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Title 8Chapter ISubchapter BPart 245a → Subpart A


Title 8: Aliens and Nationality
PART 245a—ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS TO THAT OF PERSONS ADMITTED FOR TEMPORARY OR PERMANENT RESIDENT STATUS UNDER SECTION 245A OF THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT


Subpart A—Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA) Legalization Provisions


Contents
§245a.1   Definitions.
§245a.2   Application for temporary residence.
§245a.3   Application for adjustment from temporary to permanent resident status.
§245a.4   Adjustment to lawful resident status of certain nationals of countries for which extended voluntary departure has been made available.
§245a.5   Temporary disqualification of certain newly legalized aliens from receiving benefits from programs of financial assistance furnished under federal law.
§245a.6   Treatment of denied application under part 245a, Subpart B.

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§245a.1   Definitions.

As used in this chapter:

(a) Act means the Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended by The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986.

(b) Service means the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS).

(c)(1) Resided continuously as used in section 245A(a)(2) of the Act, means that the alien shall be regarded as having resided continuously in the United States if, at the time of filing of the application for temporary resident status:

An alien who after appearing for a scheduled interview to obtain an immigrant visa at a Consulate or Embassy in Canada or Mexico but who subsequently is not issued an immigrant visa and who is paroled back into the United States, pursuant to the stateside criteria program, shall be regarded as having been granted advance parole by the Service.

(i) No single absence from the United States has exceeded forty-five (45) days, and the aggregate of all absences has not exceeded one hundred and eighty (180) days between January 1, 1982 through the date the application for temporary resident status is filed, unless the alien can establish that due to emergent reasons, his or her return to the United States could not be accomplished within the time period allowed;

(ii) The alien was maintaining residence in the United States; and

(iii) The alien's departure from the United States was not based on an order of deportation.

An alien who has been absent from the United States in accordance with the Service's advance parole procedures shall not be considered as having interrupted his or her continuous residence as required at the time of filing an application.

(2) Continuous residence, as used in section 245A(b)(1)(B) of the Act, means that the alien shall be regarded as having resided continuously in the United States if, at the time of applying for adjustment from temporary residence to permanent resident status: No single absence from the United States has exceeded thirty (30) days, and the aggregate of all absences has not exceeded ninety (90) days between the date of granting of lawful temporary resident status and of applying for permanent resident status, unless the alien can establish that due to emergent reasons the return to the United States could not be accomplished within the time period(s) allowed.

(d) In the term alien's unlawful status was known to the government, the term government means the Immigration and Naturalization Service. An alien's unlawful status was known to the government only if:

(1) The Service received factual information constituting a violation of the alien's nonimmigrant status from any agency, bureau or department, or subdivision thereof, of the Federal government, and such information was stored or otherwise recorded in the official Service alien file, whether or not the Service took follow-up action on the information received. In order to meet the standard of information constituting a violation of the alien's nonimmigrant status, the alien must have made a clear statement or declaration to the other federal agency, bureau or department that he or she was in violation of nonimmigrant status; or

(2) An affirmative determination was made by the Service prior to January 1, 1982 that the alien was subject to deportation proceedings. Evidence that may be presented by an alien to support an assertion that such a determination was made may include, but is not limited to, official Service documents issued prior to January 1, 1982, i.e., Forms I-94 (see §1.4), Arrival-Departure Records granting a period of time in which to depart the United States without imposition of proceedings; Forms I-210, Voluntary Departure Notice letter; and Forms I-221, Order to Show Cause and Notice of Hearing. Evidence from Service records that may be used to support a finding that such a determination was made may include, but is not limited to, record copies of the aforementioned forms and other documents contained in alien files, i.e., Forms I-213, Record of Deportable Alien;

Unexecuted Forms I-205, Warrant of Deportation; Forms I-265, Application for Order to Show Cause and Processing Sheet; Forms I-541, Order of Denial of Application for Extension of Stay granting a period of time in which to depart the United States without imposition of proceedings, or any other Service record reflecting that the alien's nonimmigrant status was considered by the Service to have terminated or the alien was otherwise determined to be subject to deportation proceedings prior to January 1, 1982, whether or not deportation proceedings were instituted; or

(3) A copy of a response by the Service to any other agency which advised that agency that a particular alien had no legal status in the United States or for whom no record could be found.

(4) The applicant produces documentation from a school approved to enroll foreign students under §214.3 which establishes that the said school forwarded to the Service a report that clearly indicated the applicant had violated his or her nonimmigrant student status prior to January 1, 1982. A school may submit an affirmation that the school did forward to the Service the aforementioned report and that the school no longer has available copies of the actual documentation sent. In order to be eligible under this part, the applicant must not have been reinstated to nonimmigrant student status.

(e) The term to make a determination as used in §245a.2(t)(3) of this part means obtaining and reviewing all information required to adjudicate an application for the benefit sought and making a decision thereon. If fraud, willful misrepresentation or concealment of a material fact, knowingly providing a false writing or document, knowingly making a false statement or representation, or any other activity prohibited by section 245A(c)(6) of the Act is established during the process of making the determination on the application, the Service shall refer to the United States Attorney for prosecution of the alien or of any person who created or supplied a false writing or document for use in an application for adjustment of status under this part.

(f) The term continuous physical presence as used in section 245A(a)(3)(A) of the Act means actual continuous presence in the United States since November 6, 1986 until filing of any application for adjustment of status. Aliens who were outside of the United States on the date of enactment or departed the United States after enactment may apply for legalization if they reentered prior to May 1, 1987, provided they meet the continuous residence requirements, and are otherwise eligible for legalization.

(g) Brief, casual, and innocent means a departure authorized by the Service (advance parole) subsequent to May 1, 1987 of not more than thirty (30) days for legitimate emergency or humanitarian purposes unless a further period of authorized departure has been granted in the discretion of the district director or a departure was beyond the alien's control.

(h) The term brief and casual absences as used in section 245a(b)(3)(A) of the Act permits temporary trips abroad as long as the alien establishes a continuing intention to adjust to lawful permanent resident status. However, such absences must comply with §245a.3(b)(2) of this chapter in order for the alien to maintain continuous residence as specified in the Act.

(i) Public cash assistance means income or needs-based monetary assistance to include, but not limited to, supplemental security income received by the alien through federal, state, or local programs designed to meet subsistence levels. It does not include assistance in kind, such as food stamps, public housing, or other non-cash benefits, nor does it include work-related compensation or certain types of medical assistance (Medicare, Medicaid, emergency treatment, services to pregnant women or children under 18 years of age, or treatment in the interest of public health).

(j) Legalization Office means local offices of the Immigration and Naturalization Service which accept and process applications for Legalization or Special Agricultural Worker status, under the authority of the INS district directors in whose districts such offices are located.

(k) Regional Processing Facility means Service offices established in each of the four Service regions to adjudicate, under the authority of the INS Directors of the Regional Processing Facilities, applications for adjustment of status under section 210, 245A(a) or 245A(b)(1) of the Act.

(l) Designated entity means any state, local, church, community, farm labor organization, voluntary organization, association of agricultural employers or individual determined by the Service to be qualified to assist aliens in the preparation of applications for Legalization status.

(m) The term family unity as used in section 245(d)(2)(B)(i) of the Act means maintaining the family group without deviation or change. The family group shall include the spouse, unmarried minor children under 18 years of age who are not members of some other household, and parents who reside regularly in the household of the family group.

(n) The term prima facie as used in section 245(e)(1) and (2) of the Act means eligibility is established if the applicant presents a completed I-687 and specific factual information which in the absence of rebuttal will establish a claim of eligibility under this part.

(o) Misdemeanor means a crime committed in the United States, either (1) punishable by imprisonment for a term of one year or less, regardless of the term such alien actually served, if any, or (2) a crime treated as a misdemeanor under 8 CFR 245a.1(p). For purposes of this definition, any crime punishable by imprisonment for a maximum term of five days or less shall not be considered a misdemeanor.

(p) Felony means a crime committed in the United States, punishable by imprisonment for a term of more than one year, regardless of the term such alien actually served, if any, except: When the offense is defined by the State as a misdemeanor and the sentence actually imposed is one year or less regardless of the term such alien actually served. Under this exception, for purposes of 8 CFR part 245a, the crime shall be treated as a misdemeanor.

(q) Subject of an Order to Show Cause means actual service of the Order to Show Cause upon the alien through the mail or by personal service.

(r) A qualified designated entity in good-standing with the Service means those designated entities whose cooperative agreements were not suspended or terminated by the Service or those whose agreements were not allowed to lapse by the Service prior to January 30, 1989 (the expiration date of the INS cooperative agreements for all designated entities), or those whose agreements were not terminated for cause by the Service subsequent to January 30, 1989.

Subsequent to January 30, 1989, and throughout the period ending on November 6, 1990, a QDE in good-standing may: (1) Serve as an authorized course provider under §245a.3(b)(5)(i)(C) of this chapter; (2) Administer the IRCA Test for Permanent Residency (proficiency test), provided an agreement has been entered into with and authorization has been given by INS under §245a.1(s)(5) of this chapter; and, (3) Certify as true and complete copies of original documents submitted in support of Form I-698 in the format prescribed in §245a.3(d)(2) of this chapter.

(s) Satisfactorily pursuing, as used in section 245A(b)(1)(D)(i)(II) of the Act, means:

(1) An applicant for permanent resident status has attended a recognized program for at least 40 hours of a minimum 60-hour course as appropriate for his or her ability level, and is demonstrating progress according to the performance standards of the English/citizenship course prescribed by the recognized program in which he or she is enrolled (as long as enrollment occurred on or after May 1, 1987, course standards include attainment of particular functional skills related to communicative ability, subject matter knowledge, and English language competency, and attainment of these skills is measured either by successful completion of learning objectives appropriate to the applicant's ability level, or attainment of a determined score on a test or tests, or both of these); or

(2) An applicant presents a high school diploma or general educational development diploma (GED) from a school in the United States. A GED gained in a language other than English is acceptable only if a GED English proficiency test has been passed. (The curriculum for both the high school diploma and the GED must have included at least 40 hours of instruction in English and U.S. history and government); or

(3) An applicant has attended for a period of one academic year (or the equivalent thereof according to the standards of the learning institution), a state recognized, accredited learning institution in the United States and that institution certifies such attendance (as long as the curriculum included at least 40 hours of instruction in English and U.S. history and government); or

(4) An applicant has attended courses conducted by employers, social, community, or private groups certified (retroactively, if necessary, as long as enrollment occurred on or after May 1, 1987, and the curriculum included at least 40 hours of instruction in English and U.S. history and government) by the district director or the Director of the Outreach Program under §245a.3(b)(5)(i)(D) of this chapter; or

(5) An applicant attests to having completed at least 40 hours of individual study in English and U.S. history and government and passes the proficiency test for legalization, called the IRCA Test for Permanent Residency, indicating that the applicant is able to read and understand minimal functional English within the context of the history and government of the United States. Such test may be given by INS, as well as, State Departments of Education (SDEs) (and their accredited educational agencies) and Qualified Designated Entities in good-standing (QDEs) upon agreement with and authorization by INS. Those SDEs and QDEs wishing to participate in this effort should write to the Director of the INS Outreach Program at 425 “I” Street, NW., Washington, DC 20536, for further information.

(t) Minimal understanding of ordinary English as used in section 245A(b)(1)(D)(i) of the Act means an applicant can satisfy basic survival needs and routine social demands. The person can handle jobs that involve following simple oral and very basic written communication.

(u) Curriculum means a defined course for an instructional program. Minimally, the curriculum prescribes what is to be taught, how the course is to be taught, with what materials, and when and where. The curriculum must:

(1) Teach words and phrases in ordinary, everyday usage;

(2) Include the content of the Federal Citizenship Text series as the basis for curriculum development (other texts with similar content may be used in addition to, but not in lieu of, the Federal Citizenship Text series);

(3) Be designed to provide at least 60 hours of instruction per class level;

(4) Be relevant and educationally appropriate for the program focus and the intended audience; and

(5) Be available for examination and review by INS as requested.

(v) The term developmentally disabled means the same as the term developmental disability defined in section 102(5) of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 1987, Public Law 100-146. As a convenience to the public, that definition is printed here in its entirety:

The term developmental disability means a severe, chronic disability of a person which:

(1) Is attributable to a mental or physical impairment or combination of mental and physical impairments;

(2) Is manifested before the person attains age twenty-two;

(3) Is likely to continue indefinitely;

(4) Results in substantial functional limitations in three or more of the following areas of major life activity: (i) Self-care, (ii) receptive and expressive language, (iii) learning, (iv) mobility, (v) self direction, (vi) capacity for independent living, and (vii) economic self-sufficiency; and

(5) Reflects the person's need for a combination and sequence of special, interdisciplinary, or generic care, treatment, or other services which are of lifelong or extended duration and are individually planned and coordinated.

[52 FR 16208, May 1, 1987, as amended at 52 FR 43845, Nov. 17, 1987; 53 FR 9863, Mar. 28, 1988; 53 FR 23382, June 22, 1988; 53 FR 43992, Oct. 31, 1988; 54 FR 29448, July 12, 1989; 56 FR 31061, July 9, 1991; 78 FR 18472, Mar. 27, 2013]

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§245a.2   Application for temporary residence.

(a) Application period for temporary residence. (1) An alien who has resided unlawfully in the United States since January 1, 1982, who believes that he or she meets the eligibility requirements of section 245A of the Act must make application within the twelve month period beginning on May 5, 1987 and ending on May 4, 1988, except as provided in the following paragraphs.

(2)(i) [Reserved]

(ii) An alien who is the subject of an Order to Show Cause issued under section 242 of the Act during the period beginning on May 5, 1987 and ending on April 4, 1988 must file an application for adjustment of status to that of a temporary resident prior to the thirty-first day after the issuance of the Order to Show Cause.

(iii) An alien who is the subject of an Order to Show Cause issued under section 242 of the Act during the period beginning on April 5, 1988 and ending on May 4, 1988 must file an application for adjustment of status to that of a temporary resident not later than May 4, 1988.

(iv) An alien, described in paragraphs (a)(2)(i) through (iii) of this section, who fails to file an application for adjustment of status to that of a temporary resident under section 245A(a) of the Act during the respective time period(s), will be statutorily ineligible for such adjustment of status.

(b) Eligibility. The following categories of aliens, who are otherwise eligible to apply for legalization, may file for adjustment to temporary residence status:

(1) An alien (other than an alien who entered as a nonimmigrant) who establishes that he or she entered the United States prior to January 1, 1982, and who has thereafter resided continuously in the United States in an unlawful status, and who has been physically present in the United States from November 6, 1986, until the date of filing the application.

