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e-CFR data is current as of September 17, 2020

Title 46Chapter ISubchapter WPart 199 → Subpart B


Title 46: Shipping
PART 199—LIFESAVING SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS


Subpart B—Requirements for All Vessels


Contents
§199.60   Communications.
§199.70   Personal lifesaving appliances.
§199.80   Muster list and emergency instructions.
§199.90   Operating instructions.
§199.100   Manning of survival craft and supervision.
§199.110   Survival craft muster and embarkation arrangements.
§199.120   Launching stations.
§199.130   Stowage of survival craft.
§199.140   Stowage of rescue boats.
§199.145   Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.
§199.150   Survival craft launching and recovery arrangements; general.
§199.153   Survival craft launching and recovery arrangements using falls and a winch.
§199.155   Lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements.
§199.157   Free-fall lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements.
§199.160   Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements.
§199.170   Line-throwing appliance.
§199.175   Survival craft and rescue boat equipment.
§199.176   Markings on lifesaving appliances.
§199.178   Marking of stowage locations.
§199.180   Training and drills.
§199.190   Operational readiness, maintenance, and inspection of lifesaving equipment.

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§199.60   Communications.

(a) Radio lifesaving appliances. Radio lifesaving appliance installations and arrangements must meet the requirements of 47 CFR part 80.

(b) Emergency position indicating radiobeacons (EPIRB) and search and rescue transponders (SART). Each EPIRB and SART should have the name of the vessel plainly marked or painted on its label, except for EPIRBs or SARTs in an inflatable liferaft or permanently installed in a survival craft.

(c) Distress signals. Each vessel must—

(1) Carry not less than 12 rocket parachute flares approved under approval series 160.136; and

(2) Stow the flares on or near the vessel's navigating bridge.

(d) Onboard communications and alarm systems. Each vessel must meet the requirements for onboard communications between emergency control stations, muster and embarkation stations, and strategic positions on board. Each vessel must also meet the emergency alarm system requirements in subchapter J of this chapter, which must be supplemented by either a public address system or other suitable means of communication.

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§199.70   Personal lifesaving appliances.

(a) Lifebuoys. Each vessel must carry lifebuoys approved under approval series 160.150 as follows:

(1) Stowage. Lifebuoys must be stowed as follows:

(i) Each lifebuoy must be capable of being rapidly cast loose.

(ii) No lifebuoy may be permanently secured to the vessel in any way.

(iii) Each lifebuoy stowage position must be marked with either the words “LIFEBUOY” or “LIFE BUOY”, or with the appropriate symbol from IMO Resolution A.760(18).

(iv) Lifebuoys must be so distributed as to be readily available on each side of the vessel and, as far as practicable, on each open deck extending to the side of the vessel. At least one lifebuoy must be located near the stern of the vessel. The lifebuoys with attached self-igniting lights must be equally distributed on both sides of the vessel.

(v) At least two lifebuoys, each with attached self-activating smoke signals, must be stowed where they can be quickly released from the navigating bridge and should, when released, fall directly into the water without striking any part of the vessel.

(2) Markings. Each lifebuoy must be marked in block capital letters with the name of the vessel and the name of the port required to be marked on the stern of the vessel under §67.123 of part 67 of this chapter.

(3) Attachments and fittings. Lifebuoys must have the following attachments and fittings:

(i) At least one lifebuoy on each side of the vessel fitted with a buoyant lifeline that is—

(A) At least as long as twice the height where it is stowed above the waterline with the vessel in its lightest seagoing condition, or 30 meters (100 feet) in length, whichever is the greater;

(B) Non-kinking;

(C) Not less than 8 millimeters ( 516 inch) in diameter;

(D) Of a breaking strength which is not less than 5 kiloNewtons (1,124 pounds-force); and

(E) Is, if synthetic, a dark color or certified by the manufacturer to be resistant to deterioration from ultraviolet light.

(ii) At least one-half the total number of lifebuoys on the vessel must each be fitted with a self-igniting light approved under approval series 161.010. The self-igniting light may not be attached to the lifebuoys required by this section to be fitted with lifelines.

(iii) At least two lifebuoys on the vessel must be fitted with a self-activating smoke signal approved under approval series 160.157. Lifebuoys fitted with smoke signals must also be fitted with lights.

(b) Lifejackets. Each vessel must carry lifejackets approved under approval series 160.155, 160.176 or 160.177. If the vessel carries inflatable lifejackets, they must be of the same or similar design and have the same method of operation.

(1) General. Each vessel must carry a lifejacket for each person on board, and in addition—

(i) A number of lifejackets suitable for children equal to at least 10 percent of the total number of passengers on board must be provided, or such greater number as may be required to provide a lifejacket of suitable size for each person smaller than the lower size limit of the adult-size lifejacket; and

(ii) A sufficient number of lifejackets must be carried for persons on watch and for use at remotely located survival craft stations.

(2) Stowage. Lifejackets must be stowed as follows:

(i) The lifejackets must be readily accessible.

(ii) [Reserved]

(iii) The lifejackets stowage positions must be marked with the words “LIFEJACKETS” or “CHILD LIFEJACKETS” as appropriate, or with the appropriate symbol from IMO Resolution A.760(18).

(iv) The additional lifejackets for persons on watch required by paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section must be stowed on the bridge, in the engine control room, and at other manned watch stations.

(v) Where, due to the particular arrangements of the vessel, the lifejackets required by paragraph (b) of this section may become inaccessible, alternative provisions must be made to the satisfaction of the OCMI that may include an increase in the number of lifejackets to be carried.

(3) Markings. Each lifejacket must be marked—

(i) In block capital letters with the name of the vessel; and

(ii) With Type I retro-reflective material approved under approval series 164.018. The arrangement of the retro-reflective material must meet IMO Resolution A.658(16).

(4) Attachments and fittings. Lifejackets must have the following attachments and fittings:

(i) Each lifejacket must have a lifejacket light approved under approval series 161.112 securely attached to the front shoulder area of the lifejacket.

(ii) Each lifejacket must have a whistle firmly secured by a cord to the lifejacket.

(c) Rescue boat and marine evacuation system immersion suits or anti-exposure suits—(1) General. Each vessel, except vessels operating on routes between 32 degrees north latitude and 32 degrees south latitude, must carry immersion suits approved under approval series 160.171 or anti-exposure suits approved under approval series 160.153 of suitable size for each person assigned to the rescue boat crew and each person assigned to a marine evacuation system crew.

(2) Stowage. Immersion suits or anti-exposure suits must be stowed so they are readily accessible. The stowage positions must be marked with either the words “IMMERSION SUITS” or “ANTI-EXPOSURE SUITS” as appropriate, or with the appropriate symbol from IMO Resolution A.760(18).

(3) Markings. Each immersion suit or anti-exposure suit must be marked in such a way as to identify the person or vessel to which it belongs.

(4) Attachments and fittings. Immersion suits or anti-exposure suits must have the following attachments and fittings:

(i) Each immersion suit or anti-exposure suit must have a lifejacket light approved under approval series 161.112 securely attached to the front shoulder area of the immersion suit or anti-exposure suit.

(ii) Each immersion suit or anti-exposure suit must have a whistle firmly secured by a cord to the immersion suit or anti-exposure suit.

(d) Lifejacket, immersion suit, and anti-exposure suit containers. Each lifejacket, immersion suit, and anti-exposure suit container must be marked in block capital letters and numbers with the quantity, identity, and size of the equipment stowed inside the container. The equipment may be identified in words or with the appropriate symbol from IMO Resolution A.760(18).

[CGD 84-069, 61 FR 25313, May 20, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 52818, Oct. 1, 1998; 63 FR 56066, Oct. 20, 1998; 64 FR 53229, Oct. 1, 1999]

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§199.80   Muster list and emergency instructions.

(a) General. Clear instructions must be provided on the vessel that detail the actions each person on board should follow in the event of an emergency.

