpus lacucha Buch. Ham.) 23B
Monos plum (Pseudanamomis umbellulifera (Kunth) Kausel) 23A
Mountain cherry (Bunchosia cornifolia Kunth) 23A
Nance (Byrsonima crassifolia (L.) Kunth) 23B
Natal plum (Carissa macrocarpa (Eckl.) A. DC.) 23B
Noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) 23B
Olive (Olea europaea L. subsp. europaea) 23A
Papaya, mountain (Vasconcellea pubescens A. DC.) 23B
Patauá (Oenocarpus bataua Mart.) 23C
Peach palm, fruit (Bactris gasipaes Kunth var. gasipaes) 23C
Persimmon, black (Diospyros texana Scheele) 23A
Persimmon, Japanese (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) 23B
Pitomba (Eugenia luschnathiana Klotzsch ex O. Berg) 23A
Plum-of-Martinique (Flacourtia inermis Roxb.) 23A
Pomerac (Syzygium malaccense (L.) Merr. & L.M. Perry) 23B
Rambai (Baccaurea motleyana (Mull. Arg.) Mull. Arg.) 23B
Rose apple (Syzygium jambos (L.) Alston) 23B
Rukam (Flacourtia rukam Zoll. & Moritizi) 23A
Rumberry (Myrciaria dubia (Kunth) McVaugh Myrtaceae) 23A
Sea grape (Coccoloba uvifera (L.) L.) 23A
Sentul (Sandoricum koetjape (Burm. F.) Merr.) 23B
Sete-capotes (Campomanesia guazumifolia (Cambess.) O. Berg) 23A
Silver aspen (Acronychia wilcoxian (F. Muell.) T.G. Hartley) 23A
Starfruit (Averrhoa carambola L.) 23B
Surinam cherry (Eugenia uniflora L.) 23B
Tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) 23B
Uvalha (Eugenia pyriformis Cambess ) 23B
Water apple (Syzygium aqueum (Burm. F.) Alston) 23A
Water pear (Syzygium guineense (Willd.) DC) 23A
Water berry (Syzygium cordatum Hochst. Ex C. Krauss) 23A
Wax jambu (Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. & L.M. Perry) 23A
Cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities

(iii) Table. The following Table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 23, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 23: Subgroup Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop Subgroup 23A. Tropical and Subtropical, Small fruit, edible peel subgroup
Olive Acerola; African plum; agritos; almondette; appleberry; arbutus berry; bayberry, red; bignay; breadnut; cabeluda; carandas-plum; Ceylon iron wood; Ceylon olive; cherry-of-the-Rio-Grande; Chinese olive, black; Chinese olive, white; chirauli-nut; cocoplum; desert-date; false sandalwood; fragant manjack; gooseberry, abyssinian; gooseberry, Ceylon; gooseberry, otaheite; governor's plum; grumichama; guabiroba; guava berry; guava, Brazilian; guava, Costa Rican; guayabillo; illawarra plum; Indian-plum; Jamaica-cherry; jambolan; kaffir-plum; kakadu plum; kapundung; karanda; lemon aspen; mombin, yellow; monos plum; mountain cherry; olive; persimmon, black; pitomba; plum-of-Martinique; rukam; rumberry; sea grape; sete-capotes; silver aspen; water apple; water pear; water berry; wax jambu; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities.
Crop Subgroup 23B. Tropical and Subtropical, Medium to large fruit, edible peel subgroup
Fig and guava Achachairú; ambarella; arazá; babaco; bilimbi; borojó; cajou, fruit; cambucá; carob; cashew apple; ciruela verde; davidson's plum; feijoa; fig; gooseberry, Indian; guava; guava, cattley; guava, Para; guava, purple strawberry; guava, strawberry; guava, yellow strawberry; imbé; imbu; jaboticaba; jujube, Indian; kwai muk; mangaba; Marian plum; mombin, Malayan; mombin, purple; monkeyfruit; nance; natal plum; noni; papaya, mountain; persimmon, Japanese; pomerac; rambai; rose apple; sentul; starfruit; Surinam cherry; tamarind; uvalha; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities.
Crop Subgroup 23C. Tropical and Subtropical, Palm fruit, edible peel subgroup
Date Açaí; apak palm; bacaba palm; bacaba-de-leque; date; doum palm coconut; jelly palm; patauá; peach palm, fruit; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities.

(33) Crop Group 24. Tropical and Subtropical Fruit, Inedible Peel Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Atemoya or sugar apple, avocado, banana or pomegranate, dragon fruit, lychee, passionfruit, pineapple, and prickly pear, fruit.

(ii) Commodities. The following Table 1 lists all commodities included in Crop Group 24.