(2) An alien who establishes that he or she entered the United States as a nonimmigrant prior to January 1, 1982, and whose period of authorized admission expired through the passage of time prior to January 1, 1982, and who has thereafter resided continuously in the United States in an unlawful status, and who has been physically present in the United States from November 6, 1986, until the date of filing the application.

(3) An alien who establishes that he or she entered the United States as a nonimmigrant prior to January 1, 1982, and whose unlawful status was known to the Government as of January 1, 1982, and who has thereafter resided continuously in the United States in an unlawful status, and who has been physically present in the United States from November 6, 1986, until the date of filing the application.

(4) An alien described in paragraphs (b) (1) through (3) of this section who was at any time a nonimmigrant exchange visitor (as defined in section 101(a)(15)(J) of the Act), must establish that he or she was not subject to the two-year foreign residence requirements of section 212(e) or has fulfilled that requirement or has received a waiver of such requirements and has resided continuously in the United States in unlawful status since January 1, 1982.

(5) An alien who establishes that he or she was granted voluntary departure, voluntary return, extended voluntary departure or placed in deferred action category by the Service prior to January 1, 1982 and who has thereafter resided continuously in such status in the United States and who has been physically present in the United States from November 6, 1986 until the date of filing the application.

(6) An alien who establishes that he or she was paroled into the United States prior to January 1, 1982, and whose parole status terminated prior to January 1, 1982, and who has thereafter resided continuously in such status in the United States, and who has been physically present in the United States from November 6, 1986, until the date of filing the application.

(7) An alien who establishes that he or she is a Cuban or Haitian Entrant who was physically present in the United States prior to January 1, 1982, and who has thereafter resided continuously in the United States, and who has been physically present in the United States from November 6, 1986, until the date of filing the application, without regard to whether such alien has applied for adjustment of status pursuant to section 202 of the Act.

(8) An alien's eligibility under the categories described in section 245(a)(2)(b) (1) through (7) and (9) through (15) shall not be affected by entries to the United States subsequent to January 1, 1982 that were not documented on Service Form I-94 (see §1.4), Arrival-Departure Record.

(9) An alien who would be otherwise eligible for legalization and who was present in the United States in an unlawful status prior to January 1, 1982, and reentered the United States as a nonimmigrant, such entry being documented on Service Form I-94, Arrival-Departure Record, in order to return to an unrelinquished unlawful residence.

(10) An alien described in paragraph (b)(9) of this section must receive a waiver of the excludable charge 212(a)(19) as an alien who entered the United States by fraud.

(11) A nonimmigrant who entered the United States for duration of status (“D/S”) is one of the following classes, A, A-1, A-2, G, G-1, G-2, G-3 or G-4, whose qualifying employment terminated or who ceased to be recognized by the Department of State as being entitled to such classification prior to January 1, 1982, and who has thereafter continued to reside in the United States in an unlawful status. An alien who was a dependent family member and who may be otherwise eligible for legalization may be considered a member of this class of eligible aliens if the dependent family member was also in A and G status when the principal A or G alien's status terminated or ceased to be recognized by the Department of State.

(12) A nomimmigrant who entered the United States for duration of status (“D/S”) in one of the following classes, F, F-1, or F-2, who completed a full course of study, including practical training and whose time period if any to depart the United States after completion of study expired prior to January 1, 1982 and who has remained in the United States in an unlawful status since that time. A dependent F-2 alien otherwise eligible who was admitted into the United States with a specific time period, as opposed to duration of status, documented on Service Form I-94, Arrival-Departure Record that extended beyond January 1, 1982 is considered eligible if the principal F-1 alien is found eligible.

(13) An alien who establishes that he or she is a member of the class in the Silva-Levi lawsuit (No. 76-C-4268 (N.D. ILL. March 22, 1977)); that is, an alien from an independent country of the Western Hemisphere who was present in the United States prior to March 11, 1977, and was known by the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) to have a priority date for the issuance of an immigrant visa between July 1, 1968 and December 31, 1976, inclusive, and who was clearly eligible for an immigrant visa.

(14) An alien who filed an asylum application prior to January 1, 1982 and whose application was subsequently denied or whose application has not yet been decided is considered an alien in an unlawful status known to the government.

(15) An alien, otherwise eligible who departed the United States and was paroled into the United States on or before May 1, 1987 in order to return to an unrelinquished unlawful residence.

(c) Ineligible aliens. (1) An alien who has been convicted of a felony, or three or more misdemeanors.

(2) An alien who has assisted in the persecution of any person or persons on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or political opinion.

(3) An alien excludable under the provisions of section 212(a) of the Act whose grounds of excludability may not be waived, pursuant to section 245A(d)(2)(B)(ii) of this Act.

(4) An alien who at any time was a nonimmigrant exchange visitor who is subject to the two-year foreign residence requirement unless the requirement has been satisfied or waived pursuant to the provisions of section 212(e) of the Act who has resided continuously in the United States in an unlawful status since January 1, 1982.

(5) [Reserved]

(6) An alien who is the subject of an Order to Show Cause issued under section 242 of the Act during the period beginning on May 5, 1987 and ending on April 4, 1988 who does not file an application for adjustment of status to that of temporary resident under section 245A(a) of the Act prior to the thirty-first day after issuance of the order.

(7) An alien who is the subject of an Order to Show Cause issued under section 242 of the Act during the period beginning on April 5, 1988 and ending on May 4, 1988 who does not file an application for adjustment of status to that of a temporary resident under section 245A(a) of the Act prior to May 5, 1988.

(8) An alien who was paroled into the United States prior to January 1, 1982 and whose parole status terminated or expired subsequent to January 1, 1982, except an alien who was granted advance parole.

(d) Documentation. Evidence to support an alien's eligibility for the legalization program shall include documents establishing proof of identity, proof of residence, and proof of financial responsibility, as well as photographs, a completed fingerprint card (Form FD-258), and a completed medical report of examination (Form I-693). All documentation submitted will be subject to Service verification. Applications submitted with unverifiable documentation may be denied. Failure by an applicant to authorize release to INS of information protected by the Privacy Act and/or related laws in order for INS to adjudicate a claim may result in denial of the benefit sought. Acceptable supporting documents for these three categories are discussed below.

(1) Proof of identity. Evidence to establish identity is listed below in descending order of preference:

(i) Passport;

(ii) Birth certificate;

(iii) Any national identity document from the alien's country of origin bearing photo and fingerprint (e.g., a “cedula” or “cartilla”);

(iv) Driver's license or similar document issued by a state if it contains a photo;

(v) Baptismal Record/Marriage Certificate; or

(vi) Affidavits.

(2) Assumed names—(i) General. In cases where an applicant claims to have met any of the eligibility criteria under an assumed name, the applicant has the burden of proving that the applicant was in fact the person who used that name. The applicant's true identity is established pursuant to the requirements of paragraph (d)(1) of this section. The assumed name must appear in the documentation provided by the applicant to establish eligibility. To meet the requirements of this paragraph documentation must be submitted to prove the common identity, i.e., that the assumed name was in fact used by the applicant.

(ii) Proof of common identity. The most persuasive evidence is a document issued in the assumed name which identifies the applicant by photograph, fingerprint or detailed physical description. Other evidence which will be considered are affidavit(s) by a person or persons other than the applicant, made under oath, which identify the affiant by name and address, state the affiant's relationship to the applicant and the basis of the affiant's knowledge of the applicant's use of the assumed name. Affidavits accompanied by a photograph which has been identified by the affiant as the individual known to affiant under the assumed name in question will carry greater weight.

(3) Proof of residence. Evidence to establish proof of continuous residence in the United States during the requisite period of time may consist of any combination of the following:

(i) Past employment records, which may consist of pay stubs, W-2 Forms, certification of the filing of Federal income tax returns on IRS Form 6166, state verification of the filing of state income tax returns, letters from employer(s) or, if the applicant has been in business for himself or herself, letters from banks and other firms with whom he or she has done business. In all of the above, the name of the alien and the name of the employer or other interested organization must appear on the form or letter, as well as relevant dates. Letters from employers should be on employer letterhead stationery, if the employer has such stationery, and must include:

(A) Alien's address at the time of employment;

(B) Exact period of employment;

(C) Periods of layoff;

(D) Duties with the company;

(E) Whether or not the information was taken from official company records; and

(F) Where records are located and whether the Service may have access to the records.

If the records are unavailable, an affidavit form-letter stating that the alien's employment records are unavailable and why such records are unavailable may be accepted in lieu of (3)(i)(E) and (3)(i)(F) of this paragraph. This affidavit form-letter shall be signed, attested to by the employer under penalty of perjury, and shall state the employer's willingness to come forward and give testimony if requested.

(ii) Utility bills (gas, electric, phone, etc.), receipts, or letters from companies showing the dates during which the applicant received service are acceptable documentation.

(iii) School records (letters, report cards, etc.) from the schools that the applicant or their children have attended in the United States must show name of school and periods of school attendance.

(iv) Hospital or medical records showing treatment or hospitalization of the applicant or his or her children must show the name of the medical facility or physician and the date(s) of the treatment or hospitalization.

(v) Attestations by churches, unions, or other organizations to the applicant's residence by letter which:

(A) Identifies applicant by name;

(B) Is signed by an official (whose title is shown);

(C) Shows inclusive dates of membership;

(D) States the address where applicant resided during membership period;

(E) Includes the seal of the organization impressed on the letter or the letterhead of the organization, if the organization has letterhead stationery;

(F) Establishes how the author knows the applicant; and

(G) Establishes the origin of the information being attested to.

(vi) Additional documents to support the applicant's claim may include:

(A) Money order receipts for money sent in or out of the country;

(B) Passport entries;

(C) Birth certificates of children born in the United States;

(D) Bank books with dated transactions;

(E) Letters or correspondence between applicant and another person or organization;

(F) Social Security card;

(G) Selective Service card;

(H) Automobile license receipts, title, vehicle registration, etc.;

(I) Deeds, mortgages, contracts to which applicant has been a party;

(J) Tax receipts;

(K) Insurance policies, receipts, or letters; and

(L) Any other relevant document.

(4) Proof of financial responsibility. An applicant for adjustment of status under this part is subject to the provisions of section 212(a)(15) of the Act relating to excludability of aliens likely to become public charges. Generally, the evidence of employment submitted under paragraph (d)(3)(i) of this section will serve to demonstrate the alien's financial responsibility during the documented period(s) of employment. If the alien's period(s) of residence in the United States include significant gaps in employment or if there is reason to believe that the alien may have received public assistance while employed, the alien may be required to provide proof that he or she has not received public cash assistance. An applicant for residence who is determined likely to become a public charge and is unable to overcome this determination after application of the special rule will be denied adjustment. The burden of proof to demonstrate the inapplicability of this provision of law lies with the applicant who may provide:

(i) Evidence of a history of employment (i.e., employment letter, W-2 Forms, income tax returns, etc.);

(ii) Evidence that he/she is self-supporting (i.e., bank statements, stocks, other assets, etc.); or

(iii) Form I-134, Affidavit of Support, completed by a spouse in behalf of the applicant and/or children of the applicant or a parent in behalf of children which guarantees complete or partial financial support. Acceptance of the affidavit of support shall be extended to other family members where family circumstances warrant.

(5) Burden of proof. An alien applying for adjustment of status under this part has the burden of proving by a preponderance of the evidence that he or she has resided in the United States for the requisite periods, is admissible to the United States under the provisions of section 245a of the Act, and is otherwise eligible for adjustment of status under this section. The inference to be drawn from the documentation provided shall depend on the extent of the documentation, its credibility and amenability to verification as set forth in paragraph (d) of this section.

(6) Evidence. The sufficiency of all evidence produced by the applicant will be judged according to its probative value and credibility. To meet his or her burden of proof, an applicant must provide evidence of eligibility apart from his or her own testimony. In judging the probative value and credibility of the evidence submitted, greater weight will be given to the submission of original documentation.

(e) Filing of application. (1) The application must be filed on Form I-687 at an office of a designated entity or at a Service Legalization Office within the jurisdiction of the District wherein the applicant resides. If the application is filed with a designated entity, the alien must have consented to having the designated entity forward the application to the legalization office. In the case of applications filed at a legalization office, the district director may, at his or her discretion:

(i) Require the applicant to file the application in person; or

(ii) Require the applicant to file the application by mail; or

(iii) Permit the filing of applications either by mail or in person.

The applicant must appear for a personal interview at the legalization office as scheduled. If the applicant is 14 years of age or older, the application must be accompanied by a completed Form FD-258 (Applicant Card).

(2) At the time of the interview, wherever possible, original documents must be submitted except the following: Official government records; employment or employment-related records maintained by employers, unions, or collective bargaining organizations; medical records; school records maintained by a school or school board; or other records maintained by a party other than the applicant. Copies of records maintained by parties other than the applicant which are submitted in evidence must be certified as true and correct by such parties and must bear their seal or signature or the signature and title of persons authorized to act in their behalf. If at the time of the interview the return of original documents is desired by the applicant, they must be accompanied by notarized copies or copies certified true and correct by a qualified designated entity or by the alien's representative in the format prescribed in §204.2(j)(1) or (2) of this chapter. At the discretion of the district director, original documents, even if accompanied by certified copies, may be temporarily retained for forensic examination by the Document Analysis Unit at the Regional Processing Facility having jurisdiction over the legalization office to which the documents were submitted.

(3) A separate application must be filed by each applicant with the fees required by 8 CFR 106.2.

(f) Filing date of application. The date the alien submits a completed application to a Service Legalization Office or designated entity shall be considered the filing date of the application, provided that in the case of an application filed at a designated entity the alien has consented to having the designated entity forward the application to the Service Legalization Office having jurisdiction over the location of the alien's residence. The designated entities are required to forward completed applications to the appropriate Service Legalization Office within sixty days of receipt.

(g) Selective Service registration. At the time of filing an application under this section, male applicants over the age of 17 and under the age of 26 are required to be registered under the Military Selective Service Act. An applicant shall present evidence that he has previously registered under that Act in the form of a letter of acknowledgement from the Selective Service System, or such alien shall present a completed and signed Form SSS-1 at the time of filing Form I-687 with the Immigration and Naturalization Service or a designated entity. Form SSS-1 will be forwarded to the Selective Service System by the Service.