(b) Muster list. Copies of the muster list must be posted in conspicuous places throughout the vessel including on the navigating bridge, in the engine room, and in crew accommodation spaces. The muster list must be posted before the vessel begins its voyage. After the muster list has been prepared, if any change takes place that necessitates an alteration in the muster list, the master must either revise the existing muster list or prepare a new one. Each muster lists must at least specify—

(1) The instructions for operating the general emergency alarm system and public address system;

(2) The emergency signals;

(3) The actions to be taken by the persons on board when each signal is sounded;

(4) How the order to abandon the vessel will be given.

(5) The officers that are assigned to make sure that lifesaving and firefighting appliances are maintained in good condition and ready for immediate use;

(6) The duties assigned to the different members of the crew. Duties to be specified include—

(i) Closing the watertight doors, fire doors, valves, scuppers, sidescuttles, skylights, portholes, and other similar openings in the vessel's hull;

(ii) Equipping the survival craft and other lifesaving appliances;

(iii) Preparing and launching the survival craft;

(iv) Preparing other lifesaving appliances;

(v) Mustering the passengers and other persons on board;

(vi) Using communication equipment;

(vii) Manning the emergency squad assigned to deal with fires and other emergencies; and

(viii) Using firefighting equipment and installations.

(7) The duties assigned to members of the crew in relation to passengers and other persons on board in case of an emergency. Assigned duties to be specified include—

(i) Warning the passengers and other persons on board;

(ii) Seeing that passengers and other persons on board are suitably dressed and have donned their lifejackets or immersion suits correctly;

(iii) Assembling passengers and other persons on board at muster stations;

(iv) Keeping order in the passageways and on the stairways and generally controlling the movements of the passengers and other persons on board; and

(v) Making sure that a supply of blankets is taken to the survival craft; and

(8) The substitutes for key persons if they are disabled, taking into account that different emergencies require different actions.

(c) Emergency instructions. Illustrations and instructions in English, and any other appropriate language as determined by the OCMI, must be posted in each passenger cabin and in spaces occupied by persons other than crew, and must be conspicuously displayed at each muster station. The illustrations and instructions must include information on—

(1) The fire and emergency signal;

(2) Their muster station;

(3) The essential actions they must take in an emergency;

(4) The location of lifejackets, including child-size lifejackets; and

(5) The method of donning lifejackets.

[CGD 84-069, 61 FR 25313, May 20, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 52818, Oct. 1, 1998]

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§199.90   Operating instructions.

Each vessel must have posters or signs displayed in the vicinity of each survival craft and the survival craft's launching controls that—

(a) Illustrate the purpose of controls;

(b) Illustrate the procedures for operating the launching device;

(c) Give relevant instructions or warnings;

(d) Can be easily seen under emergency lighting conditions; and

(e) Display symbols in accordance with IMO Resolution A.760(18).

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§199.100   Manning of survival craft and supervision.

(a) There must be a sufficient number of trained persons on board the vessel for mustering and assisting untrained persons.

(b) There must be a sufficient number of deck officers, able seamen, or certificated persons on board the vessel to operate the survival craft and launching arrangements required for abandonment by the total number of persons on board.

(c) There must be one person placed in charge of each survival craft to be used. The person in charge must—

(1) Be a deck officer, able seaman, or certificated person. The OCMI, considering the nature of the voyage, the number of persons permitted on board, and the characteristics of the vessel, may permit persons practiced in the handling and operation of liferafts or inflatable buoyant apparatus to be placed in charge of liferafts or inflatable buoyant apparatus; and

(2) Have a list of the survival craft crew and ensure that the crewmembers are acquainted with their duties.

(d) There must be a second-in-command designated for each lifeboat. This person should be a deck officer, able seaman, or certificated person. The second-in-command of a lifeboat must also have a list of the lifeboat crew.

(e) There must be a person assigned to each motorized survival craft who is capable of operating the engine and carrying out minor adjustments.

(f) The master must make sure that the persons required under paragraphs (a), (b), (c), and (d) of this section are equitably distributed among the vessel's survival craft.

[CGD 84-069, 61 FR 25313, May 20, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 52819, Oct. 1, 1998]

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§199.110   Survival craft muster and embarkation arrangements.

(a) Each muster station must have sufficient space to accommodate all persons assigned to muster at that station. One or more muster stations must be close to each embarkation station.

(b) Each muster station and embarkation station must be readily accessible to accommodation and work areas.

(c) Each muster station and embarkation station must be adequately illuminated by lighting with power supplied from the vessel's emergency source of electrical power.

(d) Each alleyway, stairway, and exit giving access to a muster and embarkation station must be adequately illuminated by lighting that is capable of having its power supplied by the vessel's emergency source of electrical power.

(e) Each davit-launched and free-fall survival craft muster station and embarkation station must be arranged to enable stretcher cases to be placed in the survival craft.

(f) Each launching station, or each two adjacent launching stations, must have an embarkation ladder as follows:

(1) Each embarkation ladder must be approved under approval series 160.117 or be a rope ladder approved under approval series 160.017.

(2) Each embarkation ladder must extend in a single length from the deck to the waterline with the vessel in its lightest seagoing condition under unfavorable conditions of trim and with the vessel listed not less than 15 degrees either way.

(3) Provided that there is at least one embarkation ladder on each side of the vessel, the OCMI may permit additional embarkation ladders to be other approved devices that provide safe and rapid access to survival craft in the water.

(4) The OCMI may accept other safe and effective means of embarkation for use with a liferaft required under §199.261(e).

(g) If a davit-launched survival craft is embarked over the edge of the deck, the craft must be provided with a means for bringing it against the side of the vessel and holding it alongside the vessel to allow persons to safely embark.

(h) If a davit-launched survival craft is not intended to be moved to the stowed position with persons on board, the craft must be provided with a means for bringing it against the side of the vessel and holding it alongside the vessel to allow persons to safely disembark after a drill.

[CGD 84-069, 61 FR 25313, May 20, 1996, as amended by USCG-1998-4442, 63 FR 52192, Sept. 30, 1998; 63 FR 52819, Oct. 1, 1998]

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§199.120   Launching stations.

(a) Each launching station must be positioned to ensure safe launching with clearance from the propeller and from the steeply overhanging portions of the hull.

(b) Each survival craft must be launched down the straight side of the vessel, except for free-fall launched survival craft.

(c) Each launching station in the forward part of the vessel must—

(1) Be in a sheltered position that is located aft of the collision bulkhead; and

(2) Have a launching appliance approved with an endorsement as being of sufficient strength for forward installation.

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§199.130   Stowage of survival craft.

(a) General. Each survival craft must be stowed—

(1) As close to the accommodation and service spaces as possible;

(2) So that neither the survival craft nor its stowage arrangements will interfere with the embarkation and operation of any other survival craft or rescue boat at any other launching station;

(3) As near the water surface as is safe and practicable;

(4) Except for liferafts intended for throw-overboard launching, not less than 2 meters above the waterline with the vessel—

(i) In the fully loaded condition;

(ii) Under unfavorable conditions of trim; and

(iii) Listed up to 20 degrees either way, or to the angle at which the vessel's weatherdeck edge becomes submerged, whichever is less.

(5) Sufficiently ready for use so that two crew members can complete preparations for embarkation and launching in less than 5 minutes;

(6) In a secure and sheltered position and protected from damage by fire and explosion, as far as practicable; and

(7) So as not to require lifting from its stowed position in order to launch, except that—

(i) A davit-launched liferaft may be lifted by a manually powered winch from its stowed position to its embarkation position; or

(ii) A survival craft that weights 185 kilograms (407.8 pounds) or less may be lifted not more than 300 millimeters (1 foot) in order to launch.

(b) Additional lifeboat stowage requirements. In addition to the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section, each lifeboat must be stowed as follows:

(1) Each lifeboat for lowering down the side of the vessel must be stowed as far forward of the vessel's propeller as practicable. Each lifeboat, in its stowed position, must be protected from damage by heavy seas.

(2) Each lifeboat must be stowed attached to its launching appliance.

(3) Each lifeboat must have a means for recharging the lifeboat batteries from the vessel's power supply at a supply voltage not exceeding 50 volts.