Table 1 - Crop Group 24: Tropical and Subtropical Fruit, Inedible Peel Group

Commodities Related crop subgroups
Abiu (Pouteria caimito (Ruiz & Pav.) Radlk) 24B
Aisen (Boscia senegalensis (Pers.) Lam.) 24A
Akee apple (Blighia sapida K.D. Koenig) 24B
Atemoya (Annona cherimola Mill. X A. squamosa L.) 24C
Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) 24B
Avocado, Guatemalan (Persea americana Mill. var. guatemalensis) 24B
Avocado, Mexican (Persea americana Mill. var. drymifolia (Schltdl. & Cham.) S.F. Blak) 24B
Avocado, West Indian (Persea americana var. americana) 24B
Bacury (Platonia insignis Mart.) 24B
Bael fruit (Aegle marmelos (L.) Corrêa) 24A
Banana (Musa spp.) 24B
Banana, dwarf (Musa hybrids; Musa acuminata Colla) 24B
Binjai (Mangifera caesia Jack) 24B
Biriba (Annona mucosa Jacq.) 24C
Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis (Parkinson) Fosberg) 24C
Burmese grape (Baccaurea ramiflora Lour.) 24A
Canistel (Pouteria campechiana (Kunth) Baehni) 24B
Cat's-eyes (Dimocarpus longan Lour. subsp. malesianus Leenh.) 24A
Champedak (Artocarpus integer (Thunb.) Merr.) 24C
Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) 24C
Cupuacú (Theobroma grandiflorum (Willd. Ex Spreng.) K. Schum.) 24B
Custard apple (Annona reticulata L.) 24C
Dragon fruit (Hylocereus undatus (Haw.) Britton & Rose) 24D
Durian (Durio zibethinus L.) 24C
Elephant-apple (Limonia acidissima L.) 24C
Etambe (Mangifera zeylanica (Blume) Hook. F.) 24B
Granadilla (Passiflora ligularis Juss.) 24E
Granadilla, giant (Passiflora quadrangularis L.) 24E
Ilama (Annona macroprophyllata Donn. Sm.) 24C
Ingá (Inga vera Willd. subsp. affinis (DC.) T.D. Penn.) 24A
Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.) 24C
Jatobá (Hymenaea courbaril L.) 24B
Karuka (Pandanus julianettii Martelli) 24C
Kei apple (Dovyalis caffra (Hook. F. & Harv.) Warb.) 24B
Langsat (Lansium domesticum Corrêa) 24B
Lanjut (Mangifera lagenifera Griff.) 24B
Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) 24A
Lucuma (Pouteria lucuma (Ruiz & Pav.) Kuntze) 24B
Lychee (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) 24A
Mabolo (Diospyros blancoi A. DC.) 24B
Madras-thorn (Pithecellobium dulce (Roxb.) Benth.) 24A
Mammy-apple (Mammea americana L.) 24C
Manduro (Balanites maughamii Sprague) 24A
Mango (Mangifera indica L.) 24B
Mango, horse (Mangifera foetida Lour.) 24B
Mango, Saipan (Mangifera odorata Griff.) 24B
Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. ) 24B
Marang (Artocarpus odoratissimus Blanco) 24C
Marmaladebox (Genipa americana L.) 24C
Matisia (Matisia cordata Humb. & Bonpl.) 24A
Mesquite (Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC.) 24A
Mongongo, fruit (Schinziophyton rautanenii (Schinz) Radcl.-Sm) 24A
Monkey-bread-tree (Adansonia digitata L.) 24C
Monstera (Monstera deliciosa Liebm.) 24E
Nicobar-breadfruit (Pandanus leram Jones ex Fontana) 24C
Paho (Mangifera altissima Blanco) 24B
Pandanus (Pandanus utilis Bory) 24C
Papaya (Carica papaya L.) 24B
Passionflower, winged-stem (Passiflora alata Curtis) 24E
Passionfruit (Passiflora edulis Sims) 24E
Passionfruit, banana (Passiflora tripartita var. mollissima (Kunth) Holm-Niels. & P. Jorg.) 24E
Passionfruit, purple (Passiflora edulis Sims forma edulis) 24E
Passionfruit, yellow (Passiflora edulis Sims forma flavicarpa O. Deg.) 24E
Pawpaw, common (Asimina triloba (L.) Dunal) 24B
Pawpaw, small-flower (Asimina parviflora (Michx.) Dunal) 24A
Pelipisan (Mangifera casturi Kosterm.) 24B
Pequi (Caryocar brasiliense Cambess) 24B
Pequia (Caryocar villosum (Aubl.) Pers.) 24B
Persimmon, American (Diospyros virginiana L.) 24B
Pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) 24C
Pitahaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus (F.A.C. Weber) Britton & Rose) 24D
Pitaya (Hylocereus sp. including H. megalanthus (H. ocamponis and H. polychizus) 24D
Pitaya, amarilla (Hylocereus triangularis Britton & Rose) 24D
Pitaya, roja (Hylocereus ocamponis (Salm-Dyck) Britton & Rose) 24D
Pitaya, yellow (Hylocereus megalanthus (K. Schum. ex Vaupel) Ralf Bauer) 24D
Plantain (Musa paradisiaca L.) 24B
Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) 24B
Poshte (Annona liebmanniana Baill.) 24B
Prickly pear, fruit (Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill.) 24D
Prickly pear, Texas, fruit (Opuntia engelmannii Salm-Dyck ex Engelm. var. lindheimeri (Engelm.) B.D. Parfitt & Pinkav) 24D
Pulasan (Nephelium ramboutan-ake (Labill.) Leenh.) 24C
Quandong (Santalum acuminatum (R. Br.) DC.) 24B
Rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) 24C
Saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea (Engelm.) Britton & Rose) 24D
Sapodilla (Manilkara zapota (L.) P. Royen) 24C
Sapote, black (Diospyros digyna Jacq.) 24B
Sapote, green (Pouteria viridis (Pittier) Cronquist) 24B
Sapote, mamey (Pouteria sapota (Jacq.) H.E. Moore & Stearn) 24C
Sapote, white (Casimiroa edulis La Llave & Lex) 24B
Sataw (Parkia speciosa Hassk.) 24B
Satinleaf (Chrysophyllum oliviforme L.) 24A
Screw-pine (Pandanus tectorius Parkinson) 24B
Sierra Leone-tamarind (Dialium guineense Willd.) 24A
Soncoya (Annona purpurea Moc. & Sessé ex Dunal) 24C
Soursop (Annona muricata L.) 24C
Spanish lime (Melicoccus bijugatus Jacq.) 24A
Star apple (Chrysophyllum cainito L.) 24B
Sugar apple (Annona squamosa L.) 24C
Sun sapote (Licania platypus (Hemsl.) Fritsch) 24C
Tamarind-of-the-Indies (Vangueria madagascariensis J.F. Gmel.) 24B
Velvet tamarind (Dialium indum L.) 24A
Wampi (Clausena lansium (Lour.) Skeels) 24A
White star apple (Chrysophyllum albidum G. Don) 24A
Wild loquat (Uapaca kirkiana Müll. Arg.) 24B
Cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities

(iii) Table. The following Table 2 identifies the crop subgroups for Crop Group 24, specifies the representative commodities for each subgroup, and lists all the commodities included in each subgroup.