(h) Continuous residence. (1) For the purpose of this Act, an applicant for temporary resident status shall be regarded as having resided continuously in the United States if, at the time of filing of the application:

(i) No single absence from the United States has exceeded forty-five (45) days, and the aggregate of all absences has not exceeded one hundred and eighty (180) days between January 1, 1982 through the date the application for temporary resident status is filed, unless the alien can establish that due to emergent reasons, his or her return to the United States could not be accomplished within the time period allowed;

(ii) The alien was maintaining a residence in the United States; and

(iii) The alien's departure from the United States was not based on an order of deportation.

(2) An alien who has been absent from the United States in accordance with the Service's advance parole procedures shall not be considered as having interrupted his or her continuous residence as required at the time of filing an application under this section.

(i) Medical examination. An applicant under this part shall be required to submit to an examination by a designated civil surgeon at no expense to the government. The designated civil surgeon shall report on the findings of the mental and physical condition of the applicant and the determination of the alien's immunization status. Results of the medical examination must be presented to the Service at the time of interview and shall be incorporated into the record. Any applicant certified under paragraphs (1), (2), (3), (4), or (5) of section 212(a) of the Act may appeal to a Board of Medical Officers of the U.S. Public Health Service as provided in section 234 of the Act and part 235 of this chapter.

(j) Interview. Each applicant, regardless of age, must appear at the appropriate Service Office and must be fingerprinted for the purpose of issuance of an employment authorization document and Form I-688. Each applicant shall be interviewed by an immigration officer, except that the interview may be waived for a child under 14, or when it is impractical because of the health or advanced age of the applicant.

(k) Applicability of exclusion grounds—(1) Grounds of exclusion not to be applied. The following paragraphs of section 212(a) of the Act shall not apply to applicants for temporary resident status: (14) Workers entering without Labor Certification; (20) immigrants not in possession of a valid entry document; (21) visas issued without compliance with section 203; (25) illiterates; and (32) graduates of non-accredited medical schools.

(2) Waiver of grounds of exclusion. Except as provided in paragraph (k)(3) of this section, the Attorney General may waive any other provision of section 212(a) of the Act only in the case of individual aliens for humanitarian purposes, to assure family unity, or when the granting of such a waiver is in the public interest. If an alien is excludable on grounds which may be waived as set forth in this paragraph, he or she shall be advised of the procedures for applying for a waiver of grounds of excludability on Form I-690. When an application for waiver of grounds of excludability is filed jointly with an application for temporary residence under this section, it shall be accepted for processing at the legalization office. If an application for waiver of grounds of excludability is submitted after the alien's preliminary interview at the legalization office, it shall be forwarded to the appropriate Regional Processing Facility. All applications for waivers of grounds of excludability must be accompanied by the correct fee in the exact amount. All fees for applications filed in the United States must be in the form of a money order, cashier's check, or bank check. No personal checks or currency will be accepted. Fees will not be waived or refunded under any circumstances. An application for waiver of grounds of excludability under this part shall be approved or denied by the director of the Regional Processing Facility in whose jurisdiction the applicant's application for adjustment of status was filed except that in cases involving clear statutory ineligibility or admitted fraud, such application may be denied by the district director in whose jurisdiction the application is filed, and in cases returned to a Service Legalization Office for re-interview, such application may be approved at the discretion of the district director. The applicant shall be notified of the decision and, if the application is denied, of the reason therefor. Appeal from an adverse decision under this part may be taken by the applicant on Form I-694 within 30 days after the service of the notice only to the Service's Administrative Appeals Unit pursuant to the provisions of §103.3(a) of this chapter.

(3) Grounds of exclusion that may not be waived. Notwithstanding any other provision of the Act, the following provisions of section 212(a) may not be waived by the Attorney General under paragraph (k)(2) of this section:

(i) Paragraphs (9) and (10) (criminals);

(ii) Paragraph (23) (narcotics) except for a single offense of simple possession of thirty grams or less of marijuana;

(iii) Paragraphs (27) (prejudicial to the public interest), (28) (communist), and (29) (subversive);

(iv) Paragraph (33) (participated in Nazi persecution).

(4) Special rule for determination of public charge. An alien who has a consistent employment history which shows the ability to support himself or herself even though his or her income may be below the poverty level, may be admissible. The alien's employment history need not be continuous in that it is uninterrupted. It should be continuous in the sense that the alien shall be regularly attached to the workforce, has an income over a substantial period of the applicable time, and has demonstrated the capacity to exist on his or her income without recourse to public cash assistance. This regulation is prospective in that the Service shall determine, based on the alien's history, whether he or she is likely to become a public charge. Past acceptance of public cash assistance within a history of consistent employment will enter into this decision. The weight given in considering applicability of the public charge provisions will depend on many factors, but the length of time an applicant has received public cash assistance will constitute a significant factor.

(5) Public assistance and criminal history verification. Declarations by an applicant that he or she has not been the recipient of public cash assistance and/or has not had a criminal record are subject to a verification of facts by the Service. The applicant must agree to fully cooperate in the verification process. Failure to assist the Service in verifying information necessary for the adjudication of the application may result in a denial of the application.

(l) Continous physical presence since November 6, 1986. (1) An alien applying for adjustment to temporary resident status must establish that he or she has been continuously physically present in the United States since November 6, 1986. Aliens who were outside of the United States on the date of enactment or departed the United States after enactment may apply for legalization if they reentered prior to May 1, 1987, and meet the continuous residence requirements and are otherwise eligible for legalization.

(2) A brief, casual and innocent absence means a departure authorized by the Service (advance parole) subsequent to May 1, 1987 of not more than thirty (30) days for legitimate emergency or humanitarian purposes unless a further period of authorized departure has been granted in the discretion of the district director or a departure was beyond the alien's control.

(m) Departure. (1) During the time period from the date that an alien's application establishing prima facie eligibility for temporary resident status is reviewed at a Service Legalization Office and the date status as a temporary resident is granted, the alien applicant can only be readmitted to the United States provided his or her departure was authorized under the Service's advance parole provisions contained in §212.5(f) of this chapter.

(2) An alien whose application for temporary resident status has been approved may be admitted to the United States upon return as a returning temporary resident provided he or she:

(i) Is not under deportation proceedings, such proceedings having been instituted subsequent to the approval of temporary resident status. A temporary resident alien will not be considered deported if that alien departs the United States while under an outstanding order of deportation issued prior to the approval of temporary resident status;

(ii) Has not been absent from the United States more than thirty (30) days on the date application for admission is made;

(iii) Has not been absent from the United States for an aggregate period of more than 90 days since the date the alien was granted lawful temporary resident status;

(iv) Presents Form I-688;

(v) Presents himself or herself for inspection; and

(vi) Is otherwise admissible.

(3) The periods of time in paragraph (m)(2)(ii) and (m)(2)(iii) of this section may be waived at the discretion of the Attorney General in cases where the absence from the United States was due merely to a brief temporary trip abroad due to emergent or extenuating circumstances beyond the alien's control.

(n)(1) Employment and travel authorization; general. Authorization for employment and travel abroad for temporary resident status applicants under section 245A(a) of the Act may only be granted by a Service Office. INS district directors will determine the Service location for the completion of processing of travel documentation. In the case of an application which has been filed with a designated entity, employment authorization may only be granted by the Service after the application has been properly received at the Service Office.

(2) Employment authorization prior to the granting of temporary resident status. (i) Permission to travel abroad and accept employment may be granted to the applicant after an interview has been conducted in connection with an application establishing prima facie eligibility for temporary resident status. Permission to travel abroad may be granted in emergent circumstances in accordance with the Service's advance parole provisions contained in §212.5(f) of this chapter after an interview has been conducted in connection with an application establishing prima facie eligiblity for temporary resident status.

(ii) If an interview appointment cannot be scheduled within 30 days from the date an application is filed at a Service office, authorization to accept employment will be granted, valid until the scheduled appointment date. Employment authorization, both prior and subsequent to an interview, will be restricted to increments of 1 year, pending final determination on the application for temporary resident status. If a final determination has not been made prior to the expiration date on the Employment Authorization Document (Form I-766, Form I-688A or Form I-688B), that date may be extended upon return of the employment authorization document by the applicant to the appropriate Service office.

(3) Employment and travel authorization upon grant of temporary resident status. Upon the granting of an application for adjustment to temporary resident status, the service center will forward a notice of approval to the applicant at his or her last known address and to his or her qualified designated entity or representative. The applicant may appear at any Service office and, upon surrender of the previously issued Employment Authorization Document, will be issued Form I-688, Temporary Resident Card, authorizing employment and travel abroad.

(4) Revocation of employment authorization upon denial of temporary resident status. Upon denial of an application for adjustment to temporary resident status the alien will be notified that if a timely appeal is not submitted, employment authorization shall be automatically revoked on the final day of the appeal period.

(o) Decision. The applicant shall be notified in writing of the decision, and, if the application is denied, of the reason therefor. An appeal from an adverse decision under this part may be taken by the applicant on Form I-694.

(p) Appeal process. An adverse decision under this part may be appealed to the Associate Commissioner, Examinations (Administrative Appeals Unit). Any appeal with the required fee shall be filed with the Regional Processing Facility within thirty (30) days after service of the notice of denial in accordance with the procedures of §103.3(a) of this chapter. An appeal received after the thirty (30) day period has tolled will not be accepted. The thirty (30) day period includes any time required for service or receipt by mail.

(q) Motions. The Regional Processing Facility director may sua sponte reopen and reconsider any adverse decision. When an appeal to the Associate Commissioner, Examinations (Administrative Appeals Unit) has been filed, the INS director of the Regional Processing Facility may issue a new decision that will grant the benefit which has been requested. The director's new decision must be served on the appealing party within 45 days of receipt of any briefs and/or new evidence, or upon expiration of the time allowed for the submission of any briefs. Motions to reopen a proceeding or reconsider a decision shall not be considered under this part.

(r) Certifications. The Regional Processing Facility director may, in accordance with §103.4 of this chapter, certify a decision to the Associate Commissioner, Examinations (Administrative Appeals Unit) when the case involves an unusually complex or novel question of law or fact. The party affected shall be given notice of such certification and of the right to submit a brief within thirty (30) days from service of the notice.

(s) Date of adjustment to temporary residence. The status of an alien whose application for temporary resident status is approved shall be adjusted to that of a lawful temporary resident as of the date indicated on the application fee receipt issued at Service Legalization Office.

(t) Limitation on access to information and confidentiality. (1) No person other than a sworn officer or employee of the Justice Department or bureau of agency thereof, will be permitted to examine individual applications, except employees of designated entities where applications are filed with the same designated entity. For purposes of this part, any individual employed under contract by the Service to work in connection with the legalization program shall be considered an “employee of the Justice Department or bureau or agency thereof.”

(2) Files and records prepared by designated entities under this section are confidential. The Attorney General and the Service shall not have access to these files and records without the consent of the alien.

(3) No information furnished pursuant to an application for legalization under this section shall be used for any purpose except: (i) To make a determination on the application; or, (ii) for the enforcement of the provisions encompassed in section 245A(c)(6) of the Act, except as provided in paragraph (t)(4) of this section.

(4) If a determination is made by the Service that the alien has, in connection with his or her application, engaged in fraud or willful misrepresentation or concealment of a material fact, knowingly provided a false writing or document in making his or her application, knowingly made a false statement or representation, or engaged in any other activity prohibited by section 245A(c)(6) of the Act, the Service shall refer the matter to the United States Attorney for prosecution of the alien or of any person who created or supplied a false writing or document for use in an application for adjustment of status under this part.

(5) Information obtained in a granted legalization application and contained in the applicant's file is subject to subsequent review in reference to future benefits applied for (including petitions for naturalization and permanent resident status for relatives).

(u) Termination of temporary resident staus—(1) Termination of temporary resident status; General. The status of an alien lawfully admitted for temporary residence under section 245A(a)(1) of the Act may be terminated at any time in accordance with section 245A(b)(2) of the Act. It is not necessary that a final order of deportation be entered in order to terminate temporary resident status. The temporary resident status may be terminated upon the occurance of any of the following:

(i) It is determined that the alien was ineligible for temporary residence under section 245A of this Act;

(ii) The alien commits an act which renders him or her inadmissible as an immigrant, unless a waiver is secured pursuant to §245a.2(k)(2).

(iii) The alien is convicted of any felony, or three or more misdemeanors;

(iv) The alien fails to file for adjustment of status from temporary resident to permanent resident on Form I-698 within forty-three (43) months of the date he/she was granted status as a temporary resident under §245a.1 of this part.

(2) Procedure—(i) Termination by the Service. Except as provided in paragraph (u)(2)(ii) of this section, termination of an alien's temporary resident status under paragraph (u)(1) of this section will be made before instituting deportation proceedings against a temporary resident alien and only on notice sent to the alien by certified mail directed to his or her last known address, and to his or her representative, if any. The alien must be given an opportunity to offer evidence in opposition to the grounds alleged for termination of his or her status. Evidence in opposition must be submitted within thirty (30) days after the service of the Notice of Intent to Terminate. If the alien's status is terminated, the director of the regional processing facility shall notify the alien of the decision and the reasons for the termination, and further notify the alien that any Service Form I-94, Arrival-Departure Record or other official Service document issued to the alien authorizing employment and/or travel abroad, or any Form I-688, Temporary Resident Card previously issued to the alien will be declared void by the director of the regional processing facility within thirty (30) days if no appeal of the termination decision is filed within that period. The alien may appeal the decision to the Associate Commissioner, Examinations (Administrative Appeals Unit). Any appeal with the required fee shall be filed with the regional processing facility within thirty (30) days after the service of the notice of termination. If no appeal is filed within that period, the I-94, I-688 or other official Service document shall be deemed void, and must be surrendered without delay to an immigration officer or to the issuing office of the Service.

(ii) Termination upon entry of final order of deportation or exclusion. (A) The Service may institute deportation or exclusion proceedings against a temporary resident alien without regard to the procedures set forth in paragraph (u)(2)(i) of this section:

(1) If the ground for deportation arises under section 241(a)(2)(A)(iii) of the Act (8 U.S.C. 1251(a)(2)(A)(iii));

(2) If the ground for deportation arises after the acquisition of temporary resident status, and the basis of such ground of deportation is not waivable pursuant to section 245A(d)(2)(B)(ii) of the Act (8 U.S.C. 1255a(d)(2)(B)(ii)); or

(3) If the ground for exclusion arises after the acquisition of temporary resident status and is not waivable pursuant to section 245A(d)(2)(B)(ii) of the Act (8 U.S.C. 1255a(d)(2)(B)(ii)).

