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Title 29

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Title 29

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PART 1926 - SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION
Source:

44 FR 8577, Feb. 9, 1979; 44 FR 20940, Apr. 6, 1979, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A - General
Authority:

40 U.S.C. 3701 et seq.; 29 U.S.C. 653, 655, 657; Secretary of Labor's Order No. 12-71 (36 FR 8754), 8-76 (41 FR 25059), 9-83 (48 FR 35736), 1-90 (55 FR 9033), 6-96 (62 FR 111), 3-2000 (65 FR 50017), 5-2002 (67 FR 65008), 5-2007 (72 FR 31160), 4-2010 (75 FR 55355), or 1-2012 (77 FR 3912), as applicable; and 29 CFR part 1911.

§ 1926.1 Purpose and scope.

(a) This part sets forth the safety and health standards promulgated by the Secretary of Labor under section 107 of the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act. The standards are published in subpart C of this part and following subparts.

(b) Subpart B of this part contains statements of general policy and interpretations of section 107 of the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act having general applicability.

§ 1926.2 Variances from safety and health standards.

(a) Variances from standards which are, or may be, published in this part may be granted under the same circumstances whereunder variances may be granted under section 6(b)(A) or 6(d) of the Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (29 U.S.C. 65). The procedures for the granting of variances and for related relief under this part are those published in part 1905 of this title.

(b) Any requests for variances under this section shall also be considered requests for variances under the Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, and any requests for variances under Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act with respect to construction safety or health standards shall be considered to be also variances under the Construction Safety Act. Any variance from a construction safety or health standard which is contained in this part and which is incorporated by reference in part 1910 of this title shall be deemed a variance from the standard under both the Construction Safety Act and the Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970.

§ 1926.3 Inspections - right of entry.

(a) It shall be a condition of each contract which is subject to section 107 of the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act that the Secretary of Labor or any authorized representative shall have a right of entry to any site of contract performance for the following purposes:

(1) To inspect or investigate the matter of compliance with the safety and health standards contained in subpart C of this part and following subparts; and

(2) To carry out the duties of the Secretary under section 107(b) of the Act.

(b) For the purpose of carrying out his investigative duties under the Act, the Secretary of Labor may, by agreement, use with or without reimbursement the services, personnel, and facilities of any State or Federal agency. Any agreements with States under this section shall be similar to those provided for under the Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act under 41 CFR part 50-205.

§ 1926.4 Rules of practice for administrative adjudications for enforcement of safety and health standards.

(a) The rules of practice for administrative adjudications for the enforcement of the safety and health standards contained in subpart C of this part and the following subparts shall be the same as those published in part 6 of this title with respect to safety and health violations of the Service Contract Act of 1965 (69 Stat. 1035), except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section.

(b) In the case of debarment, the findings required by section 107(d) of the Act shall be made by the hearing examiner or the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, as the case may be. Whenever, as provided in section 107(d)(2), a contractor requests termination of debarment before the end of the 3-year period prescribed in that section, the request shall be filed in writing with the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health who shall publish a notice in the Federal Register that the request has been received and afford interested persons an opportunity to be heard upon the request, and thereafter the provisions of part 6 of this title shall apply with respect to prehearing conferences, hearings and related matters, and decisions and orders.

§ 1926.5 OMB control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

The following sections or paragraphs each contain a collection of information requirement which has been approved by the Office of Management and Budget under the control number listed.

29 CFR citation OMB control No.
1926.33 1218-0065
1926.50 1218-0093
1926.52 1218-0048
1926.53 1218-0103
1926.59 1218-0072
1926.60 1218-0183
1926.62 1218-0189
1926.64 1218-0200
1926.65 1218-0202
1926.103 1218-0099
1926.200 1218-0132
1926.250 1218-0093
1926.251 1218-0233
1926.403 1218-0130
1926.404 1218-0130
1926.405 1218-0130
1926.407 1218-0130
1926.408 1218-0130
1926.453(a)(2) 1218-0216
1926.502 1218-0197
1926.503 1218-0197
1926.550(a)(1) 1218-0115
1926.550(a)(2) 1218-0115
1926.550(a)(4) 1218-0115
1926.550(a)(6) 1218-0113
1926.550(a)(11) 1218-0054
1926.550(a)(16) 1218-0115
1926.550(b)(2) 1218-0232
1926.550(g) 1218-0151
1926.552 1218-0231
1926.652 1218-0137
1926.703 1218-0095
1926.800 1218-0067
1926.803 1218-0067
1926.900 1218-0217
1926.903 1218-0227
1926.1080 1218-0069
1926.1081 1218-0069
1926.1083 1218-0069
1926.1090 1218-0069
1926.1091 1218-0069
1926.1101 1218-0134
1926.1103 1218-0085
1926.1104 1218-0084
1926.1106 1218-0086
1926.1107 1218-0083
1926.1108 1218-0087
1926.1109 1218-0089
1926.1110 1218-0082
1926.1111 1218-0090
1926.1112 1218-0080
1926.1113 1218-0079
1926.1114 1218-0088
1926.1115 1218-0044
1926.1116 1218-0081
1926.1117 1218-0010
1926.1118 1218-0104
1926.1124 1218-0267
1926.1126 1218-0252
1926.1127 1218-0186
1926.1128 1218-0129
1926.1129 1218-0128
1926.1144 1218-0101
1926.1145 1218-0126
1926.1147 1218-0108
1926.1148 1218-0145
1926.1153 1218-0266
1926.1203 1218-0258
1926.1204 1218-0258
1926.1205 1218-0258
1926.1206 1218-0258
1926.1207 1218-0258
1926.1208 1218-0258
1926.1209 1218-0258
1926.1210 1218-0258
1926.1211 1218-0258
1926.1212 1218-0258
1926.1213 1218-0258
1926.1402 1218-0261
1926.1403 1218-0261
1926.1404 1218-0261
1926.1406 1218-0261
1926.1407 1218-0261
1926.1408 1218-0261
1926.1409 1218-0261
1926.1410 1218-0261
1926.1411 1218-0261
1926.1412 1218-0261
1926.1413 1218-0261
1926.1414 1218-0261
1926.1417 1218-0261
1926.1423 1218-0261
1926.1424 1218-0261
1926.1427 1218-0270
1926.1428 1218-0261
1926.1431 1218-0261
1926.1433 1218-0261
1926.1434 1218-0261
1926.1435 1218-0261
1926.1436 1218-0261
1926.1437 1218-0261
1926.1441 1218-0261

[61 FR 5509, Feb. 13, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 3814, Jan. 27, 1998; 63 FR 13340, Mar. 19, 1998; 63 FR 17094, Apr. 8, 1998; 64 FR 18810, Apr. 16, 1999; 71 FR 38086, July 5, 2006; 75 FR 68430, Nov. 8, 2010; 81 FR 48710, July 26, 2016; 81 FR 53268, Aug. 12, 2016; 83 FR 9703, Mar. 7, 2018; 84 FR 34785, July 19, 2019]

§ 1926.6 Incorporation by reference.

(a) The standards of agencies of the U.S. Government, and organizations which are not agencies of the U.S. Government which are incorporated by reference in this part, have the same force and effect as other standards in this part. Only the mandatory provisions (i.e., provisions containing the word “shall” or other mandatory language) of standards incorporated by reference are adopted as standards under the Occupational Safety and Health Act.

(b) The standards listed in this section are incorporated by reference into this part with the approval of the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. To enforce any edition other than that specified in this section, OSHA must publish a document in the Federal Register and the material must be available to the public.

(c) Copies of standards listed in this section and issued by private standards organizations are available for purchase from the issuing organizations at the addresses or through the other contact information listed below for these private standards organizations. In addition, the standards are available for inspection at any Regional Office of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), or at the OSHA Docket Office, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue NW, Room N-3508, Washington, DC 20210; telephone: 202-693-2350 (TTY number: 877-889-5627). These standards are also available for inspection at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of these standards at NARA, telephone: 202-741-6030, or go to www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations.html.

(d) The following material is available for purchase from the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), 1330 Kemper Meadow Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45240; telephone: 513-742-6163; fax: 513-742-3355; e-mail: ; Web site: http://www.acgih.org:

(1) Threshold Limit Values of Airborne Contaminants for 1970, 1970, IBR approved for § 1926.55(a) and appendix A of § 1926.55.

(2) [Reserved]

(e) The following material is available for purchase from the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), 25 West 43rd Street, Fourth Floor, New York, NY 10036; telephone: 212-642-4900; fax: 212-302-1286; e-mail: ; Web site: http://www.ansi.org/.

(1) ANSI A10.3-1970, Safety Requirements for Explosive-Actuated Fastening Tools, IBR approved for § 1926.302(e).

(2) ANSI A10.4-1963, Safety Requirements for Workmen's Hoists, IBR approved for § 1926.552(c).

(3) ANSI A10.5-1969, Safety Requirements for Material Hoists, IBR approved for § 1926.552(b).

(4) ANSI A11.1-1965 (R1970), Practice for Industrial Lighting, IBR approved for § 1926.56(b).

(5) ANSI A17.1-1965, Elevators, Dumbwaiters, Escalators, and Moving Walks, IBR approved for § 1926.552(d).

(6) ANSI A17.1a-1967, Elevators, Dumbwaiters, Escalators, and Moving Walks Supplement, IBR approved for § 1926.552(d).

(7) ANSI A17.1b-1968, Elevators, Dumbwaiters, Escalators, and Moving Walks Supplement, IBR approved for § 1926.552(d).

(8) ANSI A17.1c-1969, Elevators, Dumbwaiters, Escalators, and Moving Walks Supplement, IBR approved for § 1926.552(d).

(9) ANSI A17.1d-1970, Elevators, Dumbwaiters, Escalators, and Moving Walks Supplement, IBR approved for § 1926.552(d).

(10) ANSI A17.2-1960, Practice for the Inspection of Elevators (Inspector's Manual), IBR approved for § 1926.552(d).

(11) ANSI A17.2a-1965, Practice for the Inspection of Elevators (Inspector's Manual) Supplement, IBR approved for § 1926.552(d).

(12) ANSI A17.2b-1967, Practice for the Inspection of Elevators (Inspector's Manual) Supplement, IBR approved for § 1926.552(d).

(13) ANSI A92.2-1969, Vehicle Mounted Elevating and Rotating Work Platforms, IBR approved for §§ 1926.453(a) and 1926.453(b).

(14) ANSI B7.1-1970, Safety Code for the Use, Care, and Protection of Abrasive Wheels, IBR approved for §§ 1926.57(g), 1926.303(b), 1926.303(c), and 1926.303(d).

(15) ANSI B20.1-1957, Safety Code for Conveyors, Cableways, and Related Equipment, IBR approved for § 1926.555(a).

(16) ANSI B56.1-1969, Safety Standards for Powered Industrial Trucks, IBR approved for § 1926.602(c).

(17-22) [Reserved]

(23) ANSI O1.1-1961, Safety Code for Woodworking Machinery, IBR approved for § 1926.304(f).

(24) ANSI Z35.1-1968, Specifications for Accident Prevention Signs; IBR approved for § 1926.200(b), (c), and 1 (i). Copies available for purchase from the IHS Standards Store, 15 Inverness Way East, Englewood, CO 80112; telephone: 1-877-413-5184; Web site: www.global.ihs.com.

(25) ANSI Z35.2-1968, Specifications for Accident Prevention Tags, IBR approved for § 1926.200(i).

(26) ANSI Z49.1-1967, Safety in Welding and Cutting, IBR approved for § 1926.350(j).

(27) USA Z53.1-1967 (also referred to as ANSI Z53.1-1967), Safety Color Code for Marking Physical Hazards, ANSI approved October 9, 1967; IBR approved for § 1926.200(c). Copies available for purchase from the IHS Standards Store, 15 Inverness Way East, Englewood, CO 80112; telephone: 1-877-413-5184; Web site: www.global.ihs.com.

(28) ANSI Z535.1-2006 (R2011), Safety Colors, reaffirmed July 19, 2011; IBR approved for § 1926.200(c). Copies available for purchase from the:

(i) American National Standards Institute's e-Standards Store, 25 W 43rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10036; telephone: 212-642-4980; Web site: http://webstore.ansi.org/;

(ii) IHS Standards Store, 15 Inverness Way East, Englewood, CO 80112; telephone: 877-413-5184; Web site: www.global.ihs.com; or

(iii) TechStreet Store, 3916 Ranchero Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48108; telephone: 877-699-9277; Web site: www.techstreet.com.

(29) ANSI Z535.2-2011, Environmental and Facility Safety Signs, published September 15, 2011; IBR approved for § 1926.200(b), (c), and (i). Copies available for purchase from the:

(i) American National Standards Institute's e-Standards Store, 25 W 43rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10036; telephone: 212-642-4980; Web site: http://webstore.ansi.org/;

(ii) IHS Standards Store, 15 Inverness Way East, Englewood, CO 80112; telephone: 877-413-5184; Web site: www.global.ihs.com; or

(iii) TechStreet Store, 3916 Ranchero Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48108; telephone: 877-699-9277; Web site: www.techstreet.com.

(30) ANSI Z535.5-2011, Safety Tags and Barricade Tapes (for Temporary Hazards), published September 15, 2011, including Errata, November 14, 2011; IBR approved for § 1926.200(h) and (i). Copies available for purchase from the:

(i) American National Standards Institute's e-Standards Store, 25 W 43rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10036; telephone: 212-642-4980; Web site: http://webstore.ansi.org/;

(ii) IHS Standards Store, 15 Inverness Way East, Englewood, CO 80112; telephone: 877-413-5184; Web site: www.global.ihs.com; or

(iii) TechStreet Store, 3916 Ranchero Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48108; telephone: 877-699-9277; Web site: www.techstreet.com.

(31) ANSI/ISEA Z87.1-2010, Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection Devices, Approved April 3, 2010; IBR approved for § 1926.102(b). Copies are available for purchase from:

(i) American National Standards Institute's e-Standards Store, 25 W 43rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10036; telephone: (212) 642-4980; Web site: http://webstore.ansi.org/;

(ii) IHS Standards Store, 15 Inverness Way East, Englewood, CO 80112; telephone: (877) 413-5184; Web site: http://global.ihs.com; or

(iii) TechStreet Store, 3916 Ranchero Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48108; telephone: (877) 699-9277; Web site: http://techstreet.com.

(32) ANSI Z87.1-2003, Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection Devices, Approved June 19, 2003; IBR approved for § 1926.102(b). Copies available for purchase from the:

(i) American National Standards Institute's e-Standards Store, 25 W 43rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10036; telephone: (212) 642-4980; Web site: http://webstore.ansi.org/;

(ii) IHS Standards Store, 15 Inverness Way East, Englewood, CO 80112; telephone: (877) 413-5184; Web site: http://global.ihs.com; or

(iii) TechStreet Store, 3916 Ranchero Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48108; telephone: (877) 699-9277; Web site: http://techstreet.com.

(33) ANSI Z87.1-1989 (R-1998), Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection, Reaffirmation approved January 4, 1999; IBR approved for § 1926.102(b). Copies are available for purchase from:

(i) American National Standards Institute's e-Standards Store, 25 W 43rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10036; telephone: (212) 642-4980; Web site: http://webstore.ansi.org/;

(ii) IHS Standards Store, 15 Inverness Way East, Englewood, CO 80112; telephone: (877) 413-5184; Web site: http://global.ihs.com; or

(iii) TechStreet Store, 3916 Ranchero Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48108; telephone: (877) 699-9277; Web site: http://techstreet.com.

(34) American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z89.1-2009, American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection, approved January 26, 2009; IBR approved for § 1926.100(b)(1)(i). Copies of ANSI Z89.1-2009 are available for purchase only from the International Safety Equipment Association, 1901 North Moore Street, Arlington, VA 22209-1762; telephone: 703-525-1695; fax: 703-528-2148; Web site: www.safetyequipment.org.

(35) American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z89.1-2003, American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection; IBR approved for § 1926.100(b)(1)(ii). Copies of ANSI Z89.1-2003 are available for purchase only from the International Safety Equipment Association, 1901 North Moore Street, Arlington, VA 22209-1762; telephone: 703-525-1695; fax: 703-528-2148; Web site: www.safetyequipment.org.

(36) American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z89.1-1997, American National Standard for Personnel Protection - Protective Headwear for Industrial Workers - Requirements; IBR approved for § 1926.100(b)(1)(iii). Copies of ANSI Z89.1-1997 are available for purchase only from the International Safety Equipment Association, 1901 North Moore Street, Arlington, VA 22209-1762; telephone: 703-525-1695; fax: 703-528-2148; Web site: www.safetyequipment.org.

(f) The following material is available for purchase from standards resellers such as the Document Center Inc., 111 Industrial Road, Suite 9, Belmont, CA 94002; telephone: 650-591-7600; fax: 650-591-7617; e-mail: ; Web site: http://www.document-center.com/:

(1) ANSI B15.1-1953 (R1958), Safety Code for Mechanical Power-Transmission Apparatus, revised 1958, IBR approved for § 1926.300(b)(2).

(2) ANSI B30.5-1968, Crawler, Locomotive, and Truck Cranes, approved Dec. 16, 1968, IBR approved for § 1926.1433(a).

(g) The following material is available for purchase from the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, PO Box C700, West Conshohocken, PA, 19428-2959; telephone: 610-832-9585; fax: 610-832-9555; e-mail: ; Web site: http://www.astm.org/:

(1) ASTM A370-1968, Methods and Definitions for Mechanical Testing and Steel Products, IBR approved for § 1926.1001(f).

(2) [Reserved]

(3) ASTM D56-1969, Standard Method of Test for Flash Point by the Tag Closed Tester, IBR approved for § 1926.155(i).

(4) ASTM D93-1969, Standard Method of Test for Flash Point by the Pensky Martens Closed Tester, IBR approved for § 1926.155(i).

(5) ASTM D323-1958 (R1968), Standard Method of Test for Vapor Pressure of Petroleum Products (Reid Method), IBR approved for § 1926.155(m).

(h) The following material is available for purchase from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), Three Park Avenue, New York, NY 10016; telephone: 1-800-843-2763; fax: 973-882-1717; e-mail: ; Web site: http://www.asme.org/:

(1) ASME B30.2-2005, Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top Running Bridge, Single or Multiple Girder, Top Running Trolley Hoist), issued Dec. 30, 2005 (“ASME B30.2-2005”), IBR approved for § 1926.1438(b).

(2) ASME B30.5-2004, Mobile and Locomotive Cranes, issued Sept. 27, 2004 (“ASME B30.5-2004”), IBR approved for §§ 1926.1414(b); 1926.1414(e); 1926.1433(b).

(3) ASME B30.7-2001, Base-Mounted Drum Hoists, issued Jan. 21, 2002 (“ASME B30.7-2001”), IBR approved for § 1926.1436(e).

(4) ASME B30.14-2004, Side Boom Tractors, issued Sept. 20, 2004 (“ASME B30.14-2004”), IBR approved for § 1926.1440(c).

(5) ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, 1968, IBR approved for §§ 1926.152(i), 1926.306(a), and 1926.603(a).

(6) ASME Power Boilers, Section I, 1968, IBR approved for § 1926.603(a).

(i) The following material is available for purchase from the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE), 2950 Niles Road, St. Joseph, MI 49085; telephone: 269-429-0300; fax: 269-429-3852; e-mail: ; Web site: http://www.asabe.org/:

(1) ASAE R313.1-1971, Soil Cone Penetrometer, reaffirmed 1975, IBR approved for § 1926.1002(e).

(2) [Reserved]

(j) The following material is available for purchase from the American Welding Society (AWS), 550 N.W. LeJeune Road, Miami, Florida 33126; telephone: 1-800-443-9353; Web site: http://www.aws.org/:

(1) AWS D1.1/D1.1M:2002, Structural Welding Code - Steel, 18th ed., ANSI approved Aug. 31, 2001 (“AWS D1.1/D1.1M:2002”), IBR approved for § 1926.1436(c).

(2) ANSI/AWS D14.3-94, Specification for Welding Earthmoving and Construction Equipment, ANSI approved Jun. 11, 1993 (“ANSI/AWS D14.3-94”), IBR approved for § 1926.1436(c).

(k) The following material is available for purchase from the British Standards Institution (BSI), 389 Chiswick High Road, London, W4 4AL, United Kingdom; telephone: + 44 20 8996 9001; fax: + 44 20 8996 7001; e-mail: ; Web site: http://www.bsigroup.com/:

(1) BS EN 13000:2004, Cranes - Mobile Cranes, published Jan. 4, 2006 (“BS EN 13000:2004”), IBR approved for § 1926.1433(c).

(2) BS EN 14439:2006, Cranes - Safety - Tower Cranes, published Jan. 31, 2007 (“BS EN 14439:2006”), IBR approved for § 1926.1433(c).

(l) The following material is available for purchase from the Bureau of Reclamation, United States Department of the Interior, 1849 C Street, NW., Washington DC 20240; telephone: 202-208-4501; Web site: http://www.usbr.gov/:

(1) Safety and Health Regulations for Construction, Part II, Sept. 1971, IBR approved for § 1926.1000(f).

(2) [Reserved]

(m) The following material is available for purchase from the California Department of Industrial Relations, 455 Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco CA 94102; telephone: (415) 703-5070; e-mail: ; Web site: http://www.dir.ca.gov/:

(1) Construction Safety Orders, IBR approved for § 1926.1000(f).

(2) [Reserved]

(n) The following material is available from the Federal Highway Administration, United States Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590; telephone: 202-366-4000; website: www.fhwa.dot.gov/:

(1) Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Streets and Highways, 2009 Edition, December 2009 (including Revision 1 dated May 2012 and Revision 2 dated May 2012), (“MUTCD”) IBR approved for §§ 1926.200(g) and 1926.201(a).

(2) [Reserved]

(o) The following material is available for purchase from the General Services Administration (GSA), 1800 F Street, NW., Washington, DC 20405; telephone: (202) 501-0800; Web site: http://www.gsa.gov/:

(1) QQ-P-416, Federal Specification Plating Cadmium (Electrodeposited), IBR approved for § 1926.104(e).

(2) [Reserved]

(p) The following material is available for purchase from the Institute of Makers of Explosives (IME), 1120 19th Street, NW., Suite 310, Washington, DC 20036; telephone: 202-429-9280; fax: 202-429-9280; e-mail: ; Web site: http://www.ime.org/:

(1) IME Pub. No. 2, American Table of Distances for Storage of Explosives, Jun. 5, 1964, IBR approved for § 1926.914(a).

(2) IME Pub. No. 20, Radio Frequency Energy - A Potential Hazard in the Use of Electric Blasting Caps, Mar. 1968, IBR approved for § 1926.900(k).

(q) The following material is available from the International Labour Organization (ILO), 4 route des Morillons, CH-1211 Genève 22, Switzerland; telephone: +41 (0) 22 799 6111; fax: +41 (0) 22 798 8685; website://www.ilo.org/:

(1) Guidelines for the Use of the ILO International Classification of Radiographs of Pneumoconioses, Revised Edition 2011, Occupational safety and health series; 22 (Rev.2011), IBR approved for § 1926.1101.

(2) [Reserved]

(r) The following material is available for purchase from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), 1, ch. de la Voie-Creuse, Case postale 56, CH-1211 Geneva 20, Switzerland; telephone: + 41 22 749 01 11; fax: + 41 22 733 34 30; Web site: http://www.iso.org/:

(1) ISO 3471:2008(E), Earth-moving machinery - Roll-over protective structures - Laboratory tests and performance requirements, Fourth Edition, Aug. 8, 2008 (“ISO 3471:2008”), IBR approved for §§ 1926.1001(c) and 1926.1002(c).

(2) ISO 5700:2013(E), Tractors for agriculture and forestry - Roll-over protective structures - Static test method and acceptance conditions, Fifth Edition, May 1, 2013 (“ISO 5700:2013”), IBR approved for § 1926.1002(c).

(3) ISO 27850:2013(E), Tractors for agriculture and forestry - Falling object protective structures - Test procedures and performance requirements, First Edition, May.01, 2013 (“ISO 27850:2013”), IBR approved for § 1926.1003(c).

(4) ISO 11660-1:2008(E), Cranes - Access, guards and restraints - Part 1: General, 2d ed., Feb. 15, 2008 (“ISO 11660-1:2008(E)”), IBR approved for § 1926.1423(c).

(5) ISO 11660-2:1994(E), Cranes - Access, guards and restraints - Part 2: Mobile cranes, 1994 (“ISO 11660-2:1994(E)”), IBR approved for § 1926.1423(c).

(6) ISO 11660-3:2008(E), Cranes - Access, guards and restraints - Part 3: Tower cranes, 2d ed., Feb. 15, 2008 (“ISO 11660-3:2008(E)”), IBR approved for § 1926.1423(c).

(s) The following material is available for purchase from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02169; telephone: 617-770-3000; fax: 617-770-0700; Web site: http://www.nfpa.org/:

(1) NFPA 10A-1970, Maintenance and Use of Portable Fire Extinguishers, IBR approved for § 1926.150(c).

(2) NFPA 13-1969, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems, IBR approved for § 1926.152(d).

(3) NFPA 30-1969, The Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code, IBR approved for § 1926.152(c).

(4) NFPA 80-1970, Standard for Fire Doors and Windows, Class E or F Openings, IBR approved for § 1926.152(b).

(5) NFPA 251-1969, Standard Methods of Fire Test of Building Construction and Material, IBR approved for §§ 1926.152(b) and 1926.155(f).

(6) NFPA 385-1966, Standard for Tank Vehicles for Flammable and Combustible Liquids, IBR approved for § 1926.152(g).

(t) The following material is available for purchase from the Power Crane and Shovel Association (PCSA), 6737 W. Washington Street, Suite 2400, Milwaukee, WI 53214; telephone: 1-800-369-2310; fax: 414-272-1170; Web site: http://www.aem.org/CBC/ProdSpec/PCSA/:

(1) PCSA Std. No. 1, Mobile Crane and Excavator Standards, 1968, IBR approved for § 1926.602(b).

(2) PCSA Std. No. 2, Mobile Hydraulic Crane Standards, 1968 (“PCSA Std. No. 2 (1968)”), IBR approved for §§ 1926.602(b) and 1926.1433(a).

(3) PCSA Std. No. 3, Mobile Hydraulic Excavator Standards, 1969, IBR approved for § 1926.602(b).

(u) The following material is available from the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), 400 Commonwealth Drive, Warrendale, PA 15096; telephone: 1-877-606-7323; fax: 724-776-0790; website: www.sae.org/:

(1) SAE 1970 Handbook, IBR approved for § 1926.602(b).

(2) SAE J166-1971, Trucks and Wagons, IBR approved for § 1926.602(a).

(3) SAE J167, Protective Frame with Overhead Protection-Test Procedures and Performance Requirements, approved July 1970, IBR approved for § 1926.1003(b).

(4) SAE J168, Protective Enclosures-Test Procedures and Performance Requirements, approved July 1970, IBR approved for § 1926.1002(b).

(5) SAE J185 (reaf. May 2003), Access Systems for Off-Road Machines, reaffirmed May 2003 (“SAE J185 (May 1993)”), IBR approved for § 1926.1423(c).

(6) SAE J236-1971, Self-Propelled Graders, IBR approved for § 1926.602(a).

(7) SAE J237-1971, Front End Loaders and Dozers, IBR approved for § 1926.602(a).

(8) SAE J319b-1971, Self-Propelled Scrapers, IBR approved for § 1926.602(a).

(9) SAE J320a, Minimum Performance Criteria for Roll-Over Protective Structure for Rubber-Tired, Self-Propelled Scrapers, revised July 1969 (editorial change July 1970), IBR approved for § 1926.1001(b).

(10) SAE J321a-1970, Fenders for Pneumatic-Tired Earthmoving Haulage Equipment, IBR approved for § 1926.602(a).

(11) SAE J333a-1970, Operator Protection for Agricultural and Light Industrial Tractors, IBR approved for § 1926.602(a).

(12) SAE J334a, Protective Frame Test Procedures and Performance Requirements, revised July 1970, IBR approved for § 1926.1002(b).

(13) SAE J386-1969, Seat Belts for Construction Equipment, IBR approved for § 1926.602(a).

(14) SAE J394, Minimum Performance Criteria for Roll-Over Protective Structure for Rubber-Tired Front End Loaders and Rubber-Tired Dozers, approved July 1969 (editorial change July 1970), IBR approved for § 1926.1001(b).

(15) SAE J395, Minimum Performance Criteria for Roll-Over Protective Structure for Crawler Tractors and Crawler-Type Loaders, approved July 1969 (editorial change July 1970), IBR approved for § 1926.1001(b).

(16) SAE J396, Minimum Performance Criteria for Roll-Over Protective Structure for Motor Graders, approved July 1969 (editorial change July 1970), IBR approved for § 1926.1001(b).

(17) SAE J397, Critical Zone Characteristics and Dimensions for Operators of Construction and Industrial Machinery, approved July 1969, IBR approved for § 1926.1001(b).

(18) SAE J987 (rev. Jun. 2003), Lattice Boom Cranes - Method of Test, revised Jun. 2003 (“SAE J987 (Jun. 2003)”), IBR approved for § 1926.1433(c).