Table 2 - Crop Group 24: Subgroup Listing

Representative commodities Commodities
Crop Subgroup 24A. Tropical and Subtropical, Small fruit, inedible peel subgroup
Lychee Aisen; bael fruit; Burmese grape; cat's-eyes; ingá; longan; lychee; madras-thorn; manduro; matisia; mesquite; mongongo, fruit; pawpaw, small-flower; satinleaf; Sierra Leone-tamarind; Spanish lime; velvet tamarind; wampi; white star apple; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities.
Crop Subgroup 24B. Tropical and Subtropical, Medium to large fruit, smooth, inedible peel subgroup
Avocado, plus pomegranate or banana Abiu; akee apple; avocado; avocado, Guatemalan; avocado, Mexican; avocado, West Indian; bacury; banana; banana, dwarf; binjai; canistel; cupuacú; etambe; jatobá; kei apple; langsat; lanjut; lucuma; mabolo; mango; mango, horse; mango, Saipan; mangosteen; paho; papaya; pawpaw, common; pelipisan; pequi; pequia; persimmon, American; plantain; pomegranate; poshte; quandong; sapote, black; sapote, green; sapote, white; sataw; screw-pine; star apple; tamarind-of-the-Indies; wild loquat; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities.
Crop Subgroup 24C. Tropical and Subtropical, Medium to large fruit, rough or hairy, inedible peel subgroup
Pineapple, plus atemoya or sugar apple Atemoya; biriba; breadfruit; champedak; cherimoya; custard apple; durian; elephant-apple; ilama; jackfruit; karuka; mammy-apple; marang; marmaladebox; monkey-bread tree; nicobar-breadfruit; pandanus; pineapple; pulasan; rambutan; sapodilla; sapote, mamey; soncoya; soursop; sugar apple; sun sapote; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities.
Crop Subgroup 24D. Tropical and Subtropical, Cactus, inedible peel subgroup
Dragon fruit and Prickly pear fruit Dragon fruit; pitahaya; pitaya; pitaya, amarilla; pitaya, roja; pitaya, yellow; prickly pear, fruit; prickly pear, Texas, fruit; saguaro; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities.
Crop Subgroup 24E. Tropical and Subtropical, Vine, inedible peel subgroup
Passionfruit Granadilla; granadilla, giant; monstera; passionflower, winged-stem; passionfruit; passionfruit, banana; passionfruit, purple; passionfruit, yellow; cultivars, varieties, and hybrids of these commodities.

(34) Crop Group 25. Herb Group.

(i) Representative commodities. Basil, dried leaves; Basil, fresh leaves; Mint, dried leaves; and Mint, fresh leaves.

(ii) Commodities. The following Table 1 lists all commodities included in Crop Group 25 and identifies the related crop subgroups.