(B) In such cases, the entry of a final order of deportation or exclusion will automatically terminate an alien's temporary resident status acquired under section 245A(a)(1) of the Act.

(3) Termination not construed as rescission under section 246. For the purposes of this part the phrase termination of status of an alien granted lawful temporary residence under section 245A(a) of the Act shall not be construed to necessitate a rescission of status as described in section 246 of the Act, and the proceedings required by the regulations issued thereunder shall not apply.

(4) Return to unlawful status after termination. Termination of the status of any alien previously adjusted to lawful temporary residence under section 245A(a) of the Act shall act to return such alien to the unlawful status held prior to the adjustment, and render him or her amenable to exclusion or deportation proceedings under section 236 or 242 of the Act, as appropriate.

(v) Ineligibility for immigration benefits. An alien whose status is adjusted to that of a lawful temporary resident under section 245A of the Act is not entitled to submit a petition pursuant to section 203(a)(2) or to any other benefit or consideration accorded under the Act to aliens lawfuly admitted for permanent residence.

(w) Declaration of Intending Citizen. An alien who has been granted the status of temporary resident under section 245A(a)(1) of this Act may assert a claim of discrimination on the basis of citizenship status under section 274B of the Act only if he or she has previously filed Form I-772 (Declaration of Intending Citizen) after being granted such status. The Declaration of Intending Citizen is not required as a basis for filing a petition for naturalization; nor shall it be regarded as a right to United States citizenship; nor shall it be regarded as evidence of a person's status as a resident.

[52 FR 16208, May 1, 1987, as amended at 52 FR 43845, 43846, Nov. 17, 1987; 53 FR 23382, June 22, 1988; 54 FR 29449, July 12, 1989; 56 FR 31061, July 9, 1991; 58 FR 45236, Aug. 27, 1993; 60 FR 21040, May 1, 1995; 60 FR 21975, May 4, 1995; 61 FR 46536, Sept. 4, 1996; 65 FR 82256, Dec. 28, 2000; 78 FR 18472, Mar. 27, 2013; 85 FR 46927, Aug. 3, 2020]

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§245a.3   Application for adjustment from temporary to permanent resident status.

(a) Application period for permanent residence. (1) An alien may submit an application for lawful permanent resident status, with fee, immediately subsequent to the granting of lawful temporary resident status. Any application received prior to the alien's becoming eligible for adjustment to permanent resident status will be administratively processed and held by the INS, but will not be considered filed until the beginning of the nineteenth month after the date the alien was granted temporary resident status as defined in §245a.2(s) of this chapter.

(2) No application shall be denied for failure to timely apply before the end of 43 months from the date of actual approval of the temporary resident application.

(3) The Service Center Director shall sua sponte reopen and reconsider without fee any application which was previously denied for late filing. No additional fee will be required for those applications which are filed during the twelve month extension period but prior to July 9, 1991.

(b) Eligibility. Any alien who has been lawfully admitted for temporary resident status under section 245A(a) of the Act, such status not having been terminated, may apply for adjustment of status of that of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence if the alien:

(1) Applies for such adjustment anytime subsequent to the granting of temporary resident status but on or before the end of 43 months from the date of actual approval of the termporary resident application. The alien need not be physically present in the United States at the time of application; however, the alien must establish continuous residence in the United States in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (b)(2) of this section and must be physically present in the United States at the time of interview and/or processing for permanent resident status (ADIT processing);

(2) Establishes continuous residence in the United States since the date the alien was granted such temporary residence status. An alien shall be regarded as having resided continuously in the United States for the purpose of this part if, at the time of applying for adjustment from temporary to permanent resident status, or as of the date of eligibility for permanent residence, whichever is later, no single absence from the United States has exceeded thirty (30) days, and the aggregate of all absences has not exceeded ninety (90) days between the date of approval of the temporary resident application, Form I-687 (not the “roll-back” date) and the date the alien applied or became eligible for permanent resident status, whichever is later, unless the alien can establish that due to emergent reasons or circumstances beyond his or her control, the return to the United States could not be accomplished within the time period(s) allowed. A single absence from the United States of more than 30 days, and aggregate absences of more than 90 days during the period for which continuous residence is required for adjustment to permanent residence, shall break the continuity of such residence, unless the temporary resident can establish to the satisfaction of the district director or the Director of the Regional Processing Facility that he or she did not, in fact, abandon his or her residence in the United States during such period;

(3) Is admissible to the United States as an immigrant, except as otherwise provided in paragraph (g) of this section; and has not been convicted of any felony, or three or more misdemeanors; and

(4)(i)(A) Can demonstrate that the alien meets the requirements of section 312 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended (relating to minimal understanding of ordinary English and a knowledge and understanding of the history and government of the United States); or

(B) Is satisfactorily pursuing a course of study recognized by the Attorney General to achieve such an understanding of English and such a knowledge and understanding of the history and government of the United States.

(ii) The requirements of paragraph (b)(4)(i) of this section must be met by each applicant. However, these requirements shall be waived without formal application for persons who, as of the date of application or the date of eligibility for permanent residence under this part, whichever date is later, are:

(A) Under 16 years of age; or

(B) 65 years of age or older; or

(C) Over 50 years of age who have resided in the United States for at least 20 years and submit evidence establishing the 20-year qualification requirement. Such evidence must be submitted pursuant to the requirements contained in Section 245a.2(d)(3) of this chapter; or

(D) Developmentally disabled as defined at §245a.1(v) of this chapter. Such persons must submit medical evidence concerning their developmental disability; or

(E) Physically unable to comply. The physical disability must be of a nature which renders the applicant unable to acquire the four language skills of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing English in accordance with the criteria and precedence established in OI 312.1(a)(2)(iii) (Interpretations). Such persons must submit medical evidence concerning their physical disability.

(iii)(A) Literacy and basic citizenship skills may be demonstrated for purposes of complying with paragraph (b)(4)(i)(A) of this section by:

(1) Speaking and understanding English during the course of the interview for permanent resident status. An applicant's ability to read and write English shall be tested by excerpts from one or more parts of the Federal Textbooks on Citizenship at the elementary literacy level. The test of an applicant's knowledge and understanding of the history and form of government of the United States shall be given in the English language. The scope of the testing shall be limited to subject matter covered in the revised (1987) Federal Textbooks on Citizenship or other approved training material. The test questions shall be selected from a list of 100 standardized questions developed by the Service. In choosing the subject matter and in phrasing questions, due consideration shall be given to the extent of the applicant's education, background, age, length of residence in the United States, opportunities available and efforts made to acquire the requisite knowledge, and any other elements or factors relevant to an appraisal of the adequacy of his or her knowledge and understanding; or

(2) By passing a standardized section 312 test (effective retroactively as of November 7, 1988) such test being given in the English language by the Legalization Assistance Board with the Educational Testing Service (ETS) or the California State Department of Education with the Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS). The scope of the test is based on the 1987 edition of the Federal Textbooks on Citizenship series written at the elementary literacy level. An applicant may evidence passing of the standardized section 312 test by submitting the approved testing organization's standard notice of passing test results at the time of filing Form I-698, subsequent to filing the application but prior to the interview, or at the time of the interview. The test results may be independently verified by INS, if necessary.

(B) An applicant who fails to pass the English literacy and/or the U.S. history and government tests at the time of the interview, shall be afforded a second opportunity after six (6) months (or earlier, at the request of the applicant) to pass the tests, submit evidence of passing an INS approved section 312 standardized examination or submit evidence of fulfillment of any one of the “satisfactorily pursuing” alternatives listed at §245a.1(s) of this chapter. The second interview shall be conducted prior to the denial of the application for permanent residence and may be based solely on the failure to pass the basic citizenship skills requirements. An applicant whose period of eligibility expires prior to the end of the six-month re-test period, shall still be accorded the entire six months within which to be re-tested.

(iv) To satisfy the English language and basic citizenship skills requirements under the “satisfactorily pursuing” standard as defined at §245a.1(s) of this chapter the applicant must submit evidence of such satisfactory pursuit in the form of a “Certificate of Satisfactory Pursuit” (Form I-699) issued by the designated school or program official attesting to the applicant's satisfactory pursuit of the course of study as defined at §245a.1(s)(1) and (4) of this chapter; or a high school diploma or general educational development diploma (GED) under §245a.1(s)(2) of this chapter; or certification on letterhead stationery from a state recognized, accredited learning institution under §245a.1(s)(3) of this chapter; or evidence of having passed the IRCA Test for Permanent Residency under §245a.1(s)(5) of this chapter. Such applicants shall not then be required to demonstrate that they meet the requirements of §245a.3(b)(4)(i)(A) of this chapter in order to be granted lawful permanent residence provided they are otherwise eligible. Evidence of “Satisfactory Pursuit” may be submitted at the time of filing Form I-698, subsequent to filing the application but prior to the interview, or at the time of the interview (the applicant's name and A90M number must appear on any such evidence submitted). An applicant need not necessarily be enrolled in a recognized course of study at the time of application for permanent residency.

(v) Enrollment in a recognized course of study as defined in §245a.3(b)(5) and issuance of a “Certificate of Satisfactory Pursuit” must occur subsequent to May 1, 1987.

(5) A course of study in the English language and in the history and government of the United States shall satisfy the requirement of paragraph (b)(4)(i) of this section if the course materials for such instruction include textbooks published under the authority of section 346 of the Act, and it is

(i) Sponsored or conducted by: (A) An established public or private institution of learning recognized as such by a qualified state certifying agency; (B) An institution of learning approved to issue Forms I-20 in accordance with §214.3 of this chapter; (C) A qualified designated entity within the meaning of section 245A(c)(2) of the Act, in good-standing with the Service; or (D) Is certified by the district director in whose jurisdiction the program is conducted, or is certified by the Director of the Outreach Program nationally.

(ii) A program seeking certification as a course of study recognized by the Attorney General under paragraph (b)(5)(i)(D) of this section shall file Form I-803, Petition for Attorney General Recognition to Provide Course of Study for Legalization: Phase II, with the Director of Outreach for national level programs or with the district director having jurisdiction over the area in which the school or program is located. In the case of local programs, a separate petition must be filed with each district director when a parent organization has schools or programs in more than one INS district. A petition must identify by name and address those schools or programs included in the petition. No fee shall be required to file Form I-803;

(A) The Director of Outreach and the district directors may approve a petition where they have determined that (1) a need exists for a course of study in addition to those already certified under §245a.3(b)(5)(i) (A), (B), or (C); and/or (2) of this chapter the petitioner has historically provided educational services in English and U.S. history and government but is not already certified under §245a.3(b)(5)(i)(A), (B), or (C); and (3) of this chapter the petitioner is otherwise qualified to provide such course of study;

(B) Upon approval of the petition the Director of Outreach and district directors shall issue a Certificate of Attorney General Recognition on Form I-804 to the petitioner. If the petition is denied, the petitioner shall be notified in writing of the decision therefor. No appeal shall lie from a denial of Form I-803, except that in such case where the petitions of a local, cross-district program are approved in one district and denied in another within the same State, the petitioner may request review of the denied petition by the appropriate Regional Commissioner. The Regional Commissioner shall then make a determination in this case;

(C) Each district director shall compile and maintain lists of programs approved under paragraph (b)(5)(i)(D) of this section within his or her jurisdiction. The Director of Outreach shall compile and maintain lists of approved national level programs.

(6) Notice of participation. All courses of study recognized under §245a.3(b)(5)(i)(A) through (C) of this chapter which are already conducting or will conduct English and U.S. history and government courses for temporary residents must submit a Notice of Participation to the district director in whose jurisdiction the program is conducted. Acceptance of “Certificates of Satisfactory Pursuit” (Form I-699) shall be delayed until such time as the course provider submits the Notice of Participation, which notice shall be in the form of a letter typed on the letterhead of the course provider (if available) and include the following:

(i) The name(s) of the school(s)/program(s).

(ii) The complete addresses and telephone numbers of sites where courses will be offered, and class schedules.

(iii) The complete names of persons who are in charge of conducting English and U.S. history and government courses of study.

(iv) A statement that the course of study will issue “Certificates of Satisfactory Pursuit” to temporary resident enrollees according to INS regulations.

(v) A list of designated officials of the recognized course of study authorized to sign “Certificates of Satisfactory Pursuit”, and samples of their original signatures.

(vi) A statement that if a course provider charges a fee to temporary resident enrollees, the fee will not be excessive.

(vii) Evidence of recognition under 8 CFR 245a.3(b)(5)(i)(A), (B), or (C) (e.g., certification from a qualified state certifying agency; evidence of INS approval for attendance by nonimmigrant students, such as the school code number, or the INS identification number from the QDE cooperative agreement).

The course provider shall notify the district director, in writing, of any changes to the information contained in the Notice of Participation subsequent to its submission within ten (10) days of such change.

A Certificate of Attorney General Recognition to Provide Course of Study for Legalization (Phase II), Form I-804, shall be issued to course providers who have submitted a Notice of Participation in accordance with the provisions of this section by the distict director. A Notice of Participation deficient in any way shall be returned to the course provider to correct the deficiency. Upon the satisfaction of the district director that the deficiency has been corrected, the course provider shall be issued Form I-804. Each district director shall compile and maintain lists of recognized courses within his or her district.

(7) Fee structure. No maximum fee standard will be imposed by the Attorney General. However, if it is believed that a fee charged is excessive, this factor alone will justify non-certification of the course provider by INS as provided in §245a.3(b)(10) and/or (12) of this section. Once fees are established, any change in fee without prior approval of the district director or the Director of Outreach may justify de-certification. In determining whether or not a fee is excessive, district directors and the Director of Outreach shall consider such factors as the means of instruction, class size, prevailing wages of instructors in the area of the program, and additional costs such as rent, materials, utilities, insurance, and taxes. District directors and the Director of Outreach may also seek the assistance of various Federal, State and local entities as the need arises (e.g., State Departments of Education) to determine the appropriateness of course fees.

(8) The Citizenship textbooks to be used by applicants for lawful permanent residence under section 245A of the Act shall be distributed by the Service to appropriate representatives of public schools. These textbooks may otherwise be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402, and are also available at certain public institutions.

(9) Maintenance of Student Records. Course providers conducting courses of study recognized under §245a.3(b)(5) of this chapter shall maintain for each student, for a period of three years from the student's enrollment, the following information and documents:

(i) Name (as copied exactly from the I-688A or I-688);

(ii) A-number (90 million series);

(iii) Date of enrollment;

(iv) Attendance records;

(v) Assessment records;

(vi) Photocopy of signed “Certificate of Satisfactory Pursuit” issued to the student.