(c) Additional liferaft stowage requirements. In addition to the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section, each liferaft must be stowed as follows:

(1) Each liferaft must be stowed to permit manual release from its securing arrangements.

(2) Each liferaft must be stowed at a height above the waterline not greater than the maximum stowage height indicated on the liferaft container with the vessel in its lightest seagoing condition. Each liferaft without an indicated maximum stowage height must be stowed not more than 18 meters (59 feet) above the waterline with the vessel in its lightest seagoing condition.

(3) Each liferaft must be arranged to permit it to drop into the water from the deck on which it is stowed. A liferaft stowage arrangements meets this requirement if it—

(i) Is outboard of the rail or bulwark;

(ii) Is on stanchions or on a platform adjacent to the rail or bulwark; or

(iii) Has a gate or other suitable opening large enough to allow the liferaft to be pushed directly overboard and, if the liferaft is intended to be available for use on either side of the vessel, such gate or opening is provided on each side of the vessel.

(4) Each davit-launched liferaft must be stowed within reach of its lifting hook, unless some means of transfer is provided that is not rendered inoperable—

(i) Within the limits of trim and list specified in paragraph (a)(4) of this section;

(ii) By vessel motion; or

(iii) By power failure.

(5) Each rigid container for an inflatable liferaft to be launched by a launching appliance must be secured so that the container or parts of it do not fall into the water during and after inflation and launching of the contained liferaft.

(6) Each liferaft must have a painter system providing a connection between the vessel and the liferaft.

(7) Each liferaft or group of liferafts must be arranged for float-free launching. The arrangement must ensure that the liferaft or liferafts, when released and inflated, are not dragged under by the sinking vessel. A hydrostatic release unit used in a float-free arrangement must be approved under approval series 160.162.

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§199.140   Stowage of rescue boats.

(a) General. Rescue boats must be stowed—

(1) To be ready for launching in not more than 5 minutes.

(2) In a position suitable for launching and recovery;

(3) In a way that neither the rescue boat nor its stowage arrangements will interfere with the operation of any survival craft at any other launching station; and

(4) If it is also a lifeboat, in compliance with the requirements of §199.130.

(b) Each rescue boat must have a means provided for recharging the rescue boat batteries from the vessel's power supply at a supply voltage not exceeding 50 volts.

(c) Each inflated rescue boat must be kept fully inflated at all times.

[CGD 84-069, 61 FR 25313, May 20, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 52819, Oct. 1, 1998]

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§199.145   Marine evacuation system launching arrangements.

(a) Arrangements. Each marine evacuation system must—

(1) Be capable of being deployed by one person;

(2) Enable the total number of persons for which it is designed, to be transferred from the vessel into the inflated liferafts within a period of 30 minutes in the case of a passenger vessel and 10 minutes in the case of a cargo vessel from the time an abandon-ship signal is given;

(3) Be arranged so that liferafts may be securely attached to and released from the marine evacuation system platform by a person either in the liferaft or on the platform;

(4) Be capable of being deployed from the vessel under unfavorable conditions of trim of up to 10 degrees either way and of list of up to 20 degrees either way;

(5) If the marine evacuation system has an inclined slide, it must—

(i) Be arranged so the angle of the slide from horizontal is within a range of 30 to 35 degrees when the vessel is upright and in its lightest seagoing condition; and

(ii) If the vessel is a passenger vessel, be arranged so the angle of the slide from horizontal is no more than 55 degrees in the final stage of flooding as described in subchapter S of this chapter; and

(6) Be capable of being restrained by a bowsing line or other positioning system that is designed to deploy automatically and if necessary, is capable of being adjusted to the position required for evacuation.

(b) Stowage. Each marine evacuation system must be stowed as follows:

(1) There must not be any openings between the marine evacuation system's embarkation station and the vessel's side at the waterline with the vessel in its lightest seagoing condition.

(2) The marine evacuation system's launching positions must be arranged, as far as practicable, to be straight down the vessel's side and to safely clear the propeller and any steeply overhanging positions of the hull.

(3) The marine evacuation system must be protected from any projections of the vessel's structure or equipment.

(4) The marine evacuation system's passage and platform, when deployed; its stowage container; and its operational arrangement must not interfere with the operation of any other lifesaving appliance at any other launching station.

(5) The marine evacuation system's stowage area must be protected from damage by heavy seas.

(c) Stowage of associated liferafts. Inflatable liferafts used in conjunction with the marine evacuation system must be stowed—

(1) Close to the system container, but capable of dropping clear of the deployed chute and boarding platform;

(2) So it is capable of individual release from its stowage rack;

(3) In accordance with the requirements of §199.130; and

(4) With pre-connected or easily connected retrieving lines to the platform.

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§199.150   Survival craft launching and recovery arrangements; general.

(a)(1) Each launching appliance must be approved under 46 CFR part 160, subpart 160.132 for use with the intended craft, with a winch approved under 46 CFR part 160, subpart 160.115 for use with the intended craft.

(2) Each launching appliance for a davit-launched liferaft must include an automatic disengaging apparatus approved under 46 CFR part 160, subpart 160.170 and be either—

(i) A launching appliance described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section; or

(ii) A launching appliance approved on or before November 10, 2011 under approval series 160.163.

(b) Unless expressly provided otherwise in this part, each survival craft must be provided with a launching appliance or marine evacuation system, except those survival craft that—

(1) Can be boarded from a position on deck less than 4.5 meters (14.75 feet) above the waterline with the vessel in its lightest seagoing condition and that are stowed for launching directly from the stowed position under unfavorable conditions of trim of 10 degrees and list of 20 degrees either way;

(2) [Reserved]

(3) Are carried in excess of the survival craft for 200 percent of the total number of persons on board the vessel, and that have a mass of not more than 185 kilograms (407 pounds);

(4) Are carried in excess of the survival craft for 200 percent of the total number of persons on board the vessel and that are stowed for launching directly from the stowed position under unfavorable conditions or trim of 10 degrees and list of 20 degrees either way; or

(5) Are provided for use in conjunction with a marine evacuation system and that are stowed for launching directly from the stowed position under unfavorable conditions of trim of 10 degrees and list of 20 degrees either way.

(c) With the exception of the secondary means of launching for free-fall lifeboats, each launching appliance must be arranged so that the fully equipped survival craft it serves can be safely launched against unfavorable conditions of trim of up to 10 degrees either way and of list of up to 20 degrees either way—

(1) When the survival craft is loaded with its full complement of persons; and

(2) When not more than the required operating crew is on board.

(d) A launching appliance must not depend on any means other than gravity or stored mechanical power, independent of the vessel's power supplies, to launch the survival craft it serves in both the fully loaded and equipped condition and in the light condition.

(e) Each launching appliance's structural attachment to the vessel must be designed, based on the ultimate strength of the construction material, to be at least 4.5 times the load imparted on the attachment by the launching appliance and its fully loaded survival craft under the most adverse combination of list and trim under paragraph (c) of this section.

(f) Each launching appliance must be arranged so that—

(1) All parts requiring regular maintenance by the vessel's crew are readily accessible and easily maintained;

(2) The launching appliance remains effective under conditions of icing;

(3) The same type of release mechanism is used for each similar survival craft carried on board the vessel;

(4) The preparation and handling of each survival craft at any one launching station does not interfere with the prompt preparation and handling of any other survival craft at any other station;

(5) The persons on board the vessel can safely and rapidly board the survival craft; and

(6) During preparation and launching, the survival craft, its launching appliance, and the area of water into which it is to be launched are illuminated by lighting supplied from the vessel's emergency source of electrical power.

(g) Each launching and recovery arrangement must allow the operator on the deck to observe the survival craft at all times during launching.

(h) Means must be provided outside the machinery space to prevent any discharge of water onto survival craft during launching.

(i) If there is a danger of the survival craft being damaged by the vessel's stabilizer wings, the stabilizer wings must be able to be brought inboard using power from the emergency source of electrical power. Indicators operated by the vessel's emergency power system must be provided on the navigating bridge to show the position of the stabilizer wings.