(19) SAE J1063 (rev. Nov. 1993), Cantilevered Boom Crane Structures - Method of Test, revised Nov. 1993 (“SAE J1063 (Nov. 1993)”), IBR approved for § 1926.1433(c).

(v) The following material is available for purchase from the United States Army Corps of Engineers, 441 G Street, NW., Washington, DC 20314; telephone: 202-761-0011; e-mail: ; Web site: http://www.usace.army.mil/:

(1) EM-385-1-1, General Safety Requirements, Mar. 1967, IBR approved for § 1926.1000(f).

(2) [Reserved]

[75 FR 48130, Aug. 9, 2010, as amended at 77 FR 37600, June 22, 2012; 78 FR 35566, June 13, 2013; 78 FR 66641, Nov. 6, 2013; 79 FR 20692, Apr. 11, 2014; 81 FR 16092, Mar. 25, 2016; 84 FR 21574, May 14, 2019]

Subpart B - General Interpretations
Authority:

Sec. 107, Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act (Construction Safety Act) (40 U.S.C. 333).

§ 1926.10 Scope of subpart.

(a) This subpart contains the general rules of the Secretary of Labor interpreting and applying the construction safety and health provisions of section 107 of the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act (83 Stat. 96). Section 107 requires as a condition of each contract which is entered into under legislation subject to Reorganization Plan Number 14 of 1950 (64 Stat. 1267), and which is for construction, alteration, and/or repair, including painting and decorating, that no contractor or subcontractor contracting for any part of the contract work shall require any laborer or mechanic employed in the performance of the contract to work in surroundings or under working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to his health or safety, as determined under construction safety and health standards promulgated by the Secretary by regulation.

§ 1926.11 Coverage under section 103 of the act distinguished.

(a) Coverage under section 103. It is important to note that the coverage of section 107 differs from that for the overtime requirements of the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act. The application of the overtime requirements is governed by section 103, which subject to specific exemptions, includes:

(1) Federal contracts requiring or involving the employment of laborers or mechanics (thus including, but not limited to, contracts for construction), and

(2) contracts assisted in whole or in part by Federal loans, grants, or guarantees under any statute “providing wage standards for such work.” The statutes “providing wage standards for such work” include statutes for construction which require the payment of minimum wages in accordance with prevailing wage findings by the Secretary of Labor in accordance with the Davis-Bacon Act. A provision to section 103 excludes from the overtime requirements work where the Federal assistance is only in the form of a loan guarantee or insurance.

(b) Coverage under section 107. To be covered by section 107 of the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act, a contract must be one which

(1) is entered into under a statute that is subject to Reorganization Plan No. 14 of 1950 (64 Stat. 1267); and

(2) is for “construction, alteration, and/or repair, including painting and decorating.”

§ 1926.12 Reorganization Plan No. 14 of 1950.

(a) General provisions. Reorganization Plan No. 14 of 1950 relates to the prescribing by the Secretary of Labor of “appropriate standards, regulations, and procedures” with respect to the enforcement of labor standards under Federal and federally assisted contracts which are subject to various statutes subject to the Plan. The rules of the Secretary of Labor implementing the Plan are published in part 5 of this title. Briefly, the statutes subject to the Plan include the Davis-Bacon Act, including its extension to Federal-aid highway legislation subject to 23 U.S.C. 113, and other statutes subject to the Plan by its original terms, statutes by which the Plan is expressly applied, such as the Contract Work Hours Standards Act by virtue of section 104(d) thereof.

(b) The Plan.

(1) The statutes subject to Reorganization Plan No. 14 of 1950 are cited and briefly described in the remaining paragraphs of this section. These descriptions are general in nature and not intended to convey the full scope of the work to be performed under each statute. The individual statutes should be resorted to for a more detailed scope of the work.

(2) Federal-Aid Highway Acts. The provisions codified in 23 U.S.C. 113 apply to the initial construction, reconstruction, or improvement work performed by contractors or subcontractors on highway projects on the Federal-aid systems, the primary and secondary, as well as their extensions in urban areas, and the Interstate System, authorized under the highway laws providing for the expenditure of Federal funds upon the Federal-aid system. As cited in 41 Op. A.G. 488, 496, the Attorney General ruled that the Federal-Aid Highway Acts are subject to Reorganization Plan No. 14 of 1950.

(3) National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1713, 1715a, 1715e, 1715k, 1715l(d)(3) and (4), 1715v, 1715w, 1715x, 1743, 1747, 1748, 1748h-2, 1750g, 1715l(h)(1), 1715z(j)(1), 1715z-1, 1715y(d), Subchapter 1x-A and 1x-B, 1715z-7). This act covers construction which is financed with assistance by the Federal Government through programs of loan and mortgage insurance for the following purposes:

(i) Rental Housing - Section 1713 provides mortgage and insurance on rental housing of eight or more units and on mobile-home courts.

(ii) Section 1715a - Repealed.

(iii) Cooperative Housing - Section 1715e authorizes mortgage insurance on cooperative housing of five or more units as well as supplementary loans for improvement of repair or resale of memberships.

(iv) Urban Renewal Housing - Section 1715k provides mortgage insurance on single family or multifamily housing in approved urban renewal areas.

(v) Low or Moderate Income Housing - Section 1715L(d) (3) and (4) insures mortgages on low-cost single family or multifamily housing.

(vi) Housing for Elderly - Section 1715v provides mortgage insurance on rental housing for elderly or handicapped persons.

(vii) Nursing Homes - Section 1715w authorizes mortgage insurance on nursing home facilities and major equipment.

(viii) Experimental Housing - Section 1715x provides mortgage insurance on single family or multifamily housing with experimental design of materials.

(ix) War Housing Insurance - Section 1743 not active.

(x) Yield Insurance - Section 1747 insures investment returns on multifamily housing.

(xi) Armed Services Housing - Section 1748b to assist in relieving acute shortage and urgent need for family housing at or in areas adjacent to military installations.

(xii) Defense Housing for Impacted Areas - Section 1748h-2 provides mortgage insurance on single family or multifamily housing for sale or rent primarily to military or civilian personnel of the Armed Services, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, or Atomic Energy Commission.

(xiii) Defense Rental Housing - Section 1750g provides for mortgage insurance in critical defense housing areas.

(xiv) Rehabilitation - Section 1715L (h)(1) provides mortgage insurance for nonprofit organizations to finance the purchase and rehabilitation of deteriorating or substandard housing for subsequent resale to low-income home purchasers. There must be located on the property five or more single family dwellings of detached, semidetached, or row construction.

(xv) Homeowner Assistance - Section 1715Z(j)(1) authorizes mortgage insurance to nonprofit organizations or public bodies or agencies executed to finance sale of individual dwellings to lower income individuals or families. Also includes the rehabilitation of such housing if it is deteriorating or substandard for subsequent resale to lower income home purchasers.

(xvi) Rental Housing Assistance - Section 1715Z-1 authorizes mortgage insurance and interest reduction payments on behalf of owners of rental housing projects designed for occupancy by lower income families. Payments are also authorized for certain State or locally aided projects.

(xvii) Condominium Housing - Section 1715y(d) provides mortgage insurance on property purchased for the development of building sites. This includes waterlines and water supply installations, sewer lines and sewage disposal installations, steam, gas, and electrical lines and installations, roads, streets, curbs, gutters, sidewalks, storm drainage facilities, and other installations or work.

(xviii) Group Medical Practice Facilities - Subchapter LX-B authorizes mortgage insurance for the financing of construction and equipment, of facilities for group practice of medicine, optometry, or dentistry.

(xix) Nonprofit Hospitals - 1715z-7 authorizes mortgage insurance to cover new and rehabilitated hospitals, including initial equipment.

(4) Hospital Survey and Construction Act, as amended by the Hospital and Medical Facilities Amendments of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 291e). The provisions of this Act cover construction contracts made by State or local authorities or private institutions under Federal grant-in-aid programs for the construction of hospitals and other medical facilities.

(5) Federal Airport Act (49 U.S.C. 1114(b)). The act provides grant-in-aid funds for airport construction limited to general site preparation runways, taxiways, aprons, lighting appurtenant thereto, and fire, rescue, and maintenance buildings. The act excludes construction intended for use as a public parking facility for passenger automobiles and the cost of construction of any part of an airport building except such of those buildings or parts of buildings to house facilities or activities directly related to the safety of persons at the airport.

(6) Housing Act of 1949 (42 U.S.C. 1459). Construction contracts awarded by local authorities financed with the assistance of loans and grants from the Federal Government. The construction programs are for slum clearance and urban renewal which includes rehabilitation grants, neighborhood development programs, neighborhood renewal plans, community renewal, demolition projects, and assistance for blighted areas. See the Housing Act of 1964, paragraph (b)(21) of this section, concerning financial assistance for low-rent housing for domestic farm labor.

(7) School Survey and Construction Act of 1950 (20 U.S.C. 636). This act provides for a Federal grant-in-aid program to assist in the construction of schools in federally affected areas.

(8) Defense Housing & Community Facilities & Services Act of 1951 (42 U.S.C. 1592i). Inactive Program.

(9) United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1416). This statute covers the construction of low-rent public housing and slum clearance projects awarded by local authorities. These projects are financed with the assistance of loans and grants from the Federal Government. The slum clearance is the demolition and removal of buildings from any slum area to be used for a low-rent housing project.

(10) Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950 (50 U.S.C. App. 2281). This act provides for Federal assistance to the several States and their political subdivisions in the field of civil defense which includes procurement, construction, leasing, or renovating of materials and facilities.

(11) Delaware River Basin Compact (sec. 15.1, 75 Stat. 714). This joint resolution creates, by intergovernmental compact between the United States, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania, a regional agency for planning, conservation, utilization, development, management and control of the water and related sources of the Delaware River.

(12) Cooperative Research Act (20 U.S.C. 332a(c)). This act provides Federal grants to a university, college, or other appropriate public or nonprofit private agency or institution for part or all of the cost of constructing a facility for research or for research and related purposes. Research and related purposes means research, research training, surveys, or demonstrations in the field of education, or the dissemination of information derived therefrom, or all of such activities, including (but without limitation) experimental schools, except that such term does not include research, research training, surveys, or demonstrations in the field of sectarian instruction or the dissemination of information derived therefrom. Construction includes new buildings, and the acquisition, expansion, remodeling, replacement, and alteration of existing buildings and the equipping of new buildings and existing buildings.

(13) Health Professions Educational Assistance Act of 1963 (42 U.S.C. 292d (c)(4), 293a(c)(5)). The provisions of this act provide for grants to assist public and nonprofit medical, dental, and similar schools for the construction, expansion, or renovation of teaching facilities.

(14) Mental Retardation Facilities Construction Act (42 U.S.C. 295(a)(2)(D), 2662(5), 2675(a)(5)). This act authorizes Federal financial assistance in the construction of centers for research on mental retardation and related aspects of human development, of university-affiliated facilities for the mentally retarded and of facilities for the mentally retarded.

(15) Community Mental Health Centers Act (42 U.S.C. 2685(a)(5)). This act authorizes Federal grants for the construction of public and other nonprofit community mental health centers.

(16) Higher Education Facilities Act of 1963 (20 U.S.C. 753). This act authorizes the grant or loan of Federal funds to assist public and other nonprofit institutions of higher education in financing the construction, rehabilitation, or improvement of academic and related facilities in undergraduate and graduate schools.

(17) Vocational Educational Act of 1963 (20 U.S.C. 35f). This act provides for Federal grants to the various States for construction of area vocational education school facilities.

(18) Library Services and Construction Act (20 U.S.C. 355e(a)(4)). This act provides for Federal assistance to the various States for the construction of public libraries.

(19) Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1954 (49 U.S.C. 1609). This act provides for grants and loans to assist States and local public bodies and agencies thereof in financing the acquisition, construction, reconstruction, and improvement of facilities and equipment for use, by operation or lease or otherwise, in mass transportation service in urban areas and in coordinating such service with highway and other transportation in such areas.

(20) Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2947). This act covers construction which is financed with assistance of the Federal Government for the following purposes:

(i) Authorizes Federal assistance for construction of projects, buildings and works which will provide young men and women in rural and urban residential centers with education, vocational training, and useful work experience (Title I).

(ii) Authorizes financial assistance for construction work planned and carried out at the community level for antipoverty programs (Title II):

(a) Authorizes loans to low income rural families by assisting them to acquire or improve real estate or reduce encumbrances or erect improvements thereon, and to participate in cooperative associations and/or to finance nonagricultural enterprises which will enable such families to supplement their income (Title III);

(b) Authorizes loans to local cooperative associations furnishing essential processing, purchasing, or marketing services, supplies, or facilities predominantly to low-income rural families (Title III);

(c) Authorizes financial assistance to States, political subdivisions of States, public and nonprofit agencies, institutions, organizations, farm associations, or individuals in establishing housing, sanitation, education, and child day-care programs for migrants and other seasonally employed agricultural employees and their families (Title III).

(iii) Authorizes loans or guarantees loans to small businesses for construction work (Title IV).

(iv) Authorizes the payment of the cost of experimental, pilot, or demonstration projects to foster State programs providing construction work experience or training for unemployed fathers and needy people (Title V).

(21) Housing Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 1486(f); 42 U.S.C. 1452b(e)). Provides financial assistance for low-rent housing for domestic farm labor. The Act further provides for loans, through public or private agencies, where feasible, to owners or tenants of property in urban renewal areas to finance rehabilitation required to conform the property to applicable code requirements or carry out the objectives of the urban renewal plan for the area.

(22) The Commercial Fisheries Research and Development Act of 1964 (16 U.S.C. 779e(b)). This Act authorizes financial assistance to State agencies for construction projects designed for the research and development of the commercial fisheries resources of the Nation.

(23) The Nurse Training Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 296a(b)(5)). This act provides for grants to assist in the construction of new facilities for collegiate, associate degree, and diploma schools of nursing, or replacement or rehabilitation of existing facilities of such schools.

(24) Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 241i, 848). The purpose of the act is to provide financial assistance to local educational agencies serving areas with concentrations of children from low-income families for construction in connection with the expansion or improvement of their educational programs.

(25) Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended by the Water Quality Act of 1965 (3 U.S.C. 466e(g)). Provides for financial assistance to States or municipalities for construction of facilities in connection with the prevention and control of water pollution. This includes projects that will control the discharge into any waters of untreated or inadequately treated sewage.

(26) Appalachian Regional Development Act of 1965 (40 U.S.C. App. 402). Authorizes Federal assistance in the construction of an Appalachian development highway system; construction of multicounty demonstration health facilities, hospitals, regional health, diagnostic and treatment centers, and other facilities for health; seal and fill voids in abandoned mines and to rehabilitate strip mine areas; construction of school facilities for vocational education; and to assist in construction of sewage treatment works.

(27) National Technical Institute for the Deaf Act (20 U.S.C. 684(b)(5)). Provides for financial assistance for institutions of higher education for the establishment, construction, including equipment and operation, of a National Institution for the Deaf.

(28) Housing Act of 1959 (12 U.S.C. 1701(q)(c)(3)). This act authorizes loans to nonprofit corporations to be used for the construction of housing and related facilities for elderly families. Also, the provisions of the act provide for rehabilitation, alteration, conversion or improvement of existing structures which are otherwise inadequate for proposed dwellings used by such families.

(29) College Housing Act of 1950, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1749a(f)). This act provides for Federal loans to assist educational institutions in providing housing and other educational facilities for students and faculties.

(30) Housing and Urban Development Act of 1965 (42 U.S.C. 1500c-3, 3107). This act provides for Federal assistance for the following purposes:

(i) Grants to States and local public bodies to assist in any construction work to be carried out under the open-space land and urban beautification provisions contained therein. It provides for parks and recreation areas, conservation of land and other natural resources, and historical and scenic purposes.

(ii) Grants to local public bodies and agencies to finance specific projects for basic public water facilities (including works for the storage, treatment, purification, and distribution of water), and for basic public sewer facilities (other than “treatment works” as defined in the Federal Water Pollution Control Act).

(iii) Grants to any local public body or agency to assist in financing neighborhood facilities. These facilities must be necessary for carrying out a program of health, recreational, social, or similar community service and located so as to be available for the use of the area's low or moderate income residents.

(31) National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 954(k)). The act establishes the “National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities” which may provide matching grants to groups (nonprofit organizations and State and other public organizations) and to individuals engaged in creative and performing arts for the entire range of artistic activity, including construction of necessary facilities.

(32) Public Works and Economic Development Act of 1965 (42 U.S.C. 3222). This act provides for Federal assistance for the following purposes:

(i) Grants for the acquisition or development of land or improvements for public works or development facility usage in redevelopment areas. It authorizes loans to assist in financing the purchase or development of land for public works which will assist in the creation of long-term employment opportunities in the area.

(ii) Loans for the purchase or development of land and facilities (including machinery and equipment) for industrial or commercial usage within redevelopment areas; guarantee of loans for working capital made to private borrowers by private lending institutions in connection with direct loan projects; and to contract to pay to, or on behalf of, business entities locating in redevelopment areas, a portion of the interest costs which they incur in financing their expansions from private sources.

(iii) Loans and grants to create economic development centers within designated county economic development districts.

(33) High-Speed Ground Transportation Study (40 U.S.C. 1636(b)). This act provides for financial assistance for construction activities in connection with research and development of different forms of high-speed ground transportation and demonstration projects relating to intercity rail passenger service.

(34) Heart Disease, Cancer and Stroke Amendments of 1965 (42 U.S.C. 299(b)(4)). This act provides for grants to public or nonprofit private universities, medical schools, research, institutions, hospitals, and other public and nonprofit agencies and institutions, or associations thereof to assist in construction and equipment of facilities in connection with research, training, demonstration of patient care, diagnostic and treatment related to heart disease, cancer, stroke, and other major diseases.

(35) Mental Retardation Facilities and Community Mental Health Centers Construction Act Amendments of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 618(g)). These provisions provide for grants to institutions of higher education for construction of facilities for research or for research and related purposes relating to education for mentally retarded, hard of hearing, deaf, speech impaired, visually handicapped, seriously emotionally disturbed, crippled, or other health impaired children who by reason thereof require special education.

(36) Vocational Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1965 (29 U.S.C. 41a(b)(4)). This act authorizes grants to assist in meeting the costs of construction of public or other nonprofit workshops and rehabilitation facilities.

(37) Clean Air and Solid Waste Disposal Acts (42 U.S.C. 3256). This act provides for financial assistance to public (Federal, State, interstate, or local) authorities, agencies, and institutions, private agencies and institutions, and individuals in the construction of facilities for solid-waste disposal. The term construction includes the installation of initial equipment.

(38) Medical Library Assistance Act of 1965 (42 U.S.C. 280b-3(b)(3)). This act provides for grants to public or private non-profit agencies or institutions for the cost of construction of medical library facilities.

(39) Veterans Nursing Home Care Act (38 U.S.C. 5035(a)(8)). The construction industry health and safety standards do not apply to this act since it is not subject to Reorganization Plan No. 14 of 1950.

(40) National Capital Transportation Act of 1965 (40 U.S.C. 682(b)(4)). This act provides for Federal assistance to the National Capital Transportation Agency for construction of a rail rapid transit system and related facilities for the Nation's Capital.

(41) Alaska Centennial - 1967 (80 Stat. 82). The program under this legislation has expired.

(42) Model Secondary School for the Deaf Act (80 Stat. 1028). This act provides for funds to establish and operate, including construction and initial equipment of new buildings, expansion, remodeling, and alteration of existing buildings and equipment thereof, a model secondary school for the deaf to serve the residents of the District of Columbia and nearby States.

(43) Allied Health Professions Personnel Training Act of 1966 (42 U.S.C. 295h(b)(2)(E)). This act provides for grants to assist in the construction of new facilities for training centers for allied health professions, or replacement or rehabilitation of existing facilities for such centers.

(44) Demonstration Cities and Metropolitan Development Act of 1966 (42 U.S.C. 3310; 12 U.S.C. 1715c; 42 U.S.C. 1416). This act provides for Federal assistance for the following purposes:

(i) Grants to assist in the construction, rehabilitation, alteration, or repair of residential property only if such residential property is designed for residential use for eight or more families to enable city demonstration agencies to carry out comprehensive city demonstration programs (42 U.S.C. 3310).

(ii) Amends the National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1715c) and the Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1416). See these acts for coverage.

(45) Air Quality Act of 1967 (42 U.S.C. 1857j-3). This act provides for Federal assistance to public or nonprofit agencies, institutions, and organizations and to individuals, and contracts with public or private agencies, institutions, or persons for construction of research and development facilities and demonstration plants relating to the application of preventing or controlling discharges into the air of various types of pollutants.

(46) Elementary and Secondary Education Amendments of 1967 (Title VII - Bilingual Education Act) (20 U.S.C. 880b-6). This act provides for Federal assistance to local educational agencies or to an institution of higher education applying jointly with a local educational agency for minor remodeling projects in connection with bilingual education programs to meet the special needs of children with limited English-speaking ability in the United States.

(47) Vocational Rehabilitation Amendments of 1967 (29 U.S.C. 42a(c)(3)). This act authorizes Federal assistance to any public or nonprofit private agency or organization for the construction of a center for vocational rehabilitation of handicapped individuals who are both deaf and blind which shall be known as the National Center for Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults. Construction includes new buildings and expansion, remodeling, alteration and renovation of existing buildings, and initial equipment of such new, newly acquired, expanded, remodeled, altered, or renovated buildings.

(48) National Visitor Center Facilities Act of 1968 (40 U.S.C. 808). This act authorizes agreements and leases with the owner of property in the District of Columbia known as Union Station for the use of all or a part of such property for a national visitor center to be known as the National Visitor Center. The agreements and leases shall provide for such alterations of the Union Station Building as necessary to provide adequate facilities for visitors. They also provide for the construction of a parking facility, including necessary approaches and ramps.

(49) Juvenile Delinquency Prevention and Control Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3843). This act provides for Federal grants to State, county, municipal, or other public agency or combination thereof for the construction of facilities to be used in connection with rehabilitation services for the diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of delinquent youths and youths in danger of becoming delinquent.

(50) Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 (including New Communities Act of 1968) (42 U.S.C. 3909). This act provides for Federal assistance for the following purposes:

(i) Guarantees, and commitments to guarantee, the bonds, debentures, notes, and other obligations issued by new community developers to help finance new community development projects.

(ii) Amends section 212(a) of the National Housing Act, adding section 236 for “Rental Housing for Lower Income Families” and section 242 “Mortgage Insurance for Nonprofit Hospitals” thereto.

(51) Public Health Service Act Amendment (Alcoholic and Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Amendments of 1968) (42 U.S.C. 2681, et seq.). This act provides for grants to a public and nonprofit private agency or organization for construction projects consisting of any facilities (including post-hospitalization treatment facilities for the prevention and treatment of alcoholism or treatment of narcotic addicts.)

(52) Vocational Education Amendments of 1968 (20 U.S.C. 1246). This act provides for grants to States for the construction of area vocational education school facilities. The act further provides grants to public educational agencies, organizations, or institutions for construction of residential schools to provide vocational education for the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility and desirability of such schools. The act still further provides grants to State boards, to colleges and universities, to public educational agencies, organizations or institutions to reduce the cost of borrowing funds for the construction of residential schools and dormitories.

(53) Postal Reorganization Act (39 U.S.C. 410(d)(2)). This Act provides for construction, modification, alteration, repair, and other improvements of postal facilities located in leased buildings.

(54) Airport and Airway Development Act of 1970 (Pub. L. 91-258, section 52(b)(7)). This Act provides for Federal financial assistance to States and localities for the construction, improvement, or repair of public airports.

(55)

(i) Public Law 91-230. This Act provides for federal financial assistance to institutions of higher learning for the construction of a National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped. The program under this statute expires on July 1, 1971. Public Law 91-230, section 662(1).

(ii) Education of the Handicapped Act (20 U.S.C. 12326, 1404(a)). This Act provides for financial assistance to States for construction, expansion, remodeling, or alteration of facilities for the education of handicapped children at the preschool, elementary school, and secondary school levels.

(56) Housing and Urban Development Act of 1970 (Pub. L. 91-609, section 707(b)). This Act provides for grants to States and local public agencies to help finance the development of open-space or other land in urban areas for open-space uses. This Act becomes effective on July 1, 1971.

(57) Developmental Disabilities Services and Facilities Construction Amendments of 1970 (Pub. L. 91-517, section 135(a)(5)). This Act authorizes grants to States for construction of facilities for the provision of services to persons with developmental disabilities who are unable to pay for such services.

(58) Rail Passenger Service Act of 1970 (Pub. L. 91-518, section 405(d)). This statute provides that the National Railroad Passenger Corporation may construct physical facilities necessary to intercity rail passenger operations within the basic national rail passenger system designated by the Secretary of Transportation.

(c) VA and FHA housing. In the course of the legislative development of section 107, it was recognized that section 107 would not apply to housing construction for which insurance was issued by the Federal Housing Authority and Veterans' Administration for individual home ownership. Concerning construction under the National Housing Act, Reorganization Plan No. 14 of 1950 applies to construction which is subject to the minimum wage requirements of section 212(a) thereof (12 U.S.C. 1715c).

§ 1926.13 Interpretation of statutory terms.

(a) The terms construction, alteration, and repair used in section 107 of the Act are also used in section 1 of the Davis-Bacon Act (40 U.S.C. 276a), providing minimum wage protection on Federal construction contracts, and section 1 of the Miller Act (40 U.S.C. 270a), providing performance and payment bond protection on Federal construction contracts. Similarly, the terms contractor and subcontractor are used in those statutes, as well as in Copeland (Anti-Kickback) Act (40 U.S.C. 276c) and the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act itself, which apply concurrently with the Miller Act and the Davis-Bacon Act on Federal construction contracts and also apply to most federally assisted construction contracts. The use of the same or identical terms in these statutes which apply concurrently with section 107 of the Act have considerable precedential value in ascertaining the coverage of section 107.

(b) It should be noted that section 1 of the Davis-Bacon Act limits minimum wage protection to laborers and mechanics “employed directly” upon the “site of the work.” There is no comparable limitation in section 107 of the Act. Section 107 expressly requires as a self-executing condition of each covered contract that no contractor or subcontractor shall require “any laborer or mechanic employed in the performance of the contract to work in surroundings or under working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to his health or safety” as these health and safety standards are applied in the rules of the Secretary of Labor.

(c) The term subcontractor under section 107 is considered to mean a person who agrees to perform any part of the labor or material requirements of a contract for construction, alteration or repair. Cf. MacEvoy Co. v. United States, 322 U.S. 102, 108-9 (1944). A person who undertakes to perform a portion of a contract involving the furnishing of supplies or materials will be considered a “subcontractor” under this part and section 107 if the work in question involves the performance of construction work and is to be performed:

(1) Directly on or near the construction site, or

(2) by the employer for the specific project on a customized basis. Thus, a supplier of materials which will become an integral part of the construction is a “subcontractor” if the supplier fabricates or assembles the goods or materials in question specifically for the construction project and the work involved may be said to be construction activity. If the goods or materials in question are ordinarily sold to other customers from regular inventory, the supplier is not a “subcontractor.” Generally, the furnishing of prestressed concrete beams and prestressed structural steel would be considered manufacturing; therefore a supplier of such materials would not be considered a “subcontractor.” An example of material supplied “for the specific project on a customized basis” as that phrase is used in this section would be ventilating ducts, fabricated in a shop away from the construction job site and specifically cut for the project according to design specifications. On the other hand, if a contractor buys standard size nails from a foundry, the foundry would not be a covered “subcontractor.” Ordinarily a contract for the supplying of construction equipment to a contractor would not, in and of itself, be considered a “subcontractor” for purposes of this part.

§ 1926.14 Federal contract for “mixed” types of performance.

(a) It is the intent of the Congress to provide safety and health protection of Federal, federally financed, or federally assisted construction. See, for example, H. Report No. 91-241, 91st Cong., first session, p. 1 (1969). Thus, it is clear that when a Federal contract calls for mixed types of performance, such as both manufacturing and construction, section 107 would apply to the construction. By its express terms, section 107 applies to a contract which is “for construction, alteration, and/or repair.” Such a contract is not required to be exclusively for such services. The application of the section is not limited to contracts which permit an overall characterization as “construction contracts.” The text of section 107 is not so limited.

(b) When the mixed types of performances include both construction and manufacturing, see also § 1926.15(b) concerning the relationship between the Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act and section 107.

§ 1926.15 Relationship to the Service Contract Act; Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act.

(a) A contract for “construction” is one for nonpersonal service. See, e.g., 41 CFR 1-1.208. Section 2(e) of the Service Contract Act of 1965 requires as a condition of every Federal contract (and bid specification therefor) exceeding $2,500, the “principal purpose” of which is to furnish services to the United States through the use of “service employees,” that certain safety and health standards be met. See 29 CFR part 1925, which contains the Department rules concerning these standards. Section 7 of the Service Contract Act provides that the Act shall not apply to “any contract of the United States or District of Columbia for construction, alteration, and/or repair, including painting and decorating of public buildings or public works.” It is clear from the legislative history of section 107 that no gaps in coverage between the two statutes are intended.