(10) Issuance of “Certificate of Satisfactory Pursuit” (I-699). (i) Each recognized course of study shall prepare a standardized certificate that is signed by the designated official. The Certificate shall be issued to an applicant who has attended a recognized course of study for at least 40 hours of a minimum of 60-hour course as appropriate for his or her ability level, and is demonstrating progress according to the performance standards of the English and U.S. history and government course prescribed. Such standards shall conform with the provisions of §245a.1(s) of this chapter.

(ii) The district director shall reject a certificate if it is determined that the certificate is fraudulent or was fraudulently issued.

(iii) The district director shall reject a Certificate if it is determined that the course provider is not complying with INS regulations. In the case of non-compliance, the district director will advise the course provider in writing of the specific deficiencies and give the provider thirty (30) days within which to correct such deficiencies.

(iv) District directors will accept Certificates from course providers once it is determined that the deficiencies have been satisfactorily corrected.

(v) Course providers which engage in fraudulent activities or fail to conform with INS regulations will be removed from the list of INS approved programs. INS will not accept Certificates from these providers.

(vi) Certificates may be accepted if a program is cited for deficiencies or decertified at a later date and no fraud was involved.

(vii) Certificates shall not be accepted from a course provider that has been decertified unless the alien enrolled in and had been issued a certificate prior to the decertification, provided that no fraud was involved.

(viii) The appropriate State agency responsible for SLIAG funding shall be notified of all decertifications by the district director.

(11) Designated official. (i) The designated official is the authorized person from each recognized course of study whose signature appears on all “Certificates of Satisfactory Pursuit” issued by that course;

(ii) The designated official must be a regularly employed member of the school administration whose office is located at the school and whose compensation does not come from commissions for recruitment of foreign students;

(iii)(A) The head of the school system or school, the director of the Qualified Designated Entity, the head of a program approved by the Attorney General, or the president or owner of other institutions recognized by the Attorney General must specify a designated official. Such designated official may not delegate this designation to any other person. Each school or institution may have up to three (3) designated officials at any one time. In a multi-campus institution, each campus may have up to three (3) designated officials at any one time;

(B) Each designated official shall have read and otherwise be familiar with the “Requirements and Guidelines for Courses of Study Recognized by the Attorney General”. The signature of a designated official shall affirm the official's compliance with INS regulations;

(C) The name, title, and sample signature of each designated official for each recognized course of study shall be on file with the district director in whose jurisdiction the program is conducted.

(12) Monitoring by INS. (i) INS Outreach personnel in conjunction with the district director shall monitor the course providers in each district in order to:

(A) Assure that the program is a course of study recognized by the Attorney General under the provisions of §245a.3(b)(5).

(B) Verify the existence of curriculm as defined in §245a.1(u) on file for each level of instruction provided in English language and U.S. history and government classes.

(C) Assure that “Certificates of Satisfactory Pursuit” are being issued in accordance with §245a.3(b)(10).

(D) Assure that records are maintained on each temporary resident enrollee in accordance with §245a.3(b)(9).

(E) Assure that fees (if any) assessed by the course provider are in compliance in accordance with §245a.3(b)(7).

(ii) If INS has reason to believe that the service is not being provided to the applicant, INS will issue a 24-hour minimum notice to the service provider before any site visit is conducted.

(iii) If it is determined that a course provider is not performing according to the standards established in either §245a.3(b)(10) or (12) of this chapter, the district director shall institute decertification proceedings. Notice of Intent to Decertify shall be provided to the course provider. The course provider has 30 days within which to correct performance according to standards established. If after the 30 days, the district director is not satisfied that the basis for decertification has been overcome, the course provider will be decertified. The appropriate State agency shall be notified in accordance with §245a.3(b)(10)(viii) of this chapter. A copy of the notice of decertification shall be sent to the State agency.

(13) Courses of study recognized by the Attorney General as defined at §245a.3(b)(5) of this chapter shall provide certain standards for the selection of teachers. Since some programs may be in locations where selection of qualified staff is limited, or where budget constraints restrict options, the following list of qualities for teacher selection is provided as guidance. Teacher selections should include as many of the following qualities as possible:

(i) Specific training in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL);

(ii) Experience as a classroom teacher with adults;

(iii) Cultural sensitivity and openness;

(iv) Familiarity with compentency-based education;

(v) Knowledge of curriculum and materials adaptation;

(vi) Knowledge of a second language.

(c) Ineligible aliens. (1) An alien who has been convicted of a felony, or three or more misdemeanors in the United States.

(2) An alien who is inadmissible to the United States as an immigrant, except as provided in §245a.3(g)(1).

(3) An alien who was previously granted temporary resident status pursuant to section 245A(a) of the Act who has not filed an application for permanent resident status under section 245A(b)(1) of the Act by the end of 43 months from the date of actual approval of the temporary resident application.

(4) An alien who was not previously granted temporary resident status under section 245A(a) of the Act.

(5) An alien whose temporary resident status has been terminated under §245a.2(u) of this chapter

(d) Filing the application. The provisions of part 211 of this chapter relating to the documentary requirements for immigrants shall not apply to an applicant under this part.

(1) The application must be filed on Form I-698. Form I-698 must be accompanied by the correct fee and documents specified in the instructions. The application will be mailed to the director having jurisdiction over the applicant's place of residence.

(2) Certification of documents. The submission of original documents is not required at the time of filing Form I-698. A copy of a document submitted in support of Form I-698 filed pursuant to section 245A(b) of the Act and this part may be accepted, though unaccompanied by the original, if the copy is certified as true and complete by

(i) An attorney in the format prescribed in §204.2(j)(1) of this chapter; or

(ii) An alien's representative in the format prescribed in §204.2(j)(2) of this chapter; or

(iii) A qualified designated entity (QDE) in good standing as defined in §245a.1(r) of this chapter, if the copy bears a certification by the QDE in good-standing, typed or rubber-stamped in the following language:

I certify that I have compared this copy with its original and it is a true and complete copy.

Signed:
Date:
Name:

QDE in good-standing representative

Name of QDE in good-standing:
Address of QDE in good-standing:
INS-QDE Cooperative Agreement Number:

(iv) Authentication. Certification of documents must be authenticated by an original signature. A facsimile signature on a rubber stamp will not be acceptable.

(v) Original documents. Original documents must be presented when requested by the Service. Official government records, employment or employment-related records maintained by employers, unions, or collective bargaining organizations, medical records, school records maintained by a school or school board or other records maintained by a party other than the applicant which are submitted in evidence must be certified as true and complete by such parties and must bear their seal or signature or the signature and title of persons authorized to act in their behalf. At the discretion of the district director and/or the Regional Processing Facility director, original documents may be kept for forensic examination.

(3) A separate application must be filed by each applicant with the fees required by 8 CFR 106.2.

(4) Applicants who filed for temporary resident status prior to December 1, 1987, are required to submit the results of a serologic test for HIV virus on Form I-693, “Medical Examination of Aliens Seeking Adjustment of Status”, completed by a designated civil surgeon, unless the serologic test for HIV was performed and the results were submitted on Form I-693 when the applicant filed for temporary resident status. Applicants who did submit an I-693 reflecting a serologic test for HIV was performed prior to December 1, 1987, must submit evidence of this fact when filing the I-698 application in order to be relieved from the requirement of submitting another I-693. If such evidence is not available, applicants may note on their I-698 application their prior submission of the results of the serologic test for HIV. This information shall then be verified at the Regional Processing Facility. Applicants having to submit an I-693 pursuant to this section are not required to have a complete medical examination. All HIV-positive applicants shall be advised that a waiver of the ground of excludability under section 212(a)(6) of the Act is available and shall be provided the opportunity to apply for the waiver. To be eligible for the waiver, the applicant must establish that:

(i) The danger to the public health of the United States created by the alien's admission to the United States is minimal,

(ii) The possibility of the spread of the infection created by the alien's admission to the United States is minimal, and

(iii) There will be no cost incurred by any government agency without prior consent of that agency. Provided these criteria are met, the waiver may be granted only for humanitarian purposes, to assure family unity, or when the granting of such a waiver is in the public interest in accordance with §245a.3(g)(2) of this chapter.

(5) If necessary, the validity of an alien's temporary resident card (I-688) will be extended in increments of one (1) year until such time as the decision on an alien's properly filed application for permanent residence becomes final.

(6) An application lacking the proper fee or incomplete in any way shall be returned to the applicant with request for the proper fee, correction, additional information, and/or documentation. Once an application has been accepted by the Service and additional information and/or documentation is required, the applicant shall be sent a notice to submit such information and/or documentation. In such case the application Form I-698 shall be retained at the RPF. If a response to this request is not received within 60 days, a second request for correction, additional information, and/or documentation shall be made. If the second request is not complied with by the end of 43 months from the date the application for temporary residence, Form I-687, was approved the application for permanent residence will be adjudicated on the basis of the existing record.

(e) Interview. Each applicant regardless of age, must appear at the appropriate Service office and must be fingerprinted for the purpose of issuance of Form I-551. Each applicant shall be interviewed by an immigration officer, except that the adjudicative interview may be waived for a child under 14, or when it is impractical because of the health or advanced age of the applicant. An applicant failing to appear for the scheduled interview may, for good cause, be afforded another interview. Where an applicant fails to appear for two scheduled interviews, his or her application shall be held in abeyance until the end of 43 months from the date the application for temporary residence was approved and adjudicated on the basis of the existing record.

(f) Numerical limitations. The numerical limitations of sections 201 and 202 of the Act do not apply to the adjustment of aliens to lawful permanent resident status under section 245A(b) of the Act.

(g) Applicability of exclusion grounds—(1) Grounds of exclusion not to be applied. The following paragraphs of section 212(a) of the Act shall not apply to applicants for adjustment of status from temporary resident to permanent resident status: (14) workers entering without labor certification; (20) immigrants not in possession of valid entry documents; (21) visas issued without compliance of section 203; (25) illiterates; and (32) graduates of non-accredited medical schools.

(2) Waiver of grounds of excludability. Except as provided in paragraph (g)(3) of this section, the Service may waive any provision of section 212(a) of the Act only in the case of individual aliens for humanitarian purposes, to assure family unity, or when the granting of such a waiver is otherwise in the public interest. In any case where a provision of section 212(a) of the Act has been waived in connection with an alien's application for lawful temporary resident status under section 245A(a) of the Act, no additional waiver of the same ground of excludability will be required when the alien applies for permanent resident status under section 245A(b)(1) of the Act. In the event that the alien was excludable under any provision of section 212(a) of the Act at the time of temporary residency and failed to apply for a waiver in connection with the application for temporary resident status, or becomes excludable subsequent to the date temporary residence was granted, a waiver of the ground of excludability, if available, will be required before permanent resident status may be granted.

(3) Grounds of exclusion that may not be waived. Notwithstanding any other provisions of the Act the following provisions of section 212(a) of the Act may not be waived by the Attorney General under paragraph (g)(2) of this section:

(i) Paragraphs (9) and (10) (criminals);

(ii) Paragraph (15) (public charge) except for an alien who is or was an aged, blind, or disabled individual (as defined in section 1614(a)(1) of the Social Security Act);

(iii) Paragraph (23) (narcotics), except for a single offense of simple possession of thirty grams or less of marijuana;

(iv) Paragraphs (27) (prejudicial to the public interest), (28) (communists), and (29) (subversives);

(v) Paragraph (33) (participated in Nazi persecution).

(4) Determination of Likely to become a public charge and Special Rule. Prior to use of the special rule for determination of public charge, paragraph (g)(4)(iii) of this section, an alien must first be determined to be excludable under section 212(a)(15) of the Act. If the applicant is determined to be likely to become a public charge, he or she may still be admissible under the terms of the Special Rule.

(i) In determining whether an alien is likely to become a public charge financial responsibility of the alien is to be established by examining the totality of the alien's circumstances at the time of his or her application for legalization. The existence or absence of a particular factor should never be the sole criteria for determining if an alien is likely to become a public charge. The determination of financial responsibility should be a prospective evaluation based on the alien's age, health, income, and vocation.

(ii) The Special Rule for determination of public charge, paragraph (g)(4)(iii) of this section, is to be applied only after an initial determination that the alien is inadmissible under the provisions of section 212(a)(15) of the act.

(iii) Special Rule. An alien who has a consistent employment history which shows the ability to support himself or herself even though his or her income may be below the poverty level is not excludable under paragraph (g)(3)(ii) of this section. The alien's employment history need not be continuous in that it is uninterrupted. It should be continuous in the sense that the alien shall be regularly attached to the workforce, has an income over a substantial period of the applicable time, and has demonstrated the capacity to exist on his or her income without recourse to public cash assistance. The Special Rule is prospective in that the Service shall determine, based on the alien's history, whether he or she is likely to become a public charge. Past acceptance of public cash assistance within a history of consistent employment will enter into this decision. The weight given in considering applicability of the public charge provisions will depend on many factors, but the length of time an applicant has received public cash assistance will constitute a significant factor. It is not necessary to file a waiver in order to apply the Special Rule for Determination of Public Charge.

(5) Public cash assistance and criminal history verification. Declarations by an applicant that he or she has not been the recipient of public cash assistance and/or has not had a criminal record are subject to a verification of facts by the Service. The applicant must agree to fully cooperate in the verification process. Failure to assist the Service in verifying information necessary for proper adjudication may result in denial of the application.

(h) Departure. An applicant for adjustment to lawful permanent resident status under section 245A(b)(1) of the Act who was granted lawful temporary resident status under section 245A(a) of the Act, shall be permitted to return to the United States after such brief and casual trips abroad, as long as the alien reflects a continuing intention to adjust to lawful permanent resident status. However, such absences from the United States must not exceed the periods of time specified in §245a.3(b)(2) of this chapter in order for the alien to maintain continuous residence as specified in the Act.

(i) Decision. The applicant shall be notified in writing of the decision, and, if the application is denied, of the reason therefor. Applications for permanent residence under this chapter will not be denied at local INS offices (districts, suboffices, and legalization offices) until the entire record of proceeding has been reviewed. An application will not be denied if the denial is based on adverse information not previously furnished to the Service by the alien without providing the alien an opportunity to rebut the adverse information and to present evidence in his or her behalf. If inconsistencies are found between information submitted with the adjustment application and information previously furnished to the Service, the applicant shall be afforded the opportunity to explain discrepancies or rebut any adverse information. A party affected under this part by an adverse decision is entitled to file an appeal on Form I-694. If an application is denied, work authorization will be granted until a final decision has been rendered on an appeal or until the end of the appeal period if no appeal is filed. An applicant whose appeal period has ended is no longer considered to be an Eligible Legalized Alien for the purposes of the administration of State Legalization Impact Assistance Grants (SLIAG) funding. An alien whose application is denied will not be required to surrender his or her temporary resident card (I-688) until such time as the appeal period has tolled, or until expiration date of the I-688, whichever date is later. After exhaustion of an appeal, an applicant who believes that the grounds for denial have been overcome may submit another application with fee, provided that the application is submitted within his or her eligibility period.