[CGD 84-069, 61 FR 25313, May 20, 1996, as amended by USCG-2010-0048, 76 FR 63015, Oct. 11, 2011; 76 FR 70062, Nov. 10, 2011]

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§199.153   Survival craft launching and recovery arrangements using falls and a winch.

Survival craft launching and recovery arrangements, in addition to meeting the requirements in §199.150, must meet the following requirements:

(a) Each launching mechanism must be arranged so it may be actuated by one person from a position on the vessel's deck, and except for secondary launching appliances for free-fall launching arrangements, from a position within the survival craft.

(b) Each fall wire must be of rotation-resistant and corrosion-resistant steel wire rope.

(c) The breaking strength of each fall wire and each attachment used on the fall must be at least six times the load imparted on the fall by the fully-loaded survival craft.

(d) Each fall must be long enough for the survival craft to reach the water with the vessel in its lightest seagoing condition, under unfavorable conditions of trim, and with the vessel listed not less than 20 degrees either way.

(e) Each unguarded fall must not pass near any operating position of the winch, such as hand cranks, pay out wheels, and brake levers.

(f) Each winch drum must be arranged so the fall wire winds onto the drum in one or more level wraps. A multiple drum winch must be arranged so that the falls wind off at the same rate when lowering and onto the drums at the same rate when hoisting.

(g) Each fall, where exposed to damage or fouling, must have guards or equivalent protection. Each fall that leads along a deck must be covered with a guard that is not more than 300 millimeters (1 foot) above the deck.

(h) The lowering speed for a fully loaded survival craft must be not less than the speed obtained from one of the following formulas:

(1) S = 0.4 + (0.02 H), where S the lowering speed in meters per second and H is the lowering height in meters from the davit head to the waterline with the vessel in its lightest seagoing condition, with H not greater than 30 regardless of the actual lowering height.

(2) S = 79 + (1.2 H), where S is the lowering speed in feet per minute and H is the lowering height in feet from the davit head to the waterline with the vessel in its lightest seagoing condition, with H not greater than 99 regardless of the actual lowering height.

(i) The lowering speed for a survival craft loaded with all of its equipment must be not less than 70 percent of the speed required under paragraph (h) of this section.

(j) The lowering speed for a fully loaded survival craft must be not more than 1.3 meters per second (256 feet per minute).

(k) If a survival craft is recovered by electric power, the electrical installation, including the electric power-operated boat winch, must meet the requirements in subchapter J of this chapter. If a survival craft is recovered by any means using power, including a portable power source, safety devices must be provided that automatically cut off the power before the davit arms or falls reach the stops in order to avoid overstressing the falls or davits, unless the motor is designed to prevent such overstressing.

(l) Each launching appliance must be fitted with brakes that meet the following requirements:

(1) The brakes must be capable of stopping the descent of the survival craft or rescue boat and holding the survival craft or rescue boat securely when loaded with its full complement of persons and equipment.

(2) The brake pads must, where necessary, be protected from water and oil.

(3) Manual brakes must be arranged so that the brake is always applied unless the operator, or a mechanism activated by the operator, holds the brake control in the off position.

[CGD 84-069, 61 FR 25313, May 20, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 52819, Oct. 1, 1998]

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§199.155   Lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements.

Lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements, in addition to meeting the requirements in §§199.150 and 199.153, must meet the following requirements:

(a) Each lifeboat must be provided with a launching appliance. The launching appliance must be capable of launching and recovering the lifeboat with its crew.

(b) Each launching appliance arrangement must allow the operator on the vessel to observe the lifeboat at all times during recovery.

(c) Each launching appliance arrangement must be designed to ensure persons can safely disembark from the survival craft prior to its stowage.

(d) Each lifeboat, other than a totally enclosed lifeboat, must be provided with a davit span with not less than two lifelines of sufficient length to reach the water with the vessel in its lightest seagoing condition, under unfavorable conditions of trim, and with the vessel listed up to 20 degrees either way.

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§199.157   Free-fall lifeboat launching and recovery arrangements.

(a) The launching appliance for a free-fall lifeboat must be designed and installed so that the launching appliance and the lifeboat it serves operate as a system to protect the occupants from harmful acceleration forces and to effectively clear the vessel.

(b) The launching appliance must be designed and arranged so that, in its ready to launch position, the distance from the lowest point on the lifeboat it serves to the water surface with the vessel in its lightest seagoing condition does not exceed the lifeboat's certificated free-fall height.

(c) The launching appliance must be arranged to preclude accidental release of the lifeboat in its unattended stowed position. If the means provided to secure the lifeboat cannot be released from inside the lifeboat, the means to secure the lifeboat must be arranged to preclude boarding the lifeboat without first releasing it.

(d) Each free-fall launching arrangement must be provided with a secondary means to launch the lifeboat by falls. Such means must comply with the requirements of §§199.150, 199.153, and 199.155. Notwithstanding §199.150(c), the secondary launching appliance must be capable of launching the lifeboat against unfavorable conditions of trim of 2 degrees either way and of list of 5 degrees either way. The secondary launching appliance need not comply with the speed requirements of §199.153 (g), (h), and (i). If the secondary launching appliance is not dependent on gravity, stored mechanical power, or other manual means, the launching arrangement must be connected both to the vessel's main and emergency power supplies.

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§199.160   Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements.

(a) Each rescue boat must be capable of being launched with the vessel making headway of 5 knots in calm water. A painter may be used to meet this requirement.

(b) Each rescue boat embarkation and launching arrangement must permit the rescue boat to be boarded and launched in the shortest possible time.

(c) The rescue boat must meet the embarkation and launching arrangement requirements of §§199.110 (e) and (g), 199.150, 199.155, and if the launching arrangement uses falls and a winch, §199.153.

(d) If the rescue boat is one of the vessel's survival craft, the rescue boat must also meet the following requirements:

(1) The rescue boat must meet the muster and embarkation arrangement requirements of §199.110 and the launching station requirements of §199.120.

(2) If the launching arrangement uses a single fall, the rescue boat may have an automatic disengaging apparatus approved under approval series 160.170 instead of a lifeboat release mechanism.

(e) Rapid recovery of the rescue boat must be possible when loaded with its full complement of persons and equipment. If the rescue boat is also a lifeboat, rapid recovery must be possible when loaded with its lifeboat equipment and an approved rescue boat complement of at least six persons.

(f) Each rescue boat launching appliance must be fitted with a powered winch motor.

(g) Each rescue boat launching appliance must be capable of hoisting the rescue boat when loaded with its full rescue boat complement of persons and equipment at a rate of not less than 0.3 meters per second (59 feet per minute).

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§199.170   Line-throwing appliance.

(a) General. Each vessel must have a line-throwing appliance approved under approval series 160.040.

(b) Stowage. The line-throwing appliance and its equipment must be readily accessible for use.

(c) Additional equipment. Each vessel must carry the following equipment for the line-throwing appliance—

(1) The equipment on the list provided by the manufacturer with the approved appliance; and

(2) An auxiliary line that—

(i) Is at least 450 meters (1,500 feet) long;

(ii) Has a breaking strength of at least 40 kiloNewtons (9,000 pounds-force); and

(iii) Is, if synthetic, of a dark color or certified by the manufacturer to be resistant to deterioration from ultraviolet light.

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§199.175   Survival craft and rescue boat equipment.

(a) All lifeboat and rescue boat equipment—

(1) Must be secured within the boat by lashings, by storage in lockers or compartments, by storage in brackets or similar mounting arrangements, or by other suitable means;

(2) Must be secured in such a manner as not to interfere with any abandonment procedures or reduce seating capacity;

(3) Must be as small and of as little mass as possible;

(4) Must be packed in a suitable and compact form; and

(5) Should be stowed so the items do not—

(i) Reduce the seating capacity;

(ii) Adversely affect the seaworthiness of the survival craft or rescue boat; or

(iii) Overload the launching appliance.