(b) The Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act requires that contracts entered into by any Federal agency for the manufacture or furnishing of materials, supplies, articles, and equipment in any amount exceeding $10,000 must contain, among other provisions, a requirement that “no part of such contract will be performed nor will any of the materials, supplies, articles or equipment to be manufactured or furnished under said contract be manufactured or fabricated in any plants, factories, buildings, or surroundings or under working conditions which are unsanitary or hazardous or dangerous to the health and safety of employees engaged in the performance of said contract.” The rules of the Secretary concerning these standards are published in 41 CFR part 50-204, and express the Secretary of Labor's interpretation and application of section 1(e) of the Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act to certain particular working conditions. None of the described working conditions are intended to deal with construction activities, although such activities may conceivably be a part of a contract which is subject to the Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act. Nevertheless, such activities remain subject to the general statutory duty prescribed by section 1(e). Section 103(b) of the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act provides, among other things, that the Act shall not apply to any work required to be done in accordance with the provisions of the Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act.

§ 1926.16 Rules of construction.

(a) The prime contractor and any subcontractors may make their own arrangements with respect to obligations which might be more appropriately treated on a jobsite basis rather than individually. Thus, for example, the prime contractor and his subcontractors may wish to make an express agreement that the prime contractor or one of the subcontractors will provide all required first-aid or toilet facilities, thus relieving the subcontractors from the actual, but not any legal, responsibility (or, as the case may be, relieving the other subcontractors from this responsibility). In no case shall the prime contractor be relieved of overall responsibility for compliance with the requirements of this part for all work to be performed under the contract.

(b) By contracting for full performance of a contract subject to section 107 of the Act, the prime contractor assumes all obligations prescribed as employer obligations under the standards contained in this part, whether or not he subcontracts any part of the work.

(c) To the extent that a subcontractor of any tier agrees to perform any part of the contract, he also assumes responsibility for complying with the standards in this part with respect to that part. Thus, the prime contractor assumes the entire responsibility under the contract and the subcontractor assumes responsibility with respect to his portion of the work. With respect to subcontracted work, the prime contractor and any subcontractor or subcontractors shall be deemed to have joint responsibility.

(d) Where joint responsibility exists, both the prime contractor and his subcontractor or subcontractors, regardless of tier, shall be considered subject to the enforcement provisions of the Act.

Subpart C - General Safety and Health Provisions
Authority:

40 U.S.C. 3701 et seq.; 29 U.S.C. 653, 655, 657; Secretary of Labor's Order No. 12-71 (36 FR 8754), 8-76 (41 FR 25059), 9-83 (48 FR 35736), 6-96 (62 FR 111), 5-2007 (72 FR 31160), or 1-2012 (77 FR 3912) as applicable; and 29 CFR part 1911.

§ 1926.20 General safety and health provisions.

(a) Contractor requirements.

(1) Section 107 of the Act requires that it shall be a condition of each contract which is entered into under legislation subject to Reorganization Plan Number 14 of 1950 (64 Stat. 1267), as defined in § 1926.12, and is for construction, alteration, and/or repair, including painting and decorating, that no contractor or subcontractor for any part of the contract work shall require any laborer or mechanic employed in the performance of the contract to work in surroundings or under working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to his health or safety.

(b) Accident prevention responsibilities.

(1) It shall be the responsibility of the employer to initiate and maintain such programs as may be necessary to comply with this part.

(2) Such programs shall provide for frequent and regular inspections of the job sites, materials, and equipment to be made by competent persons designated by the employers.

(3) The use of any machinery, tool, material, or equipment which is not in compliance with any applicable requirement of this part is prohibited. Such machine, tool, material, or equipment shall either be identified as unsafe by tagging or locking the controls to render them inoperable or shall be physically removed from its place of operation.

(4) The employer shall permit only those employees qualified by training or experience to operate equipment and machinery.

(c) The standards contained in this part shall apply with respect to employments performed in a workplace in a State, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Wake Island, Outer Continental Shelf lands defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, and Johnston Island.

(d)

(1) If a particular standard is specifically applicable to a condition, practice, means, method, operation, or process, it shall prevail over any different general standard which might otherwise be applicable to the same condition, practice, means, method, operation, or process.

(2) On the other hand, any standard shall apply according to its terms to any employment and place of employment in any industry, even though particular standards are also prescribed for the industry to the extent that none of such particular standards applies.

(e) In the event a standard protects on its face a class of persons larger than employees, the standard shall be applicable under this part only to employees and their employment and places of employment.

(f) Compliance duties owed to each employee -

(1) Personal protective equipment. Standards in this part requiring the employer to provide personal protective equipment (PPE), including respirators and other types of PPE, because of hazards to employees impose a separate compliance duty with respect to each employee covered by the requirement. The employer must provide PPE to each employee required to use the PPE, and each failure to provide PPE to an employee may be considered a separate violation.

(2) Training. Standards in this part requiring training on hazards and related matters, such as standards requiring that employees receive training or that the employer train employees, provide training to employees, or institute or implement a training program, impose a separate compliance duty with respect to each employee covered by the requirement. The employer must train each affected employee in the manner required by the standard, and each failure to train an employee may be considered a separate violation.

[44 FR 8577, Feb. 9, 1979; 44 FR 20940, Apr. 6, 1979, as amended at 58 FR 35078, June 30, 1993; 73 FR 75588, Dec. 12, 2008; 85 FR 8735, Feb. 18, 2020; 85 FR 8735, Feb. 18, 2020]

§ 1926.21 Safety training and education.

(a) General requirements. The Secretary shall, pursuant to section 107(f) of the Act, establish and supervise programs for the education and training of employers and employees in the recognition, avoidance and prevention of unsafe conditions in employments covered by the act.

(b) Employer responsibility.

(1) The employer should avail himself of the safety and health training programs the Secretary provides.

(2) The employer shall instruct each employee in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions and the regulations applicable to his work environment to control or eliminate any hazards or other exposure to illness or injury.

(3) Employees required to handle or use poisons, caustics, and other harmful substances shall be instructed regarding the safe handling and use, and be made aware of the potential hazards, personal hygiene, and personal protective measures required.

(4) In job site areas where harmful plants or animals are present, employees who may be exposed shall be instructed regarding the potential hazards, and how to avoid injury, and the first aid procedures to be used in the event of injury.

(5) Employees required to handle or use flammable liquids, gases, or toxic materials shall be instructed in the safe handling and use of these materials and made aware of the specific requirements contained in subparts D, F, and other applicable subparts of this part.

[44 FR 8577, Feb. 9, 1979; 44 FR 20940, Apr. 6, 1979, as amended at 80 FR 25518, May 4, 2015]

§ 1926.22 Recording and reporting of injuries. [Reserved]
§ 1926.23 First aid and medical attention.

First aid services and provisions for medical care shall be made available by the employer for every employee covered by these regulations. Regulations prescribing specific requirements for first aid, medical attention, and emergency facilities are contained in subpart D of this part.

§ 1926.24 Fire protection and prevention.

The employer shall be responsible for the development and maintenance of an effective fire protection and prevention program at the job site throughout all phases of the construction, repair, alteration, or demolition work. The employer shall ensure the availability of the fire protection and suppression equipment required by subpart F of this part.

§ 1926.25 Housekeeping.

(a) During the course of construction, alteration, or repairs, form and scrap lumber with protruding nails, and all other debris, shall be kept cleared from work areas, passageways, and stairs, in and around buildings or other structures.

(b) Combustible scrap and debris shall be removed at regular intervals during the course of construction. Safe means shall be provided to facilitate such removal.

(c) Containers shall be provided for the collection and separation of waste, trash, oily and used rags, and other refuse. Containers used for garbage and other oily, flammable, or hazardous wastes, such as caustics, acids, harmful dusts, etc. shall be equipped with covers. Garbage and other waste shall be disposed of at frequent and regular intervals.

§ 1926.26 Illumination.

Construction areas, aisles, stairs, ramps, runways, corridors, offices, shops, and storage areas where work is in progress shall be lighted with either natural or artificial illumination. The minimum illumination requirements for work areas are contained in subpart D of this part.

§ 1926.27 Sanitation.

Health and sanitation requirements for drinking water are contained in subpart D of this part.

§ 1926.28 Personal protective equipment.

(a) The employer is responsible for requiring the wearing of appropriate personal protective equipment in all operations where there is an exposure to hazardous conditions or where this part indicates the need for using such equipment to reduce the hazards to the employees.

(b) Regulations governing the use, selection, and maintenance of personal protective and lifesaving equipment are described under subpart E of this part.

§ 1926.29 Acceptable certifications.

(a) Pressure vessels. Current and valid certification by an insurance company or regulatory authority shall be deemed as acceptable evidence of safe installation, inspection, and testing of pressure vessels provided by the employer.

(b) Boilers. Boilers provided by the employer shall be deemed to be in compliance with the requirements of this part when evidence of current and valid certification by an insurance company or regulatory authority attesting to the safe installation, inspection, and testing is presented.

(c) Other requirements. Regulations prescribing specific requirements for other types of pressure vessels and similar equipment are contained in subparts F and O of this part.

§ 1926.30 Shipbuilding and ship repairing.

(a) General. Shipbuilding, ship repairing, alterations, and maintenance performed on ships under Government contract, except naval ship construction, is work subject to the Act.

(b) Applicable safety and health standards. For the purpose of work carried out under this section, the safety and health regulations in part 1915 of this title, Shipyard Employment, shall apply.

[44 FR 8577, Feb. 9, 1979; 44 FR 20940, Apr. 6, 1979, as amended at 61 FR 9249, Mar. 7, 1996]

§ 1926.32 Definitions.

The following definitions shall apply in the application of the regulations in this part:

(a) Act means section 107 of the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act, commonly known as the Construction Safety Act (86 Stat. 96; 40 U.S.C. 333).

(b) ANSI means American National Standards Institute.

(c) Approved means sanctioned, endorsed, accredited, certified, or accepted as satisfactory by a duly constituted and nationally recognized authority or agency.

(d) Authorized person means a person approved or assigned by the employer to perform a specific type of duty or duties or to be at a specific location or locations at the jobsite.

(e) Administration means the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

(f) Competent person means one who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to employees, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them.

(g) Construction work. For purposes of this section, Construction work means work for construction, alteration, and/or repair, including painting and decorating.

(h) Defect means any characteristic or condition which tends to weaken or reduce the strength of the tool, object, or structure of which it is a part.

(i) Designated person means “authorized person” as defined in paragraph (d) of this section.

(j) Employee means every laborer or mechanic under the Act regardless of the contractual relationship which may be alleged to exist between the laborer and mechanic and the contractor or subcontractor who engaged him. “Laborer and mechanic” are not defined in the Act, but the identical terms are used in the Davis-Bacon Act (40 U.S.C. 276a), which provides for minimum wage protection on Federal and federally assisted construction contracts. The use of the same term in a statute which often applies concurrently with section 107 of the Act has considerable precedential value in ascertaining the meaning of “laborer and mechanic” as used in the Act. Laborer generally means one who performs manual labor or who labors at an occupation requiring physical strength; mechanic generally means a worker skilled with tools. See 18 Comp. Gen. 341.

(k) Employer means contractor or subcontractor within the meaning of the Act and of this part.

(l) Hazardous substance means a substance which, by reason of being explosive, flammable, poisonous, corrosive, oxidizing, irritating, or otherwise harmful, is likely to cause death or injury.

(m) Qualified means one who, by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training, and experience, has successfully demonstrated his ability to solve or resolve problems relating to the subject matter, the work, or the project.

(n) Safety factor means the ratio of the ultimate breaking strength of a member or piece of material or equipment to the actual working stress or safe load when in use.

(o) Secretary means the Secretary of Labor.

(p) SAE means Society of Automotive Engineers.

(q) Shall means mandatory.

(r) Should means recommended.

(s) Suitable means that which fits, and has the qualities or qualifications to meet a given purpose, occasion, condition, function, or circumstance.

[44 FR 8577, Feb. 9, 1979; 44 FR 20940, Apr. 6, 1979, as amended at 58 FR 35078, June 30, 1993]

§ 1926.33 Access to employee exposure and medical records.
Note:

The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to those set forth at § 1910.1020 of this chapter.

[61 FR 31431, June 20, 1996]

§ 1926.34 Means of egress.

(a) General. In every building or structure exits shall be so arranged and maintained as to provide free and unobstructed egress from all parts of the building or structure at all times when it is occupied. No lock or fastening to prevent free escape from the inside of any building shall be installed except in mental, penal, or corrective institutions where supervisory personnel is continually on duty and effective provisions are made to remove occupants in case of fire or other emergency.

(b) Exit marking. Exits shall be marked by a readily visible sign. Access to exits shall be marked by readily visible signs in all cases where the exit or way to reach it is not immediately visible to the occupants.

(c) Maintenance and workmanship. Means of egress shall be continually maintained free of all obstructions or impediments to full instant use in the case of fire or other emergency.

[58 FR 35083, June 30, 1993]

§ 1926.35 Employee emergency action plans.

(a) Scope and application. This section applies to all emergency action plans required by a particular OSHA standard. The emergency action plan shall be in writing (except as provided in the last sentence of paragraph (e)(3) of this section) and shall cover those designated actions employers and employees must take to ensure employee safety from fire and other emergencies.

(b) Elements. The following elements, at a minimum, shall be included in the plan:

(1) Emergency escape procedures and emergency escape route assignments;

(2) Procedures to be followed by employees who remain to operate critical plant operations before they evacuate;

(3) Procedures to account for all employees after emergency evacuation has been completed;

(4) Rescue and medical duties for those employees who are to perform them;

(5) The preferred means of reporting fires and other emergencies; and

(6) Names or regular job titles of persons or departments who can be contacted for further information or explanation of duties under the plan.

(c) Alarm system.

(1) The employer shall establish an employee alarm system which complies with § 1926.159.

(2) If the employee alarm system is used for alerting fire brigade members, or for other purposes, a distinctive signal for each purpose shall be used.

(d) Evacuation. The employer shall establish in the emergency action plan the types of evacuation to be used in emergency circumstances.

(e) Training.

(1) Before implementing the emergency action plan, the employer shall designate and train a sufficient number of persons to assist in the safe and orderly emergency evacuation of employees.

(2) The employer shall review the plan with each employee covered by the plan at the following times:

(i) Initially when the plan is developed,

(ii) Whenever the employee's responsibilities or designated actions under the plan change, and

(iii) Whenever the plan is changed.

(3) The employer shall review with each employee upon initial assignment those parts of the plan which the employee must know to protect the employee in the event of an emergency. The written plan shall be kept at the workplace and made available for employee review. For those employers with 10 or fewer employees the plan may be communicated orally to employees and the employer need not maintain a written plan.

[58 FR 35083, June 30, 1993]

Subpart D - Occupational Health and Environmental Controls
Authority:

40 U.S.C. 3704; 29 U.S.C. 653, 655, and 657; and Secretary of Labor's Order No. 12-71 (36 FR 8754), 8-76 (41 FR 25059), 9-83 (48 FR 35736), 1-90 (55 FR 9033), 6-96 (62 FR 111), 3-2000 (65 FR 50017), 5-2002 (67 FR 65008), 5-2007 (72 FR 31159), 4-2010 (75 FR 55355), or 1-2012 (77 FR 3912) as applicable; and 29 CFR part 1911.

Sections 1926.59, 1926.60, and 1926.65 also issued under 5 U.S.C. 553 and 29 CFR part 1911.

Section 1926.61 also issued under 49 U.S.C. 1801-1819 and 5 U.S.C. 553.

Section 1926.62 also issued under sec. 1031, Public Law 102-550, 106 Stat. 3672 (42 U.S.C. 4853).

Section 1926.65 also issued under sec. 126, Public Law 99-499, 100 Stat. 1614 (reprinted at 29 U.S.C.A. 655 Note) and 5 U.S.C. 553.

§ 1926.50 Medical services and first aid.

(a) The employer shall insure the availability of medical personnel for advice and consultation on matters of occupational health.

(b) Provisions shall be made prior to commencement of the project for prompt medical attention in case of serious injury.

(c) In the absence of an infirmary, clinic, hospital, or physician, that is reasonably accessible in terms of time and distance to the worksite, which is available for the treatment of injured employees, a person who has a valid certificate in first-aid training from the U.S. Bureau of Mines, the American Red Cross, or equivalent training that can be verified by documentary evidence, shall be available at the worksite to render first aid.

(d)

(1) First aid supplies shall be easily accessible when required.

(2) The contents of the first aid kit shall be placed in a weatherproof container with individual sealed packages for each type of item, and shall be checked by the employer before being sent out on each job and at least weekly on each job to ensure that the expended items are replaced.

(e) Proper equipment for prompt transportation of the injured person to a physician or hospital, or a communication system for contacting necessary ambulance service, shall be provided.

(f)

(1) In areas where 911 emergency dispatch services are not available, the telephone numbers of the physicians, hospitals, or ambulances shall be conspicuously posted.

(2) In areas where 911 emergency dispatch services are available and an employer uses a communication system for contacting necessary emergency-medical service, the employer must:

(i) Ensure that the communication system is effective in contacting the emergency-medical service; and

(ii)

(A) When using a communication system in an area that does not automatically supply the caller's latitude and longitude information to the 911 emergency dispatcher, the employer must post in a conspicuous location at the worksite either:

(1) The latitude and longitude of the worksite; or

(2) Other location-identification information that communicates effectively to employees the location of the worksite.

(B) The requirement specified in paragraph (f)(2)(ii)(A) of this section does not apply to worksites with readily available telephone land lines that have 911 emergency service that automatically identifies the location of the caller.

(g) Where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use.

Appendix A to § 1926.50 - First aid Kits (Non-Mandatory)

First aid supplies are required to be easily accessible under paragraph § 1926.50(d)(1). An example of the minimal contents of a generic first aid kit is described in American National Standard (ANSI) Z308.1-1978 “Minimum Requirements for Industrial Unit-Type First-aid Kits”. The contents of the kit listed in the ANSI standard should be adequate for small work sites. When larger operations or multiple operations are being conducted at the same location, employers should determine the need for additional first aid kits at the worksite, additional types of first aid equipment and supplies and additional quantities and types of supplies and equipment in the first aid kits.

In a similar fashion, employers who have unique or changing first-aid needs in their workplace may need to enhance their first-aid kits. The employer can use the OSHA 300 log, OSHA 301 log, or other reports to identify these unique problems. Consultation from the local fire/rescue department, appropriate medical professional, or local emergency room may be helpful to employers in these circumstances. By assessing the specific needs of their workplace, employers can ensure that reasonably anticipated supplies are available. Employers should assess the specific needs of their worksite periodically and augment the first aid kit appropriately.

If it is reasonably anticipated employees will be exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials while using first-aid supplies, employers should provide personal protective equipment (PPE). Appropriate PPE includes gloves, gowns, face shields, masks and eye protection (see “Occupational Exposure to Blood borne Pathogens”, 29 CFR 1910.1030(d)(3)) (56 FR 64175).

[44 FR 8577, Feb. 9, 1979; 44 FR 20940, Apr. 6, 1979, as amended at 49 FR 18295, Apr. 30, 1984; 58 FR 35084, June 30, 1993; 61 FR 5510, Feb. 13, 1996; 63 FR 33469, June 18, 1998; 76 FR 80740, Dec. 27, 2011; 84 FR 21575, May 14, 2019]

§ 1926.51 Sanitation.

(a) Potable water.

(1) An adequate supply of potable water shall be provided in all places of employment.

(2) Portable containers used to dispense drinking water shall be capable of being tightly closed, and equipped with a tap. Water shall not be dipped from containers.

(3) Any container used to distribute drinking water shall be clearly marked as to the nature of its contents and not used for any other purpose.

(4) The common drinking cup is prohibited.

(5) Where single service cups (to be used but once) are supplied, both a sanitary container for the unused cups and a receptacle for disposing of the used cups shall be provided.

(6) Potable water means water that meets the standards for drinking purposes of the State or local authority having jurisdiction, or water that meets the quality standards prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (40 CFR part 141).

(b) Nonpotable water.

(1) Outlets for nonpotable water, such as water for industrial or firefighting purposes only, shall be identified by signs meeting the requirements of subpart G of this part, to indicate clearly that the water is unsafe and is not to be used for drinking, washing, or cooking purposes.

(2) There shall be no cross-connection, open or potential, between a system furnishing potable water and a system furnishing nonpotable water.

(c) Toilets at construction jobsites.

(1) Toilets shall be provided for employees according to the following table:

Table D-1

Number of employees Minimum number of facilities
20 or less 1.
20 or more 1 toilet seat and 1 urinal per 40 workers.
200 or more 1 toilet seat and 1 urinal per 50 workers.

(2) Under temporary field conditions, provisions shall be made to assure not less than one toilet facility is available.

(3) Job sites, not provided with a sanitary sewer, shall be provided with one of the following toilet facilities unless prohibited by local codes:

(i) Privies (where their use will not contaminate ground or surface water);

(ii) Chemical toilets;

(iii) Recirculating toilets;

(iv) Combustion toilets.

(4) The requirements of this paragraph (c) for sanitation facilities shall not apply to mobile crews having transportation readily available to nearby toilet facilities.

(d) Food handling.

(1) All employees' food service facilities and operations shall meet the applicable laws, ordinances, and regulations of the jurisdictions in which they are located.

(2) All employee food service facilities and operations shall be carried out in accordance with sound hygienic principles. In all places of employment where all or part of the food service is provided, the food dispensed shall be wholesome, free from spoilage, and shall be processed, prepared, handled, and stored in such a manner as to be protected against contamination.

(e) Temporary sleeping quarters. When temporary sleeping quarters are provided, they shall be heated, ventilated, and lighted.

(f) Washing facilities.

(1) The employer shall provide adequate washing facilities for employees engaged in the application of paints, coating, herbicides, or insecticides, or in other operations where contaminants may be harmful to the employees. Such facilities shall be in near proximity to the worksite and shall be so equipped as to enable employees to remove such substances.

(2) General. Washing facilities shall be maintained in a sanitary condition.

(3) Lavatories.

(i) Lavatories shall be made available in all places of employment. The requirements of this subdivision do not apply to mobile crews or to normally unattended work locations if employees working at these locations have transportation readily available to nearby washing facilities which meet the other requirements of this paragraph.

(ii) Each lavatory shall be provided with hot and cold running water, or tepid running water.

(iii) Hand soap or similar cleansing agents shall be provided.

(iv) Individual hand towels or sections thereof, of cloth or paper, air blowers or clean individual sections of continuous cloth toweling, convenient to the lavatories, shall be provided.

(4) Showers.

(i) Whenever showers are required by a particular standard, the showers shall be provided in accordance with paragraphs (f)(4) (ii) through (v) of this section.

(ii) One shower shall be provided for each 10 employees of each sex, or numerical fraction thereof, who are required to shower during the same shift.

(iii) Body soap or other appropriate cleansing agents convenient to the showers shall be provided as specified in paragraph (f)(3)(iii) of this section.

(iv) Showers shall be provided with hot and cold water feeding a common discharge line.

(v) Employees who use showers shall be provided with individual clean towels.

(g) Eating and drinking areas. No employee shall be allowed to consume food or beverages in a toilet room nor in any area exposed to a toxic material.

(h) Vermin control. Every enclosed workplace shall be so constructed, equipped, and maintained, so far as reasonably practicable, as to prevent the entrance or harborage of rodents, insects, and other vermin. A continuing and effective extermination program shall be instituted where their presence is detected.

(i) Change rooms. Whenever employees are required by a particular standard to wear protective clothing because of the possibility of contamination with toxic materials, change rooms equipped with storage facilities for street clothes and separate storage facilities for the protective clothing shall be provided.

[44 FR 8577, Feb. 9, 1979; 44 FR 20940, Apr. 6, 1979, as amended at 58 FR 35084, June 30, 1993; 76 FR 33611, June 8, 2011]

§ 1926.52 Occupational noise exposure.

(a) Protection against the effects of noise exposure shall be provided when the sound levels exceed those shown in Table D-2 of this section when measured on the A-scale of a standard sound level meter at slow response.

(b) When employees are subjected to sound levels exceeding those listed in Table D-2 of this section, feasible administrative or engineering controls shall be utilized. If such controls fail to reduce sound levels within the levels of the table, personal protective equipment as required in subpart E, shall be provided and used to reduce sound levels within the levels of the table.

(c) If the variations in noise level involve maxima at intervals of 1 second or less, it is to be considered continuous.

(d)

(1) In all cases where the sound levels exceed the values shown herein, a continuing, effective hearing conservation program shall be administered.

Table D-2 - Permissible Noise Exposures

Duration per day, hours Sound level dBA slow response
8 90
6 92
4 95
3 97
2 100
1 1/2 102
1 105
1/2 110
1/4 or less 115

(2)

(i) When the daily noise exposure is composed of two or more periods of noise exposure of different levels, their combined effect should be considered, rather than the individual effect of each. Exposure to different levels for various periods of time shall be computed according to the formula set forth in paragraph (d)(2)(ii) of this section.

(ii) Fe = (T1/L1) + (T2/L2) + · · · + (Tn/Ln)

Where:

Fe = The equivalent noise exposure factor.

T = The period of noise exposure at any essentially constant level.

L = The duration of the permissible noise exposure at the constant level (from Table D-2).

If the value of Fe exceeds unity (1) the exposure exceeds permissible levels.

(iii) A sample computation showing an application of the formula in paragraph (d)(2)(ii) of this section is as follows. An employee is exposed at these levels for these periods:

110 db A1/4 hour.

100 db A1/2 hour.

90 db A 11/2 hours.

Fe = (1/4/1/2) + (1/2/2) + (11/2/8)

Fe = 0.500 + 0.25 + 0.188

Fe = 0.938

Since the value of Fe does not exceed unity, the exposure is within permissible limits.

(e) Exposure to impulsive or impact noise should not exceed 140 dB peak sound pressure level.

§ 1926.53 Ionizing radiation.

(a) In construction and related activities involving the use of sources of ionizing radiation, the pertinent provisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Standards for Protection Against Radiation (10 CFR part 20), relating to protection against occupational radiation exposure, shall apply.

(b) Any activity which involves the use of radioactive materials or X-rays, whether or not under license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, shall be performed by competent persons specially trained in the proper and safe operation of such equipment. In the case of materials used under Commission license, only persons actually licensed, or competent persons under direction and supervision of the licensee, shall perform such work.

(c-r) [Reserved]

Note:

The requirements applicable to construction work under paragraphs (c) through (r) of this section are identical to those set forth at paragraphs (a) through (p) of § 1910.1096 of this chapter.

[44 FR 8577, Feb. 9, 1979; 44 FR 20940, Apr. 6, 1979, as amended at 61 FR 5510, Feb. 13, 1996; 61 FR 31431, June 20, 1996]

§ 1926.54 Nonionizing radiation.

(a) Only qualified and trained employees shall be assigned to install, adjust, and operate laser equipment.

(b) Proof of qualification of the laser equipment operator shall be available and in possession of the operator at all times.

(c) Employees, when working in areas in which a potential exposure to direct or reflected laser light greater than 0.005 watts (5 milliwatts) exists, shall be provided with antilaser eye protection devices as specified in subpart E of this part.

(d) Areas in which lasers are used shall be posted with standard laser warning placards.

(e) Beam shutters or caps shall be utilized, or the laser turned off, when laser transmission is not actually required. When the laser is left unattended for a substantial period of time, such as during lunch hour, overnight, or at change of shifts, the laser shall be turned off.

(f) Only mechanical or electronic means shall be used as a detector for guiding the internal alignment of the laser.

(g) The laser beam shall not be directed at employees.

(h) When it is raining or snowing, or when there is dust or fog in the air, the operation of laser systems shall be prohibited where practicable; in any event, employees shall be kept out of range of the area of source and target during such weather conditions.

(i) Laser equipment shall bear a label to indicate maximum output.

(j) Employees shall not be exposed to light intensities above:

(1) Direct staring: 1 micro-watt per square centimeter;

(2) Incidental observing: 1 milliwatt per square centimeter;

(3) Diffused reflected light: 21/2 watts per square centimeter.

(k) Laser unit in operation should be set up above the heads of the employees, when possible.

(l) Employees shall not be exposed to microwave power densities in excess of 10 milliwatts per square centimeter.

§ 1926.55 Gases, vapors, fumes, dusts, and mists.

(a) Employers must limit an employee's exposure to any substance listed in Table 1 or 2 of this section in accordance with the following:

(1) Substances with limits preceded by (C) - Ceiling Values. An employee's exposure, as determined from breathing-zone air samples, to any substance in Table 1 of this section with a permissible exposure limit preceded by (C) must at no time exceed the exposure limit specified for that substance. If instantaneous monitoring is not feasible, then the employer must assess the ceiling as a 15-minute time-weighted average exposure that the employer cannot exceed at any time during the working day.