(j) Appeal process. An adverse decision under this part may be appealed to the Associate Commissioner, Examinations (Administrative Appeals Unit) the appellate authority designated in §103.1(f)(2). Any appeal shall be submitted to the Regional Processing Facility with the required fee within thirty (30) days after service of the Notice of Denial in accordance with the procedures of §103.3(a) of this chapter. An appeal received after the thirty (30) day period has tolled will not be accepted. The thirty (30) day period for submitting an appeal begins three days after the notice of denial is mailed. If a review of the Record of Proceeding (ROP) is requested by the alien or his or her legal representative and an appeal has been properly filed, an additional thirty (30) days will be allowed for this review from the time the Record of Proceeding is photocopied and mailed. A brief may be submitted with the appeal form or submitted up to thirty (30) calendar days from the date of receipt of the appeal form at the Regional Processing Facility. Briefs filed after submission of the appeal should be mailed directly to the Regional Processing Facility. For good cause shown, the time within which a brief supporting an appeal may be submitted may be extended by the Director of the Regional Processing Facility.

(k) Motions. The Regional Processing Facility director may reopen and reconsider any adverse decision sua sponte. When an appeal to the Associate Commissioner, Examinations (Administrative Appeals Unit) has been filed, the INS director of the Regional Processing Facility may issue a new decision that will grant the benefit which has been requested. The director's new decision must be served on the appealing party within forty-five (45) days of receipt of any briefs and/or new evidence, or upon expiration of the time allowed for the submission of any briefs.

(l) Certifications. The Regional Processing Facility director or district director may, in accordance with §103.4 of this chapter, certify a decision to the Associate Commissioner, Examinations (Administrative Appeals Unit) when the case involves an unusually complex or novel question of law or fact. The decision on an appealed case subsequently remanded back to either the Regional Processing Facility director or the district director will be certified to the Administrative Appeals Unit.

(m) Date of adjustment to permanent residence. The status of an alien whose application for permanent resident status is approved shall be adjusted to that of a lawful permanent resident as of the date of filing of the application for permanent residence or the eligibility date, whichever is later. For purposes of making application to petition for naturalization, the continuous residence requirements for naturalization shall begin as of the date the alien's status is adjusted to that of a person lawfully admitted for permanent residence under this part.

(n) Limitation on access to information and confidentiality. (1) No person other than a sworn officer or employee of the Department of Justice or bureau of agency thereof, will be permitted to examine individual applications. For purposes of this part, any individual employed under contract by the Service to work in connection with the Legalization Program shall be considered an employee of the Department of Justice or bureau or agency thereof.

(2) No information furnished pursuant to an application for permanent resident status under this section shall be used for any purpose except: (i) To make a determination on the application; or (ii) for the enforcement of the provisions encompassed in section 245A(c)(6) of the Act, except as provided in paragraph (n)(3) of this section.

(3) If a determination is made by the Service that the alien has, in connection with his or her application, engaged in fraud or willful misrepresentation or concealment of a material fact, knowingly provided a false writing or document in making his or her application, knowingly made a false statement or representation, or engaged in any other activity prohibited by section 245A(c)(6) of the Act, the Service shall refer the matter to the United States Attorney for prosecution of the alien and/or of any person who created or supplied a false writing or document for use in an application for adjustment of status under this part.

(4) Information contained in granted legalization files may be used by the Service at a later date to make a decision (i) On an immigrant visa petition or other status filed by the applicant under section 204(a) of the Act; (ii) On a naturalization application submitted by the applicant; (iii) For the preparation of reports to Congress under section 404 of IRCA, or; (iv) For the furnishing of information, at the discretion of the Attorney General, in the same manner and circumstances as census information may be disclosed by the Secretary of Commerce under section 8 of title 13, Unites States Code.

(o) Rescission. Rescission of adjustment of status under 245a shall occur under the guidelines established in section 246 of the Act.

[54 FR 29449, July 12, 1989; 54 FR 43384, Oct. 24, 1989, as amended at 56 FR 31061, July 9, 1991; 57 FR 3926, Feb. 3, 1992; 59 FR 33905, July 1, 1994; 85 FR 46927, Aug. 3, 2020]

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§245a.4   Adjustment to lawful resident status of certain nationals of countries for which extended voluntary departure has been made available.

(a) Definitions. As used in this section: (1) Act means the Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended by the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986.

(2) Service means the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS).

(3) Resided continuously means that the alien shall be regarded as having resided continuously in the United States if, at the time of filing of the application for temporary resident status:

(i) No single absence from the United States has exceeded 45 days, and the aggregate of all absences has not exceeded 180 days between July 21, 1984, through the date the application for temporary resident status is filed, unless the alien can establish that due to emergent reasons, his or her return to the United States could not be accomplished within the time period allowed;

(ii) The alien was maintaining residence in the United States; and

(iii) The alien's departure from the United States was not based on an order of deportation.

An alien who has been absent from the United States in accordance with the Service's advance parole procedures shall not be considered as having interrupted his or her continuous residence as required at the time of filing an application. An alien who, after appearing for a scheduled interview to obtain an immigrant visa at a Consulate or Embassy in Canada or Mexico but who subsequently is not issued an immigrant visa and who is paroled back into the United States pursuant to the stateside criteria program, shall be considered as having resided continuously.

(4) Continous residence means that the alien shall be regarded as having resided continously in the United States if, at the time of applying for adjustment from temporary residence to permanent resident status: No single absence from the United States has exceeded 30 days, and the aggregate of all absences has not exceeded 90 days between the date on which lawful temporary resident status was granted and the date permanent resident status was applied for, unless the alien can establish that due to emergent reasons or extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control, the return to the United States could not be accomplished within the time period(s) allowed. A single absence from the United States of more than 30 days, and aggregate absences of more than 90 days during the period for which continuous residence is required for adjustment to permanent resident status, shall break the continuity of such residence unless the temporary resident can establish to the satisfaction of the district director that he or she did not, in fact, abandon his or her residence in the United States during such period.

(5) To make a determination means obtaining and reviewing all information required to adjudicate an application for the benefit sought and making a decision thereon. If fraud, willful misrepresentation or concealment of a material fact, knowingly providing a false writing or document, knowingly making a false statement or representation, or any other activity prohibited by the Act is established during the process of making the determination on the application, the Service shall refer the matter to the United States Attorney for prosecution of the alien or of any person who created or supplied a false writing or document for use in an application for adjustment of status under this part.

(6) Continuous physical presence means actual continuous presence in the United States since December 22, 1987, until filing of any application for adjustment of status. Aliens who were outside of the United States after enactment may apply for temporary residence if they reentered prior to March 21, 1988, provided they meet the continuous residence requirements, and are otherwise eligible for legalization.

(7) Brief, casual, and innocent means a departure authorized by the Service (advance parole) subsequent to March 21, 1988, for not more than 30 days for legitimate emergency or humanitarian purposes unless a further period of authorized departure has been granted in the discretion of the district director or a departure was beyond the alien's control.

(8) Brief and casual means temporary trips abroad as long as the alien establishes a continuing intention to adjust to lawful permanent resident status. However, such absences must not exceed the specific periods of time required in order to maintain continuous residence.

(9) Certain nationals of countries for which extended voluntary departure has been made available on the basis of a nationality group determination at any time during the 5-year period ending on November 1, 1987 is limited to nationals of Poland, Afghanistan, Ethiopia, and Uganda.

(10) Public cash assistance means income or need-based monetary assistance to include, but not limited to, supplemental security income received by the alien through federal, state, or local programs designed to meet subsistence levels. It does not include assistance in kind, such as food stamps, public housing, or other non-cash benefits, nor does it include work related compensation or certain types of medical assistance (Medicare, Medicaid, emergency treatment, services to pregnant women or children under 18 years of age, or treatment in the interest of public health).

(11) Designated entity means any state, local, church, community, farm labor organization, voluntary organization, association of agricultural employers or individual determined by the Service to be qualified to assist aliens in the preparation of applications for legalization status.

(12) Through the passage of time means through the expiration date of the nonimmigrant permission to remain in the United States, including any extensions and/or change of status.

(13) Prima facie eligibility means eligibility is established if the applicant presents a completed I-687 and specific factual information which in the absence of rebuttal will establish a claim of eligibility under this part.

(b) Application for temporary residence—(1) Application for temporary residence. (i) An alien who is a national of Poland, Uganda, Ethiopia, or Afghanistan who has resided continuously in the United States since prior to July 2l, 1984, and who believes that he or she meets the eligibility requirements of section 245A of the Act must make application within the 21-month period beginning on March 21, 1988, and ending on December 22, 1989.

(ii) An alien who fails to file an application for adjustment of status to that of a temporary resident under §245A.4 of this part during the time period, will be statutorily ineligible for such adjustment of status.

(2) Eligibility (i) The following categories of aliens who are not otherwise excludable under section 212(a) of the Act are eligible to apply for status to that of a person admitted for temporary residence:

(A) An alien who is a national of Poland, Uganda, Ethiopia, or Afghanistan, (other than an alien who entered as a nonimmigrant) who establishes that he or she entered the United States prior to July 21, 1984, and who has thereafter resided continuously in the United States, and who has been physically present in the United States from December 22, 1987, until the date of filing the application.

(B) An alien who is a national of Poland, Uganda, Ethiopia, or Afghanistan, and establishes that he or she entered the United States as a nonimmigrant prior to July 21, 1984, and whose period of authorized admission expired through the passage of time prior to January 21, 1985, and who has thereafter resided continuously in the United States, and who has been physically present in the United States from December 22, 1987, until the date of filing the application.

(C) An alien who is a national of Poland, Uganda, Ethiopia, or Afghanistan, and establishes that he or she entered the United States as a nonimmigrant prior to July 21, 1984, and who applied for asylum prior to July 21, 1984, and who has thereafter resided continuously in the United States, and who has been physically present in the United States from December 22, 1987, until the date of filing the application.

(D) An alien who is a national of Poland, Uganda, Ethiopia, or Afghanistan, who would otherwise be eligible for temporary resident status and who establishes that he or she resided continuously in the United States prior to July 21, 1984, and who subsequently reentered the United States as a nonimmigrant in order to return to an unrelinquished residence. An alien described in this paragraph must have received a waiver of 212(a)(19) as an alien who entered the United States by fraud.

(E) An alien who is a national of Poland, Uganda, Ethiopia, or Afghanistan, and was a nonimmigrant who entered the United States in the classification A, A-1, A-2, G, G-1, G-2, G-3, or G-4, for Duration of Status (D/S), and whose qualifying employment terminated or who ceased to be recognized by the Department of State as being entitled to such classification prior to January 21, 1985, and who thereafter continued to reside in the United States.

(F) An alien who is a national of Poland, Uganda, Ethiopia, or Afghanistan, and who was a nonimmigrant who entered the United States as an F, F-1, or F-2 for Duration of Status (D/S), and who completed a full course of studies, including practical training (if any), and whose time period to depart the United States after completion of studies expired prior to January 21, 1985, and who has thereafter continued to reside in the United States. Those students placed in a nunc pro tunc retroactive student status which would otherwise preclude their eligibility for legalization under this section, must present evidence that they had otherwise terminated their status during the requisite time period. A dependent F-2 alien otherwise eligible who was admitted into the United States with a specific time period, as opposed to duration of status, documented on Service Form I-94 (see §1.4), Arrival-Departure Record that extended beyond July 21, 1984 is considered eligible if the principal F-1 alien is found eligible.

(3) Ineligible aliens. (i) An alien who has been convicted of a felony, or three or more misdemeanors.

(ii) An alien who has assisted in the persecution of any person or persons on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion.

(iii) An alien excludable under the provisions of section 212(a) of the Act whose grounds of excludability may not be waived.

(4) Documentation. Evidence to support an alien's eligibility for temporary residence status shall include documents establishing proof of identity, proof of nationality, proof of residence, and proof of financial responsibility, as well as photographs, a completed fingerprint card (Form FD-258), and a completed medical report of examination (Form I-693). All documentation submitted will be subject to Service verification. Applications submitted with unverifiable documentation may be denied. Failure by an applicant to authorize release to INS of information protected by the Privacy Act and/or related laws in order for INS to adjudicate a claim may result in denial of the benefit sought. Acceptable supporting documents for the four categories of documentation are discussed as follows:

(i) Proof of identity. Evidence to establish identity is listed below in descending order of preference:

(A) Passport;

(B) Birth certificate;

(C) Any national identity document from the alien's country of origin bearing photo and fingerprint;

(D) Driver's license or similar document issued by a state if it contains a photo;

(E) Baptismal Record/Marriage Certificate; or

(F) Affidavits.

(ii) Proof of nationality. Evidence to establish nationality is listed as follows:

(A) Passport;

(B) Birth certificate;

(C) Any national identity document from the alien's country of origin bearing photo and fingerprint;

(D) Other credible documents, including those created by, or in the possession of the INS, or any other documents (excluding affidavits) that, when taken singly, or together as a whole, establish the alien's nationality.

(iii) Assumed names—(A) General. In cases where an applicant claims to have met any of the eligibility criteria under an assumed name, the applicant has the burden of proving that the applicant was in fact the person who used that name. The applicant's true identity is established pursuant to the requirements of paragraph (b)(4)(i) and (ii) of this section. The assumed name must appear in the documentation provided by the applicant to establish eligibility. To meet the requirement of this paragraph, documentation must be submitted to prove the common identity, i.e., that the assumed name was in fact used by the applicant.

(B) Proof of common identity. The most persuasive evidence is a document issued in the assumed name which identifies the applicant by photograph, fingerprint, or detailed physical description. Other evidence which will be considered are affidavit(s) by a person or persons other than the applicant, made under oath, which identify the affiant by name and address, state the affiant's relationship to the applicant and the basis of the affiant's knowledge of the applicant's use of the assumed name. Affidavits accompanied by a photograph which has been identified by the affiant as the individual known to the affiant under the assumed name in question will carry greater weight.