Table 1 - Crop Group 25: Herb Group

Commodities Related crop subgroup
Agrimony, fresh leaves, Agrimonia eupatoria L 25A
Agrimony, dried leaves, Agrimonia eupatoria L 25B
Amla, fresh leaves, Phyllanthus amarus Schumach 25A
Amla, dried leaves, Phyllanthus amarus Schumach 25B
Angelica, fresh leaves, Angelica archangelica L 25A
Angelica, dried leaves, Angelica archangelica L 25B
Angelica, dahurian, fresh leaves, Angelica dahurica (Hoffm.) Benth & Hook. F. ex Franch. & Sav 25A
Angelica, dahurian, dried leaves, Angelica dahurica (Hoffm.) Benth & Hook. F. ex Franch. & Sav 25B
Applemint, fresh leaves, Mentha suaveolens Ehrh 25A
Applemint, dried leaves, Mentha suaveolens Ehrh 25B
Avarum, fresh leaves, Senna auriculata (L.) Roxb 25A
Avarum, dried leaves, Senna auriculata (L.) Roxb 25B
Balloon pea, fresh leaves, Lessertia frutescens (L.) Goldblatt & J. C. Manning 25A
Balloon pea, dried leaves, Lessertia frutescens (L.) Goldblatt & J. C. Manning 25B
Balm, fresh leaves, Melissa officinalis L 25A
Balm, dried leaves, Melissa officinalis L 25B
Barrenwort, fresh leaves, Epimedium grandiflorum C. Morren 25A
Barrenwort, dried leaves, Epimedium grandiflorum C. Morren 25B
Basil, fresh leaves, Ocimum basilicum L 25A
Basil, dried leaves, Ocimum basilicum L 25B
Basil, American, fresh leaves, Ocimum americanum L 25A
Basil, American, dried leaves, Ocimum americanum L 25B
Basil, Greek, fresh leaves, Ocimum minimum L 25A
Basil, Greek, dried leaves, Ocimum minimum L 25B
Basil, holy, fresh leaves, Ocimum tenuiflorum L 25A
Basil, holy, dried leaves, Ocimum tenuiflorum L 25B
Basil, lemon, fresh leaves, Ocimum x citriodorum Vis 25A
Basil, lemon, dried leaves, Ocimum x citriodorum Vis 25B
Basil, Russian, fresh leaves, Ocimum gratissimum L 25A
Basil, Russian, dried leaves, Ocimum gratissimum L 25B
Bay, fresh leaves, Laurus nobilis L 25A
Bay, dried leaves, Laurus nobilis L 25B
Bearberry, fresh leaves, Arctostaphylos uva ursi (L.) Spreng 25A
Bearberry, dried leaves, Arctostaphylos uva ursi (L.) Spreng 25B
Bisongrass, fresh leaves, Anthoxanthum nitens (Weber) Y. Schouten & Veldkamp 25A
Bisongrass, dried leaves, Anthoxanthum nitens (Weber) Y. Schouten & Veldkamp 25B
Blue mallow, fresh leaves, Malva sylvestris L 25A
Blue mallow, dried leaves, Malva sylvestris L 25B
Boneset, fresh leaves, Eupatorium perfoliatum L 25A
Boneset, dried leaves, Eupatorium perfoliatum L 25B
Borage, fresh leaves, Borago officinalis L 25A
Borage, dried leaves, Borago officinalis L 25B
Borage, Indian, fresh leaves, Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng 25A
Borage, Indian, dried leaves, Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng 25B
Burnet, fresh leaves, Sanguisorba spp 25A
Burnet, dried leaves, Sanguisorba spp 25B
Burnet, garden, fresh leaves, Sanguisorba officinalis L 25A
Burnet, garden, dried leaves, Sanguisorba officinalis L 25B
Burnet, salad, fresh leaves, Sanguisorba minor Scop 25A
Burnet, salad, dried leaves, Sanguisorba minor Scop 25B
Butterbur, fresh leaves, Petasites hybridus (L.) G. Gaertn. Et al., P. frigidus (L.) Fr 25A
Butterbur, dried leaves, Petasites hybridus (L.) G. Gaertn. Et al., P. frigidus (L.) Fr 25B
Calamint, fresh leaves, Clinopodium spp 25A
Calamint, dried leaves, Clinopodium spp 25B
Calamint, large-flower, fresh leaves, Clinopodium grandiflorum (L.) Kuntze 25A
Calamint, large-flower, dried leaves, Clinopodium grandiflorum (L.) Kuntze 25B
Calamint, lesser, fresh leaves, Clinopodium nepeta (L.) Kuntze 25A
Calamint, lesser, dried leaves, Clinopodium nepeta (L.) Kuntze 25B
Calendula, fresh leaves, Calendula officinalis L 25A
Calendula, dried leaves, Calendula officinalis L 25B
Caltrop, fresh leaves, Tribulus terrestris L 25A
Caltrop, dried leaves, Tribulus terrestris L 25B
Camomile (Chamomile), fresh leaves, Chamaemelum spp. and Matricaria spp 25A
Camomile (Chamomile), dried leaves, Chamaemelum spp. and Matricaria spp 25B
Camomile (Chamomile), German, fresh leaves, Matricaria recutita L 25A
Camomile (Chamomile), German, dried leaves, Matricaria recutita L 25B
Camomile (Chamomile), Roman, fresh leaves, Chamaemelum nobile (L.) All 25A
Camomile (Chamomile), Roman, dried leaves, Chamaemelum nobile (L.) All 25B