(2) Other substances - 8-hour Time Weighted Averages. An employee's exposure, as determined from breathing-zone air samples, to any substance in Table 1 or 2 of this section with a permissible exposure limit not preceded by (C) must not exceed the limit specified for that substance measured as an 8-hour time-weighted average in any work shift.

(b) To achieve compliance with paragraph (a) of this section, administrative or engineering controls must first be implemented whenever feasible. When such controls are not feasible to achieve full compliance, protective equipment or other protective measures shall be used to keep the exposure of employees to air contaminants within the limits prescribed in this section. Any equipment and technical measures used for this purpose must first be approved for each particular use by a competent industrial hygienist or other technically qualified person. Whenever respirators are used, their use shall comply with § 1926.103.

(c) Paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section do not apply to the exposure of employees to airborne asbestos, tremolite, anthophyllite, or actinolite dust. Whenever any employee is exposed to airborne asbestos, tremolite, anthophyllite, or actinolite dust, the requirements of § 1926.1101 shall apply.

(d) Paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section do not apply to the exposure of employees to formaldehyde. Whenever any employee is exposed to formaldehyde, the requirements of § 1910.1048 of this title shall apply.

Table 1 to § 1926.55 - Permissible Exposure Limits for Airborne Contaminants

Substance CAS No.d ppma mg/m3 b Skin
designation *
Abate; see Temephos
Acetaldehyde 75-07-0 200 360 -
Acetic acid 64-19-7 10 25 -
Acetic anhydride 108-24-7 5 20 -
Acetone 67-64-1 1000 2400 -
Acetonitrile 75-05-8 40 70 -
2-Acetylaminofluorine; see § 1926.1114 53-96-3
Acetylene 74-86-2 E
Acetylene dichloride; see 1,2-Dichloroethylene
Acetylene tetrabromide 79-27-6 1 14 -
Acrolein 107-02-8 0.1 0.25 -
Acrylamide 79-06-1 - 0.3 X
Acrylonitrile; see § 1926.1145 107-13-1
Aldrin 309-00-2 - 0.25 X
Allyl alcohol 107-18-6 2 5 X
Allyl chloride 107-05-1 1 3 -
Allyl glycidyl ether (AGE) 106-92-3 (C)10 (C)45 -
Allyl propyl disulfide 2179-59-1 2 12 -
alpha-Alumina 1344-28-1
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Alundum; see alpha-Alumina
4-Aminodiphenyl; see § 1926.1111 92-67-1
2-Aminoethanol; see Ethanolamine
2-Aminopyridine 504-29-0 0.5 2 -
Ammonia 7664-41-7 50 35 -
Ammonium sulfamate 7773-06-0
Total dust - 15 -
Respirable fraction - 5 -
n-Amyl acetate 628-63-7 100 525 -
sec-Amyl acetate 626-38-0 125 650 -
Aniline and homologs 62-53-3 5 19 X
Anisidine (o-, p-isomers) 29191-52-4 - 0.5 X
Antimony and compounds (as Sb) 7440-36-0 - 0.5 -
ANTU (alpha Naphthylthiourea) 86-88-4 - 0.3 -
Argon 7440-37-1 E
Arsenic, inorganic compounds (as As); see § 1926.1118 7440-38-2 - - -
Arsenic, organic compounds (as As) 7440-38-2 - 0.5 -
Arsine 7784-42-1 0.05 0.2 -
Asbestos; see § 1926.1101
Azinphos-methyl 86-50-0 - 0.2 X
Barium, soluble compounds (as Ba) 7440-39-3 - 0.5 -
Benzeneg; see § 1926.1128 71-43-2
Benzidine; see § 1926.1110 92-87-5
p-Benzoquinone; see Quinone
Benzo(a)pyrene; see Coal tar pitch volatiles
Benzoyl peroxide 94-36-0 - 5 -
Benzyl chloride 100-44-7 1 5 -
Beryllium and beryllium compounds (as Be); see 1926.1124(q) 7440-41-7 - 0.002 -
Biphenyl; see Diphenyl
Bisphenol A; see Diglycidyl ether
Boron oxide 1303-86-2
Total dust - 15 -
Boron tribromide 10294-33-4 1 10 -
Boron trifluoride 7637-07-2 (C)1 (C)3 -
Bromine 7726-95-6 0.1 0.7 -
Bromine pentafluoride 7789-30-2 0.1 0.7 -
Bromoform 75-25-2 0.5 5 X
Butadiene (1,3-Butadiene); see 29 CFR 1910.1051; 29 CFR 1910.19(l) 106-99-0 STEL 1 ppm/5 ppm -
Butanethiol; see Butyl mercaptan
2-Butanone (Methyl ethyl ketone) 78-93-3 200 590 -
2-Butoxyethanol 111-76-2 50 240 X
n-Butyl-acetate 123-86-4 150 710 -
sec-Butyl acetate 105-46-4 200 950 -
tert-Butyl acetate 540-88-5 200 950 -
n-Butyl alcohol 71-36-3 100 300 -
sec-Butyl alcohol 78-92-2 150 450 -
tert-Butyl alcohol 75-65-0 100 300 -
Butylamine 109-73-9 (C)5 (C)15 X
tert-Butyl chromate (as CrO3); see 1926.1126n 1189-85-1
n-Butyl glycidyl ether (BGE) 2426-08-6 50 270 -
Butyl mercaptan 109-79-5 0.5 1.5 -
p-tert-Butyltoluene 98-51-1 10 60 -
Cadmium (as Cd); see 1926.1127 7440-43-9
Calcium carbonate 1317-65-3
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Calcium oxide 1305-78-8 - 5 -
Calcium sulfate 7778-18-9
Total dust - 15 -
Respirable fraction - 5 -
Camphor, synthetic 76-22-2 - 2 -
Carbaryl (Sevin) 63-25-2 - 5 -
Carbon black 1333-86-4 - 3.5 -
Carbon dioxide 124-38-9 5000 9000 -
Carbon disulfide 75-15-0 20 60 X
Carbon monoxide 630-08-0 50 55 -
Carbon tetrachloride 56-23-5 10 65 X
Cellulose 9004-34-6
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Chlordane 57-74-9 - 0.5 X
Chlorinated camphene 8001-35-2 - 0.5 X
Chlorinated diphenyl oxide 55720-99-5 - 0.5 -
Chlorine 7782-50-5 1 3 -
Chlorine dioxide 10049-04-4 0.1 0.3
Chlorine trifluoride 7790-91-2 (C)0.1 (C)0.4 -
Chloroacetaldehyde 107-20-0 (C)1 (C)3 -
a-Chloroacetophenone (Phenacyl chloride) 532-27-4 0.05 0.3 -
Chlorobenzene 108-90-7 75 350 -
o-Chlorobenzylidene malononitrile 2698-41-1 0.05 0.4 -
Chlorobromomethane 74-97-5 200 1050 -
2-Chloro-1,3-butadiene; see beta-Chloroprene
Chlorodiphenyl (42% Chlorine) (PCB) 53469-21-9 - 1 X
Chlorodiphenyl (54% Chlorine) (PCB) 11097-69-1 - 0.5 X
1-Chloro,2,3-epoxypropane; see Epichlorohydrin
2-Chloroethanol; see Ethylene chlorohydrin
Chloroethylene; see Vinyl chloride
Chloroform (Trichloromethane) 67-66-3 (C)50 (C)240 -
bis(Chloromethyl) ether; see § 1926.1108 542-88-1
Chloromethyl methyl ether; see § 1926.1106 107-30-2
1-Chloro-1-nitropropane 600-25-9 20 100 -
Chloropicrin 76-06-2 0.1 0.7 -
beta-Chloroprene 126-99-8 25 90 X
Chromium (II) compounds
(as Cr) 7440-47-3 - 0.5 -
Chromium (III) compounds
(as Cr) 7440-47-3 - 0.5 -
Chromium (VI) compounds; See 1926.1126o
Chromium metal and insol. salts (as Cr) 7440-47-3 - 1 -
Chrysene; see Coal tar pitch volatiles
Coal tar pitch volatiles (benzene soluble fraction), anthracene, BaP, phenanthrene, acridine, chrysene, pyrene 65996-93-2 - 0.2 -
Cobalt metal, dust, and fume (as Co) 7440-48-4 - 0.1 -
Copper 7440-50-8
Fume (as Cu) - 0.1 -
Dusts and mists (as Cu) - 1 -
Corundum; see Emery
Cotton dust (raw) - 1
Crag herbicide (Sesone) 136-78-7
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Cresol, all isomers 1319-77-3 5 22 X
Crotonaldehyde 123-73-9; 2 6
4170-30-3
Cumene 98-82-8 50 245 X
Cyanides (as CN) Varies with Compound - 5 X
Cyanogen 460-19-5 10 - -
Cyclohexane 110-82-7 300 1050 -
Cyclohexanol 108-93-0 50 200 -
Cyclohexanone 108-94-1 50 200 -
Cyclohexene 110-83-8 300 1015 -
Cyclonite 121-82-4 - 1.5 X
Cyclopentadiene 542-92-7 75 200 -
DDT, see Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane
DDVP, see Dichlorvos
2,4-D (Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) 94-75-7 - 10 -
Decaborane 17702-41-9 0.05 0.3 X
Demeton (Systox) 8065-48-3 - 0.1 X
Diacetone alcohol (4-Hydroxy-4-methyl-2-pentanone) 123-42-2 50 240 -
1,2-Diaminoethane; see Ethylenediamine
Diazomethane 334-88-3 0.2 0.4 -
Diborane 19287-45-7 0.1 0.1 -
1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP); see § 1926.1144 96-12-8 -
1,2-Dibromoethane; see Ethylene dibromide
Dibutyl phosphate 107-66-4 1 5 -
Dibutyl phthalate 84-74-2 - 5 -
Dichloroacetylene 7572-29-4 (C)0.1 (C)0.4 -
o-Dichlorobenzene 95-50-1 (C)50 (C)300 -
p-Dichlorobenzene 106-46-7 75 450 -
3,3′-Dichlorobenzidine; see § 1926.1107 91-94-1
Dichlorodifluoromethane 75-71-8 1000 4950 -
1,3-Dichloro-5,5-dimethyl hydantoin 118-52-5 - 0.2 -
Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) 50-29-3 - 1 X
1,1-Dichloroethane 75-34-3 100 400 -
1,2-Dichloroethane; see Ethylene dichloride
1,2-Dichloroethylene 540-59-0 200 790 -
Dichloroethyl ether 111-44-4 (C)15 (C)90 X
Dichloromethane; see Methylene chloride
Dichloromonofluoromethane 75-43-4 1000 4200 -
1,1-Dichloro-1-nitroethane 594-72-9 (C)10 (C)60 -
1,2-Dichloropropane; see Propylene dichloride
Dichlorotetrafluoroethane 76-14-2 1000 7000 -
Dichlorvos (DDVP) 62-73-7 - 1 X
Dieldrin 60-57-1 - 0.25 X
Diethylamine 109-89-7 25 75 -
2-Diethylaminoethanol 100-37-8 10 50 X
Diethylene triamine 111-40-0 (C)10 (C)42 X
Diethyl ether; see Ethyl ether
Difluorodibromomethane 75-61-6 100 860 -
Diglycidyl ether (DGE) 2238-07-5 (C)0.5 (C)2.8 -
Dihydroxybenzene; see Hydroquinone
Diisobutyl ketone 108-83-8 50 290 -
Diisopropylamine 108-18-9 5 20 X
4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene; see § 1926.1115 60-11-7
Dimethoxymethane; see Methylal
Dimethyl acetamide 127-19-5 10 35 X
Dimethylamine 124-40-3 10 18 -
Dimethylaminobenzene; see Xylidine
Dimethylaniline (N,N-Dimethylaniline) 121-69-7 5 25 X
Dimethylbenzene; see Xylene
Dimethyl-1,2-dibromo- 2,2-dichloroethyl phosphate 300-76-5 - 3 -
Dimethylformamide 68-12-2 10 30 X
2,6-Dimethyl-4-heptanone; see Diisobutyl ketone
1,1-Dimethylhydrazine 57-14-7 0.5 1 X
Dimethylphthalate 131-11-3 - 5 -
Dimethyl sulfate 77-78-3 1 5 X
Dinitrobenzene (all isomers) 1 X
(ortho) 528-29-0
(meta) 99-65-0
(para) 100-25-4
Dinitro-o-cresol 534-52-1 - 0.2 X
Dinitrotoluene 25321-14-6 - 1.5 X
Dioxane (Diethylene dioxide) 123-91-1 100 360 X
Diphenyl (Biphenyl) 92-52-4 0.2 1 -
Diphenylamine 122-39-4 - 10 -
Diphenylmethane diisocyanate; see Methylene bisphenyl isocyanate
Dipropylene glycol methyl ether 34590-94-8 100 600 X
Di-sec octyl phthalate (Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate) 117-81-7 - 5 -
Emery 12415-34-8
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Endosulfan 115-29-7 - 0.1 X
Endrin 72-20-8 - 0.1 X
Epichlorohydrin 106-89-8 5 19 X
EPN 2104-64-5 - 0.5 X
1,2-Epoxypropane; see Propylene oxide
2,3-Epoxy-1-propanol; see Glycidol
Ethane 74-84-0 E
Ethanethiol; see Ethyl mercaptan
Ethanolamine 141-43-5 3 6 -
2-Ethoxyethanol (Cellosolve) 110-80-5 200 740 X
2-Ethoxyethyl acetate (Cellosolve acetate) 111-15-9 100 540 X
Ethyl acetate 141-78-6 400 1400 -
Ethyl acrylate 140-88-5 25 100 X
Ethyl alcohol (Ethanol) 64-17-5 1000 1900 -
Ethylamine 75-04-7 10 18 -
Ethyl amyl ketone (5-Methyl-3-heptanone) 541-85-5 25 130 -
Ethyl benzene 100-41-4 100 435 -
Ethyl bromide 74-96-4 200 890 -
Ethyl butyl ketone (3-Heptanone) 106-35-4 50 230 -
Ethyl chloride 75-00-3 1000 2600 -
Ethyl ether 60-29-7 400 1200 -
Ethyl formate 109-94-4 100 300 -
Ethyl mercaptan 75-08-1 0.5 1 -
Ethyl silicate 78-10-4 100 850 -
Ethylene 74-85-1 E
Ethylene chlorohydrin 107-07-3 5 16 X
Ethylenediamine 107-15-3 10 25 -
Ethylene dibromide 106-93-4 (C)25 (C)190 X
Ethylene dichloride (1,2-Dichloroethane) 107-06-2 50 200 -
Ethylene glycol dinitrate 628-96-6 (C)0.2 (C)1 X
Ethylene glycol methyl acetate; see Methyl cellosolve acetate
Ethyleneimine; see § 1926.1112 151-56-4
Ethylene oxide; see § 1926.1147 75-21-8
Ethylidene chloride; see 1,1-Dichloroethane
N-Ethylmorpholine 100-74-3 20 94 X
Ferbam 14484-64-1
Total dust - 15 -
Ferrovanadium dust 12604-58-9 - 1 -
Fibrous Glass
Total dust -
Respirable fraction - -
Fluorides (as F) Varies with compound - 2.5 -
Fluorine 7782-41-4 0.1 0.2 -
Fluorotrichloromethane (Trichlorofluoromethane) 75-69-4 1000 5600 -
Formaldehyde; see § 1926.1148 50-00-0
Formic acid 64-18-6 5 9 -
Furfural 98-01-1 5 20 X
Furfuryl alcohol 98-00-0 50 200 -
Gasoline 8006-61-9 A3 -
Glycerin (mist) 56-81-5
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Glycidol 556-52-5 50 150 -
Glycol monoethyl ether; see 2-Ethoxyethanol
Graphite, natural, respirable dust 7782-42-5 (2) (2) (2)
Graphite, synthetic
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Guthion; see Azinphos methyl
Gypsum 13397-24-5
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Hafnium 7440-58-6 - 0.5 -
Helium 7440-59-7 E
Heptachlor 76-44-8 - 0.5 X
Heptane (n-Heptane) 142-82-5 500 2000 -
Hexachloroethane 67-72-1 1 10 X
Hexachloronaphthalene 1335-87-1 - 0.2 X
n-Hexane 110-54-3 500 1800 -
2-Hexanone (Methyl n-butyl ketone) 591-78-6 100 410 -
Hexone (Methyl isobutyl ketone) 108-10-1 100 410 -
sec-Hexyl acetate 108-84-9 50 300 -
Hydrazine 302-01-2 1 1.3 X
Hydrogen 1333-74-0 E
Hydrogen bromide 10035-10-6 3 10 -
Hydrogen chloride 7647-01-0 (C)5 (C)7 -
Hydrogen cyanide 74-90-8 10 11 X
Hydrogen fluoride (as F) 7664-39-3 3 2 -
Hydrogen peroxide 7722-84-1 1 1.4 -
Hydrogen selenide (as Se) 7783-07-5 0.05 .02 -
Hydrogen sulfide 7783-06-4 10 15 -
Hydroquinone 123-31-9 - 2 -
Indene 95-13-6 10 45 -
Indium and compounds (as In) 7440-74-6 - 0.1 -
Iodine 7553-56-2 (C)0.1 (C)1 -
Iron oxide fume 1309-37-1 - 10 -
Iron salts (soluble) (as Fe) Varies with compound - 1 -
Isoamyl acetate 123-92-2 100 525 -
Isoamyl alcohol (primary and secondary) 123-51-3 100 360 -
Isobutyl acetate 110-19-0 150 700 -
Isobutyl alcohol 78-83-1 100 300 -
Isophorone 78-59-1 25 140 -
Isopropyl acetate 108-21-4 250 950 -
Isopropyl alcohol 67-63-0 400 980 -
Isopropylamine 75-31-0 5 12 -
Isopropyl ether 108-20-3 500 2100 -
Isopropyl glycidyl ether (IGE) 4016-14-2 50 240 -
Kaolin 1332-58-7
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Ketene 463-51-4 0.5 0.9 -
Lead, inorganic (as Pb); see 1926.62 7439-92-1
Limestone 1317-65-3
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Lindane 58-89-9 - 0.5 X
Lithium hydride 7580-67-8 - 0.025 -
L.P.G. (Liquefied petroleum gas) 68476-85-7 1000 1800
Magnesite 546-93-0
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Magnesium oxide fume 1309-48-4
Total particulate 15 - -
Malathion 121-75-5
Total dust - 15 X
Maleic anhydride 108-31-6 0.25
Manganese compounds (as Mn) 7439-96-5 - (C)5 -
Manganese fume (as Mn) 7439-96-5 - (C)5 -
Marble 1317-65-3
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Mercury (aryl and inorganic)(as Hg) 7439-97-6 0.1 X
Mercury (organo) alkyl compounds (as Hg) 7439-97-6 - 0.01 X
Mercury (vapor) (as Hg) 7439-97-6 - 0.1 X
Mesityl oxide 141-79-7 25 100 -
Methane 74-82-8 E
Methanethiol; see Methyl mercaptan
Methoxychlor 72-43-5
Total dust - 15 -
2-Methoxyethanol (Methyl cellosolve) 109-86-4 25 80 X
2-Methoxyethyl acetate (Methyl cellosolve acetate) 110-49-6 25 120 X
Methyl acetate 79-20-9 200 610 -
Methyl acetylene (Propyne) 74-99-7 1000 1650 -
Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture (MAPP) 1000 1800 -
Methyl acrylate 96-33-3 10 35 X
Methylal (Dimethoxy-methane) 109-87-5 1000 3100 -
Methyl alcohol 67-56-1 200 260 -
Methylamine 74-89-5 10 12 -
Methyl amyl alcohol; see Methyl isobutyl carbinol
Methyl n-amyl ketone 110-43-0 100 465 -
Methyl bromide 74-83-9 (C)20 (C)80 X
Methyl butyl ketone; see 2-Hexanone
Methyl cellosolve; see 2-Methoxyethanol
Methyl cellosolve acetate; see 2-Methoxyethyl acetate
Methylene chloride; see § 1910.1052
Methyl chloroform (1,1,1-Trichloroethane) 71-55-6 350 1900 -
Methylcyclohexane 108-87-2 500 2000 -
Methylcyclohexanol 25639-42-3 100 470 -
o-Methylcyclohexanone 583-60-8 100 460 X
Methylene chloride 75-09-2 500 1740 -
Methylenedianiline (MDA) 101-77-9
Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK); see 2-Butanone
Methyl formate 107-31-3 100 250 -
Methyl hydrazine (Monomethyl hydrazine) 60-34-4 (C)0.2 (C)0.35 X
Methyl iodide 74-88-4 5 28 X
Methyl isoamyl ketone 110-12-3 100 475 -
Methyl isobutyl carbinol 108-11-2 25 100 X
Methyl isobutyl ketone; see Hexone
Methyl isocyanate 624-83-9 0.02 0.05 X
Methyl mercaptan 74-93-1 0.5 1 -
Methyl methacrylate 80-62-6 100 410 -
Methyl propyl ketone; see 2-Pentanone
Methyl silicate 681-84-5 (C)5 (C)30 -
alpha-Methyl styrene 98-83-9 (C)100 (C)480 -
Methylene bisphenyl isocyanate (MDI) 101-68-8 (C)0.02 (C)0.2 -
Mica; see Silicates
Molybdenum (as Mo) 7439-98-7
Soluble compounds - 5 -
Insoluble compounds
Total dust - 15 -
Monomethyl aniline 100-61-8 2 9 X
Monomethyl hydrazine; see Methyl hydrazine
Morpholine 110-91-8 20 70 X
Naphtha (Coal tar) 8030-30-6 100 400 -
Naphthalene 91-20-3 10 50 -
alpha-Naphthylamine; see § 1926.1104 134-32-7
beta-Naphthylamine; see § 1926.1109 91-59-8 -
Neon 7440-01-9 E
Nickel carbonyl (as Ni) 13463-39-3 0.001 0.007 -
Nickel, metal and insoluble compounds (as Ni) 7440-02-0 - 1 -
Nickel, soluble compounds (as Ni) 7440-02-0 - 1 -
Nicotine 54-11-5 - 0.5 X
Nitric acid 7697-37-2 2 5 -
Nitric oxide 10102-43-9 25 30 -
p-Nitroaniline 100-01-6 1 6 X
Nitrobenzene 98-95-3 1 5 X
p-Nitrochlorobenzene 100-00-5 - 1 X
4-Nitrodiphenyl; see § 1926.1103 92-93-3
Nitroethane 79-24-3 100 310 -
Nitrogen 7727-37-9 E
Nitrogen dioxide 10102-44-0 (C)5 (C)9 -
Nitrogen trifluoride 7783-54-2 10 29 -
Nitroglycerin 55-63-0 (C)0.2 (C)2 X
Nitromethane 75-52-5 100 250 -
1-Nitropropane 108-03-2 25 90 -
2-Nitropropane 79-46-9 25 90 -
N-Nitrosodimethylamine; see § 1926.1116 62-79-9 -
Nitrotoluene (all isomers) 5 30 X
o-isomer 88-72-2;
m-isomer 99-08-1;
p-isomer 99-99-0
Nitrotrichloromethane; see Chloropicrin
Nitrous oxide 10024-97-2 E
Octachloronaphthalene 2234-13-1 - 0.1 X
Octane 111-65-9 400 1900 -
Oil mist, mineral 8012-95-1 - 5 -
Osmium tetroxide (as Os) 20816-12-0 - 0.002 -
Oxalic acid 144-62-7 - 1 -
Oxygen difluoride 7783-41-7 0.05 0.1 -
Ozone 10028-15-6 0.1 0.2 -
Paraquat, respirable dust 4685-14-7; - 0.5 X
1910-42-5;
2074-50-2
Parathion 56-38-2 - 0.1 X
Particulates not otherwise regulated
Total dust organic and inorganic - 15 -
PCB; see Chlorodiphenyl (42% and 54% chlorine)
Pentaborane 19624-22-7 0.005 0.01 -
Pentachloronaphthalene 1321-64-8 - 0.5 X
Pentachlorophenol 87-86-5 - 0.5 X
Pentaerythritol 115-77-5
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Pentane 109-66-0 500 1500 -
2-Pentanone (Methyl propyl ketone) 107-87-9 200 700 -
Perchloroethylene (Tetrachloroethylene) 127-18-4 100 670 -
Perchloromethyl mercaptan 594-42-3 0.1 0.8 -
Perchloryl fluoride 7616-94-6 3 13.5 -
Petroleum distillates (Naphtha)(Rubber Solvent) A3 -
Phenol 108-95-2 5 19 X
p-Phenylene diamine 106-50-3 - 0.1 X
Phenyl ether, vapor 101-84-8 1 7 -
Phenyl ether-biphenyl mixture, vapor 1 7 -
Phenylethylene; see Styrene
Phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE) 122-60-1 10 60 -
Phenylhydrazine 100-63-0 5 22 X
Phosdrin (Mevinphos) 7786-34-7 - 0.1 X
Phosgene (Carbonyl chloride) 75-44-5 0.1 0.4 -
Phosphine 7803-51-2 0.3 0.4 -
Phosphoric acid 7664-38-2 - 1 -
Phosphorus (yellow) 7723-14-0 - 0.1 -
Phosphorus pentachloride 10026-13-8 - 1 -
Phosphorus pentasulfide 1314-80-3 - 1 -
Phosphorus trichloride 7719-12-2 0.5 3 -
Phthalic anhydride 85-44-9 2 12 -
Picric acid 88-89-1 - 0.1 X
Pindone (2-Pivalyl-1,3-indandione) 83-26-1 - 0.1 -
Plaster of Paris 26499-65-0
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Platinum (as Pt) 7440-06-4
Metal - - -
Soluble salts - 0.002 -
Polytetrafluoroethylene decomposition products A2
Portland cement 65997-15-1
Total dust - 15 -
Respirable fraction 5 -
Propane 74-98-6 E
Propargyl alcohol 107-19-7 1 - X
beta-Propriolactone; see § 1926.1113 57-57-8
n-Propyl acetate 109-60-4 200 840 -
n-Propyl alcohol 71-23-8 200 500 -
n-Propyl nitrate 627-13-4 25 110 -
Propylene dichloride 78-87-5 75 350 -
Propylene imine 75-55-8 2 5 X
Propylene oxide 75-56-9 100 240 -
Propyne; see Methyl acetylene
Pyrethrum 8003-34-7 - 5 -
Pyridine 110-86-1 5 15 -
Quinone 106-51-4 0.1 0.4 -
RDX; see Cyclonite
Rhodium (as Rh), metal fume and insoluble compounds 7440-16-6 - 0.1 -
Rhodium (as Rh), soluble compounds 7440-16-6 - 0.001 -
Ronnel 299-84-3 - 10 -
Rotenone 83-79-4 - 5 -
Rouge
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Selenium compounds (as Se) 7782-49-2 - 0.2 -
Selenium hexafluoride (as Se) 7783-79-1 0.05 0.4 -
Silica, amorphous, precipitated and gel 112926-00-8 (2) (2) (2)
Silica, amorphous, diatomaceous earth, containing less than 1% crystalline silica 61790-53-2 (2) (2) (2)
Silica, crystalline, respirable dust
Cristobalite; see 1926.1153 14464-46-1
Quartz; see 1926.11535 14808-60-7
Tripoli (as quartz); see 1926.11535 1317-95-9
Tridymite; see 1926.1153 15468-32-3
Silica, fused, respirable dust 60676-86-0 (2) (2) (2)
Silicates (less than 1% crystalline silica)
Mica (respirable dust) 12001-26-2 (2) (2) (2)
Soapstone, total dust (2) (2) (2)
Soapstone, respirable dust (2) (2) (2)
Talc (containing asbestos); use asbestos limit; see § 1926.1101
Talc (containing no asbestos), respirable dust 14807-96-6 (2) (2) (2)
Tremolite, asbestiform; see § 1926.1101
Silicon carbide 409-21-2
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Silver, metal and soluble compounds (as Ag) 7440-22-4 - 0.01 -
Soapstone; see Silicates
Sodium fluoroacetate 62-74-8 - 0.05 X
Sodium hydroxide 1310-73-2 - 2 -
Starch 9005-25-8
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Stibine 7803-52-3 0.1 0.5 -
Stoddard solvent 8052-41-3 200 1150 -
Strychnine 57-24-9 - 0.15 -
Styrene 100-42-5 (C)100 (C)420 -
Sucrose 57-50-1
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Sulfur dioxide 7446-09-5 5 13 -
Sulfur hexafluoride 2551-62-4 1000 6000 -
Sulfuric acid 7664-93-9 - 1 -
Sulfur monochloride 10025-67-9 1 6 -
Sulfur pentafluoride 5714-22-7 0.025 0.25 -
Sulfuryl fluoride 2699-79-8 5 20 -
Systox, see Demeton
2,4,5-T (2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid) 93-76-5 - 10 -
Talc; see Silicates -
Tantalum, metal and oxide dust 7440-25-7 - 5 -
TEDP (Sulfotep) 3689-24-5 - 0.2 X
Teflon decomposition products A2
Tellurium and compounds (as Te) 13494-80-9 - 0.1 -
Tellurium hexafluoride (as Te) 7783-80-4 0.02 0.2 -
Temephos 3383-96-8
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
TEPP (Tetraethyl pyrophosphate) 107-49-3 - 0.05 X
Terphenyls 26140-60-3 (C)1 (C)9 -
1,1,1,2-Tetrachloro-2,2-difluoroethane 76-11-9 500 4170 -
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloro-1,2-difluoroethane 76-12-0 500 4170 -
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane 79-34-5 5 35 X
Tetrachloroethylene; see Perchloroethylene
Tetrachloromethane; see Carbon tetrachloride
Tetrachloronaphthalene 1335-88-2 - 2 X
Tetraethyl lead (as Pb) 78-00-2 - 0.1 X
Tetrahydrofuran 109-99-9 200 590 -
Tetramethyl lead, (as Pb) 75-74-1 - 0.15 X
Tetramethyl succinonitrile 3333-52-6 0.5 3 X
Tetranitromethane 509-14-8 1 8 -
Tetryl (2,4,6-Trinitrophenylmethylnitramine) 479-45-8 - 1.5 X
Thallium, soluble compounds (as Tl) 7440-28-0 - 0.1 X
Thiram 137-26-8 - 5 -
Tin, inorganic compounds (except oxides) (as Sn) 7440-31-5 - 2 -
Tin, organic compounds (as Sn) 7440-31-5 - 0.1 -
Tin oxide (as Sn) 21651-19-4 - - -
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Titanium dioxide 13463-67-7
Total dust - -
Toluene 108-88-3 200 750 -
Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) 584-84-9 (C)0.02 (C)0.14 -
o-Toluidine 95-53-4 5 22 X
Toxaphene; see Chlorinated camphene
Tremolite; see Silicates
Tributyl phosphate 126-73-8 - 5 -
1,1,1-Trichloroethane; see Methyl chloroform
1,1,2-Trichloroethane 79-00-5 10 45 X
Trichloroethylene 79-01-6 100 535 -
Trichloromethane; see Chloroform
Trichloronaphthalene 1321-65-9 - 5 X
1,2,3-Trichloropropane 96-18-4 50 300 -
1,1,2-Trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane 76-13-1 1000 7600 -
Triethylamine 121-44-8 25 100 -
Trifluorobromomethane 75-63-8 1000 6100 -
Trimethyl benzene 25551-13-7 25 120 -
2,4,6-Trinitrophenol; see Picric acid
2,4,6-Trinitrophenylmethylnitramine; see Tetryl
2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) 118-96-7 - 1.5 X
Triorthocresyl phosphate 78-30-8 - 0.1 -
Triphenyl phosphate 115-86-6 - 3 -
Tungsten (as W) 7440-33-7
Insoluble compounds - 5 -
Soluble compounds - 1 -
Turpentine 8006-64-2 100 560 -
Uranium (as U) 7440-61-1
Soluble compounds - 0.2 -
Insoluble compounds - 0.2 -
Vanadium 1314-62-1
Respirable dust (as V2 O5) - (C)0.5 -
Fume (as V2 O5) - (C)0.1 -
Vegetable oil mist
Total dust - -
Respirable fraction - -
Vinyl benzene; see Styrene
Vinyl chloride; see § 1926.1117 75-01-4
Vinyl cyanide; see Acrylonitrile
Vinyl toluene 25013-15-4 100 480 -
Warfarin 81-81-2 - 0.1 -
Xylenes (o-, m-, p-isomers) 1330-20-7 100 435 -
Xylidine 1300-73-8 5 25 X
Yttrium 7440-65-5 - 1 -
Zinc chloride fume 7646-85-7 - 1 -
Zinc oxide fume 1314-13-2 - 5 -
Zinc oxide 1314-13-2
Total dust - 15 -
Respirable fraction - 5 -
Zirconium compounds (as Zr) 7440-67-7 - 5