(iv) Proof of residence. Evidence to establish proof of continuous residence in the United States during the requisite period of time may consist of any combination of the following:

(A) Past employment records, which may consist of pay stubs, W-2 Forms, certification of the filing of Federal income tax returns on IRS Form 6166, a state verification of the filing of state income tax returns, letters from employer(s) or, if the applicant has been in business for himself or herself, letters from banks and other firms with whom he or she has done business. In all of the above, the name of the alien and the name of the employer or other interested organizations must appear on the form or letter, as well as relevant dates. Letters from employers should be on employer letterhead stationery, if the employer has such stationery, and must include:

(1) Alien's address at the time of employment;

(2) Exact period of employment;

(3) Periods of layoff;

(4) Duties with the company;

(5) Whether or not the information was taken from official company records; and

(6) Where records are located, whether the Service may have access to the records.

If the records are unavailable, an affidavit form letter stating that the alien's employment records are unavailable and why such records are unavailable may be accepted in lieu of paragraphs (b)(4)(iv)(A)(5) and (6) of this section. This affidavit form letter shall be signed, attested to by the employer under penalty of perjury, and shall state the employer's willingness to come forward and give testimony if requested.

(B) Utility bills (gas, electric, phone, etc.) receipts, or letters from companies showing the dates during which the applicant received service are acceptable documentation.

(C) School records (letters, report cards, etc.) from the schools that the applicant or his or her children have attended in the United States must show the name of school and periods of school attendance.

(D) Hospital or medical records showing treatment or hospitalization of the applicant or his or her children must show the name of the medical facility or physician and the date(s) of the treatment or hospitalization.

(E) Attestations by churches, unions, or other organizations as to the applicant's residence by letter which:

(1) Identify applicant by name;

(2) Are signed by an official (whose title is shown);

(3) Show inclusive dates of membership;

(4) State the address where applicant resided during membership period;

(5) Include the seal of the organization impressed on the letter or the letterhead of the organization, if the organization has letterhead stationery;

(6) Establish how the author knows the applicant; and

(7) Establish the origin of the information being attested to.

(F) Additional documents to support the applicant's claim may include:

(1) Money order receipts for money sent into or out of the country;

(2) Passport entries;

(3) Birth certificates of children born in the United States;

(4) Bank books with dated transactions;

(5) Letters or correspondence between applicant and other person or organization;

(6) Social Security card;

(7) Selective Service card;

(8) Automobile license receipts, title, vehicle registration, etc.;

(9) Deeds, mortgages, contracts to which applicant has been a party;

(10) Tax receipts;

(11) Insurance policies, receipts, or letters; and

(12) Any other relevant document.

(v) Proof of financial responsibility. An applicant for adjustment of status under this part is subject to the provisions of section 212(a)(15) of the Act relating to excludability of aliens likely to become public charges. Generally, the evidence of employment submitted under paragraph (b)(4)(iv)(A) of this section will serve to demonstrate the alien's financial responsibility during the documented period(s) of employment. If the alien's period(s) of residence in the United States include significant gaps in employment or if there is reason to believe that the alien may have received public assistance while employed, the alien may be required to provide proof that he or she has not received public cash assistance. An applicant for residence who is determined likely to become a public charge and is unable to overcome this determination after application of the Special Rule under paragraph (b)(11)(iv)(C) of this section will be denied adjustment. The burden of proof to demonstrate the inapplicability of this provision of law lies with the applicant who may provide:

(A) Evidence of a history of employment (i.e., employment letter, W-2 forms, income tax returns, etc.);

(B) Evidence that he/she is self-supporting (i.e., bank statements, stocks, other assets, etc.); or

(C) Form I-134. Affidavit of Support, completed by a spouse on behalf of the applicant and/or children of the applicant or a parent in behalf of children which guarantees complete or partial financial support. Acceptance of the Affidavit of Support shall be extended to other family members in unusual family circumstances.

Generally, the evidence of employment submitted under paragraph (b)(4)(iv)(A) of this section will serve to demonstrate the alien's financial responsibility during the documented period(s) of employment. If the alien's period(s) of residence in the United States include significant gaps in employment or if there is reason to believe that the alien may have received public assistance while employed, the alien may be required to provide proof that he or she has not received public cash assistance. An applicant for residence who is likely to become a public charge will be denied adjustment.

(vi) Burden of proof. An alien applying for adjustment of status under this part has the burden of proving by a preponderance of the evidence that he or she has resided in the United States for the requisite periods, is admissible to the United States under the provisions of section 245A of the Act, and is otherwise eligible for adjustment of status under this section. The inference to be drawn from the documentation provided shall depend on the extent of the documentation, its credibility and amenability to verification.

(vii) Evidence. The sufficiency of all evidence produced by the applicant will be judged according to its probative value and credibility. To meet his or her burden of proof, an applicant must provide evidence of eligibility apart from his or her own testimony. In judging the probative value and credibility of the evidence submitted, greater weight will be given to the submission of original documentation.

(5) Filing of application. (i) The application must be filed on Form I-687 at an office of a designated entity or at a Service office within the jurisdiction of the district where the applicant resides. If the application is filed with a designated entity, the alien must have consented to having the designated entity forward the application to the Service office. In the case of applications filed at a Service office, the district director may, at his or her discretion:

(A) Require the applicant to file the application in person; or

(B) Require the applicant to file the application by mail; or

(C) Permit the filing of applications whether by mail or in person.

The applicant must appear for a personal interview at the Service office as scheduled. If the applicant is 14 years of age or older, the application must be accompanied by a completed Form FD-258 (Applicant Card).

(ii) At the time of the interview, whenever possible, original documents must be submitted except the following: Official government records; employment or employment-related records maintained by employers, union, or collective bargaining organizations; medical records; school records maintained by a school or school board; or other records maintained by a party other than the applicant. Copies of records maintained by parties other than the applicant which are submitted in evidence must be certified as true and correct by such parties and must bear their seal or signature or the signature and title of persons authorized to act in their behalf. If at the time of the interview the return of the original document is desired by the applicant, the document must be accompanied by notarized copies or copies certified true and correct by a qualified designated entity or by the alien's representative in the format prescribed in §204.2(j)(1) or (2) of this chapter. At the discretion of the district director, original documents, even if accompanied by certified copies, may be temporarily retained for forensic examination by the Document Analysis Unit at the Regional Processing Facility having jurisdiction over the Service office to which the documents were submitted.

(iii) A separate application must be filed by each applicant with the fees required by 8 CFR 106.2.

(6) Filing date of application. The date the alien submits a completed application to a Service office or designated entity shall be considered the filing date of the application, provided that in the case of an application filed at a designated entity the alien has consented to having the designated entity forward the application to the Service office having jurisdiction over the location of the alien's residence. Designated entities are required to forward completed applications to the appropriate Service office within 60 days of receipt.

(7) Selective Service registration. At the time of filing an application under this section, male applicants over the age of 17 and under the age of 26, are required to be registered under the Military Selective Service Act. An applicant shall present evidence that he has previously registered under that Act in the form of a letter of acknowledgement from the Selective Service System, or such alien shall present a completed and signed Form SSS-1 at the time of filing Form I-687 with the Immigration and Naturalization Service or a designated entity. Form SSS-1 will be forwarded to the Selective Service System by the Service.

(8) Continuous residence. (i) For the purpose of this Act, an applicant for temporary residence status shall be regarded as having resided continuously in the United States if, at the time of filing of the application:

(A) No single absence from the United States has exceeded 45 days, and the aggregate of all absences has not exceeded 180 days between July 2l, 1984, through the date the application for temporary resident status is filed, unless the alien can establish that due to emergent reasons, his or her return to the United States could not be accomplished within the time period allowed;

(B) The alien was maintaining a residence in the United States; and

(C) The alien's departure from the United States was not based on an order of deportation.

(ii) An alien who has been absent from the United States in accordance with the Service's advance parole procedures shall not be considered as having interrupted his or her continuous residence as required at the time of filing an application under this section.

(9) Medical examination. (i) An applicant under this part shall be required to submit to an examination by a designated civil surgeon at no expense to the government. The designated civil surgeon shall report on the findings of the mental and physical condition of the applicant and the determination of the alien's immunization status on Form I-693, “Medical Examination of Aliens Seeking Adjustment of Status, (Pub. L. 99-603)”. Results of the medical examination must be presented to the Service at the time of interview and shall be incorporated into the record. Any applicant certified under paragraphs (1), (2), (3), (4) or (5) of section 212(a) of the Act may appeal to a Board of Medical Officers of the U.S. Public Health Service as provided in section 234 of the Act and part 235 of this chapter.

(ii) All applicants who file for temporary resident status are required to include the results of a serological test for the HIV virus on the I-693. All HIV-positive applicants shall be advised that a waiver is available and shall be provided with the opportunity to apply for a waiver.

(10) Interview. Each applicant, regardless of age, must appear at the appropriate Service office and must be fingerprinted for the purpose of issuance of an employment authorization document and Form I-688. Each applicant shall be interviewed by an immigration officer, except that the interview may be waived for a child under 14 years of age, or when it is impractical because of the health or advanced age of the applicant.

(11) Applicability of exclusion grounds—(i) Grounds of exclusion not to be applied. Paragraphs (14), (workers entering without labor certification); (20), (immigrants not in possession of a valid entry document); (21), (visas issued without compliance with section 203); (25), (illiterates); and (32) (graduates of non-accredited medical schools) of section 212(a) of the Act shall not apply to applicants for temporary resident status.

(ii) Waiver of grounds of exclusion. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(11)(iii) of this section, the Attorney General may waive any other provision of section 212(a) of the Act only in the case of individual aliens for humanitarian purposes, to assure family unity, or when the granting of such a waiver is in the public interest. If an alien is excludable on grounds which may be waived as set forth in this paragraph, he or she shall be advised of the procedures for applying for a waiver of grounds of excludability on Form I-690. When an application for waiver of grounds of excludability is filed jointly with an application for temporary residence under this section, it shall be accepted for processing at the Service office. If an application for waiver of grounds of excludability is submitted after the alien's preliminary interview at the Service office, it shall be forwarded to the appropriate Regional Processing Facility. All applications for waivers of grounds of excludability must be accompanied by the correct fee in the exact amount. All fees for applications filed in the United States must be in the form of a money order, cashier's check, or bank check. No personal checks or currency will be accepted. Fees will not be waived or refunded under any circumstances. An application for waiver of grounds of excludability under this part shall be approved or denied by the director of the Regional Processing Facility in whose jurisdiction the alien's application for adjustment of status was filed except that in cases involving clear statutory ineligibility or fraud, such application may be denied by the district director in whose jurisdiction the application is filed, and in cases returned to a Service office for re-interview, such application may be approved at the discretion of the district director. The applicant shall be notified of the decision and, if the application is denied, of the reason therefore. Appeal from an adverse decision under this part may be taken by the applicant on Form I-694 within 30 days after the service of the notice only to the Service's Administrative Appeals Unit pursuant to the provisions of section 103.3(a) of this chapter.

(iii) Grounds of exclusion that may not be waived. Notwithstanding any other provision of the Act, the following provisions of section 212(a) may not be waived by the Attorney General under paragraph (b)(11)(ii) of this section:

(A) Paragraphs (9) and (10) (criminals);

(B) Paragraph (23) (narcotics) except for a single offense of simple possession of thirty grams or less of marijuana;

(C) Paragraphs (27) (prejudicial to the public interest), (28) (communist), and (29) (subversive);

(D) Paragraph (33) (participated in Nazi persecution).

(iv) Determination of Likely to become a public charge and the special rule. (A) Prior to use of the special rule for determination of public charge, an alien must first be determined to be excludable under section 212(a)(15) of the Act. If the applicant is determined to be likely to become a public charge, he or she may still be admissible under the terms of the Special Rule.

(B) In determining whether an alien is likely to become a public charge, financial responsibility of the alien is to be established by examining the totality of the alien's circumstances at the time of his or her application for legalization. The existence or absence of a particular factor should never be the sole criterion for determining if an alien is likely to become a public charge. The determination of financial responsibility should be a prospective evaluation based on the alien's age, health, income and vocation.

(C) An alien who has a consistent employment history which shows the ability to support himself or herself even though his or her income may be below the poverty level may be admissible under this section. The alien's employment history need not be continuous in that it is uninterrupted. It should be continuous in the sense that the alien shall be regularly attached to the workforce, has an income over a substantial period of the applicable time, and has demonstrated the capacity to exist on his or her income without recourse to public cash assistance. The Special Rule is prospective in that the Service shall determine, based on the alien's history, whether he or she is likely to become a public charge. Past acceptance of public cash assistance within a history of consistent employment will enter into this decision. The weight given in considering applicability of the public charge provisions will depend on many factors, but the length of time an applicant has received public cash assistance will constitute a significant factor. It is not necessary to file a waiver in order to apply the Special Rule for Determination of Public Charge.

(v) Public assistance and criminal history verification. Declarations by an applicant that he or she has not been the recipient of public cash assistance and/or has not had a criminal record are subject to a verification of facts by the Service. The applicant must agree to fully cooperate in the verification process. Failure to assist the Service in verifying information necessary for the adjudication of the application may result in a denial of the application.

(12) Continuous physical presence since December 22, 1987. (i) An alien applying for adjustment to temporary resident status must establish that he or she has been continuously physically present in the United States since December 22, 1987. Aliens who were outside of the United States on the date of enactment or departed the United States after enactment may apply for legalization if they reentered prior to March 21, 1988, and meet the continuous residence requirements and are otherwise eligible for legalization.

(ii) A brief, casual and innocent absence means a departure authorized by the Service (advance parole) subsequent to March 21, 1988, of not more than thirty (30) days for legitimate emergency or humanitarian purposes unless a further period of authorized departure has been granted in the discretion of the district director or a departure was beyond the alien's control.

(13) Departure. (i) During the time period from the date that an alien's application establishing prima facie eligibility for temporary resident status is reviewed at a Service office and the date status as a temporary resident is granted, the alien applicant can be readmitted to the United States provided his or her departure was authorized under the Service's advance parole provisions contained in §212.5(f) of this chapter.

(ii) An alien whose application for temporary resident status has been approved may be admitted to the United States upon return as a returning temporary resident provided he or she:

(A) Is not under deportation proceedings, such proceedings having been instituted subsequent to the approval of temporary resident status. A temporary resident alien will not be considered deported if that alien departs the United States while under an outstanding order of deportation issued prior to the approval of temporary resident status;

(B) Has not been absent from the United States for more than 30 days on the date application for admission is made;

(C) Has not been absent from the United States for an aggregate period of more than 90 days since the date the alien was granted lawful temporary resident status;

(D) Presents Form I-688;

(E) Presents himself or herself for inspection; and

(F) Is otherwise admissible.