Caraway, fresh leaves, Carum carvi L 25A
Caraway, dried leaves, Carum carvi L 25B
Cat's claw, fresh leaves, Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC., U. guianensis (Aubl.) J. F. Gmel 25A
Cat's claw, dried leaves, Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC., U. guianensis (Aubl.) J. F. Gmel 25B
Catnip, fresh leaves, Nepeta cataria L 25A
Catnip, dried leaves, Nepeta cataria L 25B
Catnip, Japanese, fresh leaves, Schizonepeta multifida (L.) Briq 25A
Catnip, Japanese, dried leaves, Schizonepeta multifida (L.) Briq 25B
Celandine, greater, fresh leaves, Chelidonium majus L 25A
Celandine, greater, dried leaves, Chelidonium majus L 25B
Celandine, lesser, fresh leaves, Ficaria verna Huds 25A
Celandine, lesser, dried leaves, Ficaria verna Huds 25B
Celery, dried leaves, Apium graveolens L. var. dulce (Mill.) DC 25B
Centaury, fresh leaves, Centaurium erythrarae Rafn 25A
Centaury, dried leaves, Centaurium erythrarae Rafn 25B
Chaste tree, fresh leaves, Vitex agnus-castus L 25A
Chaste tree, dried leaves, Vitex agnus-castus L 25B
Chaste tree, Chinese, fresh leaves, Vitex negundo L 25A
Chaste tree, Chinese, dried leaves, Vitex negundo L. 25B
Chervil, dried leaves, Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm 25B
Chinese blackberry, fresh leaves, Rubus stipulates L.H. Bailey 25A
Chinese blackberry, dried leaves, Rubus stipulates L.H. Bailey 25B
Chinese foxglove, fresh leaves, Rehmannia glutinosa (Gaertn.) Steud 25A
Chinese foxglove, dried leaves, Rehmannia glutinosa (Gaertn.) Steud 25B
Chive, dried leaves, Allium schoenoprasum L 25B
Chive, Chinese, dried leaves, Allium tuberosum Rottler ex Spreng 25B
Cicely, sweet, fresh leaves, Myrrhis odorata (L.) Scop 25A
Cicely, sweet, dried leaves, Myrrhis odorata (L.) Scop 25B
Cilantro, dried leaves, Coriandrum sativum L 25B
Clary, fresh leaves, Salvia sclarea L 25A
Clary, dried leaves, Salvia sclarea L 25B
Coriander, Bolivian, fresh leaves, Porophyllum ruderale (Jacq.) Cass 25A
Coriander, Bolivian, dried leaves, Porophyllum ruderale (Jacq.) Cass 25B
Coriander, Vietnamese, fresh leaves, Persicaria odorata (Lour.) Sojak 25A
Coriander, Vietnamese, dried leaves, Persicaria odorata (Lour.) Sojak 25B
Costmary, fresh leaves, Tanacetum balsamita L. subsp. Balsamita 25A
Costmary, dried leaves, Tanacetum balsamita L. subsp. Balsamita 25B
Creat, fresh leaves, Andrographis paniculata (Burm. f.) Wall. Ex Nees 25A
Creat, dried leaves, Andrographis paniculata (Burm. f.) Wall. Ex Nees 25B
Culantro, fresh leaves, Eryngium foetidum L 25A
Culantro, dried leaves, Eryngium foetidum L 25B
Curry leaf, fresh leaves, Bergera koenigii L 25A
Curry leaf, dried leaves, Bergera koenigii L 25B
Curryplant, fresh leaves, Helichrysum italicum (Roth) G. Don 25A
Curryplant, dried leaves, Helichrysum italicum (Roth) G. Don 25B
Cut leaf, fresh leaves, Prostanthera incisa R. Br 25A
Cut leaf, dried leaves, Prostanthera incisa R. Br 25B
Damiana, fresh leaves, Turnera diffusa Willd 25A
Damiana, dried leaves, Turnera diffusa Willd 25B
Dillweed, dried leaves, Anethum graveolens L 25B
Dokudami, fresh leaves, Houttuynia cordata Thunb 25A
Dokudami, dried leaves, Houttuynia cordata Thunb 25B
Echinacea, fresh leaves, Echinacea angustifolia DC., Echinacea spp 25A
Echinacea, dried leaves, Echinacea angustifolia DC., Echinacea spp 25B
Epazote, fresh leaves, Dysphania ambrosioides (L.) Mosyakin & Clemants 25A
Epazote, dried leaves, Dysphania ambrosioides (L.) Mosyakin & Clemants 25B
Eucommia, fresh leaves, Eucommia ulmoides Oliv 25A
Eucommia, dried leaves, Eucommia ulmoides Oliv 25B
Evening primrose, fresh leaves, Oenothera biennis L 25A
Evening primrose, dried leaves, Oenothera biennis L 25B
Eyebright, fresh leaves, Euphrasia officinalis L. 25A
Eyebright, dried leaves, Euphrasia officinalis L. 25B
Fennel, common, fresh leaves, Foeniculum vulgare Mill. subsp. vulgare var. vulgare 25A
Fennel, common, dried leaves, Foeniculum vulgare Mill. subsp. vulgare var. vulgare 25B
Fennel, Florence, dried leaves, Foeniculum vulgare Mill. subsp. vulgare var. azoricum (Mill.) Thell 25B
Fennel, Spanish, fresh leaves, Nigella spp 25A