Table 2 to § 1926.55 - Mineral Dusts

Substance mppcf(j)
SILICA:
Crystalline 250(k)
Quartz. Threshold Limit calculated from the formula(p) % SiO2 + 5
Cristobalite
Amorphous, including natural diatomaceous earth 20
SILICATES (less than 1% crystalline silica)
Mica 20
Portland cement 50
Soapstone 20
Talc (non-asbestiform) 20
Talc (fibrous), use asbestos limit -
Graphite (natural) 15
Inert or Nuisance Particulates:(m) 50 (or 15 mg/m3 whichever is the smaller) of total dust <1% SiO2
[Inert or Nuisance Dusts includes all mineral, inorganic, and organic dusts as indicated by examples in TLV's appendix D]
Conversion factors
mppcf × 35.3 = million particles per cubic meter = particles per c.c.

[39 FR 22801, June 24, 1974, as amended at 51 FR 37007, Oct. 17, 1986; 52 FR 46312, Dec. 4, 1987; 58 FR 35089, June 30, 1993; 61 FR 9249, 9250, Mar. 7, 1996; 61 FR 56856, Nov. 4, 1996; 62 FR 1619, Jan. 10, 1997; 71 FR 10381, Feb. 28, 2006; 71 FR 36009, June 23, 2006; 81 FR 16875, Mar. 25, 2016; 81 FR 31168, May 18, 2016; 81 FR 60273, Sept. 1, 2016; 82 FR 2750, Jan. 9, 2017; 84 FR 21576, May 14, 2019]

§ 1926.56 Illumination.

(a) General. Construction areas, ramps, runways, corridors, offices, shops, and storage areas shall be lighted to not less than the minimum illumination intensities listed in Table D-3 while any work is in progress:

Table D-3 - Minimum Illumination Intensities in Foot-Candles

Foot-candles Area or operation
5 General construction area lighting.
3 General construction areas, concrete placement, excavation and waste areas, accessways, active storage areas, loading platforms, refueling, and field maintenance areas.
5 Indoors: warehouses, corridors, hallways, and exitways.
5 Tunnels, shafts, and general underground work areas: (Exception: minimum of 10 foot-candles is required at tunnel and shaft heading during drilling, mucking, and scaling. Bureau of Mines approved cap lights shall be acceptable for use in the tunnel heading.)
10 General construction plant and shops (e.g., batch plants, screening plants, mechanical and electrical equipment rooms, carpenter shops, rigging lofts and active storerooms, barracks or living quarters, locker or dressing rooms, mess halls, and indoor toilets and workrooms).
30 First aid stations, infirmaries, and offices.

(b) Other areas. For areas or operations not covered above, refer to the American National Standard A11.1-1965, R1970, Practice for Industrial Lighting, for recommended values of illumination.

§ 1926.57 Ventilation.

(a) General. Whenever hazardous substances such as dusts, fumes, mists, vapors, or gases exist or are produced in the course of construction work, their concentrations shall not exceed the limits specified in § 1926.55(a). When ventilation is used as an engineering control method, the system shall be installed and operated according to the requirements of this section.

(b) Local exhaust ventilation. Local exhaust ventilation when used as described in (a) shall be designed to prevent dispersion into the air of dusts, fumes, mists, vapors, and gases in concentrations causing harmful exposure. Such exhaust systems shall be so designed that dusts, fumes, mists, vapors, or gases are not drawn through the work area of employees.

(c) Design and operation. Exhaust fans, jets, ducts, hoods, separators, and all necessary appurtenances, including refuse receptacles, shall be so designed, constructed, maintained and operated as to ensure the required protection by maintaining a volume and velocity of exhaust air sufficient to gather dusts, fumes, vapors, or gases from said equipment or process, and to convey them to suitable points of safe disposal, thereby preventing their dispersion in harmful quantities into the atmosphere where employees work.

(d) Duration of operations.

(1) The exhaust system shall be in operation continually during all operations which it is designed to serve. If the employee remains in the contaminated zone, the system shall continue to operate after the cessation of said operations, the length of time to depend upon the individual circumstances and effectiveness of the general ventilation system.

(2) Since dust capable of causing disability is, according to the best medical opinion, of microscopic size, tending to remain for hours in suspension in still air, it is essential that the exhaust system be continued in operation for a time after the work process or equipment served by the same shall have ceased, in order to ensure the removal of the harmful elements to the required extent. For the same reason, employees wearing respiratory equipment should not remove same immediately until the atmosphere seems clear.

(e) Disposal of exhaust materials. The air outlet from every dust separator, and the dusts, fumes, mists, vapors, or gases collected by an exhaust or ventilating system shall discharge to the outside atmosphere. Collecting systems which return air to work area may be used if concentrations which accumulate in the work area air do not result in harmful exposure to employees. Dust and refuse discharged from an exhaust system shall be disposed of in such a manner that it will not result in harmful exposure to employees.

(f) Abrasive blasting -

(1) Definitions applicable to this paragraph -

(i) Abrasive. A solid substance used in an abrasive blasting operation.

(ii) Abrasive-blasting respirator. A respirator constructed so that it covers the wearer's head, neck, and shoulders to protect the wearer from rebounding abrasive.

(iii) Blast cleaning barrel. A complete enclosure which rotates on an axis, or which has an internal moving tread to tumble the parts, in order to expose various surfaces of the parts to the action of an automatic blast spray.

(iv) Blast cleaning room. A complete enclosure in which blasting operations are performed and where the operator works inside of the room to operate the blasting nozzle and direct the flow of the abrasive material.

(v) Blasting cabinet. An enclosure where the operator stands outside and operates the blasting nozzle through an opening or openings in the enclosure.

(vi) Clean air. Air of such purity that it will not cause harm or discomfort to an individual if it is inhaled for extended periods of time.

(vii) Dust collector. A device or combination of devices for separating dust from the air handled by an exhaust ventilation system.

(viii) Exhaust ventilation system. A system for removing contaminated air from a space, comprising two or more of the following elements

(A) enclosure or hood,

(B) duct work,

(C) dust collecting equipment,

(D) exhauster, and

(E) discharge stack.

(ix) Particulate-filter respirator. An air purifying respirator, commonly referred to as a dust or a fume respirator, which removes most of the dust or fume from the air passing through the device.

(x) Respirable dust. Airborne dust in sizes capable of passing through the upper respiratory system to reach the lower lung passages.

(xi) Rotary blast cleaning table. An enclosure where the pieces to be cleaned are positioned on a rotating table and are passed automatically through a series of blast sprays.

(xii) Abrasive blasting. The forcible application of an abrasive to a surface by pneumatic pressure, hydraulic pressure, or centrifugal force.

(2) Dust hazards from abrasive blasting.

(i) Abrasives and the surface coatings on the materials blasted are shattered and pulverized during blasting operations and the dust formed will contain particles of respirable size. The composition and toxicity of the dust from these sources shall be considered in making an evaluation of the potential health hazards.

(ii) The concentration of respirable dust or fume in the breathing zone of the abrasive-blasting operator or any other worker shall be kept below the levels specified in § 1926.55 or other pertinent sections of this part.

(iii) Organic abrasives which are combustible shall be used only in automatic systems. Where flammable or explosive dust mixtures may be present, the construction of the equipment, including the exhaust system and all electric wiring, shall conform to the requirements of American National Standard Installation of Blower and Exhaust Systems for Dust, Stock, and Vapor Removal or Conveying, Z33.1-1961 (NFPA 91-1961), and subpart S of this part. The blast nozzle shall be bonded and grounded to prevent the build up of static charges. Where flammable or explosive dust mixtures may be present, the abrasive blasting enclosure, the ducts, and the dust collector shall be constructed with loose panels or explosion venting areas, located on sides away from any occupied area, to provide for pressure relief in case of explosion, following the principles set forth in the National Fire Protection Association Explosion Venting Guide. NFPA 68-1954.

(3) Blast-cleaning enclosures.

(i) Blast-cleaning enclosures shall be exhaust ventilated in such a way that a continuous inward flow of air will be maintained at all openings in the enclosure during the blasting operation.

(A) All air inlets and access openings shall be baffled or so arranged that by the combination of inward air flow and baffling the escape of abrasive or dust particles into an adjacent work area will be minimized and visible spurts of dust will not be observed.

(B) The rate of exhaust shall be sufficient to provide prompt clearance of the dust-laden air within the enclosure after the cessation of blasting.

(C) Before the enclosure is opened, the blast shall be turned off and the exhaust system shall be run for a sufficient period of time to remove the dusty air within the enclosure.

(D) Safety glass protected by screening shall be used in observation windows, where hard deep-cutting abrasives are used.

(E) Slit abrasive-resistant baffles shall be installed in multiple sets at all small access openings where dust might escape, and shall be inspected regularly and replaced when needed.

(1) Doors shall be flanged and tight when closed.

(2) Doors on blast-cleaning rooms shall be operable from both inside and outside, except that where there is a small operator access door, the large work access door may be closed or opened from the outside only.

(4) Exhaust ventilation systems.

(i) The construction, installation, inspection, and maintenance of exhaust systems shall conform to the principles and requirements set forth in American National Standard Fundamentals Governing the Design and Operation of Local Exhaust Systems, Z9.2-1960, and ANSI Z33.1-1961.

(a) When dust leaks are noted, repairs shall be made as soon as possible.

(b) The static pressure drop at the exhaust ducts leading from the equipment shall be checked when the installation is completed and periodically thereafter to assure continued satisfactory operation. Whenever an appreciable change in the pressure drop indicates a partial blockage, the system shall be cleaned and returned to normal operating condition.

(ii) In installations where the abrasive is recirculated, the exhaust ventilation system for the blasting enclosure shall not be relied upon for the removal of fines from the spent abrasive instead of an abrasive separator. An abrasive separator shall be provided for the purpose.

(iii) The air exhausted from blast-cleaning equipment shall be discharged through dust collecting equipment. Dust collectors shall be set up so that the accumulated dust can be emptied and removed without contaminating other working areas.

(5) Personal protective equipment.

(i) Employers must use only respirators approved by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 for protecting employees from dusts produced during abrasive-blasting operations.

(ii) Abrasive-blasting respirators shall be worn by all abrasive-blasting operators:

(A) When working inside of blast-cleaning rooms, or

(B) When using silica sand in manual blasting operations where the nozzle and blast are not physically separated from the operator in an exhaust ventilated enclosure, or

(C) Where concentrations of toxic dust dispersed by the abrasive blasting may exceed the limits set in § 1926.55 or other pertinent sections of this part and the nozzle and blast are not physically separated from the operator in an exhaust-ventilated enclosure.

(iii) Properly fitted particulate-filter respirators, commonly referred to as dust-filter respirators, may be used for short, intermittent, or occasional dust exposures such as cleanup, dumping of dust collectors, or unloading shipments of sand at a receiving point when it is not feasible to control the dust by enclosure, exhaust ventilation, or other means. The respirators used must be approved by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 for protection against the specific type of dust encountered.

(iv) A respiratory protection program as defined and described in § 1926.103, shall be established wherever it is necessary to use respiratory protective equipment.

(v) Operators shall be equipped with heavy canvas or leather gloves and aprons or equivalent protection to protect them from the impact of abrasives. Safety shoes shall be worn to protect against foot injury where heavy pieces of work are handled.

(A) Safety shoes shall conform to the requirements of American National Standard for Men's Safety-Toe Footwear, Z41.1-1967.

(B) Equipment for protection of the eyes and face shall be supplied to the operator when the respirator design does not provide such protection and to any other personnel working in the vicinity of abrasive blasting operations. This equipment shall conform to the requirements of § 1926.102.

(6) Air supply and air compressors. Air for abrasive-blasting respirators must be free of harmful quantities of dusts, mists, or noxious gases, and must meet the requirements for supplied-air quality and use specified in 29 CFR 1910.134(i).

(7) Operational procedures and general safety. Dust shall not be permitted to accumulate on the floor or on ledges outside of an abrasive-blasting enclosure, and dust spills shall be cleaned up promptly. Aisles and walkways shall be kept clear of steel shot or similar abrasive which may create a slipping hazard.

(8) Scope. This paragraph applies to all operations where an abrasive is forcibly applied to a surface by pneumatic or hydraulic pressure, or by centrifugal force. It does not apply to steam blasting, or steam cleaning, or hydraulic cleaning methods where work is done without the aid of abrasives.

(g) Grinding, polishing, and buffing operations -

(1) Definitions applicable to this paragraph -

(i) Abrasive cutting-off wheels. Organic-bonded wheels, the thickness of which is not more than one forty-eighth of their diameter for those up to, and including, 20 inches (50.8 cm) in diameter, and not more than one-sixtieth of their diameter for those larger than 20 inches (50.8 cm) in diameter, used for a multitude of operations variously known as cutting, cutting off, grooving, slotting, coping, and jointing, and the like. The wheels may be “solid” consisting of organic-bonded abrasive material throughout, “steel centered” consisting of a steel disc with a rim of organic-bonded material moulded around the periphery, or of the “inserted tooth” type consisting of a steel disc with organic-bonded abrasive teeth or inserts mechanically secured around the periphery.

(ii) Belts. All power-driven, flexible, coated bands used for grinding, polishing, or buffing purposes.

(iii) Branch pipe. The part of an exhaust system piping that is connected directly to the hood or enclosure.

(iv) Cradle. A movable fixture, upon which the part to be ground or polished is placed.

(v) Disc wheels. All power-driven rotatable discs faced with abrasive materials, artificial or natural, and used for grinding or polishing on the side of the assembled disc.

(vi) Entry loss. The loss in static pressure caused by air flowing into a duct or hood. It is usually expressed in inches of water gauge.

(vii) Exhaust system. A system consisting of branch pipes connected to hoods or enclosures, one or more header pipes, an exhaust fan, means for separating solid contaminants from the air flowing in the system, and a discharge stack to outside.

(viii) Grinding wheels. All power-driven rotatable grinding or abrasive wheels, except disc wheels as defined in this standard, consisting of abrasive particles held together by artificial or natural bonds and used for peripheral grinding.

(ix) Header pipe (main pipe). A pipe into which one or more branch pipes enter and which connects such branch pipes to the remainder of the exhaust system.

(x) Hoods and enclosures. The partial or complete enclosure around the wheel or disc through which air enters an exhaust system during operation.

(xi) Horizontal double-spindle disc grinder. A grinding machine carrying two power-driven, rotatable, coaxial, horizontal spindles upon the inside ends of which are mounted abrasive disc wheels used for grinding two surfaces simultaneously.

(xii) Horizontal single-spindle disc grinder. A grinding machine carrying an abrasive disc wheel upon one or both ends of a power-driven, rotatable single horizontal spindle.

(xiii) Polishing and buffing wheels. All power-driven rotatable wheels composed all or in part of textile fabrics, wood, felt, leather, paper, and may be coated with abrasives on the periphery of the wheel for purposes of polishing, buffing, and light grinding.

(xiv) Portable grinder. Any power-driven rotatable grinding, polishing, or buffing wheel mounted in such manner that it may be manually manipulated.

(xv) Scratch brush wheels. All power-driven rotatable wheels made from wire or bristles, and used for scratch cleaning and brushing purposes.

(xvi) Swing-frame grinder. Any power-driven rotatable grinding, polishing, or buffing wheel mounted in such a manner that the wheel with its supporting framework can be manipulated over stationary objects.

(xvii) Velocity pressure (vp). The kinetic pressure in the direction of flow necessary to cause a fluid at rest to flow at a given velocity. It is usually expressed in inches of water gauge.

(xviii) Vertical spindle disc grinder. A grinding machine having a vertical, rotatable power-driven spindle carrying a horizontal abrasive disc wheel.

(2) Application. Wherever dry grinding, dry polishing or buffing is performed, and employee exposure, without regard to the use of respirators, exceeds the permissible exposure limits prescribed in § 1926.55 or other pertinent sections of this part, a local exhaust ventilation system shall be provided and used to maintain employee exposures within the prescribed limits.

(3) Hood and branch pipe requirements.

(i) Hoods connected to exhaust systems shall be used, and such hoods shall be designed, located, and placed so that the dust or dirt particles shall fall or be projected into the hoods in the direction of the air flow. No wheels, discs, straps, or belts shall be operated in such manner and in such direction as to cause the dust and dirt particles to be thrown into the operator's breathing zone.

(ii) Grinding wheels on floor stands, pedestals, benches, and special-purpose grinding machines and abrasive cutting-off wheels shall have not less than the minimum exhaust volumes shown in Table D-57.1 with a recommended minimum duct velocity of 4,500 feet per minute in the branch and 3,500 feet per minute in the main. The entry losses from all hoods except the vertical-spindle disc grinder hood, shall equal 0.65 velocity pressure for a straight takeoff and 0.45 velocity pressure for a tapered takeoff. The entry loss for the vertical-spindle disc grinder hood is shown in figure D-57.1 (following paragraph (g) of this section).

Table D-57.1 - Grinding and Abrasive Cutting-Off Wheels

Wheel diameter, inches (cm) Wheel width, inches (cm) Minimum exhaust volume (feet3/min.)
To 9 (22.86) 1 1/2 (3.81) 220
Over 9 to 16 (22.86 to 40.64) 2 (5.08) 390
Over 16 to 19 (40.64 to 48.26) 3 (7.62) 500
Over 19 to 24 (48.26 to 60.96) 4 (10.16) 610
Over 24 to 30 (60.96 to 76.2) 5 (12.7) 880
Over 30 to 36 (76.2 to 91.44) 6 (15.24) 1,200

For any wheel wider than wheel diameters shown in Table D-57.1, increase the exhaust volume by the ratio of the new width to the width shown.

Example:

If wheel width = 41/2 inches (11.43 cm),

then 4.5 ÷ 4 × 610 = 686 (rounded to 690).

(iii) Scratch-brush wheels and all buffing and polishing wheels mounted on floor stands, pedestals, benches, or special-purpose machines shall have not less than the minimum exhaust volume shown in Table D-57.2.

Table D-57.2 - Buffing and Polishing Wheels

Wheel diameter, inches (cm) Wheel width, inches cm) Minimum exhaust volume (feet3/min.)
To 9 (22.86) 2 (5.08) 300
Over 9 to 16 (22.86 to 40.64) 3 (7.62) 500
Over 16 to 19 (40.64 to 48.26) 4 (10.16) 610
Over 19 to 24 (48.26 to 60.96) 5 (12.7) 740
Over 24 to 30 (60.96 to 76.2) 6 (15.24) 1,040
Over 30 to 36 (76.2 to 91.44) 6 (15.24) 1,200

(iv) Grinding wheels or discs for horizontal single-spindle disc grinders shall be hooded to collect the dust or dirt generated by the grinding operation and the hoods shall be connected to branch pipes having exhaust volumes as shown in Table D-57.3.

Table D-57.3 - Horizontal Single-Spindle Disc Grinder

Disc diameter, inches (cm) Exhaust volume (ft.3/min.)
Up to 12 (30.48) 220
Over 12 to 19 (30.48 to 48.26) 390
Over 19 to 30 (48.26 to 76.2) 610
Over 30 to 36 (76.2 to 91.44) 880

(v) Grinding wheels or discs for horizontal double-spindle disc grinders shall have a hood enclosing the grinding chamber and the hood shall be connected to one or more branch pipes having exhaust volumes as shown in Table D-57.4.

Table D-57.4 - Horizontal Double-Spindle Disc Grinder

Disc diameter, inches (cm) Exhaust volume (ft.3/min.)
Up to 19 (48.26) 610
Over 19 to 25 (48.26 to 63.5) 880
Over 25 to 30 (63.5 to 76.2) 1,200
Over 30 to 53 (76.2 to 134.62) 1,770
Over 53 to 72 (134.62 to 182.88) 6,280

(vi) Grinding wheels or discs for vertical single-spindle disc grinders shall be encircled with hoods to remove the dust generated in the operation. The hoods shall be connected to one or more branch pipes having exhaust volumes as shown in Table D-57.5.

Table D-57.5 - Vertical Spindle Disc Grinder

Disc diameter, inches (cm) One-half or more of disc covered Disc not covered
Number1 Exhaust foot3/min. Number1 Exhaust foot3/min.
Up to 20 (50.8) 1 500 2 780
Over 20 to 30 (50.8 to 76.2) 2 780 2 1,480
Over 30 to 53 (76.2 to 134.62) 2 1,770 4 3,530
Over 53 to 72 (134.62 to 182.88) 2 3,140 5 6,010

(vii) Grinding and polishing belts shall be provided with hoods to remove dust and dirt generated in the operations and the hoods shall be connected to branch pipes having exhaust volumes as shown in Table D-57.6.

Table D-57.6 - Grinding and Polishing Belts

Belts width, inches (cm) Exhaust volume (ft.3/min.)
Up to 3 (7.62) 220
Over 3 to 5 (7.62 to 12.7) 300
Over 5 to 7 (12.7 to 17.78) 390
Over 7 to 9 (17.78 to 22.86) 500
Over 9 to 11 (22.86 to 27.94) 610
Over 11 to 13 (27.94 to 33.02) 740

(viii) Cradles and swing-frame grinders. Where cradles are used for handling the parts to be ground, polished, or buffed, requiring large partial enclosures to house the complete operation, a minimum average air velocity of 150 feet per minute shall be maintained over the entire opening of the enclosure. Swing-frame grinders shall also be exhausted in the same manner as provided for cradles. (See fig. D-57.3)

(ix) Where the work is outside the hood, air volumes must be increased as shown in American Standard Fundamentals Governing the Design and Operation of Local Exhaust Systems, Z9.2-1960 (section 4, exhaust hoods).

(4) Exhaust systems.

(i) Exhaust systems for grinding, polishing, and buffing operations should be designed in accordance with American Standard Fundamentals Governing the Design and Operation of Local Exhaust Systems, Z9.2-1960.

(ii) Exhaust systems for grinding, polishing, and buffing operations shall be tested in the manner described in American Standard Fundamentals Governing the Design and Operation of Local Exhaust Systems, Z9.2-1960.

(iii) All exhaust systems shall be provided with suitable dust collectors.

(5) Hood and enclosure design.

(i)

(A) It is the dual function of grinding and abrasive cutting-off wheel hoods to protect the operator from the hazards of bursting wheels as well as to provide a means for the removal of dust and dirt generated. All hoods shall be not less in structural strength than specified in the American National Standard Safety Code for the Use, Care, and Protection of Abrasive Wheels, B7.1-1970.

(B) Due to the variety of work and types of grinding machines employed, it is necessary to develop hoods adaptable to the particular machine in question, and such hoods shall be located as close as possible to the operation.

(ii) Exhaust hoods for floor stands, pedestals, and bench grinders shall be designed in accordance with figure D-57.2. The adjustable tongue shown in the figure shall be kept in working order and shall be adjusted within one-fourth inch (0.635 cm) of the wheel periphery at all times.

(iii) Swing-frame grinders shall be provided with exhaust booths as indicated in figure D-57.3.

(iv) Portable grinding operations, whenever the nature of the work permits, shall be conducted within a partial enclosure. The opening in the enclosure shall be no larger than is actually required in the operation and an average face air velocity of not less than 200 feet per minute shall be maintained.

(v) Hoods for polishing and buffing and scratch-brush wheels shall be constructed to conform as closely to figure D-57.4 as the nature of the work will permit.

(vi) Cradle grinding and polishing operations shall be performed within a partial enclosure similar to figure D-57.5. The operator shall be positioned outside the working face of the opening of the enclosure. The face opening of the enclosure should not be any greater in area than that actually required for the performance of the operation and the average air velocity into the working face of the enclosure shall not be less than 150 feet per minute.

(vii) Hoods for horizontal single-spindle disc grinders shall be constructed to conform as closely as possible to the hood shown in figure D-57.6. It is essential that there be a space between the back of the wheel and the hood, and a space around the periphery of the wheel of at least 1 inch (2.54 cm) in order to permit the suction to act around the wheel periphery. The opening on the side of the disc shall be no larger than is required for the grinding operation, but must never be less than twice the area of the branch outlet.

(viii) Horizontal double-spindle disc grinders shall have a hood encircling the wheels and grinding chamber similar to that illustrated in figure D-57.7. The openings for passing the work into the grinding chamber should be kept as small as possible, but must never be less than twice the area of the branch outlets.

(ix) Vertical-spindle disc grinders shall be encircled with a hood so constructed that the heavy dust is drawn off a surface of the disc and the lighter dust exhausted through a continuous slot at the top of the hood as shown in figure D-57.1.

(x) Grinding and polishing belt hoods shall be constructed as close to the operation as possible. The hood should extend almost to the belt, and 1-inch (2.54 cm) wide openings should be provided on either side. Figure D-57.8 shows a typical hood for a belt operation.