(b) Each lifeboat, rigid liferaft, and rescue boat, unless otherwise stated in this paragraph, must carry the equipment listed in this paragraph and specified for it in table 199.175 of this section under the vessel's category of service. A lifeboat that is also a rescue boat must carry the equipment in the table column marked for a lifeboat.

(1) Bailer. The bailer must be buoyant.

(2) Bilge pump. The bilge pump must be approved under approval series 160.044 and must be installed in a ready-to-use condition as follows:

(i) The bilge pump for a lifeboat approved for less than 70 persons must be either size 2 or size 3.

(ii) The bilge pump for a lifeboat approved for 70 persons or more must be size 3.

(3) Boathook. In the case of a boat launched by falls, the boathook must be kept free for fending-off purposes. For inflated rescue boats and for rigid-inflated rescue boats, each boathook must be designed to minimize the possibility of damage to the inflated portions of the hull.

(4) Bucket. The bucket must be made of corrosion-resistant material and should either be buoyant or have an attached lanyard at least 1.8 meters (6 feet) long.

(5) Can opener. A can opener may be in a jackknife approved under approval series 160.043.

(6) Compass. The compass and its mounting arrangement must be approved under approval series 160.014. In a totally enclosed lifeboat, the compass must be permanently fitted at the steering position; in any other boat it must be provided with a binnacle, if necessary to protect it from the weather, and with suitable mounting arrangements.

(7) Dipper. The dipper must be rustproof and attached to a lanyard that should be at least 0.9 meters (3 feet) long.

(8) Drinking cup. The drinking cup must be graduated and rustproof. The cup should also be of a breakage-resistant material.

(9) Fire extinguisher. The fire extinguisher must be approved under approval series 162.028. The fire extinguisher must be type B-C, size II, or larger. Two type B-C, size I fire extinguishers may be carried in place of a type B-C, size II fire extinguisher.

(10) First aid kit. The first aid kit in a lifeboat and in a rescue boat must be approved under approval series 160.041. The first aid kit in a rigid liferaft must be approved under approval series 160.054.

(11) Fishing kit. The fishing kit must be approved under approval series 160.061.

(12) Flashlight. The flashlight must be a type I or type III that is constructed and marked in accordance with the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) F 1014 (incorporated by reference, see §199.05). One spare set of batteries and one spare bulb, stored in a watertight container, must be provided for each flashlight.

(13) Hatchet. The hatchet must be approved under approval series 160.013. The hatchet should be stowed in brackets near the release mechanism and, if more than one hatchet is carried, the hatchets should be stowed at opposite ends of the boat.

(14) Heaving line. The heaving line must be buoyant, must be at least 30 meters (99 feet) long, must have a buoyant rescue quoit attached to one end, and should be at least 8 millimeters ( 516 inches) in diameter.

(15) Instruction card. The instruction card must be waterproof and contain the information required by IMO Resolution A.657(16). The instruction card should be located so that it can be easily seen upon entering the liferaft.

(16) Jackknife. The jackknife must be approved under approval series 160.043 and must be attached to the boat by its lanyard.

(17) Knife. The knife must be of the non-folding type with a buoyant handle as follows:

(i) The knife for a rigid liferaft must be secured to the raft by a lanyard and stowed in a pocket on the exterior of the canopy near the point where the painter is attached to the liferaft. If an approved jackknife is substituted for the second knife required on a liferaft equipped for 13 or more persons, the jackknife must also be secured to the liferaft by a lanyard.

(ii) The knife in an inflated or rigid-inflated rescue boat must be of a type designed to minimize the possibility of damage to the fabric portions of the hull.

(18) Ladder. The boarding ladder must be capable of being used at each entrance on either side or at the stern of the boat to enable persons in the water to board the boat. The lowest step of the ladder must be not less than 0.4 meters (15.75 inches) below the boat's light waterline.

(19) Mirror. The signalling mirror must be approved under approval series 160.020.

(20) Oars and paddles. Each lifeboat and rescue boat must have buoyant oars or paddles of the number, size, and type specified by the manufacturer of the boat. An oarlock or equivalent device, either permanently installed or attached to the boat by a lanyard or chain, must be provided for each oar. Each oar should have the vessel's name marked on it in block letters.

(21) Painter. (i) One painter on a lifeboat and the painter on a rescue boat must be attached by a painter release device at the forward end of the lifeboat. The second painter on a lifeboat must be secured at or near the bow of the lifeboat, ready for use. On lifeboats to be launched by free-fall launching, both painters must be stowed near the bow ready for use.

(A) If the painter is of synthetic material, the painter must be of a dark color or certified by the manufacturer to be resistant to deterioration from ultraviolet light.

(B) The painter for a lifeboat and each painter for a rescue boat must be of a length that is at least twice the distance from the stowage position of the boat to the waterline with the vessel in its lightest seagoing condition, or must be 15 meters (50 feet) long, whichever is the greater.

(C) The painter must have a breaking strength of at least 34 kiloNewtons (7,700 pounds-force).

(ii) The painter for a rigid liferaft must be of a length that is at least 20 meters (66 feet) plus the distance from the liferaft's stowed position to the waterline with the vessel in its lightest seagoing condition, or must be 15 meters (50 feet) long, whichever is the greater.

(A) If the painter is of synthetic material, the painter must be of a dark color or certified by the manufacturer to be resistant to deterioration from ultraviolet light.

(B) The painter must have a breaking strength of at least 15 kiloNewtons (3,370 pounds-force) for liferafts approved for more than 25 persons, of at least 20 kiloNewtons (2,250 pounds-force) for liferafts approved for 9 to 25 persons, and of at least 7.5 kiloNewtons (1,687 pounds-force) for any other liferaft.

(C) The painter must have a float-free link meeting the requirements of part 160, subpart 160.073 of this chapter secured to the end of the painter that is attached to the vessel. The float-free link arrangement must break under a load of 2.2±0.4 kiloNewtons (400 to 536 pounds-force).

(22) Provisions. Each unit of provisions must be approved under approval series 160.046 and must provide at least 10,000 kiloJoules (2,390 calories). Individual provision packages may provide less than 10,000 kiloJoules, as long as the total quantity of provisions on board provides for at least 10,000 kiloJoules per person.

(23) Pump. The pump or bellows must be manually operated and should be arranged so it is capable of inflating any part of the inflatable structure of the rescue boat.

(24) Radar reflector. The radar reflector must be capable of detection at a distance of 4 nautical miles and must have a mounting arrangements to install it on the boat in its proper orientation. A 9-GigaHertz radar transponder may be substituted for the radar reflector if the transponder is accepted by the Federal Communications Commission as meeting the requirements of 47 CFR part 80 and is stowed in the boat or raft.

(25) Rainwater collection device. The rainwater collection device must be arranged to collect falling rain and direct it into the water tanks in the lifeboat. If the lifeboat carries a manually-powered, reverse osmosis desalinator approved under approval series 160.058, a rainwater collection device is not required.

(26) Repair kit. The repair kit for an inflated and a rigid-inflated rescue boat must be packed in a suitable container and include at least—

(i) Six sealing clamps;

(ii) Five 50-millimeter (2-inch) diameter tube patches;

(iii) A roughing tool; and

(iv) A container of cement compatible with the tube fabric. The cement must have an expiration date on its container that is not more than 24 months after the date of manufacture of the cement.

(27) Sea anchor. (i) The sea anchor for a lifeboat must be approved under approval series 160.019.

(ii) Each sea anchor for a rigid liferaft must be of the type specified by the liferaft manufacturer and must be fitted with a shock resistant hawser. It may also be fitted with a tripping line. One sea anchor must be permanently attached to the liferaft in such a way that, when the liferaft is waterborne, it will cause the liferaft to lie oriented to the wind in the most stable manner. The second sea anchor must be stowed in the liferaft as a spare. A davit-launched liferaft and a liferaft on a passenger vessel must have the permanently attached sea anchor arranged to deploy automatically when the liferaft floats free.

(iii) The sea anchor for a rescue boat must be of the type specified by the rescue boat manufacturer, and must have a hawser of adequate strength that is at least 10 meters (33 feet) long.