Fennel, Spanish, dried leaves, Nigella spp 25B
Fenugreek, fresh leaves, Trigonella foenum-graecum L 25A
Fenugreek, dried leaves, Trigonella foenum-graecum L 25B
Feverfew, fresh leaves, Tanacetum parthenium (L.) Sch. Bip 25A
Feverfew, dried leaves, Tanacetum parthenium (L.) Sch. Bip 25B
Field pennycress, fresh leaves, Thlaspi arvense L 25A
Field pennycress, dried leaves, Thlaspi arvense L 25B
Flowers, edible, fresh, multiple species 25A
Flowers, edible, dried, multiple species 25B
Fumitory, fresh leaves, Fumaria officinalis L 25A
Fumitory, dried leaves, Fumaria officinalis L 25B
Galbanum, fresh leaves, Ferula gummosa Boiss 25A
Galbanum, dried leaves, Ferula gummosa Boiss 25B
Galega, fresh leaves, Galega officinalis L 25A
Galega, dried leaves, Galega officinalis L 25B
Gambir, fresh leaves, Uncaria gambir (W. Hunter) Roxb 25A
Gambir, dried leaves, Uncaria gambir (W. Hunter) Roxb 25B
Geranium, fresh leaves, Pelargonium spp. 25A
Geranium, dried leaves, Pelargonium spp 25B
Geranium, lemon, fresh leaves, Pelargonium crispum (P. J. Bergius) L'Her 25A
Geranium, lemon, dried leaves, Pelargonium crispum (P. J. Bergius) L'Her 25B
Geranium, rose, fresh leaves, Pelargonium graveolens L'Her 25A
Geranium, rose, dried leaves, Pelargonium graveolens L'Her 25B
Germander, golden, fresh leaves, Teucrium polium L 25A
Germander, golden, dried leaves, Teucrium polium L 25B
Goldenrod, European, fresh leaves, Solidago virgaurea Scop 25A
Goldenrod, European, dried leaves, Solidago virgaurea Scop 25B
Goldenseal, fresh leaves, Hydrastis canadensis L 25A
Goldenseal, dried leaves, Hydrastis canadensis L 25B
Gotu kola, fresh leaves, Centella asiatica (L.) Urb 25A
Gotu kola, dried leaves, Centella asiatica (L.) Urb 25B
Greater periwinkle, fresh leaves, Vinca major L 25A
Greater periwinkle, dried leaves, Vinca major L 25B
Guayusa, fresh leaves, Ilex guayusa Loes 25A
Guayusa, dried leaves, Ilex guayusa Loes 25B
Gumweed, fresh leaves, Grindelia camporum Greene 25A
Gumweed, dried leaves, Grindelia camporum Greene 25B
Gymnema, fresh leaves, Gymnema sylvestre (Retz.) Schult 25A
Gymnema, dried leaves, Gymnema sylvestre (Retz.) Schult 25B
Gypsywort, fresh leaves, Lycopus europaeus L 25A
Gypsywort, dried leaves, Lycopus europaeus L 25B
Hawthorn, fresh leaves, Crataegus monogyna Jacq.; Crataegus spp 25A
Hawthorn, dried leaves, Crataegus monogyna Jacq.; Crataegus spp 25B
Heal-all, fresh leaves, Prunella vulgaris L 25A
Heal-all, dried leaves, Prunella vulgaris L 25B
Hemp nettle, fresh leaves, Galeopsis segetum Neck., Galeopsis spp 25A
Hemp nettle, dried leaves, Galeopsis segetum Neck., Galeopsis spp 25B
Honewort, fresh leaves, Cryptotaenia canadensis (L.) DC 25A
Honewort, dried leaves, Cryptotaenia canadensis (L.) DC 25B
Honeybush, fresh leaves, Cyclopia genistoides (L.) R. Br 25A
Honeybush, dried leaves, Cyclopia genistoides (L.) R. Br 25B
Horehound, fresh leaves, Marrubium vulgare L 25A
Horehound, dried leaves, Marrubium vulgare L 25B
Horsemint, fresh leaves, Mentha longifolia (L.) Huds 25A
Horsemint, dried leaves, Mentha longifolia (L.) Huds 25B
Horsetail, fresh leaves, Equisetum arvense L, E. ttelmateia Ehrh 25A
Horsetail, dried leaves, Equisetum arvense L, E. ttelmateia Ehrh 25B
Hyssop, fresh leaves, Hyssopus officinalis L 25A
Hyssop, dried leaves, Hyssopus officinalis L 25B
Hyssop, anise, fresh leaves, Agastache foeniculum (Pursh) Kuntze 25A
Hyssop, anise, dried leaves, Agastache foeniculum (Pursh) Kuntze 25B
Indian tobacco, fresh leaves, Lobelia inflata L 25A
Indian tobacco, dried leaves, Lobelia inflata L 25B
Ironwort, fresh leaves, Sideritis scardica Griseb., Sideritis spp 25A
Ironwort, dried leaves, Sideritis scardica Griseb., Sideritis spp 25B
Ivy, fresh leaves, Hedera helix L 25A
Ivy, dried leaves, Hedera helix L 25B
Jamaica dogwood, fresh leaves, Piscidia piscipula (L.) Sarg 25A
Jamaica dogwood, dried leaves, Piscidia piscipula (L.) Sarg 25B
Jasmine, dried leaves, Jasminum officinale L., J. odoratissimum L 25B
Jasmine, fresh leaves, Jasminum officinale L., J. odoratissimum L 25A
Labrador tea, fresh leaves, Rhododendron groenlandicum (Oeder) Kron & Judd, R. tomentosum Harmaja 25A