Figure D-57.1 - Vertical Spindle Disc Grinder Exhaust Hood and Branch Pipe Connections
Dia. D inches (cm) Exhaust E Volume Exhausted at 4,500 ft/min ft3/min Note
Min. Max. No Pipes Dia.
20 (50.8) 1 4 1/4 (10.795) 500 When one-half or more of the disc can be hooded, use exhaust ducts as shown at the left.
Over 20 (50.8) 30 (76.2) 2 4 (10.16) 780
Over 30 (76.2) 72 (182.88) 2 6 (15.24) 1,770
Over 53 (134.62) 72 (182.88) 2 8 (20.32) 3,140
20 (50.8) 2 4 (10.16) 780 When no hood can be used over disc, use exhaust ducts as shown at left.
Over 20 (50.8) 20 (50.8) 2 4 (10.16) 780
Over 30 (76.2) 30 (76.2) 2 5 1/2 (13.97) 1,480
Over 53 (134.62) 53 (134.62) 4 6 (15.24) 3,530
72 (182.88) 5 7 (17.78) 6,010
Figure D-57.2 - Standard Grinder Hood
Wheel dimension, inches (centimeters) Exhaust outlet, inches (centimeters) E Volume of air at 4,500 ft/min
Diameter Width, Max
Min= d Max= D
9 (22.86) 1 1/2 (3.81) 3 220
Over 9 (22.86) 16 (40.64) 2 (5.08) 4 390
Over 16 (40.64) 19 (48.26) 3 (7.62) 4 1/2 500
Over 19 (48.26) 24 (60.96) 4 (10.16) 5 610
Over 24 (60.96) 30 (76.2) 5 (12.7) 6 880
Over 30 (76.2) 36 (91.44) 6 (15.24) 7 1,200
Figure D-57.3 - A Method of Applying an Exhaust Enclosure to Swing-Frame Grinders
Note:

Baffle to reduce front opening as much as possible

Figure D-57.4

Standard Buffing and Polishing Hood

Wheel dimension, inches (centimeters) Exhaust outlet, inches E Volume of air at 4,500 ft/min
Diameter Width, Max
Min= d Max= D
9 (22.86) 2 (5.08) 3 1/2 (3.81) 300
Over 9 (22.86) 16 (40.64) 3 (5.08) 4 500
Over 16 (40.64) 19 (48.26) 4 (11.43) 5 610
Over 19 (48.26) 24 (60.96) 5 (12.7) 5 1/2 740
Over 24 (60.96) 30 (76.2) 6 (15.24) 6 1/2 1.040
Over 30 (76.2) 36 (91.44) 6 (15.24) 7 1.200
Figure D-57.5 - Cradle Polishing or Grinding Enclosure

Entry loss = 0.45 velocity pressure for tapered takeoff

Figure D-57.6 - Horizontal Single-Spindle Disc Grinder Exhaust Hood and Branch Pipe Connections
Dia D, inches (centimeters) Exhaust E, dia. inches (cm) Volume exhausted at 4,500 ft/min ft3/min
Min. Max.
12 (30.48) 3 (7.6) 220
Over 12 (30.48) 19 (48.26) 4 (10.16) 390
Over 19 (48.26) 30 (76.2) 5 (12.7) 610
Over 30 (76.2) 36 (91.44) 6 (15.24) 880
Figure D-57.7 - Horizontal Double-Spindle Disc Grinder Exhaust Hood and Branch Pipe Connections
Disc dia. inches (centimeters) Exhaust E Volume exhaust at 4,500 ft/min. ft3/min Note
Min. Max. No Pipes Dia.
19 (48.26) 1 5 610
Over 19 (48.26) 25 (63.5) 1 6 880 When width “W” permits, exhaust ducts should be as near heaviest grinding as possible.
Over 25 (63.5) 30 (76.2) 1 7 1,200
Over 30 (76.2) 53 (134.62) 2 6 1,770
Over 53 (134.62) 72 (182.88) 4 8 6,280
Figure D-57.8 - A Typical Hood for a Belt Operation

Entry loss = 0.45 velocity pressure for tapered takeoff

Belt width W. inches (centimeters) Exhaust volume. ft.1/min
Up to 3 (7.62) 220
3 to 5 (7.62 to 12.7) 300
5 to 7 (12.7 to 17.78) 390
7 to 9 (17.78 to 22.86) 500
9 to 11 (22.86 to 27.94) 610
11 to 13 (27.94 to 33.02) 740

(6) Scope. This paragraph (g), prescribes the use of exhaust hood enclosures and systems in removing dust, dirt, fumes, and gases generated through the grinding, polishing, or buffing of ferrous and nonferrous metals.

(h) Spray finishing operations -

(1) Definitions applicable to this paragraph -

(i) Spray-finishing operations. Spray-finishing operations are employment of methods wherein organic or inorganic materials are utilized in dispersed form for deposit on surfaces to be coated, treated, or cleaned. Such methods of deposit may involve either automatic, manual, or electrostatic deposition but do not include metal spraying or metallizing, dipping, flow coating, roller coating, tumbling, centrifuging, or spray washing and degreasing as conducted in self-contained washing and degreasing machines or systems.

(ii) Spray booth. Spray booths are defined and described in § 1926.66(a). (See sections 103, 104, and 105 of the Standard for Spray Finishing Using Flammable and Combustible Materials, NFPA No. 33-1969).

(iii) Spray room. A spray room is a room in which spray-finishing operations not conducted in a spray booth are performed separately from other areas.

(iv) Minimum maintained velocity. Minimum maintained velocity is the velocity of air movement which must be maintained in order to meet minimum specified requirements for health and safety.

(2) Location and application. Spray booths or spray rooms are to be used to enclose or confine all operations. Spray-finishing operations shall be located as provided in sections 201 through 206 of the Standard for Spray Finishing Using Flammable and Combustible Materials, NFPA No. 33-1969.

(3) Design and construction of spray booths.

(i) Spray booths shall be designed and constructed in accordance with § 1926.66(b) (1) through (4) and (6) through (10) (see sections 301-304 and 306-310 of the Standard for Spray Finishing Using Flammable and Combustible Materials, NFPA No. 33-1969), for general construction specifications. For a more detailed discussion of fundamentals relating to this subject, see ANSI Z9.2-1960

(A) Lights, motors, electrical equipment, and other sources of ignition shall conform to the requirements of § 1926.66(b)(10) and (c). (See section 310 and chapter 4 of the Standard for Spray Finishing Using Flammable and Combustible Materials NFPA No. 33-1969.)

(B) In no case shall combustible material be used in the construction of a spray booth and supply or exhaust duct connected to it.

(ii) Unobstructed walkways shall not be less than 61/2 feet (1.976 m) high and shall be maintained clear of obstruction from any work location in the booth to a booth exit or open booth front. In booths where the open front is the only exit, such exits shall be not less than 3 feet (0.912 m) wide. In booths having multiple exits, such exits shall not be less than 2 feet (0.608 m) wide, provided that the maximum distance from the work location to the exit is 25 feet (7.6 m) or less. Where booth exits are provided with doors, such doors shall open outward from the booth.

(iii) Baffles, distribution plates, and dry-type overspray collectors shall conform to the requirements of § 1926.66(b) (4) and (5). (See sections 304 and 305 of the Standard for Spray Finishing Using Flammable and Combustible Materials, NFPA No. 33-1969.)

(A) Overspray filters shall be installed and maintained in accordance with the requirements of § 1926.66(b)(5), (see section 305 of the Standard for Spray Finishing Using Flammable and Combustible Materials, NFPA No. 33-1969), and shall only be in a location easily accessible for inspection, cleaning, or replacement.

(B) Where effective means, independent of the overspray filters, are installed which will result in design air distribution across the booth cross section, it is permissible to operate the booth without the filters in place.

(iv)

(A) For wet or water-wash spray booths, the water-chamber enclosure, within which intimate contact of contaminated air and cleaning water or other cleaning medium is maintained, if made of steel, shall be 18 gage or heavier and adequately protected against corrosion.

(B) Chambers may include scrubber spray nozzles, headers, troughs, or other devices. Chambers shall be provided with adequate means for creating and maintaining scrubbing action for removal of particulate matter from the exhaust air stream.

(v) Collecting tanks shall be of welded steel construction or other suitable non-combustible material. If pits are used as collecting tanks, they shall be concrete, masonry, or other material having similar properties.

(A) Tanks shall be provided with weirs, skimmer plates, or screens to prevent sludge and floating paint from entering the pump suction box. Means for automatically maintaining the proper water level shall also be provided. Fresh water inlets shall not be submerged. They shall terminate at least one pipe diameter above the safety overflow level of the tank.

(B) Tanks shall be so constructed as to discourage accumulation of hazardous deposits.

(vi) Pump manifolds, risers, and headers shall be adequately sized to insure sufficient water flow to provide efficient operation of the water chamber.

(4) Design and construction of spray rooms.

(i) Spray rooms, including floors, shall be constructed of masonry, concrete, or other noncombustible material.

(ii) Spray rooms shall have noncombustible fire doors and shutters.

(iii) Spray rooms shall be adequately ventilated so that the atmosphere in the breathing zone of the operator shall be maintained in accordance with the requirements of paragraph (h)(6)(ii) of this section.

(iv) Spray rooms used for production spray-finishing operations shall conform to the requirements for spray booths.

(5) Ventilation.

(i) Ventilation shall be provided in accordance with provisions of § 1926.66(d) (see chapter 5 of the Standard for Spray Finishing Using Flammable or Combustible Materials, NFPA No. 33-1969), and in accordance with the following:

(A) Where a fan plenum is used to equalize or control the distribution of exhaust air movement through the booth, it shall be of sufficient strength or rigidity to withstand the differential air pressure or other superficially imposed loads for which the equipment is designed and also to facilitate cleaning. Construction specifications shall be at least equivalent to those of paragraph (h)(5)(iii) of this section.

(B) [Reserved]

(ii) Inlet or supply ductwork used to transport makeup air to spray booths or surrounding areas shall be constructed of noncombustible materials.

(A) If negative pressure exists within inlet ductwork, all seams and joints shall be sealed if there is a possibility of infiltration of harmful quantities of noxious gases, fumes, or mists from areas through which ductwork passes.

(B) Inlet ductwork shall be sized in accordance with volume flow requirements and provide design air requirements at the spray booth.

(C) Inlet ductwork shall be adequately supported throughout its length to sustain at least its own weight plus any negative pressure which is exerted upon it under normal operating conditions.

(iii) [Reserved]

(A) Exhaust ductwork shall be adequately supported throughout its length to sustain its weight plus any normal accumulation in interior during normal operating conditions and any negative pressure exerted upon it.

(B) Exhaust ductwork shall be sized in accordance with good design practice which shall include consideration of fan capacity, length of duct, number of turns and elbows, variation in size, volume, and character of materials being exhausted. See American National Standard Z9.2-1960 for further details and explanation concerning elements of design.

(C) Longitudinal joints in sheet steel ductwork shall be either lock-seamed, riveted, or welded. For other than steel construction, equivalent securing of joints shall be provided.

(D) Circumferential joints in ductwork shall be substantially fastened together and lapped in the direction of airflow. At least every fourth joint shall be provided with connecting flanges, bolted together, or of equivalent fastening security.

(E) Inspection or clean-out doors shall be provided for every 9 to 12 feet (2.736 to 3.648 m) of running length for ducts up to 12 inches (0.304 m) in diameter, but the distance between cleanout doors may be greater for larger pipes. (See 8.3.21 of American National Standard Z9.1-1951.) A clean-out door or doors shall be provided for servicing the fan, and where necessary, a drain shall be provided.

(F) Where ductwork passes through a combustible roof or wall, the roof or wall shall be protected at the point of penetration by open space or fire-resistive material between the duct and the roof or wall. When ducts pass through firewalls, they shall be provided with automatic fire dampers on both sides of the wall, except that three-eighth-inch steel plates may be used in lieu of automatic fire dampers for ducts not exceeding 18 inches (45.72 cm) in diameter.

(G) Ductwork used for ventilating any process covered in this standard shall not be connected to ducts ventilating any other process or any chimney or flue used for conveying any products of combustion.

(6) Velocity and air flow requirements.

(i) Except where a spray booth has an adequate air replacement system, the velocity of air into all openings of a spray booth shall be not less than that specified in Table D-57.7 for the operating conditions specified. An adequate air replacement system is one which introduces replacement air upstream or above the object being sprayed and is so designed that the velocity of air in the booth cross section is not less than that specified in Table D-57.7 when measured upstream or above the object being sprayed.

Table D-57.7 - Minimum Maintained Velocities Into Spray Booths

Operating conditions for objects completely inside booth Crossdraft, f.p.m. Airflow velocities, f.p.m.
Design Range
Electrostatic and automatic airless operation contained in booth without operator Negligible 50 large booth 50-75
100 small booth 75-125
Air-operated guns, manual or automatic Up to 50 100 large booth 75-125
150 small booth 125-175
Air-operated guns, manual or automatic Up to 100 150 large booth 125-175
200 small booth 150-250

(ii) In addition to the requirements in paragraph (h)(6)(i) of this section the total air volume exhausted through a spray booth shall be such as to dilute solvent vapor to at least 25 percent of the lower explosive limit of the solvent being sprayed. An example of the method of calculating this volume is given below.

Example:

To determine the lower explosive limits of the most common solvents used in spray finishing, see Table D-57.8. Column 1 gives the number of cubic feet of vapor per gallon of solvent and column 2 gives the lower explosive limit (LEL) in percentage by volume of air. Note that the quantity of solvent will be diminished by the quantity of solids and nonflammables contained in the finish.

To determine the volume of air in cubic feet necessary to dilute the vapor from 1 gallon of solvent to 25 percent of the lower explosive limit, apply the following formula:

Dilution volume required per gallon of solvent = 4 (100-LEL) (cubic feet of vapor per gallon) ÷ LEL

Using toluene as the solvent.

(1) LEL of toluene from Table D-57.8, column 2, is 1.4 percent.

(2) Cubic feet of vapor per gallon from Table D-57.8, column 1, is 30.4 cubic feet per gallon.

(3) Dilution volume required =

4 (100-1.4) 30.4 ÷ 1.4 = 8,564 cubic feet.

(4) To convert to cubic feet per minute of required ventilation, multiply the dilution volume required per gallon of solvent by the number of gallons of solvent evaporated per minute.

Table D-57.8 - Lower Explosive Limit of Some Commonly Used Solvents

Solvent Cubic feet per gallon of vapor of liquid at 70 °F (21.11 °C). Lower explosive limit in percent by volume of air at 70 °F (21.11 °C)
Column 1 Column 2
Acetone 44.0 2.6
Amyl Acetate (iso) 21.6 1 1.0
Amyl Alcohol (n) 29.6 1.2
Amyl Alcohol (iso) 29.6 1.2
Benzene 36.8 1 1.4
Butyl Acetate (n) 24.8 1.7
Butyl Alcohol (n) 35.2 1.4
Butyl Cellosolve 24.8 1.1
Cellosolve 33.6 1.8
Cellosolve Acetate 23.2 1.7
Cyclohexanone 31.2 1 1.1
1,1 Dichloroethylene 42.4 5.9
1,2 Dichloroethylene 42.4 9.7
Ethyl Acetate 32.8 2.5
Ethyl Alcohol 55.2 4.3
Ethyl Lactate 28.0 1 1.5
Methyl Acetate 40.0 3.1
Methyl Alcohol 80.8 7.3
Methyl Cellosolve 40.8 2.5
Methyl Ethyl Ketone 36.0 1.8
Methyl n-Propyl Ketone 30.4 1.5
Naphtha (VM&P) (76°Naphtha) 22.4 0.9
Naphtha (100°Flash) Safety Solvent - Stoddard Solvent 23.2 1.0
Propyl Acetate (n) 27.2 2.8
Propyl Acetate (iso) 28.0 1.1
Propyl Alcohol (n) 44.8 2.1
Propyl Alcohol (iso) 44.0 2.0
Toluene 30.4 1.4
Turpentine 20.8 0.8
Xylene (o) 26.4 1.0

(iii)

(A) When an operator is in a booth downstream of the object being sprayed, an air-supplied respirator or other type of respirator approved by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 for the material being sprayed should be used by the operator.

(B) Where downdraft booths are provided with doors, such doors shall be closed when spray painting.

(7) Make-up air.

(i) Clean fresh air, free of contamination from adjacent industrial exhaust systems, chimneys, stacks, or vents, shall be supplied to a spray booth or room in quantities equal to the volume of air exhausted through the spray booth.

(ii) Where a spray booth or room receives make-up air through self-closing doors, dampers, or louvers, they shall be fully open at all times when the booth or room is in use for spraying. The velocity of air through such doors, dampers, or louvers shall not exceed 200 feet per minute. If the fan characteristics are such that the required air flow through the booth will be provided, higher velocities through the doors, dampers, or louvers may be used.

(iii)

(A) Where the air supply to a spray booth or room is filtered, the fan static pressure shall be calculated on the assumption that the filters are dirty to the extent that they require cleaning or replacement.

(B) The rating of filters shall be governed by test data supplied by the manufacturer of the filter. A pressure gage shall be installed to show the pressure drop across the filters. This gage shall be marked to show the pressure drop at which the filters require cleaning or replacement. Filters shall be replaced or cleaned whenever the pressure drop across them becomes excessive or whenever the air flow through the face of the booth falls below that specified in Table D-57.7.

(iv)

(A) Means for heating make-up air to any spray booth or room, before or at the time spraying is normally performed, shall be provided in all places where the outdoor temperature may be expected to remain below 55 °F. (12.77 °C.) for appreciable periods of time during the operation of the booth except where adequate and safe means of radiant heating for all operating personnel affected is provided. The replacement air during the heating seasons shall be maintained at not less than 65 °F. (18.33 °C.) at the point of entry into the spray booth or spray room. When otherwise unheated make-up air would be at a temperature of more than 10 °F. below room temperature, its temperature shall be regulated as provided in section 3.6.3 of ANSI Z9.2-1960.

(B) As an alternative to an air replacement system complying with the preceding section, general heating of the building in which the spray room or booth is located may be employed provided that all occupied parts of the building are maintained at not less than 65 °F. (18.33 °C.) when the exhaust system is in operation or the general heating system supplemented by other sources of heat may be employed to meet this requirement.

(C) No means of heating make-up air shall be located in a spray booth.

(D) Where make-up air is heated by coal or oil, the products of combustion shall not be allowed to mix with the make-up air, and the products of combustion shall be conducted outside the building through a flue terminating at a point remote from all points where make-up air enters the building.

(E) Where make-up air is heated by gas, and the products of combustion are not mixed with the make-up air but are conducted through an independent flue to a point outside the building remote from all points where make-up air enters the building, it is not necessary to comply with paragraph (h)(7)(iv)(F) of this section.

(F) Where make-up air to any manually operated spray booth or room is heated by gas and the products of combustion are allowed to mix with the supply air, the following precautions must be taken:

(1) The gas must have a distinctive and strong enough odor to warn workmen in a spray booth or room of its presence if in an unburned state in the make-up air.

(2) The maximum rate of gas supply to the make-up air heater burners must not exceed that which would yield in excess of 200 p.p.m. (parts per million) of carbon monoxide or 2,000 p.p.m. of total combustible gases in the mixture if the unburned gas upon the occurrence of flame failure were mixed with all of the make-up air supplied.

(3) A fan must be provided to deliver the mixture of heated air and products of combustion from the plenum chamber housing the gas burners to the spray booth or room.

(8) Scope. Spray booths or spray rooms are to be used to enclose or confine all spray finishing operations covered by this paragraph (h). This paragraph does not apply to the spraying of the exteriors of buildings, fixed tanks, or similar structures, nor to small portable spraying apparatus not used repeatedly in the same location.

(i) Open surface tanks -

(1) General.

(i) This paragraph applies to all operations involving the immersion of materials in liquids, or in the vapors of such liquids, for the purpose of cleaning or altering the surface or adding to or imparting a finish thereto or changing the character of the materials, and their subsequent removal from the liquid or vapor, draining, and drying. These operations include washing, electroplating, anodizing, pickling, quenching, dying, dipping, tanning, dressing, bleaching, degreasing, alkaline cleaning, stripping, rinsing, digesting, and other similar operations.

(ii) Except where specific construction specifications are prescribed in this section, hoods, ducts, elbows, fans, blowers, and all other exhaust system parts, components, and supports thereof shall be so constructed as to meet conditions of service and to facilitate maintenance and shall conform in construction to the specifications contained in American National Standard Fundamentals Governing the Design and Operation of Local Exhaust Systems, Z9.2-1960.

(2) Classification of open-surface tank operations.

(i) Open-surface tank operations shall be classified into 16 classes, numbered A-1 to D-4, inclusive.

(ii) Determination of class. Class is determined by two factors, hazard potential designated by a letter from A to D, inclusive, and rate of gas, vapor, or mist evolution designated by a number from 1 to 4, inclusive (for example, B.3).

(iii) Hazard potential is an index, on a scale of from A to D, inclusive, of the severity of the hazard associated with the substance contained in the tank because of the toxic, flammable, or explosive nature of the vapor, gas, or mist produced therefrom. The toxic hazard is determined from the concentration, measured in parts by volume of a gas or vapor, per million parts by volume of contaminated air (p.p.m.), or in milligrams of mist per cubic meter of air (mg./m.3), below which ill effects are unlikely to occur to the exposed worker. The concentrations shall be those in § 1926.55 or other pertinent sections of this part.

(iv) The relative fire or explosion hazard is measured in degrees Fahrenheit in terms of the closed-cup flash point of the substance in the tank. Detailed information on the prevention of fire hazards in dip tanks may be found in Dip Tanks Containing Flammable or Combustible Liquids, NFPA No. 34-1966, National Fire Protection Association. Where the tank contains a mixture of liquids, other than organic solvents, whose effects are additive, the hygienic standard of the most toxic component (for example, the one having the lowest p.p.m. or mg./m.3) shall be used, except where such substance constitutes an insignificantly small fraction of the mixture. For mixtures of organic solvents, their combined effect, rather than that of either individually, shall determine the hazard potential. In the absence of information to the contrary, the effects shall be considered as additive. If the sum of the ratios of the airborne concentration of each contaminant to the toxic concentration of that contaminant exceeds unity, the toxic concentration shall be considered to have been exceeded. (See Note A to paragraph (i)(2)(v) of this section.)

(v) Hazard potential shall be determined from Table D-57.9, with the value indicating greater hazard being used. When the hazardous material may be either a vapor with a threshold limit value (TLV) in p.p.m. or a mist with a TLV in mg./m.3, the TLV indicating the greater hazard shall be used (for example, A takes precedence over B or C; B over C; C over D).

Note A:

(c1 ÷ TLV1) + (c2 ÷ TLV2) + (c3 ÷ TLV3) + ; . . .(cN ÷ TLVN)1

Where:

c = Concentration measured at the operation in p.p.m.

Table D-57.9 - Determination of Hazard Potential

Hazard potential Toxicity group
Gas or vapor (p.p.m.) Mist (mg./m3) Flash point in degrees F. (C.)
A 0-10 0-0.1
B 11-100 0.11-1.0 Under 100 (37.77)
C 101-500 1.1-10 100 200 (37.77-93.33)
D Over 500 Over 10 Over 200 (93.33)

(vi) Rate of gas, vapor, or mist evolution is a numerical index, on a scale of from 1 to 4, inclusive, both of the relative capacity of the tank to produce gas, vapor, or mist and of the relative energy with which it is projected or carried upwards from the tank. Rate is evaluated in terms of

(A) The temperature of the liquid in the tank in degrees Fahrenheit;

(B) The number of degrees Fahrenheit that this temperature is below the boiling point of the liquid in degrees Fahrenheit;

(C) The relative evaporation of the liquid in still air at room temperature in an arbitrary scale - fast, medium, slow, or nil; and

(D) The extent that the tank gases or produces mist in an arbitrary scale - high, medium, low, and nil. (See Table D-57.10, Note 2.) Gassing depends upon electrochemical or mechanical processes, the effects of which have to be individually evaluated for each installation (see Table D-57.10, Note 3).

(vii) Rate of evolution shall be determined from Table D-57.10. When evaporation and gassing yield different rates, the lowest numerical value shall be used.

Table D-57.10 - Determination of Rate of Gas, Vapor, or Mist Evolution1

Rate Liquid temperature, °F. (C.) Degrees below boiling point Relative evaporation2 Gassing3
1 Over 200 (93.33) 0-20 Fast High.
2 150-200 (65.55-93.33) 21-50 Medium Medium.
3 94-149 (34.44-65) 51-100 Slow Low.
4 Under 94 (34.44) Over 100 Nil Nil.

(3) Ventilation. Where ventilation is used to control potential exposures to workers as defined in paragraph (i)(2)(iii) of this section, it shall be adequate to reduce the concentration of the air contaminant to the degree that a hazard to the worker does not exist. Methods of ventilation are discussed in American National Standard Fundamentals Governing the Design and Operation of Local Exhaust Systems, Z9.2-1960.

(4) Control requirements.

(i) Control velocities shall conform to Table D-57.11 in all cases where the flow of air past the breathing or working zone of the operator and into the hoods is undisturbed by local environmental conditions, such as open windows, wall fans, unit heaters, or moving machinery.

(ii) All tanks exhausted by means of hoods which

(A) Project over the entire tank;

(B) Are fixed in position in such a location that the head of the workman, in all his normal operating positions while working at the tank, is in front of all hood openings; and

(C) Are completely enclosed on at least two sides, shall be considered to be exhausted through an enclosing hood.

(D) The quantity of air in cubic feet per minute necessary to be exhausted through an enclosing hood shall be not less than the product of the control velocity times the net area of all openings in the enclosure through which air can flow into the hood.

Table D-57.11 - Control Velocities in Feet Per Minute (f.p.m.) for Undisturbed Locations

Class Enclosing hood Lateral exhaust1 Canopy hood2
One open side Two open sides Three open sides Four open sides
B-1 and A-2 100 150 150 Do not use Do not use
A-32, B-1, B-2, and C-1 75 100 100 125 175
A-3, C-2, and D-13 65 90 75 100 150
B-42, C-3, and D-23 50 75 50 75 125
A-4, C-4, D-33, and D-44

(iii) All tanks exhausted by means of hoods which do not project over the entire tank, and in which the direction of air movement into the hood or hoods is substantially horizontal, shall be considered to be laterally exhausted. The quantity of air in cubic feet per minute necessary to be laterally exhausted per square foot of tank area in order to maintain the required control velocity shall be determined from Table D-57.12 for all variations in ratio of tank width (W) to tank length $(L). The total quantity of air in cubic feet per minute required to be exhausted per tank shall be not less than the product of the area of tank surface times the cubic feet per minute per square foot of tank area, determined from Table D-57.12.

(A) For lateral exhaust hoods over 42 inches (1.06 m) wide, or where it is desirable to reduce the amount of air removed from the workroom, air supply slots or orifices shall be provided along the side or the center of the tank opposite from the exhaust slots. The design of such systems shall meet the following criteria:

(1) The supply air volume plus the entrained air shall not exceed 50 percent of the exhaust volume.

(2) The velocity of the supply airstream as it reaches the effective control area of the exhaust slot shall be less than the effective velocity over the exhaust slot area.

Table D-57.12 - Minimum Ventilation Rate in Cubic Feet of Air Per Minute Per Square Foot of Tank Area for Lateral Exhaust

Required minimum control velocity, f.p.m. (from Table D-57.11) C.f.m. per sq. ft. to maintain required minimum velocities at following ratios (tank width (W)/tank length (L)).1 2
0.0-0.09 0.1-0.24 0.25-0.49 0.5-0.99 1.0-2.0
Hood along one side or two parallel sides of tank when one hood is against a wall or baffle.2
Also for a manifold along tank centerline.3
50 50 60 75 90 100
75 75 90 110 130 150
100 100 125 150 175 200
150 150 190 225 260 300
Hood along one side or two parallel sides of free standing tank not against wall or baffle.
50 75 90 100 110 125
75 110 130 150 170 190
100 150 175 200 225 250
150 225 260 300 340 375

(3) The vertical height of the receiving exhaust hood, including any baffle, shall not be less than one-quarter the width of the tank.

(4) The supply airstream shall not be allowed to impinge on obstructions between it and the exhaust slot in such a manner as to significantly interfere with the performance of the exhaust hood.

(5) Since most failure of push-pull systems result from excessive supply air volumes and pressures, methods of measuring and adjusting the supply air shall be provided. When satisfactory control has been achieved, the adjustable features of the hood shall be fixed so that they will not be altered.

(iv) All tanks exhausted by means of hoods which project over the entire tank, and which do not conform to the definition of enclosing hoods, shall be considered to be overhead canopy hoods. The quantity of air in cubic feet per minute necessary to be exhausted through a canopy hood shall be not less than the product of the control velocity times the net area of all openings between the bottom edges of the hood and the top edges of the tank.

(v) The rate of vapor evolution (including steam or products of combustion) from the process shall be estimated. If the rate of vapor evolution is equal to or greater than 10 percent of the calculated exhaust volume required, the exhaust volume shall be increased in equal amount.

(5) Spray cleaning and degreasing. Wherever spraying or other mechanical means are used to disperse a liquid above an open-surface tank, control must be provided for the airborne spray. Such operations shall be enclosed as completely as possible. The inward air velocity into the enclosure shall be sufficient to prevent the discharge of spray into the workroom. Mechanical baffles may be used to help prevent the discharge of spray. Spray painting operations are covered by paragraph (h) of this section.