(28) Searchlight. (i) The searchlight must be of the type originally provided with the approved lifeboat or rescue boat, or must be certified by the searchlight manufacturer to meet ASTM F 1003 (incorporated by reference, see §199.05). The boat must carry two spare bulbs.

(ii) The searchlight must be permanently mounted on the canopy or must have a stanchion-type or collapsible-type, portable mounting on the canopy. The mounting must be located to enable operation of the searchlight by the boat operator.

(iii) The searchlights power source must be capable of operating the light without charging or recharging for not less than—

(A) Three hours of continuous operation; or

(B) Six hours total operation when it is operated in cycles of 15 minutes on and 5 minutes off.

(iv) If the searchlight's power source is an engine starting battery, there must be sufficient battery capacity to start the engine at the end of either operating period specified in paragraph (b)(28)(iii) of this section.

(v) The searchlight's power source must be connected to the searchlight using watertight electrical fittings.

(29) Seasickness kit. The seasickness kit must be in a waterproof package and must include one waterproof seasickness bag, anti-seasickness medication sufficient for one person for 48 hours, and instructions for using the medication. Each seasickness kit should be stowed within reach of the seat for which it is intended.

(30) Signal, smoke. The smoke signal must be approved under approval series 160.122.

(31) Signal, hand flare. The hand flare must be approved under approval series 160.121.

(32) Signal, rocket parachute flare. The rocket parachute flare must be approved under approval series 160.136.

(33) Skates and fenders. The skates and fenders must be as specified by the lifeboat or rescue boat manufacturer to facilitate launching and prevent damage to a lifeboat intended for launching down the side of a vessel.

(34) Sponge. The sponge must be suitable for soaking up water.

(35) Survival instructions. The survival instructions must be as described in IMO Resolution A.657(16), Annex I for liferafts and Annex II for lifeboats.

(36) Table of lifesaving signals. The table of lifesaving signals must be as described in Annex IV to the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea 1972, as amended, and must be printed on a waterproof card or stored in a waterproof container.

(37) Thermal protective aid. The thermal protective aid must be approved under approval series 160.174.

(38) Tool kit. The tool kit must contain sufficient tools for minor adjustments to the engine and its accessories.

(39) Towline. The towline must be buoyant and at least 50 meters (164 feet) long. The towline must have a breaking strength of not less than 13.3 kiloNewtons (3,000 pounds-force) or be of sufficient strength to tow the largest liferaft carried on the vessel when loaded with its full complement of persons and equipment at a speed of at least 2 knots.

(40) Water. The water must be emergency drinking water approved under approval series 160.026.

(i) The requirement for up to one-third of the emergency drinking water may be met by a desalting apparatus approved under approval series 160.058 that is capable of producing the substituted amount of water in 2 days.

(ii) The requirement for up to two-thirds of the emergency drinking water may be met by a manually-powered, reverse osmosis desalinator approved under approval series 160.058 and that is capable of producing the substituted amount of water in 2 days.

(41) Whistle. The whistle must be corrosion-resistant, and should be a ball-type or multi-tone whistle that is attached to a lanyard.

Table 199.175—Survival Craft Equipment

Item No. Item International voyage Short international voyage
Lifeboat Rigid liferaft (SOLAS A pack) Rescue boat Lifeboat Rigid liferaft (SOLAS B pack) Rescue boat
1Bailer1111111
2Bilge pump211
3Boathook2121
4Bucket32121
5Can opener333
6Compass1111
7Dipper11
8Drinking cup111
9Fire extinguisher1111
10First aid kit111111
11Fishing kit11
12Flashlight111111
13Hatchet22
14Heaving line212212
15Instruction card11
16Jackknife11
17Knife1 41111
18Ladder1111
19Mirror, signalling1111
20Oars, units5 61111
   Paddles22
21Painter211211
22Provisions (units per person)11
23Pump711
24Radar reflector111111
25Rainwater collection device11
26Repair kit711
27Sea anchor121121
28Searchlight1111
29Seasickness kit (units per person)1111
30Signal, smoke2221
31Signal, hand flare6663
32Signal, parachute flare4442
33Skates and fenders81111
34Sponge72222
35Survival instructions1111
36Table of lifesaving signals1111
37Thermal protective aids910%10%10%10%10%10%
38Tool kit11
39Towline101111
40Water (liters per person)31.53
41Whistle111111

Notes:

1Each liferaft equipped for 13 persons or more must carry two of these items.

2Not required for boats of self-bailing design.

3Not required for inflated or rigid-inflated rescue boats.

4A hatchet counts towards this requirement in rigid rescue boats.

5Oars are not required on a free-fall lifeboat; a unit of oars means the number of oars specified by the boat manufacturer.

6Rescue boats may substitute buoyant paddles for oars, as specified by the manufacturer.

7Not required for a rigid rescue boat.

8Required if specified by the boat manufacturer.

9Sufficient thermal protective aids are required for at least 10% of the persons the survival craft is equipped to carry, but not less than two.

10Required only if the lifeboat is also the rescue boat.

[CGD 84-069, 61 FR 25313, May 20, 1996; 61 FR 40281, Aug. 1, 1996; 63 FR 52819, Oct. 1, 1998; USCG-1999-6216, 64 FR 53229, Oct. 1, 1999; USCG-2000-7790, 65 FR 58465, Sept. 29, 2000; USCG-2004-18884, 69 FR 58352, Sept. 30, 2004]

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§199.176   Markings on lifesaving appliances.

(a) Lifeboats and rescue boats. Each lifeboat and rescue boat must be plainly marked as follows:

(1) Each side of each lifeboat and rescue boat bow must be marked in block capital letters and numbers with—

(i) The name of the vessel; and

(ii) The name of the port required to be marked on the stern of the vessel to meet the requirements of subpart 67.123 of this chapter.

(2) The number of persons for which the boast is equipped must be clearly marked, preferably on the bow, in permanent characters. The number of persons for which the boat is equipped must not exceed the number of persons shown on its nameplate.

(3) The number of the boat and a means of identifying the vessel to which the boat belongs, such as the vessel's name, must be plainly marked or painted so that the markings are visible from above the boat.

(4) The Type II retro-reflective material approved under approval series 164.018 must be placed on the boat to meet the arrangement requirements in IMO Resolution A.658(16).

(b) Rigid liferafts. Each rigid liferaft must be marked as follows:

(1) The name of the vessel must be marked on each rigid liferaft.

(2) The name of the port required to be marked on the stern of the vessel to meet the requirements of §67.123 of this chapter must be marked on each rigid liferaft.

(3) The rigid liferaft must be marked with the words “SOLAS A pack” or “SOLAS B pack”, to reflect the pack inside.

(4) The length of the painter must be marked on each rigid liferaft.

(5) At each entrance of each rigid liferaft, the number of persons for which the rigid liferaft is equipped must be marked in letters and numbers at least 100 millimeters (4 inches) high and in a color contrasting to that of the liferaft. The number of persons for which the liferaft is equipped must not exceed the number of persons shown on its nameplate.

[CGD 84-69, 61 FR 52313, May 20, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 52819, Oct. 1, 1998]

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§199.178   Marking of stowage locations.

(a) Containers, brackets, racks, and other similar stowage locations for lifesaving equipment must be marked with symbols in accordance with IMO Resolution A.760(18) indicating the device stowed in that location.

(b) If more than one device is stowed in a location, the number of devices stowed must be indicated.

(c) Survival craft should be numbered consecutively starting from the vessel's bow. Survival craft on the starboard side should be numbered with odd numerals and survival craft on the port side should be numbered with even numerals.

(d) Each liferaft stowage location should be marked with the capacity of the liferaft stowed there.

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§199.180   Training and drills.

(a) Training materials. Training material must be on board each vessel and must consist of a manual of one or more volumes written in easily understood terms and illustrated wherever possible, or of audiovisual training aids, or of both as follows:

(1) If a training manual is used, a copy must be in each crew messroom and recreation room or in each crew cabin. If audiovisual training aids are used, they must be incorporated into the onboard training sessions described in paragraph (g) of this section.