Labrador tea, dried leaves, Rhododendron groenlandicum (Oeder) Kron & Judd, R. tomentosum Harmaja 25B
Lavender, fresh leaves, Lavandula angustifolia Mill 25A
Lavender, dried leaves, Lavandula angustifolia Mill 25B
Lemon verbena, fresh leaves, Aloysia citrodora Palau 25A
Lemon verbena, dried leaves, Aloysia citrodora Palau 25B
Lemongrass, fresh leaves, Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf 25A
Lemongrass, dried leaves, Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf 25B
Lovage, fresh leaves, Levisticum officinale W.D.J. Koch 25A
Lovage, dried leaves, Levisticum officinale W.D.J. Koch 25B
Love-in-a-mist, fresh leaves, Nigella damascena L 25A
Love-in-a-mist, dried leaves, Nigella damascena L 25B
Mamaki, fresh leaves, Pipturus arborescens (Link) C. B. Rob 25A
Mamaki, dried leaves, Pipturus arborescens (Link) C. B. Rob 25B
Marigold, fresh leaves, Tagetes spp 25A
Marigold, dried leaves, Tagetes spp 25B
Marigold, African, fresh leaves, Tagetes erecta L 25A
Marigold, African, dried leaves, Tagetes erecta L 25B
Marigold, Aztec, fresh leaves, Tagetes minuta L 25A
Marigold, Aztec, dried leaves, Tagetes minuta L 25B
Marigold, French, fresh leaves, Tagetes patula L 25A
Marigold, French, dried leaves, Tagetes patula L 25B
Marigold, Irish lace, fresh leaves, Tagetes filifolia Lag 25A
Marigold, Irish lace, dried leaves, Tagetes filifolia Lag 25B
Marigold, licorice, fresh leaves, Tagetes micrantha Cav 25A
Marigold, licorice, dried leaves, Tagetes micrantha Cav 25B
Marigold, Mexican mint, fresh leaves, Tagetes lucida Cav 25A
Marigold, Mexican mint, dried leaves, Tagetes lucida Cav 25B
Marigold, signet, fresh leaves, Tagetes tenuifolia Cav 25A
Marigold, signet, dried leaves, Tagetes tenuifolia Cav 25B
Marjoram, fresh leaves, Origanum spp 25A
Marjoram, dried leaves, Origanum spp 25B
Marjoram, pot, fresh leaves, Origanum onites L 25A
Marjoram, pot, dried leaves, Origanum onites L 25B
Marjoram, sweet, fresh leaves, Origanum majorana L 25A
Marjoram, sweet, dried leaves, Origanum majorana L 25B
Marshmallow, fresh leaves, Althaea officinalis L 25A
Marshmallow, dried leaves, Althaea officinalis L 25B
Meadowsweet, fresh leaves, Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim 25A
Meadowsweet, dried leaves, Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim 25B
Mint, fresh leaves, Mentha spp 25A
Mint, dried leaves, Mentha spp 25B
Mint, corn, fresh leaves, Mentha arvensis L 25A
Mint, corn, dried leaves, Mentha arvensis L 25B
Mint, Korean, fresh leaves, Agastache rugosa (Fisch. & C.A. Mey.) Kun 25A
Mint, Korean, dried leaves, Agastache rugosa (Fisch. & C.A. Mey.) Kun 25B
Monarda, fresh leaves, Monarda spp 25A
Monarda, dried leaves, Monarda spp 25B
Moringa, fresh leaves, Moringa oleifera L 25A
Moringa, dried leaves, Moringa oleifera L 25B
Motherwort, fresh leaves, Leonurus cardiaca L 25A
Motherwort, dried leaves, Leonurus cardiaca L 25B
Mountainmint, fresh leaves, Pycnanthemum spp 25A
Mountainmint, dried leaves, Pycnanthemum spp 25B
Mountainmint, clustered, fresh leaves, Pycnanthemum muticum (Michx.) Pers 25A
Mountainmint, clustered, dried leaves, Pycnanthemum muticum (Michx.) Pers 25B
Mountainmint, hoary, fresh leaves, Pycnanthemum incanum Michx 25A
Mountainmint, hoary, dried leaves, Pycnanthemum incanum Michx 25B
Mountainmint, Virginia, fresh leaves, Pycnanthemum virginianum (L.) T. Durand & B.D. Jacks. Ex B.L. Rob. & Fernald 25A
Mountainmint, Virginia, dried leaves, Pycnanthemum virginianum (L.) T. Durand & B.D. Jacks. ex B.L. Rob. & Fernald 25B
Mountainmint, whorled, fresh leaves, Pycnanthemum verticillatum (Michx.) Pers 25A
Mountainmint, whorled, dried leaves, Pycnanthemum verticillatum (Michx.) Pers 25B
Mugwort, fresh leaves, Artemisia vulgaris L 25A
Mugwort, dried leaves, Artemisia vulgaris L 25B
Mulberry, white, fresh leaves, Morus alba L 25A
Mulberry, white, dried leaves, Morus alba L 25B
Mullein, fresh leaves, Verbascum densiflorum Bertol., Verbascum spp 25A
Mullein, dried leaves, Verbascum densiflorum Bertol., Verbascum spp 25B
Mustard, hedge, fresh leaves, Sisymbrium officinale (L.) Scop 25A
Mustard, hedge, dried leaves, Sisymbrium officinale (L.) Scop 25B
Nasturtium, fresh leaves, Tropaeolum spp 25A