(6) Control means other than ventilation. Tank covers, foams, beads, chips, or other materials floating on the tank surface so as to confine gases, mists, or vapors to the area under the cover or to the foam, bead, or chip layer; or surface tension depressive agents added to the liquid in the tank to minimize mist formation, or any combination thereof, may all be used as gas, mist, or vapor control means for open-surface tank operations, provided that they effectively reduce the concentrations of hazardous materials in the vicinity of the worker below the limits set in accordance with paragraph (i)(2) of this section.

(7) System design.

(i) The equipment for exhausting air shall have sufficient capacity to produce the flow of air required in each of the hoods and openings of the system.

(ii) The capacity required in paragraph (i)(7)(i) of this section shall be obtained when the airflow producing equipment is operating against the following pressure losses, the sum of which is the static pressure:

(A) Entrance losses into the hood.

(B) Resistance to airflow in branch pipe including bends and transformations.

(C) Entrance loss into the main pipe.

(D) Resistance to airflow in main pipe including bends and transformations.

(E) Resistance of mechanical equipment; that is, filters, washers, condensers, absorbers, etc., plus their entrance and exit losses.

(F) Resistance in outlet duct and discharge stack.

(iii) Two or more operations shall not be connected to the same exhaust system where either one or the combination of the substances removed may constitute a fire, explosion, or chemical reaction hazard in the duct system. Traps or other devices shall be provided to insure that condensate in ducts does not drain back into any tank.

(iv) The exhaust system, consisting of hoods, ducts, air mover, and discharge outlet, shall be designed in accordance with American National Standard Fundamentals Governing the Design and Operation of Local Exhaust Systems, Z9.2-1960, or the manual, Industrial Ventilation, published by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists 1970. Airflow and pressure loss data provided by the manufacturer of any air cleaning device shall be included in the design calculations.

(8) Operation.

(i) The required airflow shall be maintained at all times during which gas, mist, or vapor is emitted from the tank, and at all times the tank, the draining, or the drying area is in operation or use. When the system is first installed, the airflow from each hood shall be measured by means of a pitot traverse in the exhaust duct and corrective action taken if the flow is less than that required. When the proper flow is obtained, the hood static pressure shall be measured and recorded. At intervals of not more than 3 months operation, or after a prolonged shutdown period, the hoods and duct system shall be inspected for evidence of corrosion or damage. In any case where the airflow is found to be less than required, it shall be increased to the required value. (Information on airflow and static pressure measurement and calculations may be found in American National Standard Fundamental Governing the Design and Operation of Local Exhaust Systems, Z9.2-1960, or in the manual, Industrial Ventilation, published by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists.)

(ii) The exhaust system shall discharge to the outer air in such a manner that the possibility of its effluent entering any building is at a minimum. Recirculation shall only be through a device for contaminant removal which will prevent the creation of a health hazard in the room or area to which the air is recirculated.

(iii) A volume of outside air in the range of 90 percent to 110 percent of the exhaust volume shall be provided to each room having exhaust hoods. The outside air supply shall enter the workroom in such a manner as not to be detrimental to any exhaust hood. The airflow of the makeup air system shall be measured on installation. Corrective action shall be taken when the airflow is below that required. The makeup air shall be uncontaminated.

(9) Personal protection.

(i) All employees working in and around open-surface tank operations must be instructed as to the hazards of their respective jobs, and in the personal protection and first aid procedures applicable to these hazards.

(ii) All persons required to work in such a manner that their feet may become wet shall be provided with rubber or other impervious boots or shoes, rubbers, or wooden-soled shoes sufficient to keep feet dry.

(iii) All persons required to handle work wet with a liquid other than water shall be provided with gloves impervious to such a liquid and of a length sufficient to prevent entrance of liquid into the tops of the gloves. The interior of gloves shall be kept free from corrosive or irritating contaminants.

(iv) All persons required to work in such a manner that their clothing may become wet shall be provided with such aprons, coats, jackets, sleeves, or other garments made of rubber, or of other materials impervious to liquids other than water, as are required to keep their clothing dry. Aprons shall extend well below the top of boots to prevent liquid splashing into the boots. Provision of dry, clean, cotton clothing along with rubber shoes or short boots and an apron impervious to liquids other than water shall be considered a satisfactory substitute where small parts are cleaned, plated, or acid dipped in open tanks and rapid work is required.

(v) Whenever there is a danger of splashing, for example, when additions are made manually to the tanks, or when acids and chemicals are removed from the tanks, the employees so engaged shall be required to wear either tight-fitting chemical goggles or an effective face shield. See § 1926.102.

(vi) When, during the emergencies specified in paragraph (i)(11)(v) of this section, employees must be in areas where concentrations of air contaminants are greater than the limits set by paragraph (i)(2)(iii) of this section or oxygen concentrations are less than 19.5 percent, they must use respirators that reduce their exposure to a level below these limits or that provide adequate oxygen. Such respirators must also be provided in marked, quickly-accessible storage compartments built for this purpose when the possibility exists of accidental release of hazardous concentrations of air contaminants. Respirators must be approved by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, selected by a competent industrial hygienist or other technically-qualified source, and used in accordance with 29 CFR 1926.103.

(vii) Near each tank containing a liquid which may burn, irritate, or otherwise be harmful to the skin if splashed upon the worker's body, there shall be a supply of clean cold water. The water pipe (carrying a pressure not exceeding 25 pounds (11.325 kg)) shall be provided with a quick opening valve and at least 48 inches (1.216 m) of hose not smaller than three-fourths inch, so that no time may be lost in washing off liquids from the skin or clothing. Alternatively, deluge showers and eye flushes shall be provided in cases where harmful chemicals may be splashed on parts of the body.

(viii) Operators with sores, burns, or other skin lesions requiring medical treatment shall not be allowed to work at their regular operations until so authorized by a physician. Any small skin abrasions, cuts, rash, or open sores which are found or reported shall be treated by a properly designated person so that chances of exposures to the chemicals are removed. Workers exposed to chromic acids shall have a periodic examination made of the nostrils and other parts of the body, to detect incipient ulceration.

(ix) Sufficient washing facilities, including soap, individual towels, and hot water, shall be provided for all persons required to use or handle any liquids which may burn, irritate, or otherwise be harmful to the skin, on the basis of at least one basin (or its equivalent) with a hot water faucet for every 10 employees. See § 1926.51(f).

(x) Locker space or equivalent clothing storage facilities shall be provided to prevent contamination of street clothing.

(xi) First aid facilities specific to the hazards of the operations conducted shall be readily available.

(10) Special precautions for cyanide. Dikes or other arrangements shall be provided to prevent the possibility of intermixing of cyanide and acid in the event of tank rupture.

(11) Inspection, maintenance, and installation.

(i) Floors and platforms around tanks shall be prevented from becoming slippery both by original type of construction and by frequent flushing. They shall be firm, sound, and of the design and construction to minimize the possibility of tripping.

(ii) Before cleaning the interior of any tank, the contents shall be drained off, and the cleanout doors shall be opened where provided. All pockets in tanks or pits, where it is possible for hazardous vapors to collect, shall be ventilated and cleared of such vapors.

(iii) Tanks which have been drained to permit employees to enter for the purposes of cleaning, inspection, or maintenance may contain atmospheres which are hazardous to life or health, through the presence of flammable or toxic air contaminants, or through the absence of sufficient oxygen. Before employees shall be permitted to enter any such tank, appropriate tests of the atmosphere shall be made to determine if the limits set by paragraph (i)(2)(iii) of this section are exceeded, or if the oxygen concentration is less than 19.5 percent.

(iv) If the tests made in accordance with paragraph (i)(11)(iii) of this section indicate that the atmosphere in the tank is unsafe, before any employee is permitted to enter the tank, the tank shall be ventilated until the hazardous atmosphere is removed, and ventilation shall be continued so as to prevent the occurrence of a hazardous atmosphere as long as an employee is in the tank.

(v) If, in emergencies, such as rescue work, it is necessary to enter a tank which may contain a hazardous atmosphere, suitable respirators, such as self-contained breathing apparatus; hose mask with blower, if there is a possibility of oxygen deficiency; or a gas mask, selected and operated in accordance with paragraph (i)(9)(vi) of this section, shall be used. If a contaminant in the tank can cause dermatitis, or be absorbed through the skin, the employee entering the tank shall also wear protective clothing. At least one trained standby employee, with suitable respirator, shall be present in the nearest uncontaminated area. The standby employee must be able to communicate with the employee in the tank and be able to haul him out of the tank with a lifeline if necessary.

(vi) Maintenance work requiring welding or open flame, where toxic metal fumes such as cadmium, chromium, or lead may be evolved, shall be done only with sufficient local exhaust ventilation to prevent the creation of a health hazard, or be done with respirators selected and used in accordance with paragraph (i)(9)(vi) of this section. Welding, or the use of open flames near any solvent cleaning equipment shall be permitted only after such equipment has first been thoroughly cleared of solvents and vapors.

(12) Vapor degreasing tanks.

(i) In any vapor degreasing tank equipped with a condenser or vapor level thermostat, the condenser or thermostat shall keep the level of vapors below the top edge of the tank by a distance at least equal to one-half the tank width, or at least 36 inches (0.912 m), whichever is shorter.

(ii) Where gas is used as a fuel for heating vapor degreasing tanks, the combustion chamber shall be of tight construction, except for such openings as the exhaust flue, and those that are necessary for supplying air for combustion. Flues shall be of corrosion-resistant construction and shall extend to the outer air. If mechanical exhaust is used on this flue, a draft diverter shall be used. Special precautions must be taken to prevent solvent fumes from entering the combustion air of this or any other heater when chlorinated or fluorinated hydrocarbon solvents (for example, trichloroethylene, Freon) are used.

(iii) Heating elements shall be so designed and maintained that their surface temperature will not cause the solvent or mixture to decompose, break down, or be converted into an excessive quantity of vapor.

(iv) Tanks or machines of more than 4 square feet (0.368 m2) of vapor area, used for solvent cleaning or vapor degreasing, shall be equipped with suitable cleanout or sludge doors located near the bottom of each tank or still. These doors shall be so designed and gasketed that there will be no leakage of solvent when they are closed.

(13) Scope.

(i) This paragraph (i) applies to all operations involving the immersion of materials in liquids, or in the vapors of such liquids, for the purpose of cleaning or altering their surfaces, or adding or imparting a finish thereto, or changing the character of the materials, and their subsequent removal from the liquids or vapors, draining, and drying. Such operations include washing, electroplating, anodizing, pickling, quenching, dyeing, dipping, tanning, dressing, bleaching, degreasing, alkaline cleaning, stripping, rinsing, digesting, and other similar operations, but do not include molten materials handling operations, or surface coating operations.

(ii) Molten materials handling operations means all operations, other than welding, burning, and soldering operations, involving the use, melting, smelting, or pouring of metals, alloys, salts, or other similar substances in the molten state. Such operations also include heat treating baths, descaling baths, die casting stereotyping, galvanizing, tinning, and similar operations.

(iii) Surface coating operations means all operations involving the application of protective, decorative, adhesive, or strengthening coating or impregnation to one or more surfaces, or into the interstices of any object or material, by means of spraying, spreading, flowing, brushing, roll coating, pouring, cementing, or similar means; and any subsequent draining or drying operations, excluding open-tank operations.

[44 FR 8577, Feb. 9, 1979; 44 FR 20940, Apr. 6, 1979, as amended at 58 FR 35099, June 30, 1993; 61 FR 9250, Mar. 3, 1996; 63 FR 1295, Jan. 8, 1998]

§ 1926.58 [Reserved]
§ 1926.59 Hazard communication.
Note:

The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to those set forth at § 1910.1200 of this chapter.

[61 FR 31431, June 20, 1996]

§ 1926.60 Methylenedianiline.

(a) Scope and application.

(1) This section applies to all construction work as defined in 29 CFR 1910.12(b), in which there is exposure to MDA, including but not limited to the following:

(i) Construction, alteration, repair, maintenance, or renovation of structures, substrates, or portions thereof, that contain MDA;

(ii) Installation or the finishing of surfaces with products containing MDA;

(iii) MDA spill/emergency cleanup at construction sites; and

(iv) Transportation, disposal, storage, or containment of MDA or products containing MDA on the site or location at which construction activities are performed.

(2) Except as provided in paragraphs (a)(7) and (f)(5) of this section, this section does not apply to the processing, use, and handling of products containing MDA where initial monitoring indicates that the product is not capable of releasing MDA in excess of the action level under the expected conditions of processing, use, and handling which will cause the greatest possible release; and where no “dermal exposure to MDA” can occur.

(3) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(7) of this section, this section does not apply to the processing, use, and handling of products containing MDA where objective data are reasonably relied upon which demonstrate the product is not capable of releasing MDA under the expected conditions of processing, use, and handling which will cause the greatest possible release; and where no “dermal exposure to MDA” can occur.

(4) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(7) of this section, this section does not apply to the storage, transportation, distribution or sale of MDA in intact containers sealed in such a manner as to contain the MDA dusts, vapors, or liquids, except for the provisions of 29 CFR 1910.1200 and paragraph (e) of this section.

(5) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(7) of this section, this section does not apply to materials in any form which contain less than 0.1% MDA by weight or volume.

(6) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(7) of this section, this section does not apply to “finished articles containing MDA.”

(7) Where products containing MDA are exempted under paragraphs (a)(2) through (a)(6) of this section, the employer shall maintain records of the initial monitoring results or objective data supporting that exemption and the basis for the employer's reliance on the data, as provided in the recordkeeping provision of paragraph (o) of this section.

(b) Definitions. For the purpose of this section, the following definitions shall apply:

Action level means a concentration of airborne MDA of 5 ppb as an eight (8)-hour time-weighted average.

Assistant Secretary means the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, U.S. Department of Labor, or designee.

Authorized person means any person specifically authorized by the employer whose duties require the person to enter a regulated area, or any person entering such an area as a designated representative of employees for the purpose of exercising the right to observe monitoring and measuring procedures under paragraph (p) of this section, or any other person authorized by the Act or regulations issued under the Act.

Container means any barrel, bottle, can, cylinder, drum, reaction vessel, storage tank, commercial packaging or the like, but does not include piping systems.

Decontamination area means an area outside of but as near as practical to the regulated area, consisting of an equipment storage area, wash area, and clean change area, which is used for the decontamination of workers, materials, and equipment contaminated with MDA.

Dermal exposure to MDA occurs where employees are engaged in the handling, application or use of mixtures or materials containing MDA, with any of the following non-airborne forms of MDA:

(i) Liquid, powdered, granular, or flaked mixtures containing MDA in concentrations greater than 0.1% by weight or volume; and

(ii) Materials other than “finished articles” containing MDA in concentrations greater than 0.1% by weight or volume.

Director means the Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or designee.

Emergency means any occurrence such as, but not limited to, equipment failure, rupture of containers, or failure of control equipment which results in an unexpected and potentially hazardous release of MDA.

Employee exposure means exposure to MDA which would occur if the employee were not using respirators or protective work clothing and equipment.

Finished article containing MDA is defined as a manufactured item:

(i) Which is formed to a specific shape or design during manufacture;

(ii) Which has end use function(s) dependent in whole or part upon its shape or design during end use; and

(iii) Where applicable, is an item which is fully cured by virtue of having been subjected to the conditions (temperature, time) necessary to complete the desired chemical reaction.

Historical monitoring data means monitoring data for construction jobs that meet the following conditions:

(i) The data upon which judgments are based are scientifically sound and were collected using methods that are sufficiently accurate and precise;

(ii) The processes and work practices that were in use when the historical monitoring data were obtained are essentially the same as those to be used during the job for which initial monitoring will not be performed;

(iii) The characteristics of the MDA-containing material being handled when the historical monitoring data were obtained are the same as those on the job for which initial monitoring will not be performed;

(iv) Environmental conditions prevailing when the historical monitoring data were obtained are the same as those on the job for which initial monitoring will not be performed; and

(v) Other data relevant to the operations, materials, processing, or employee exposures covered by the exception are substantially similar. The data must be scientifically sound, the characteristics of the MDA containing material must be similar and the environmental conditions comparable.

4,4Methylenedianiline or MDA means the chemical; 4,4′-diaminodiphenylmethane, Chemical Abstract Service Registry number 101-77-9, in the form of a vapor, liquid, or solid. The definition also includes the salts of MDA.

Regulated Areas means areas where airborne concentrations of MDA exceed or can reasonably be expected to exceed, the permissible exposure limits, or where “dermal exposure to MDA” can occur.

STEL means short term exposure limit as determined by any 15-minute sample period.

(c) Permissible exposure limits. The employer shall assure that no employee is exposed to an airborne concentration of MDA in excess of ten parts per billion (10 ppb) as an 8-hour time-weighted average and a STEL of one hundred parts per billion (100 ppb).

(d) Communication among employers. On multi-employer worksites, an employer performing work involving the application of MDA or materials containing MDA for which establishment of one or more regulated areas is required shall inform other employers on the site of the nature of the employer's work with MDA and of the existence of, and requirements pertaining to, regulated areas.

(e) Emergency situations -

(1) Written plan.

(i) A written plan for emergency situations shall be developed for each construction operation where there is a possibility of an emergency. The plan shall include procedures where the employer identifies emergency escape routes for his employees at each construction site before the construction operation begins. Appropriate portions of the plan shall be implemented in the event of an emergency.

(ii) The plan shall specifically provide that employees engaged in correcting emergency conditions shall be equipped with the appropriate personal protective equipment and clothing as required in paragraphs (i) and (j) of this section until the emergency is abated.

(iii) The plan shall specifically include provisions for alerting and evacuating affected employees as well as the applicable elements prescribed in 29 CFR 1910.38 and 29 CFR 1910.39, “Emergency action plans” and “Fire prevention plans,” respectively.

(2) Alerting employees. Where there is the possibility of employee exposure to MDA due to an emergency, means shall be developed to promptly alert employees who have the potential to be directly exposed. Affected employees not engaged in correcting emergency conditions shall be evacuated immediately in the event that an emergency occurs. Means shall also be developed for alerting other employees who may be exposed as a result of the emergency.

(f) Exposure monitoring -

(1) General.

(i) Determinations of employee exposure shall be made from breathing zone air samples that are representative of each employee's exposure to airborne MDA over an eight (8) hour period. Determination of employee exposure to the STEL shall be made from breathing zone air samples collected over a 15 minute sampling period.

(ii) Representative employee exposure shall be determined on the basis of one or more samples representing full shift exposure for each shift for each job classification in each work area where exposure to MDA may occur.

(iii) Where the employer can document that exposure levels are equivalent for similar operations in different work shifts, the employer shall only be required to determine representative employee exposure for that operation during one shift.

(2) Initial monitoring. Each employer who has a workplace or work operation covered by this standard shall perform initial monitoring to determine accurately the airborne concentrations of MDA to which employees may be exposed unless:

(i) The employer can demonstrate, on the basis of objective data, that the MDA-containing product or material being handled cannot cause exposures above the standard's action level, even under worst-case release conditions; or

(ii) The employer has historical monitoring or other data demonstrating that exposures on a particular job will be below the action level.

(3) Periodic monitoring and monitoring frequency.

(i) If the monitoring required by paragraph (f)(2) of this section reveals employee exposure at or above the action level, but at or below the PELs, the employer shall repeat such monitoring for each such employee at least every six (6) months.

(ii) If the monitoring required by paragraph (f)(2) of this section reveals employee exposure above the PELs, the employer shall repeat such monitoring for each such employee at least every three (3) months.

(iii) Employers who are conducting MDA operations within a regulated area can forego periodic monitoring if the employees are all wearing supplied-air respirators while working in the regulated area.

(iv) The employer may alter the monitoring schedule from every three months to every six months for any employee for whom two consecutive measurements taken at least 7 days apart indicate that the employee exposure has decreased to below the PELs but above the action level.

(4) Termination of monitoring.

(i) If the initial monitoring required by paragraph (f)(2) of this section reveals employee exposure to be below the action level, the employer may discontinue the monitoring for that employee, except as otherwise required by paragraph (f)(5) of this section.

(ii) If the periodic monitoring required by paragraph (f)(3) of this section reveals that employee exposures, as indicated by at least two consecutive measurements taken at least 7 days apart, are below the action level the employer may discontinue the monitoring for that employee, except as otherwise required by paragraph (f)(5) of this section.

(5) Additional monitoring. The employer shall institute the exposure monitoring required under paragraphs (f)(2) and (f)(3) of this section when there has been a change in production process, chemicals present, control equipment, personnel, or work practices which may result in new or additional exposures to MDA, or when the employer has any reason to suspect a change which may result in new or additional exposures.

(6) Accuracy of monitoring. Monitoring shall be accurate, to a confidence level of 95 percent, to within plus or minus 25 percent for airborne concentrations of MDA.

(7) Employee notification of monitoring results.

(i) The employer must, as soon as possible but no later than 5 working days after the receipt of the results of any monitoring performed under this section, notify each affected employee of these results either individually in writing or by posting the results in an appropriate location that is accessible to employees.

(ii) The written notification required by paragraph (f)(7)(i) of this section shall contain the corrective action being taken by the employer or any other protective measures which have been implemented to reduce the employee exposure to or below the PELs, wherever the PELs are exceeded.

(8) Visual monitoring. The employer shall make routine inspections of employee hands, face and forearms potentially exposed to MDA. Other potential dermal exposures reported by the employee must be referred to the appropriate medical personnel for observation. If the employer determines that the employee has been exposed to MDA the employer shall:

(i) Determine the source of exposure;

(ii) Implement protective measures to correct the hazard; and

(iii) Maintain records of the corrective actions in accordance with paragraph (o) of this section.

(g) Regulated areas -

(1) Establishment -

(i) Airborne exposures. The employer shall establish regulated areas where airborne concentrations of MDA exceed or can reasonably be expected to exceed, the permissible exposure limits.

(ii) Dermal exposures. Where employees are subject to “dermal exposure to MDA” the employer shall establish those work areas as regulated areas.

(2) Demarcation. Regulated areas shall be demarcated from the rest of the workplace in a manner that minimizes the number of persons potentially exposed.

(3) Access. Access to regulated areas shall be limited to authorized persons.

(4) Personal protective equipment and clothing. Each person entering a regulated area shall be supplied with, and required to use, the appropriate personal protective clothing and equipment in accordance with paragraphs (i) and (j) of this section.

(5) Prohibited activities. The employer shall ensure that employees do not eat, drink, smoke, chew tobacco or gum, or apply cosmetics in regulated areas.

(h) Methods of compliance -

(1) Engineering controls and work practices and respirators.

(i) The employer shall use one or any combination of the following control methods to achieve compliance with the permissible exposure limits prescribed by paragraph (c) of this section:

(A) Local exhaust ventilation equipped with HEPA filter dust collection systems;

(B) General ventilation systems;

(C) Use of workpractices; or

(D) Other engineering controls such as isolation and enclosure that the Assistant Secretary can show to be feasible.

(ii) Wherever the feasible engineering controls and work practices “which can be instituted are not sufficient to reduce employee exposure to or below the PELs, the employer shall use them to reduce employee exposure to the lowest levels achievable by these controls and shall supplement them by the use of respiratory protective devices which comply with the requirements of paragraph (i) of this section.

(2) Special Provisions. For workers engaged in spray application methods, respiratory protection must be used in addition to feasible engineering controls and work practices to reduce employee exposure to or below the PELs.

(3) Prohibitions. Compressed air shall not be used to remove MDA, unless the compressed air is used in conjunction with an enclosed ventilation system designed to capture the dust cloud created by the compressed air.

(4) Employee rotation. The employer shall not use employee rotation as a means of compliance with the exposure limits prescribed in paragraph (c) of this section.

(5) Compliance program.

(i) The employer shall establish and implement a written program to reduce employee exposure to or below the PELs by means of engineering and work practice controls, as required by paragraph (h)(1) of this section, and by use of respiratory protection where permitted under this section.

(ii) Upon request this written program shall be furnished for examination and copying to the Assistant Secretary, the Director, affected employees and designated employee representatives. The employer shall review and, as necessary, update such plans at least once every 12 months to make certain they reflect the current status of the program.

(i) Respiratory protection -

(1) General. For employees who use respirators required by this section, the employer must provide each employee an appropriate respirator that complies with the requirements of this paragraph. Respirators must be used during:

(i) Periods necessary to install or implement feasible engineering and work-practice controls.

(ii) Work operations, such as maintenance and repair activities and spray-application processes, for which engineering and work-practice controls are not feasible.

(iii) Work operations for which feasible engineering and work-practice controls are not yet sufficient to reduce employee exposure to or below the PELs.

(iv) Emergencies.

(2) Respirator program. The employer must implement a respiratory protection program in accordance with § 1910.134 (b) through (d) (except (d)(1)(iii)), and (f) through (m), which covers each employee required by this section to use a respirator.

(3) Respirator selection.

(i) Employers must:

(A) Select, and provide to employees, the appropriate respirators specified in paragraph (d)(3)(i)(A) of 29 CFR 1910.134.

(B) Provide HEPA filters for powered and non-powered air-purifying respirators.

(C) For escape, provide employees with one of the following respirator options: Any self-contained breathing apparatus with a full facepiece or hood operated in the positive-pressure or continuous-flow mode; or a full facepiece air-purifying respirator.

(D) Provide a combination HEPA filter and organic vapor canister or cartridge with air-purifying respirators when MDA is in liquid form or used as part of a process requiring heat.

(ii) An employee who cannot use a negative-pressure respirator must be given the option of using a positive-pressure respirator, or a supplied-air respirator operated in the continuous-flow or pressure-demand mode.

(j) Protective work clothing and equipment -

(1) Provision and use. Where employees are subject to dermal exposure to MDA, where liquids containing MDA can be splashed into the eyes, or where airborne concentrations of MDA are in excess of the PEL, the employer shall provide, at no cost to the employee, and ensure that the employee uses, appropriate protective work clothing and equipment which prevent contact with MDA such as, but not limited to:

(i) Aprons, coveralls or other full-body work clothing;

(ii) Gloves, head coverings, and foot coverings; and

(iii) Face shields, chemical goggles; or

(iv) Other appropriate protective equipment which comply with 29 CFR 1910.133.

(2) Removal and storage.

(i) The employer shall ensure that, at the end of their work shift, employees remove MDA-contaminated protective work clothing and equipment that is not routinely removed throughout the day in change areas provided in accordance with the provisions in paragraph (k) of this section.

(ii) The employer shall ensure that, during their work shift, employees remove all other MDA-contaminated protective work clothing or equipment before leaving a regulated area.

(iii) The employer shall ensure that no employee takes MDA-contaminated work clothing or equipment out of the decontamination areas, except those employees authorized to do so for the purpose of laundering, maintenance, or disposal.

(iv) MDA-contaminated work clothing or equipment shall be placed and stored and transported in sealed, impermeable bags, or other closed impermeable containers.

(v) Containers of MDA-contaminated protective work clothing or equipment which are to be taken out of decontamination areas or the workplace for cleaning, maintenance, or disposal, shall bear labels warning of the hazards of MDA.

(3) Cleaning and replacement.

(i) The employer shall provide the employee with clean protective clothing and equipment. The employer shall ensure that protective work clothing or equipment required by this paragraph is cleaned, laundered, repaired, or replaced at intervals appropriate to maintain its effectiveness.

(ii) The employer shall prohibit the removal of MDA from protective work clothing or equipment by blowing, shaking, or any methods which allow MDA to re-enter the workplace.

(iii) The employer shall ensure that laundering of MDA-contaminated clothing shall be done so as to prevent the release of MDA in the workplace.

(iv) Any employer who gives MDA-contaminated clothing to another person for laundering shall inform such person of the requirement to prevent the release of MDA.

(v) The employer shall inform any person who launders or cleans protective clothing or equipment contaminated with MDA of the potentially harmful effects of exposure.

(4) Visual Examination.

(i) The employer shall ensure that employees' work clothing is examined periodically for rips or tears that may occur during performance of work.

(ii) When rips or tears are detected, the protective equipment or clothing shall be repaired and replaced immediately.

(k) Hygiene facilities and practices -

(1) General.

(i) The employer shall provide decontamination areas for employees required to work in regulated areas or required by paragraph (j)(1) of this section to wear protective clothing. Exception: In lieu of the decontamination area requirement specified in paragraph (k)(1)(i) of this section, the employer may permit employees engaged in small scale, short duration operations, to clean their protective clothing or dispose of the protective clothing before such employees leave the area where the work was performed.

(ii) Change areas. The employer shall ensure that change areas are equipped with separate storage facilities for protective clothing and street clothing, in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.141(e).

(iii) Equipment area. The equipment area shall be supplied with impermeable, labeled bags and containers for the containment and disposal of contaminated protective clothing and equipment.

(2) Shower area.

(i) Where feasible, shower facilities shall be provided which comply with 29 CFR 1910.141(d)(3) wherever the possibility of employee exposure to airborne levels of MDA in excess of the permissible exposure limit exists.

(ii) Where dermal exposure to MDA occurs, the employer shall ensure that materials spilled or deposited on the skin are removed as soon as possible by methods which do not facilitate the dermal absorption of MDA.

(3) Lunch Areas.

(i) Whenever food or beverages are consumed at the worksite and employees are exposed to MDA the employer shall provide clean lunch areas were MDA levels are below the action level and where no dermal exposure to MDA can occur.