(2) The training material must explain in detail—

(i) The procedure for donning lifejackets, immersion suits, and anti-exposure suits carried on board;

(ii) The procedure for mustering at the assigned stations;

(iii) The procedure for boarding, launching, and clearing the survival craft and rescue boats;

(iv) The method of launching from within the survival craft;

(v) The procedure for releasing survival craft from launching appliances;

(vi) The method and use of water spray systems in launching areas when such systems are required for the protection of aluminum survival craft or launching appliances;

(vii) The illumination in the launching areas;

(viii) The use of all survival equipment;

(ix) The use of all detection equipment for the location of survivors or survival craft;

(x) With the assistance of illustrations, the use of radio lifesaving appliances;

(xi) The use of sea anchors;

(xii) The use of the survival craft engine and accessories;

(xiii) The recovery of survival craft and rescue boats, including stowage and securing;

(xiv) The hazards of exposure and the need for warm clothing;

(xv) The best use of the survival craft for survival;

(xvi) The methods of retrieval, including the use of helicopter rescue gear such as slings, baskets, and stretchers; the use of breeches-buoy and shore lifesaving apparatus; and the use of the vessel's line-throwing apparatus;

(xvii) All other functions contained in the muster list and emergency instructions; and

(xviii) The instructions for emergency repair of the lifesaving appliances.

(b) Familiarity with emergency procedures. (1) Every crewmember with emergency duties assigned on the muster list must be familiar with their assigned duties before the voyage begins.

(2) On a vessel engaged on voyage when the passengers or special personnel are scheduled to be on board for more than 24 hours, musters of the passengers and special personnel must take place within 24 hours after their embarkation. Passengers and special personnel must be instructed in the use of the lifejackets and the action to take in an emergency.

(3) Whenever new passengers or special personnel embark, a safety briefing must be given immediately before sailing or immediately after sailing. The briefing must include the instructions required by §199.80 and must be made by means of an announcement in one or more languages likely to be understood by the passengers and special personnel. The announcement must be made on the vessel's public address system or by other equivalent means likely to be heard by the passengers and special personnel who have not yet heard it during the voyage. The briefing may be included in the muster required by paragraph (b)(2) of this section if the muster is held immediately upon departure. Information cards or posters, or video programs displayed on the vessel video displays, may be used to supplement the briefing, but may not be used to replace the announcement.

(c) Drills—general. (1) Drills must, as far as practicable, be conducted as if there were an actual emergency.

(2) Every crewmember must participate in at least one abandon-ship drill and one fire drill every month. The drills of the crew must take place within 24 hours of the vessel leaving a port if more than 25 percent of the crew have not participated in abandon-ship and fire drills on board that particular vessel in the previous month.

(3) Drills must be held before sailing when a vessel enters service for the first time, after modification of a major character, or when a new crew is engaged.

(4) The OCMI may accept other equivalent drill arrangements for those classes of vessels for which compliance with this paragraph is impracticable.

(d) Abandon-ship drills. (1) Abandon-ship drills must include—

(i) Summoning persons on board to muster stations with the general alarm followed by drill announcements on the public address or other communication system and ensuring that the persons on board are made aware of the order to abandon ship;

(ii) Reporting to stations and preparing for the duties described in the muster list;

(iii) Checking that persons on board are suitably dressed;

(iv) Checking that lifejackets or immersion suits are correctly donned;

(v) Lowering of at least one lifeboat after any necessary preparation for launching;

(vi) Starting and operating the lifeboat engine; and

(vii) Operating davits used for launching the liferafts.

(2) Abandon-ship drills should also include conducting a mock search and rescue of passengers or special personnel trapped in their staterooms, and giving instructions in the use of radio lifesaving appliances.

(3) Different lifeboats must, as far as practicable, be lowered to comply with the requirements of paragraph (d)(1)(v) of this section at successive drills.

(4) Except as provided in paragraphs (d)(5) and (d)(6) of this section, each lifeboat must be launched with its assigned operating crew aboard and maneuvered in the water at least once every 3 months during an abandon-ship drill.

(5) Lowering into the water, rather than launching of a lifeboat arranged for free-fall launching, is acceptable when free-fall launching is impracticable, provided that the lifeboat is free-fall launched with its assigned operating crew aboard and is maneuvered in the water at least once every 6 months. However, when compliance with the 6-month requirement is impracticable, the OCMI may extend this period to 12 months, provided that arrangements are made for simulated launching at intervals of not more than 6 months.

(6) The OCMI may exempt a vessel operating on short international voyages from the requirement to launch the lifeboats on both sides of the vessel if berthing arrangements in port and operations do not permit launching of lifeboats on one side. However, all lifeboats on the vessel must be lowered at least once every 3 months and launched at least annually.

(7) As far as is reasonable and practicable, rescue boats, other than lifeboats which are also rescue boats, must be launched with their assigned crew aboard and maneuvered in the water each month. Such launching and maneuvering must occur at least once every 3 months.

(8) If lifeboat and rescue boat launching drills are carried out with the vessel making headway, such drills must, because of the dangers involved, be practiced in sheltered waters only and be under the supervision of an officer experienced in such drills.

(9) If a vessel is fitted with marine evacuation systems, drills must include an exercising of the procedures required for the deployment of such a system up to the point immediately preceding actual deployment of the system. This aspect of drills should be augmented by regular instruction using the on board training aids. Additionally, every crewmember assigned to duties involving the marine evacuation system must, as far as practicable, participate in a full deployment of a similar system into water, either on board a vessel or ashore, every 2 years but not longer than every 3 years. This training may be associated with the deployments required by §199.190(k).

(10) Emergency lighting for mustering and abandonment must be tested at each abandon-ship drill.

(11) If a vessel carries immersion suits or anti-exposure suits, the suits must be worn by crewmembers in at least one abandon ship drill in any three-month period. If wearing the suits is impracticable due to warm weather, the crewmembers must be instructed on their donning and use.

(12) If a vessel carries immersion suits for persons other than the crew, the abandon-ship drill must include instruction to these persons on the stowage, donning, and use of the suits.

(e) Line-throwing appliance. A drill must be conducted on the use of the line-throwing appliance at least once every 3 months. The actual firing of the appliance is at the discretion of the master.

(f) Fire drills. (1) Fire drills must, as far as practicable, be planned with due consideration given to the various emergencies that may occur for that type of vessel and its cargo.

(2) Each fire drill must include—

(i) Reporting to stations and preparing for the duties described in the muster list for the particular fire emergency being simulated;

(ii) Starting of fire pumps and the use of two jets of water to determine that the system is in proper working order;

(iii) Checking the firemen's outfits and other personal rescue equipment;

(iv) Checking the relevant communications equipment;

(v) Checking the operation of watertight doors, fire doors, and fire dampers and main inlets and outlets of ventilation systems in the drill area; and

(vi) Checking the necessary arrangements for subsequent abandonment of the vessel.

(3) The equipment used during drills must immediately be brought back to its fully operational condition. Any faults and defects discovered during the drills must be remedied as soon as possible.

(g) Onboard training and instruction. (1) Onboard training in the use of the vessel's lifesaving appliances, including survival craft equipment, and in the use of the vessel's fire-extinguishing appliances must be given as soon as possible but not later than 2 weeks after a crewmember joins the vessel.

(2) If the crewmember is on a regularly scheduled rotating assignment to the vessel, the training required in paragraph (g)(1) of this section need be given only within 2 weeks of the time the crewmember first joins the vessel.

(3) The crew must be instructed in the use of the vessel's fire-extinguishing and lifesaving appliances and in survival at sea at the same interval as the drills. Individual units of instruction may cover different parts of the vessel's lifesaving and fire-extinguishing appliances, but all the vessel's lifesaving and fire-extinguishing appliances must be covered within any period of 2 months.