Nasturtium, dried leaves, Tropaeolum spp 25B
Nasturtium, bush, fresh leaves, Tropaeolum minus L 25A
Nasturtium, bush, dried leaves, Tropaeolum minus L 25B
Nasturtium, garden, fresh leaves, Tropaeolum majus L 25A
Nasturtium, garden, dried leaves, Tropaeolum majus L 25B
Nettle, stinging, fresh leaves, Urtica dioica L 25A
Nettle, stinging, dried leaves, Urtica dioica L 25B
Oregano, fresh leaves, Origanum vulgare L 25A
Oregano, dried leaves, Origanum vulgare L 25B
Oregano, Mexican, fresh leaves, Lippia graveolens Kunth 25A
Oregano, Mexican, dried leaves, Lippia graveolens Kunth 25B
Oregano, Puerto Rico, fresh leaves, Lippia micromera Schauer 25A
Oregano, Puerto Rico, dried leaves, Lippia micromera Schauer 25B
Oswego tea, fresh leaves, Monarda didyma L 25A
Oswego tea, dried leaves, Monarda didyma L 25B
Pandan leaf, fresh leaves, Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb 25A
Pandan leaf, dried leaves, Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb 25B
Pansy, fresh leaves, Viola tricolor L 25A
Pansy, dried leaves, Viola tricolor L 25B
Paracress, fresh leaves, Acmella oleracea (L.) R.K. Jansen 25A
Paracress, dried leaves, Acmella oleracea (L.) R.K. Jansen 25B
Parsley, dried leaves, Petroselinum crispum (Mill.) Fuss 25B
Partridge berry, fresh leaves, Mitchella repens L 25A
Partridge berry, dried leaves, Mitchella repens L 25B
Patchouli, fresh leaves, Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth 25A
Patchouli, dried leaves, Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth 25B
Pennyroyal, fresh leaves, Mentha pulegium L 25A
Pennyroyal, dried leaves, Mentha pulegium L 25B
Pepper leaf, black, fresh leaves, Piper nigrum L 25A
Pepper leaf, black, dried leaves, Piper nigrum L 25B
Peppermint, fresh leaves, Mentha X piperita L 25A
Peppermint, dried leaves, Mentha X piperita L 25B
Perilla, fresh leaves, Perilla frutescens (L.) Britton 25A
Perilla, dried leaves, Perilla frutescens (L.) Britton 25B
Pill bearing spurge, fresh leaves, Euphorbia hirta L 25A
Pill bearing spurge, dried leaves, Euphorbia hirta L 25B
Pipsissewa, fresh leaves, Chimaphila umbellata (L.) W. P. C. Barton 25A
Pipsissewa, dried leaves, Chimaphila umbellata (L.) W. P. C. Barton 25B
Plantain, common, fresh leaves, Plantago major L 25A
Plantain, common, dried leaves, Plantago major L 25B
Rooibos, fresh leaves, Aspalathus linearis (Burm. f.) R. Dahlgren 25A
Rooibos, dried leaves, Aspalathus linearis (Burm. f.) R. Dahlgren 25B
Rose, fresh leaves, Rosa spp 25A
Rose, dried leaves, Rosa spp 25B
Rosemary, fresh leaves, Rosmarinus officinalis L 25A
Rosemary, dried leaves, Rosmarinus officinalis L 25B
Sage, fresh leaves, Salvia officinalis L 25A
Sage, dried leaves, Salvia officinalis L 25B
Sage, Greek, fresh leaves, Salvia fruticosa Mill 25A
Sage, Greek, dried leaves, Salvia fruticosa Mill 25B
Sage, Spanish, fresh leaves, Salvia lavandulifolia Vahl 25A
Sage, Spanish, dried leaves, Salvia lavandulifolia Vahl 25B
Sage, white, fresh leaves, Salvia apiana Jeps 25A
Sage, white, dried leaves, Salvia apiana Jeps 25B
Savory, summer, fresh leaves, Satureja hortensis L 25A
Savory, summer, dried leaves, Satureja hortensis L 25B
Savory, winter, fresh leaves, Satureja montana L 25A
Savory, winter, dried leaves, Satureja montana L. 25B
Senna, fresh leaves, Senna alexandrina Mill 25A
Senna, dried leaves, Senna alexandrina Mill 25B
Siberian fir, fresh leaves, Abies sibirica Ledeb 25A
Siberian fir, dried leaves, Abies sibirica Ledeb 25B
Skullcap, fresh leaves, Scutellaria lateriflora L 25A
Skullcap, dried leaves, Scutellaria lateriflora L 25B
Small flower willow head, fresh leaves, Epilobium parviflorum Schreb 25A
Small flower willow head, dried leaves, Epilobium parviflorum Schreb 25B
Sorrel, fresh leaves, Rumex spp 25A
Sorrel, dried leaves, Rumex spp 25B
Sorrel, French, fresh leaves, Rumex scutatus L 25A
Sorrel, French, dried leaves, Rumex scutatus L 25B
Sorrel, garden, fresh leaves, Rumex acetosa L 25A
Sorrel, garden, dried leaves, Rumex acetosa L 25B
Southernwood, fresh leaves, Artemisia abrotanum L 25A
Southernwood, dried leaves, Artemisia abrotanum L 25B
Spearmint, fresh leaves, Mentha spicata L 25A