(iii) The periods of time in paragraphs (b)(13)(ii)(B) and (C) of this section may be waived at the discretion of the Attorney General in cases where the absence from the United States was due merely to a brief and casual trip abroad due to emergent or extenuating circumstances beyond the alien's control.

(14) Employment and travel authorization—(i) General. Authorization for employment and travel abroad for temporary resident status applicants under this section may be granted only by a Service office. INS district directors will determine the Service location for the completion of processing travel documentation. In the case of an application which has been filed with a designated entity, employment authorization may be granted by the Service only after the application has been properly received at the Service office.

(ii) Employment and travel authorization prior to the granting of temporary resident status. (A) Permission to travel abroad and accept employment may be granted to the applicant after an interview has been conducted in connection with an application establishing prima facie eligibility for temporary resident status. Permission to travel abroad may be granted in emergent circumstances in accordance with the Service's advance parole provisions contained in §212.5(f) of this chapter after an interview has been conducted in connection with an application establishing prima facie eligibility for temporary resident status.

(B) If an appointment cannot be scheduled within 30 days, authorization to accept employment will be granted, valid until the scheduled appointment date. The appointment letter will be endorsed with the temporary employment authorization. An employment authorization document will be given to the applicant after an interview has been completed by an immigration officer unless a formal denial is issued by a Service office. This temporary employment authorization will be restricted to six-months duration, pending final determination on the application for temporary resident status.

(iii) Employment and travel authorization upon grant of temporary resident status. Upon grant of an application for adjustment to temporary resident status by a Regional Processing Facility, the processing facility will forward a notice of approval to the alien at his or her last known address, or to his or her legal representative. The alien will be required to return to the appropriate INS office, surrender the I-688A or employment authorization document previously issued, and obtain Form I-688, Temporary Resident Card, authorizing employment and travel abroad.

(iv) Revocation of employment authorization upon denial of temporary resident status. Upon denial of an application for adjustment to temporary resident status, the alien will be notified that if a timely appeal is not submitted, employment authorization shall be automatically revoked on the final day of the appeal period. An applicant whose appeal period has ended is no longer considered to be an Eligible Legalized Alien for the purposes of the administration of State Legalization Impact Assistance Grants (SLIAG) funding.

(15) Decision. The applicant shall be notified in writing of the decision. If the application is denied, the reason(s) for the decision shall be provided to the applicant. An appeal from an adverse decision under this part may be taken by the applicant on Form I-694.

(16) Appeal process. An adverse decision under this part may be appealed to the Associate Commissioner, Examinations (Administrative Appeals Unit), the appellate authority designated in §103.1(f)(2). Any appeal shall be submitted to the Regional Processing Facility (RPF) with the required fee within 30 days after service of the Notice of Denial in accordance with the procedures of §103.3(a) of this chapter. An appeal received after the 30-day period will not be accepted. The 30-day period for submission of an appeal begins three days after the Notice of Denial is mailed as provided in 8 CFR 103.8(b). If a review of the Record of Proceeding (ROP) is requested by the alien or his or her legal representative and an appeal has been properly filed, an additional 30 days will be allowed for this review beginning at the time the ROP is mailed. A brief may be submitted with the appeal form or submitted up to 30 calendar days from the date of receipt of the appeal form at the RPF. Briefs filed after submission of the appeal should be mailed directly to the RPF. For good cause shown, the time within which a brief supporting an appeal may be submitted may be extended by the Director of the Regional Processing Facility.

(17) Motions. The Regional Processing Facility director may sua sponte reopen and reconsider any adverse decision. When an appeal to the Associate Commissioner, Examinations (Administrative Appeals Unit) has been filed, the INS director of the Regional Processing Facility may issue a new decision granting the benefit which has been requested. The director's new decision must be served on the appealing party within 45 days of receipt of any briefs and/or new evidence, or upon expiration of the time allowed for the submission of any briefs. Motions to reopen a proceeding or reconsider a decision shall not be considered under this part.

(18) Certifications. The Regional Processing Facility director may, in accordance with §103.4 of this chapter, certify a decision to the Associate Commissioner, Examinations (Administrative Appeals Unit) when the case involves an unusually complex or novel question of law or fact. The decision on an appealed case subsequently remanded to the Regional Processing Facility director will be certified to the Administrative Appeals Unit.

(19) Date of adjustment to temporary residence. The status of an alien whose application for temporary resident status is approved shall be adjusted to that of a lawful temporary resident as of the date indicated on the application fee receipt issued at the Service office.

(20) Termination of temporary resident status—(i) Termination of temporary resident status (General). The status of an alien lawfully admitted for temporary residence under §245a.4 of this part may be terminated at any time. It is not necessary that a final order of deportation be entered in order to terminate temporary resident status. The temporary resident status may be terminated upon the occurrence of any of the following:

(A) It is determined that the alien was ineligible for temporary residence under §245a.4 of this part;

(B) The alien commits an act which renders him or her inadmissible as an immigrant unless a waiver is obtained, as provided in this part;

(C) The alien is convicted of any felony, or three or more misdemeanors;

(D) The alien fails to file for adjustment of status from temporary resident to permanent resident within 31 months of the date he or she was granted status as a temporary resident.

(ii) Procedure. Termination of an alien's status will be made only on notice to the alien sent by certified mail directed to his or her last known address, and, if applicable, to his or her representative. The alien must be given an opportunity to offer evidence in opposition to the grounds alleged for termination of his or her status. Evidence in opposition must be submitted within 30 days after the service of the Notice of Intent to Terminate. If the alien's status is terminated, the director of the Regional Processing Facility shall notify the alien of the decision and the reason for the termination, and further notify the alien that any Service Form issued to the alien authorizing employment and/or travel abroad, or any Form I-688, Temporary Resident Card previously issued to the alien will be declared void by the director of the Regional Processing Facility within 30 days if no appeal of the termination decision is filed within that period. The alien may appeal the decision to the Associate Commissioner, Examinations (Administrative Appeals Unit). Any appeal along with the required fee, shall be filed with the Regional Processing Facility within 30 days after the service of the notice of termination. If no appeal is filed within that period, the official Service document shall be deemed void, and must be surrendered without delay to an immigration officer or to the issuing office of the Service.

(iii) Termination not construed as rescission under section 246. For the purposes of this part the phrase termination of status of an alien granted lawful temporary residence under this section shall not be construed to necessitate a rescission of status as described in section 246 of the Act, and the proceedings required by the regulations issued thereunder shall not apply.

(iv) Return to unlawful status after termination. Termination of the status of any alien previously adjusted to lawful temporary residence shall act to return such alien to the status held prior to the adjustment, and render him or her amenable to exclusion or deportation proceedings under sections 236 or 242 of the Act, as appropriate.

(21) Ineligibility for immigration benefits. An alien whose status is adjusted to that of a lawful temporary resident under §245a.4 of this part is not entitled to submit a petition pursuant to section 203(a)(2), nor is such alien entitled to any other benefit or consideration accorded under the Act to aliens lawfully admitted for permanent residence.

(22) Declaration of intending citizen. An alien who has been granted the status of temporary resident under §245a.4 of this part may assert a claim of discrimination on the basis of citizenship status under section 274B of the Act only if he or she has previously filed Form I-772 (Declaration of Intending Citizen) after being granted such status. The Declaration of Intending Citizen is not required as a basis for filing a petition for naturalization; nor shall it be regarded as a right to United States citizenship; nor shall it be regarded as evidence of a person's status as a resident.

(23) Limitation on access to information and confidentiality. (i) No person other than a sworn officer or employee of the Department of Justice or bureau or agency thereof, will be permitted to examine individual applications. For purposes of this part, any individual employed under contract by the Service to work in connection with the Legalization Program shall be considered an employee of the Department of Justice or bureau or agency thereof.

(ii) No information furnished pursuant to an application for temporary or permanent resident status under this section shall be used for any purpose except:

(A) To make a determination on the application; or,

(B) for the enforcement of the provisions encompassed in section 245A(c)(6) of the Act, except as provided in paragraph (b)(23)(iii) of this section.

(iii) If a determination is made by the Service that the alien has, in connection with his or her application, engaged in fraud or willful misrepresentation or concealment of a material fact, knowingly provided a false writing or document in making his or her application, knowingly made a false statement or representation, or engaged in any other activity prohibited by section 245A(c)(6) of the Act, the Service shall refer the matter to the United States Attorney for prosecution of the alien or of any person who created or supplied a false writing or document for use in an application for adjustment of status under this part.

(iv) Information contained in granted legalization files may be used by the Service at a later date to make a decision on an immigrant visa petition (or other status petition) filed by the applicant under section 204(a), or for naturalization applications submitted by the applicant.

(c) Adjustment from temporary to permanent resident status. The provisions of §245a.3 of this part shall be applied to aliens adjusting to permanent residence under this part.

[54 FR 6505, Feb. 13, 1989, as amended at 54 FR 29455, July 12, 1989; 54 FR 47676, Nov. 16, 1989; 60 FR 21976, May 4, 1995; 65 FR 82256, Dec. 28, 2000; 76 FR 53794, Aug. 29, 2011; 78 FR 18472, Mar. 27, 2013; 85 FR 46927, Aug. 3, 2020]

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§245a.5   Temporary disqualification of certain newly legalized aliens from receiving benefits from programs of financial assistance furnished under federal law.

(a) Except as provided in §245a.5(b), any alien who has obtained the status of an alien lawfully admitted for temporary residence pursuant to section 245A of the Act (Adjustment of Status of Certain Entrants Before January 1, 1982, to that of Person Admitted for Lawful Residence) or 210A of the Act (Determinations of Agricultural Labor Shortages and Admission of Additional Special Agricultural Workers) is ineligible, for a period of five years from the date such status was obtained, for benefits financed directly or indirectly, in whole or in part, through the programs identified in §245a.5(c) of this chapter.

(b)(1) Section 245a.5(a) shall not apply to a Cuban or Haitian entrant (as defined in paragraph (1) or (2)(A) of section 501(e) of Public Law 96-422, as in effect on April 1, 1983), or in the case of assistance (other than aid to families with dependent children) which is furnished to an alien who is an aged, blind, or disabled individual (as defined in section 1614(a)(1) of the Social Security Act).

(2) With respect to any alien who has obtained the status of an alien lawfully admitted for temporary residence pursuant to section 210A of the Act only, assistance furnished under the Legal Services Corporation Act (42 U.S.C. 2996, et seq.) or title V of the Housing Act of 1949 (42 U.S.C. l471 et seq.) shall not be construed to be financial assistance referred to in §245a.5(a).

(3) Section 245a.5(a) shall not apply to benefits financed through the programs identified in §245a.5(c), which are marked with an asterisk (*), except to the extent that such benefits:

(i) Consist of, or are financed by, financial assistance in the form of grants, wages, loan, loan guarantees, or otherwise, which is furnished by the Federal Government directly, or indirectly through a State or local government or a private entity, to eligible individuals or to private suppliers of goods or services to such individuals, or is furnished to a State or local government that provides to such individuals goods or services of a kind that is offered by private suppliers, and

(ii) Are targeted to individuals in financial need; either (A) in order to be eligible, individuals must establish that their income or wealth is below some maximum level, or, with respect to certain loan or loan guarantee programs, that they are unable to obtain financing from alternative sources, or at prevailing interest rates, or at rates that would permit the achievement of program goals, or (B) distribution of assistance is directed, geographically or otherwise, in a way that is intended to primarily benefit persons in financial need, as evidenced by references to such intent in the authorizing legislation.

(c) The programs of Federal financial assistance referred to in §245a.5(a) are those identified in the list set forth below. The General Services Administration (GSA) Program Numbers set forth in the right column of the program list refer to the program identification numbers used in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance, published by the United States General Services Administration, as updated through December, 1986.

   GSA Program Numbers
Department of Agriculture:
Farm Operating Loans10.406
Farm Ownership Loans10.407
Department of Health and Human Services:
Assistance Payments—Maintenance Assistance (Maintenance Assistance; Emergency Assistance; State Aid; Aid to Families with Dependent Children)13.780
Low-Income Home Energy Assistance13.789
*Community Services Block Grant13.792
*Community Services Block Grant—Discretionary Awards13.793
Department of Housing and Urban Development:
Mortgage Insurance—Housing in Older, Declining Areas (223(e))14.123
Mortgage Insurance—Special Credit Risks (237)14.140
*Community Development Block Grants/Entitlement Grants14.218
*Community Development Block Grants/Small Cities Program (Small Cities)14.219
Section 312 Rehabilitation Loans (312)14.220
*Urban development action grants14.221
*Community Development Block Grants/State's Program14.228
Section 221(d)(3) Mortgage Insurance for Multifamily Rental Housing for Low and Moderate Income Families (Below Market Interest Rate)14.136
Department of Labor:
Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP)17.235
Office of Personnel Management:
Federal Employment for Disadvantaged Youth—Part-Time (Stay-in-School Program)27.003
Federal Employment for Disadvantaged Youth—Summer (Summer Aides)27.004
Small Business Administration:
Small Business Loans (7(a) Loans)59.012
Department of Energy:
Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons81.042
Department of Education:
Patricia Roberts Harris Fellowships (Graduate and Professional Study; Graduate and Professional Study Opportunity Fellowships; Public Service Education Fellowships)84.094
Legal Training for the Disadvantaged (The American Bar Association Fund for Public Education)84.136
Allen J. Ellender Fellowship Program (Ellender Fellowship)84.148
Legal Services Corporation:
Payments to Legal Services Corporation

[54 FR 29437, July 12, 1989, as amended at 54 FR 49964, Dec. 4, 1989]

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§245a.6   Treatment of denied application under part 245a, Subpart B.

If the district director finds that an eligible alien as defined at §245a.10 has not established eligibility under section 1104 of the LIFE Act (part 245a, Subpart B), the district director shall consider whether the eligible alien has established eligibility for adjustment to temporary resident status under section 245A of the Act, as in effect before enactment of section 1104 of the LIFE Act (part 245a, Subpart A). In such an adjudication using this Subpart A, the district director will deem the “date of filing the application” to be the date the eligible alien establishes that he or she was “front-desked” or that, though he or she took concrete steps to apply, the front-desking policy was a substantial cause of his or her failure to apply. If the eligible alien has established eligibility for adjustment to temporary resident status, the LIFE Legalization application shall be deemed converted to an application for temporary residence under this Subpart A.

[67 FR 38350, June 4, 2002]

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