(4) Every crewmember must be given instructions that include, but are not limited to—

(i) The operation and use of the vessel's inflatable liferafts;

(ii) The problems of hypothermia, first aid treatment for hypothermia, and other appropriate first aid procedures;

(iii) Any special instructions necessary for use of the vessel's lifesaving appliances in severe weather and severe sea conditions; and

(iv) The operation and use of fire-extinguishing appliances.

(5) Onboard training in the use of davit-launched liferafts must take place at intervals of not more than 4 months on each vessel with davit-launched liferafts. Whenever practicable, this training must include the inflation and lowering of a liferaft. If this liferaft is a special liferaft intended for training purposes only and is not part of the vessel's lifesaving equipment, this liferaft must be conspicuously marked.

(h) Records. (1) When musters are held, details of abandon-ship drills, fire drills, drills of other lifesaving appliances, and onboard training must be recorded in the vessel's official logbook. Logbook entries must include—

(i) The date and time of the drill, muster, or training session;

(ii) The survival craft and fire-extinguishing equipment used in the drills;

(iii) Identification of inoperative or malfunctioning equipment and the corrective action taken;

(iv) Identification of crewmembers participating in drills or training sessions; and

(v) The subject of the onboard training session.

(2) If a full muster, drill, or training session is not held at the appointed time, an entry must be made in the logbook stating the circumstances and the extent of the muster, drill, or training session held.

[CGD 84-69, 61 FR 25313, May 20, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 52819, Oct. 1, 1998]

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§199.190   Operational readiness, maintenance, and inspection of lifesaving equipment.

(a) Operational readiness. Before the vessel leaves port and at all times during the voyage, each lifesaving appliance must be in working order and ready for immediate use.

(b) Maintenance. (1) The manufacturer's instructions for onboard maintenance of lifesaving appliances must be on board the vessel. The following must be provided for each appliance.

(i) Checklists for use when carrying out the inspections required under paragraph (e) of this section.

(ii) Maintenance and repair instructions.

(iii) A schedule of periodic maintenance.

(iv) A diagram of lubrication points with the recommended lubricants.

(v) A list of replaceable parts.

(vi) A list of sources of spare parts.

(vii) A log for records of inspections and maintenance.

(2) In lieu of compliance with paragraph (b)(1) of this section, the OCMI may accept a shipboard planned maintenance program that includes the items listed in that paragraph.

(c) Spare parts and repair equipment. Spare parts and repair equipment must be provided for each lifesaving appliance and component that is subject to excessive wear or consumption and that needs to be replaced regularly.

(d) Weekly inspections and tests. (1) Each survival craft, rescue boat, and launching appliance must be visually inspected to ensure its readiness for use.

(2) Each lifeboat engine and rescue boat engine must be run ahead and astern for a total of not less than 3 minutes unless the ambient temperature is below the minimum temperature required for starting the engine. During this time, demonstrations should indicate that the gear box and gear box train are engaging satisfactorily. If the special characteristics of an outboard motor fitted to a rescue boat would not allow the outboard motor to be run other than with its propeller submerged for a period of 3 minutes, the outboard motor should be run for such period as prescribed in the manufacturer's handbook.

(3) The general alarm system must be tested.

(e) Monthly inspections. (1) Each lifesaving appliance, including lifeboat equipment, must be inspected monthly using the checklists required under paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section to make sure the appliance and the equipment are complete and in good working order. A report of the inspection, including a statement as to the condition of the equipment, must be recorded in the vessel's official logbook.

(2) Each EPIRB and each SART, other than an EPIRB or SART in an inflatable liferaft, must be tested monthly. The EPIRB must be tested using the integrated test circuit and output indicator to determine that it is operative.

(f) Annual inspections. Annual inspections must include the following:

(1) Each survival craft, except for inflatable craft, must be stripped, cleaned, and thoroughly inspected and repaired, as needed, at least once each year and each fuel tank must be emptied, cleaned, and refilled with fresh fuel.

(2) Each davit, winch, fall, and other launching appliance must be thoroughly inspected and repaired, as needed, once each year.

(3) Each item of survival equipment with an expiration date must be replaced during the annual inspection if the expiration date has passed.

(4) Each battery clearly marked with an expiration date and used in an item of survival equipment must be replaced during the annual inspection if the expiration date has passed.

(5) Except for a storage battery used in a lifeboat or rescue boat, each battery without an expiration date that is used in an item of survival equipment must be replaced during the annual inspection.

(g) Servicing of inflatable lifesaving appliances, inflated rescue boats, and marine evacuation systems. (1) Each inflatable lifesaving appliance and marine evacuation system must be serviced—

(i) Within 12 months of its initial packing; and

(ii) Within 12 months of each subsequent servicing, except when servicing is delayed until the next scheduled inspection of the vessel, provided the delay does not exceed 5 months.

(2) Each inflatable lifejacket must be serviced in accordance with servicing procedures meeting the requirements of part 160, subpart 160.176 of this chapter. Each hybrid inflatable lifejacket must be serviced in accordance with the owner's manual and meet the requirements of part 160, subpart 160.077 of this chapter.

(3) An inflatable liferaft or inflatable buoyant apparatus must be serviced at a facility specifically approved by the Commandant for the particular brand, and in accordance with servicing procedures meeting the requirements of part 160, subpart 160.151, of this chapter—

(i) No later than the month and year on its servicing sticker affixed under 46 CFR 160.151-57(n), except that servicing may be delayed until the next scheduled inspection of the vessel, provided that the delay does not exceed 5 months; and

(ii) Whenever the container is damaged or the container straps or seals are broken.

(4) Each inflated rescue boat must be repaired and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. All repairs to inflated chambers must be made at a servicing facility approved by the Commandant, except for emergency repairs carried out on board the vessel.

(h) Periodic servicing of hydrostatic release units. Each hydrostatic release unit, other than a disposable hydrostatic release unit, must be serviced in accordance with repair and testing procedures meeting the requirements of part 160, subpart 160.062 of this chapter—

(1) Within 12 months of its manufacture; and

(2) Within 12 months of each subsequent servicing, except when servicing is delayed until the next scheduled inspection of the vessel, provided the delay does not exceed 5 months.

(i) Periodic servicing of launching appliances and release gear. (1) Launching appliances must be serviced at the intervals recommended in the manufacturer's instructions or as set out in the shipboard planned maintenance program.

(2) Launching appliances must be thoroughly examined at intervals not exceeding 5 years and, upon completion of the examination, the launching appliance must be subjected to a dynamic test of the winch brake.

(3) Lifeboat and rescue boat release gear must be serviced at the intervals recommended in the manufacturer's instructions, or as set out in the shipboard-planned-maintenance program.

(4) Lifeboat and rescue boat release gear must be subjected to a thorough examination by properly trained personnel familiar with the system at each inspection for certification.

(5) Lifeboat and rescue boat release gear must be operationally tested under a load of 1.1 times the total mass of the lifeboat when loaded with its full complement of persons and equipment whenever overhauled or at least once every 5 years.

(j) Maintenance of falls. (1) Each fall used in a launching appliance must—

(i) Be turned end-for-end at intervals of not more than 30 months; and

(ii) Be renewed when necessary due to deterioration or at intervals of not more than 5 years, whichever is earlier.

(2) As an alternative to paragraph (j)(1) of this section, each fall may—

(i) Be inspected annually; and

(ii) Be renewed whenever necessary due to deterioration or at intervals of not more than 4 years, whichever is earlier.

(k) Rotational deployment of marine evacuation systems. In addition, to or in conjunction with, the servicing intervals of marine evacuation systems required by paragraph (g)(1) of this section, each marine evacuation system must be deployed from the vessel on a rotational basis. Each marine evacuation system must be deployed at least once every 6 years.

[CGD 84-069, 61 FR 25313, May 20, 1996; 61 FR 40281, Aug. 1, 1996, as amended by CGD 85-205, 62 FR 25557, May 9, 1997; 63 FR 52819, Oct. 1, 1998; USCG-2001-11118, 67 FR 58542, Sept. 17, 2002; USCG-2014-0688, 79 FR 58289, Sept. 29, 2014]

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