(ii) The employer shall ensure that employees wash their hands and faces with soap and water prior to eating, drinking, smoking, or applying cosmetics.

(iii) The employer shall ensure that employees do not enter lunch facilities with contaminated protective work clothing or equipment.

(l) Communication of hazards to employees -

(1) Hazard communication. The employer shall include Methylenedianiline (MDA) in the program established to comply with the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) (§ 1910.1200). The employer shall ensure that each employee has access to labels on containers of MDA and safety data sheets, and is trained in accordance with the provisions of HCS and paragraph (l)(3) of this section. The employer shall ensure that at least the following hazards are addressed: Cancer; liver effects; and skin sensitization.

(2) Signs and labels -

(i) Signs.

(A) The employer shall post and maintain legible signs demarcating regulated areas and entrances or access-ways to regulated areas that bear the following legend:

DANGER

MDA

MAY CAUSE CANCER

CAUSES DAMAGE TO THE LIVER

RESPIRATORY PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING MAY BE REQUIRED IN THIS AREA

AUTHORIZED PERSONNEL ONLY

(B) Prior to June 1, 2016, employers may use the following legend in lieu of that specified in paragraph (l)(2)(i)(A) of this section:

DANGER

MDA

MAY CAUSE CANCER

LIVER TOXIN

AUTHORIZED PERSONNEL ONLY

RESPIRATORS AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING MAY BE REQUIRED TO BE WORN IN THIS AREA

(ii) Labels.

(A) The employer shall ensure that labels or other appropriate forms of warning are provided for containers of MDA within the workplace. The labels shall comply with the requirements of § 1910.1200(f) and shall include at least the following information for pure MDA and mixtures containing MDA:

DANGER

CONTAINS MDA

MAY CAUSE CANCER

CAUSES DAMAGE TO THE LIVER

(B) Prior to June 1, 2015, employers may include the following information workplace labels in lieu of the labeling requirements in paragraph (l)(2)(ii)(A) of this section:

(1) For Pure MDA:

DANGER

CONTAINS MDA

MAY CAUSE CANCER

LIVER TOXIN

(2) For mixtures containing MDA:

DANGER

CONTAINS MDA

CONTAINS MATERIALS WHICH MAY CAUSE CANCER

LIVER TOXIN

(3) Information and training.

(i) The employer shall provide employees with information and training on MDA, in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1200(h), at the time of initial assignment and at least annually thereafter.

(ii) In addition to the information required under 29 CFR 1910.1200, the employer shall:

(A) Provide an explanation of the contents of this section, including appendices A and B of this section, and indicate to employees where a copy of the standard is available;

(B) Describe the medical surveillance program required under paragraph (n) of this section, and explain the information contained in appendix C of this section; and

(C) Describe the medical removal provision required under paragraph (n) of this section.

(4) Access to training materials.

(i) The employer shall make readily available to all affected employees, without cost, all written materials relating to the employee training program, including a copy of this regulation.

(ii) The employer shall provide to the Assistant Secretary and the Director, upon request, all information and training materials relating to the employee information and training program.

(m) Housekeeping.

(1) All surfaces shall be maintained as free as practicable of visible accumulations of MDA.

(2) The employer shall institute a program for detecting MDA leaks, spills, and discharges, including regular visual inspections of operations involving liquid or solid MDA.

(3) All leaks shall be repaired and liquid or dust spills cleaned up promptly.

(4) Surfaces contaminated with MDA may not be cleaned by the use of compressed air.

(5) Shoveling, dry sweeping, and other methods of dry clean-up of MDA may be used where HEPA filtered vacuuming and/or wet cleaning are not feasible or practical.

(6) Waste, scrap, debris, bags, containers, equipment, and clothing contaminated with MDA shall be collected and disposed of in a manner to prevent the re-entry of MDA into the workplace.

(n) Medical surveillance -

(1) General.

(i) The employer shall make available a medical surveillance program for employees exposed to MDA under the following circumstances:

(A) Employees exposed at or above the action level for 30 or more days per year;

(B) Employees who are subject to dermal exposure to MDA for 15 or more days per year;

(C) Employees who have been exposed in an emergency situation;

(D) Employees whom the employer, based on results from compliance with paragraph (f)(8) of this section, has reason to believe are being dermally exposed; and

(E) Employees who show signs or symptoms of MDA exposure.

(ii) The employer shall ensure that all medical examinations and procedures are performed by or under the supervision of a licensed physician at a reasonable time and place, and provided without cost to the employee.

(2) Initial examinations.

(i) Within 150 days of the effective date of this standard, or before the time of initial assignment, the employer shall provide each employee covered by paragraph (n)(1)(i) of this section with a medical examination including the following elements:

(A) A detailed history which includes:

(1) Past work exposure to MDA or any other toxic substances;

(2) A history of drugs, alcohol, tobacco, and medication routinely taken (duration and quantity); and

(3) A history of dermatitis, chemical skin sensitization, or previous hepatic disease.

(B) A physical examination which includes all routine physical examination parameters, skin examination, and examination for signs of liver disease.

(C) Laboratory tests including:

(1) Liver function tests and

(2) Urinalysis.

(D) Additional tests as necessary in the opinion of the physician.

(ii) No initial medical examination is required if adequate records show that the employee has been examined in accordance with the requirements of this section within the previous six months prior to the effective date of this standard or prior to the date of initial assignment.

(3) Periodic examinations.

(i) The employer shall provide each employee covered by this section with a medical examination at least annually following the initial examination. These periodic examinations shall include at least the following elements:

(A) A brief history regarding any new exposure to potential liver toxins, changes in drug, tobacco, and alcohol intake, and the appearance of physical signs relating to the liver, and the skin;

(B) The appropriate tests and examinations including liver function tests and skin examinations; and

(C) Appropriate additional tests or examinations as deemed necessary by the physician.

(ii) If in the physician's opinion the results of liver function tests indicate an abnormality, the employee shall be removed from further MDA exposure in accordance with paragraph (n)(9) of this section. Repeat liver function tests shall be conducted on advice of the physician.

(4) Emergency examinations. If the employer determines that the employee has been exposed to a potentially hazardous amount of MDA in an emergency situation under paragraph (e) of this section, the employer shall provide medical examinations in accordance with paragraphs (n)(3) (i) and (ii) of this section. If the results of liver function testing indicate an abnormality, the employee shall be removed in accordance with paragraph (n)(9) of this section. Repeat liver function tests shall be conducted on the advice of the physician. If the results of the tests are normal, tests must be repeated two to three weeks from the initial testing. If the results of the second set of tests are normal and on the advice of the physician, no additional testing is required.

(5) Additional examinations. Where the employee develops signs and symptoms associated with exposure to MDA, the employer shall provide the employee with an additional medical examination including liver function tests. Repeat liver function tests shall be conducted on the advice of the physician. If the results of the tests are normal, tests must be repeated two to three weeks from the initial testing. If the results of the second set of tests are normal and on the advice of the physician, no additional testing is required.

(6) Multiple physician review mechanism.

(i) If the employer selects the initial physician who conducts any medical examination or consultation provided to an employee under this section, and the employee has signs or symptoms of occupational exposure to MDA (which could include an abnormal liver function test), and the employee disagrees with the opinion of the examining physician, and this opinion could affect the employee's job status, the employee may designate an appropriate and mutually acceptable second physician:

(A) To review any findings, determinations or recommendations of the initial physician; and

(B) To conduct such examinations, consultations, and laboratory tests as the second physician deems necessary to facilitate this review.

(ii) The employer shall promptly notify an employee of the right to seek a second medical opinion after each occasion that an initial physician conducts a medical examination or consultation pursuant to this section. The employer may condition its participation in, and payment for, the multiple physician review mechanism upon the employee doing the following within fifteen (15) days after receipt of the foregoing notification, or receipt of the initial physician's written opinion, whichever is later:

(A) The employee informing the employer that he or she intends to seek a second medical opinion, and

(B) The employee initiating steps to make an appointment with a second physician.

(iii) If the findings, determinations, or recommendations of the second physician differ from those of the initial physician, then the employer and the employee shall assure that efforts are made for the two physicians to resolve any disagreement.

(iv) If the two physicians have been unable to quickly resolve their disagreement, then the employer and the employee through their respective physicians shall designate a third physician:

(A) To review any findings, determinations, or recommendations of the prior physicians; and

(B) To conduct such examinations, consultations, laboratory tests, and discussions with the prior physicians as the third physician deems necessary to resolve the disagreement of the prior physicians.

(v) The employer shall act consistent with the findings, determinations, and recommendations of the second physician, unless the employer and the employee reach a mutually acceptable agreement.

(7) Information provided to the examining physician.

(i) The employer shall provide the following information to the examining physician:

(A) A copy of this regulation and its appendices;

(B) A description of the affected employee's duties as they relate to the employee's potential exposure to MDA;

(C) The employee's current actual or representative MDA exposure level;

(D) A description of any personal protective equipment used or to be used; and

(E) Information from previous employment related medical examinations of the affected employee.

(ii) The employer shall provide the foregoing information to a second physician under this section upon request either by the second physician, or by the employee.

(8) Physician's written opinion.

(i) For each examination under this section, the employer shall obtain, and provide the employee with a copy of, the examining physician's written opinion within 15 days of its receipt. The written opinion shall include the following:

(A) The occupationally pertinent results of the medical examination and tests;

(B) The physician's opinion concerning whether the employee has any detected medical conditions which would place the employee at increased risk of material impairment of health from exposure to MDA;

(C) The physician's recommended limitations upon the employee's exposure to MDA or upon the employee's use of protective clothing or equipment and respirators; and

(D) A statement that the employee has been informed by the physician of the results of the medical examination and any medical conditions resulting from MDA exposure which require further explanation or treatment.

(ii) The written opinion obtained by the employer shall not reveal specific findings or diagnoses unrelated to occupational exposures.

(9) Medical removal -

(i) Temporary medical removal of an employee -

(A) Temporary removal resulting from occupational exposure. The employee shall be removed from work environments in which exposure to MDA is at or above the action level or where dermal exposure to MDA may occur, following an initial examination (paragraph (n)(2) of this section), periodic examinations (paragraph (n)(3) of this section), an emergency situation (paragraph (n)(4) of this section), or an additional examination (paragraph (n)(5) of this section) in the following circumstances:

(1) When the employee exhibits signs and/or symptoms indicative of acute exposure to MDA; or

(2) When the examining physician determines that an employee's abnormal liver function tests are not associated with MDA exposure but that the abnormalities may be exacerbated as a result of occupational exposure to MDA.

(B) Temporary removal due to a final medical determination.

(1) The employer shall remove an employee from work having an exposure to MDA at or above the action level or where the potential for dermal exposure exists on each occasion that a final medical determination results in a medical finding, determination, or opinion that the employee has a detected medical condition which places the employee at increased risk of material impairment to health from exposure to MDA.

(2) For the purposes of this section, the phrase “final medical determination” shall mean the outcome of the physician review mechanism used pursuant to the medical surveillance provisions of this section.

(3) Where a final medical determination results in any recommended special protective measures for an employee, or limitations on an employee's exposure to MDA, the employer shall implement and act consistent with the recommendation.

(ii) Return of the employee to former job status.

(A) The employer shall return an employee to his or her former job status:

(1) When the employee no longer shows signs or symptoms of exposure to MDA, or upon the advice of the physician.

(2) When a subsequent final medical determination results in a medical finding, determination, or opinion that the employee no longer has a detected medical condition which places the employee at increased risk of material impairment to health from exposure to MDA.

(B) For the purposes of this section, the requirement that an employer return an employee to his or her former job status is not intended to expand upon or restrict any rights an employee has or would have had, absent temporary medical removal, to a specific job classification or position under the terms of a collective bargaining agreement.

(iii) Removal of other employee special protective measure or limitations. The employer shall remove any limitations placed on an employee or end any special protective measures provided to an employee pursuant to a final medical determination when a subsequent final medical determination indicates that the limitations or special protective measures are no longer necessary.

(iv) Employer options pending a final medical determination. Where the physician review mechanism used pursuant to the medical surveillance provisions of this section, has not yet resulted in a final medical determination with respect to an employee, the employer shall act as follows:

(A) Removal. The employer may remove the employee from exposure to MDA, provide special protective measures to the employee, or place limitations upon the employee, consistent with the medical findings, determinations, or recommendations of the physician who has reviewed the employee's health status.

(B) Return. The employer may return the employee to his or her former job status, and end any special protective measures provided to the employee, consistent with the medical findings, determinations, or recommendations of any of the physicians who have reviewed the employee's health status, with two exceptions:

(1) If the initial removal, special protection, or limitation of the employee resulted from a final medical determination which differed from the findings, determinations, or recommendations of the initial physician; or

(2) The employee has been on removal status for the preceding six months as a result of exposure to MDA, then the employer shall await a final medical determination.

(v) Medical removal protection benefits -

(A) Provisions of medical removal protection benefits. The employer shall provide to an employee up to six (6) months of medical removal protection benefits on each occasion that an employee is removed from exposure to MDA or otherwise limited pursuant to this section.

(B) Definition of medical removal protection benefits. For the purposes of this section, the requirement that an employer provide medical removal protection benefits means that the employer shall maintain the earnings, seniority, and other employment rights and benefits of an employee as though the employee had not been removed from normal exposure to MDA or otherwise limited.

(C) Follow-up medical surveillance during the period of employee removal or limitations. During the period of time that an employee is removed from normal exposure to MDA or otherwise limited, the employer may condition the provision of medical removal protection benefits upon the employee's participation in follow-up medical surveillance made available pursuant to this section.

(D) Workers' compensation claims. If a removed employee files a claim for workers' compensation payments for a MDA-related disability, then the employer shall continue to provide medical removal protection benefits pending disposition of the claim. To the extent that an award is made to the employee for earnings lost during the period of removal, the employer's medical removal protection obligation shall be reduced by such amount. The employer shall receive no credit for workers' compensation payments received by the employee for treatment-related expenses.

(E) Other credits. The employer's obligation to provide medical removal protection benefits to a removed employee shall be reduced to the extent that the employee receives compensation for earnings lost during the period of removal either from a publicly or employer-funded compensation program, or receives income from employment with any employer made possible by virtue of the employee's removal.

(F) Employees who do not recover within the 6 months of removal. The employer shall take the following measures with respect to any employee removed from exposure to MDA:

(1) The employer shall make available to the employee a medical examination pursuant to this section to obtain a final medical determination with respect to the employee;

(2) The employer shall assure that the final medical determination obtained indicates whether or not the employee may be returned to his or her former job status, and, if not, what steps should be taken to protect the employee's health;

(3) Where the final medical determination has not yet been obtained, or once obtained indicates that the employee may not yet be returned to his or her former job status, the employer shall continue to provide medical removal protection benefits to the employee until either the employee is returned to former job status, or a final medical determination is made that the employee is incapable of ever safely returning to his or her former job status; and

(4) Where the employer acts pursuant to a final medical determination which permits the return of the employee to his or her former job status despite what would otherwise be an unacceptable liver function test, later questions concerning removing the employee again shall be decided by a final medical determination. The employer need not automatically remove such an employee pursuant to the MDA removal criteria provided by this section.

(vi) Voluntary removal or restriction of an employee. Where an employer, although not required by this section to do so, removes an employee from exposure to MDA or otherwise places limitations on an employee due to the effects of MDA exposure on the employee's medical condition, the employer shall provide medical removal protection benefits to the employee equal to that required by paragraph (n)(9)(v) of this section.

(o) Recordkeeping -

(1) Objective data for exempted operations.

(i) Where the employer has relied on objective data that demonstrate that products made from or containing MDA are not capable of releasing MDA or do not present a dermal exposure problem under the expected conditions of processing, use, or handling to exempt such operations from the initial monitoring requirements under paragraph (f)(2) of this section, the employer shall establish and maintain an accurate record of objective data reasonably relied upon in support of the exemption.

(ii) The record shall include at least the following information:

(A) The product qualifying for exemption;

(B) The source of the objective data;

(C) The testing protocol, results of testing, and/or analysis of the material for the release of MDA;

(D) A description of the operation exempted and how the data support the exemption; and

(E) Other data relevant to the operations, materials, processing, or employee exposures covered by the exemption.

(iii) The employer shall maintain this record for the duration of the employer's reliance upon such objective data.

(2) Historical monitoring data.

(i) Where the employer has relied on historical monitoring data that demonstrate that exposures on a particular job will be below the action level to exempt such operations from the initial monitoring requirements under paragraph (f)(2) of this section, the employer shall establish and maintain an accurate record of historical monitoring data reasonably relied upon in support of the exception.

(ii) The record shall include information that reflect the following conditions:

(A) The data upon which judgments are based are scientifically sound and were collected using methods that are sufficiently accurate and precise;

(B) The processes and work practices that were in use when the historical monitoring data were obtained are essentially the same as those to be used during the job for which initial monitoring will not be performed;

(C) The characteristics of the MDA-containing material being handled when the historical monitoring data were obtained are the same as those on the job for which initial monitoring will not be performed;

(D) Environmental conditions prevailing when the historical monitoring data were obtained are the same as those on the job for which initial monitoring will not be performed; and

(E) Other data relevant to the operations, materials, processing, or employee exposures covered by the exception.

(iii) The employer shall maintain this record for the duration of the employer's reliance upon such historical monitoring data.

(3) The employer may utilize the services of competent organizations such as industry trade associations and employee associations to maintain the records required by this section.

(4) Exposure measurements.

(i) The employer shall keep an accurate record of all measurements taken to monitor employee exposure to MDA.

(ii) This record shall include at least the following information:

(A) The date of measurement;

(B) The operation involving exposure to MDA;

(C) Sampling and analytical methods used and evidence of their accuracy;

(D) Number, duration, and results of samples taken;

(E) Type of protective devices worn, if any; and

(F) Name and exposure of the employees whose exposures are represented.

(iii) The employer shall maintain this record for at least thirty (30) years, in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.33.

(5) Medical surveillance.

(i) The employer shall establish and maintain an accurate record for each employee subject to medical surveillance by paragraph (n) of this section, in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.33.

(ii) The record shall include at least the following information:

(A) The name of the employee;

(B) A copy of the employee's medical examination results, including the medical history, questionnaire responses, results of any tests, and physician's recommendations.

(C) Physician's written opinions;

(D) Any employee medical complaints related to exposure to MDA; and

(E) A copy of the information provided to the physician as required by paragraph (n) of this section.

(iii) The employer shall ensure that this record is maintained for the duration of employment plus thirty (30) years, in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.33.

(iv) A copy of the employee's medical removal and return to work status.

(6) Training records. The employer shall maintain all employee training records for one (1) year beyond the last date of employment.

(7) Availability.

(i) The employer, upon written request, shall make all records required to be maintained by this section available to the Assistant Secretary and the Director for examination and copying.

(ii) The employer, upon request, shall make any exposure records required by paragraphs (f) and (n) of this section available for examination and copying to affected employees, former employees, designated representatives, and the Assistant Secretary, in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.33(a)-(e) and (g)-(i).

(iii) The employer, upon request, shall make employee medical records required by paragraphs (n) and (o) of this section available for examination and copying to the subject employee, anyone having the specific written consent of the subject employee, and the Assistant Secretary, in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.33.

(8) Transfer of records. The employer shall comply with the requirements concerning transfer of records set forth in 29 CFR 1910.1020(h).

(p) Observation of monitoring -

(1) Employee observation. The employer shall provide affected employees, or their designated representatives, an opportunity to observe the measuring or monitoring of employee exposure to MDA conducted pursuant to paragraph (f) of this section.

(2) Observation procedures. When observation of the measuring or monitoring of employee exposure to MDA requires entry into areas where the use of protective clothing and equipment or respirators is required, the employer shall provide the observer with personal protective clothing and equipment or respirators required to be worn by employees working in the area, assure the use of such clothing and equipment or respirators, and require the observer to comply with all other applicable safety and health procedures.

(q) Appendices. The information contained in appendices A, B, C, and D of this section is not intended, by itself, to create any additional obligations not otherwise imposed by this standard nor detract from any existing obligation.

Appendix A to § 1926.60 - Substance Data Sheet, for 4-4′ Methylenedianiline

Note:

The requirements applicable to construction work under this appendix A are identical to those set forth in appendix A to § 1910.1050 of this chapter.

Appendix B to § 1926.60 - Substance Technical Guidelines, MDA

Note:

The requirements applicable to construction work under this appendix B are identical to those set forth in appendix B to § 1910.1050 of this chapter.

Appendix C to § 1926.60 - Medical Surveillance Guidelines for MDA

Note:

The requirements applicable to construction work under this appendix C are identical to those set forth in appendix C to § 1910.1050 of this chapter.

Appendix D to § 1926.60 - Sampling and Analytical Methods for MDA Monitoring and Measurement Procedures

Note:

The requirements applicable to construction work under this appendix D are identical to those set forth in appendix D to § 1910.1050 of this chapter.

[57 FR 35681, Aug. 10, 1992, as amended at 57 FR 49649, Nov. 3, 1992; 61 FR 5510, Feb. 13, 1996; 61 FR 31431, June 20, 1996; 63 FR 1296, Jan. 8, 1998; 69 FR 70373, Dec. 6, 2004; 70 FR 1143, Jan. 5, 2005; 71 FR 16674, Apr. 3, 2006; 71 FR 50191, Aug. 24, 2006; 73 FR 75588, Dec. 12, 2008; 76 FR 33611, June 8, 2011; 77 FR 17889, Mar. 26, 2012]

§ 1926.61 Retention of DOT markings, placards and labels.
Note:

The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to those set forth at § 1910.1201 of this chapter.

[61 FR 31432, June 20, 1996]

§ 1926.62 Lead.

(a) Scope. This section applies to all construction work where an employee may be occupationally exposed to lead. All construction work excluded from coverage in the general industry standard for lead by 29 CFR 1910.1025(a)(2) is covered by this standard. Construction work is defined as work for construction, alteration and/or repair, including painting and decorating. It includes but is not limited to the following:

(1) Demolition or salvage of structures where lead or materials containing lead are present;

(2) Removal or encapsulation of materials containing lead;

(3) New construction, alteration, repair, or renovation of structures, substrates, or portions thereof, that contain lead, or materials containing lead;

(4) Installation of products containing lead;

(5) Lead contamination/emergency cleanup;

(6) Transportation, disposal, storage, or containment of lead or materials containing lead on the site or location at which construction activities are performed, and

(7) Maintenance operations associated with the construction activities described in this paragraph.

(b) Definitions.

Action level means employee exposure, without regard to the use of respirators, to an airborne concentration of lead of 30 micrograms per cubic meter of air (30 µg/m3) calculated as an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA).

Assistant Secretary means the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, U.S. Department of Labor, or designee.

Competent person means one who is capable of identifying existing and predictable lead hazards in the surroundings or working conditions and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them.

Director means the Director, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or designee.

Lead means metallic lead, all inorganic lead compounds, and organic lead soaps. Excluded from this definition are all other organic lead compounds.

This section means this standard.

(c) Permissible exposure limit.

(1) The employer shall assure that no employee is exposed to lead at concentrations greater than fifty micrograms per cubic meter of air (50 µg/m3) averaged over an 8-hour period.

(2) If an employee is exposed to lead for more than 8 hours in any work day the employees' allowable exposure, as a time weighted average (TWA) for that day, shall be reduced according to the following formula:

Allowable employee exposure (in µg/m3) = 400 divided by hours worked in the day.

(3) When respirators are used to limit employee exposure as required under paragraph (c) of this section and all the requirements of paragraphs (e)(1) and (f) of this section have been met, employee exposure may be considered to be at the level provided by the protection factor of the respirator for those periods the respirator is worn. Those periods may be averaged with exposure levels during periods when respirators are not worn to determine the employee's daily TWA exposure.

(d) Exposure assessment -

(1) General.

(i) Each employer who has a workplace or operation covered by this standard shall initially determine if any employee may be exposed to lead at or above the action level.

(ii) For the purposes of paragraph (d) of this section, employee exposure is that exposure which would occur if the employee were not using a respirator.

(iii) With the exception of monitoring under paragraph (d)(3), where monitoring is required under this section, the employer shall collect personal samples representative of a full shift including at least one sample for each job classification in each work area either for each shift or for the shift with the highest exposure level.

(iv) Full shift personal samples shall be representative of the monitored employee's regular, daily exposure to lead.

(2) Protection of employees during assessment of exposure.

(i) With respect to the lead related tasks listed in paragraph (d)(2)(i) of this section, where lead is present, until the employer performs an employee exposure assessment as required in paragraph (d) of this section and documents that the employee performing any of the listed tasks is not exposed above the PEL, the employer shall treat the employee as if the employee were exposed above the PEL, and not in excess of ten (10) times the PEL, and shall implement employee protective measures prescribed in paragraph (d)(2)(v) of this section. The tasks covered by this requirement are:

(A) Where lead containing coatings or paint are present: Manual demolition of structures (e.g, dry wall), manual scraping, manual sanding, heat gun applications, and power tool cleaning with dust collection systems;

(B) Spray painting with lead paint.

(ii) In addition, with regard to tasks not listed in paragraph (d)(2)(i), where the employee has any reason to believe that an employee performing the task may be exposed to lead in excess of the PEL, until the employer performs an employee exposure assessment as required by paragraph (d) of this section and documents that the employee's lead exposure is not above the PEL the employer shall treat the employee as if the employee were exposed above the PEL and shall implememt employee protective measures as prescribed in paragraph (d)(2)(v) of this section.

(iii) With respect to the tasks listed in this paragraph (d)(2)(iii) of this section, where lead is present, until the employer performs an employee exposure assessment as required in this paragraph (d), and documents that the employee performing any of the listed tasks is not exposed in excess of 500 µg/m3, the employer shall treat the employee as if the employee were exposed to lead in excess of 500 µg/m3 and shall implement employee protective measures as prescribed in paragraph (d)(2)(v) of this section. Where the employer does establish that the employee is exposed to levels of lead below 500 µg/m3, the employer may provide the exposed employee with the appropriate respirator prescribed for such use at such lower exposures, in accordance with paragraph (f) of this section. The tasks covered by this requirement are:

(A) Using lead containing mortar; lead burning

(B) Where lead containing coatings or paint are present: rivet busting; power tool cleaning without dust collection systems; cleanup activities where dry expendable abrasives are used; and abrasive blasting enclosure movement and removal.

(iv) With respect to the tasks listed in this paragraph (d)(2)(iv), where lead is present, until the employer performs an employee exposure assessment as required in this paragraph (d) and documents that the employee performing any of the listed tasks is not exposed to lead in excess of 2,500 µg/m3 (50×PEL), the employer shall treat the employee as if the employee were exposed to lead in excess of 2,500 µg/m3 and shall implement employee protective measures as prescribed in paragraph (d)(2)(v) of this section. Where the employer does establish that the employee is exposed to levels of lead below 2,500 µg/m3, the employer may provide the exposed employee with the appropriate respirator prescribed for use at such lower exposures, in accordance with paragraph (f) of this section. Interim protection as described in this paragraph is required where lead containing coatings or paint are present on structures when performing:

(v) Until the employer performs an employee exposure assessment as required under paragraph (d) of this section and determines actual employee exposure, the employer shall provide to employees performing the tasks described in paragraphs (d)(2)(i), (d)(2)(ii), (d)(2)(iii), and (d)(2)(iv) of this section with interim protection as follows:

(A) Appropriate respiratory protection in accordance with paragraph (f) of this section.

(B) Appropriate personal protective clothing and equipment in accordance with paragraph (g) of this section.

(C) Change areas in accordance with paragraph (i)(2) of this section.

(D) Hand washing facilities in accordance with paragraph (i)(5) of this section.

(E) Biological monitoring in accordance with paragraph (j)(1)(i) of this section, to consist of blood sampling and analysis for lead and zinc protoporphyrin levels, and

(F) Training as required under paragraph (l)(1)(i) of this section regarding 29 CFR 1926.59, Hazard Communication; training as required under paragraph (1)(2)(iii) of this section, regarding use of respirators; and training in accordance with 29 CFR 1926.21, Safety training and education.

(3) Basis of initial determination.

(i) Except as provided under paragraphs (d)(3)(iii) and (d)(3)(iv) of this section the employer shall monitor employee exposures and shall base initial determinations on the employee exposure monitoring results and any of the following, relevant considerations:

(A) Any information, observations, or calculations which would indicate employee exposure to lead;

(B) Any previous measurements of airborne lead; and

(C) Any employee complaints of symptoms which may be attributable to exposure to lead.

(ii) Monitoring for the initial determination where performed may be limited to a representative sample of the exposed employees who the employer reasonably believes are exposed to the greatest airborne concentrations of lead in the workplace.

(iii) Where the employer has previously monitored for lead exposures, and the data were obtained within the past 12 months during work operations conducted under workplace conditions closely resembling the processes, type of material, control methods, work practices, and environmental conditions used and prevailing in the employer's current operations, the employer may rely on such earlier monitoring results to satisfy the requirements of paragraphs (d)(3)(i) and (d)(6) of this section if the sampling and anal