e-CFR banner

Home
gpo.gov
govinfo.gov

e-CFR Navigation Aids

Browse

Simple Search

Advanced Search

 — Boolean

 — Proximity

 

Search History

Search Tips

Corrections

Latest Updates

User Info

FAQs

Agency List

Incorporation By Reference

eCFR logo

Related Resources

 

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR data is current as of December 4, 2019

Title 46Chapter ISubchapter SPart 172 → Subpart E


Title 46: Shipping
PART 172—SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO BULK CARGOES


Subpart E—Special Rules Pertaining to a Barge That Carries a Hazardous Liquid Regulated Under Subchapter O of This Chapter


Contents
§172.080   Specific applicability.
§172.085   Hull type.
§172.087   Cargo loading assumptions.
§172.090   Intact transverse stability.
§172.095   Intact longitudinal stability.
§172.100   Watertight integrity.
§172.103   Damage stability.
§172.104   Character of damage.
§172.105   Extent of damage.
§172.110   Survival conditions.

§172.080   Specific applicability.

This subpart applies to each tank barge that carries a cargo listed in Table 151.05 of this chapter.

[CGD 79-023, 48 FR 51040, Nov. 4, 1983, as amended by USCG-2009-0702, 74 FR 49239, Sept. 25, 2009]

§172.085   Hull type.

If a cargo listed in Table 151.05 of part 151 of this chapter is to be carried, the tank barge must be at least the hull type specified in Table 151.05 of this chapter for that cargo.

§172.087   Cargo loading assumptions.

(a) The calculations required in this subpart must be done for cargo weights and densities up to and including the maximum that is to be endorsed on the Certificate of Inspection in accordance with §151.04-1(c) of this chapter.

(b) For each condition of loading and operation, each cargo tank must be assumed to have its maximum free surface.

§172.090   Intact transverse stability.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each tank barge must be shown by design calculations to have a righting arm curve with the following characteristics:

(1) If the tank barge is in river service, the area under the righting arm curve must be at least 5 foot-degrees (1.52 meter-degrees) up to the smallest of the following angles:

(i) The angle of maximum righting arm.

(ii) The downflooding angle.

(2) If the tank barge is in lakes, bays and sounds or Great Lakes summer service, the area under the righting arm curve must be at least 10 foot-degrees (3.05 meter-degrees) up to the smallest of the following angles:

(i) The angle of maximum righting arm.

(ii) The downflooding angle.

(3) If the tank barge is in ocean or Great Lakes winter service, the area under the righting arm curve must be at least 15 foot-degrees (4.57 meter-degrees) up to the smallest of the following angles:

(i) The angle of maximum righting arm.

(ii) The downflooding angle.

(b) If the vertical center of gravity of the cargo is below the weather deck at the side of the tank barge amidships, it must be shown by design calculations that the barge has at least the following metacentric height (GM) in feet (meters) in each condition of loading and operation:

eCFR graphic ec01mr91.025.gif

View or download PDF

where—

K = 0.3 for river service.

K = 0.4 for lakes, bays and sounds and Great Lakes summer service.

K = 0.5 for ocean and Great Lakes winter service.

B = beam in feet (meters).

fe = effective freeboard in feet (meters).

(c) The effective freeboard is given by—

fe = f + fa ; or

fe = d, whichever is less.

where—

f = the freeboard to the deck edge amidships in feet (meters).

fa = (1.25)(a/L)((2b/B)-1)(h); or

fa = h, whichever is less.

where—

a = trunk length in feet (meters).

L = LOA in feet (meters)

b = breadth of a watertight trunk in feet (meters).

B = beam of the barge in feet (meters).

h = height of a watertight trunk in feet (meters).

d = draft of the barge in feet (meters).

(d) For the purpose of this section, downflooding angle means the static angle from the intersection of the vessel's centerline and waterline in calm water to the first opening that does not close watertight automatically.

§172.095   Intact longitudinal stability.

Each tank barge must be shown by design calculations to have a longitudinal metacentric height (GM) in feet (meters) in each condition of loading and operation, at least equal to the following:

eCFR graphic ec01mr91.026.gif

View or download PDF

where—

L = LOA in feet (meters)

d = draft in feet (meters).

§172.100   Watertight integrity.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each Type I or II hopper barge hull must have a weathertight weather deck.

(b) If a Type I or II barge hull has an open hopper, the fully loaded barge must be shown by design calculations to have at least 2 inches (50 mm) of positive GM when the hopper space is flooded to the height of the weather deck.

(c) When doing the calculations required by this section, credit may be given for the buoyancy of the immersed portion of cargo tanks if the tank securing devices are shown by design calculations to be strong enough to hold the tanks in place when they are subjected to the buoyant forces resulting from the water in the hopper.

§172.103   Damage stability.

Each tank barge must be shown by design calculations to meet the survival conditions in §172.110 assuming the damage specified in §172.104 to the hull type specified in Table 151.05 of part 151 of this chapter.

§172.104   Character of damage.

(a) Type I barge hull not in an integrated tow. If a Type I hull is required and the barge is not a box barge designed for use in an integrated tow, design calculations must show that the barge can survive damage at any location including the intersection of a transverse and a longitudinal bulkhead.

(b) Type I barge hull in an integrated tow. If a Type I barge hull is required and the barge is a box barge designed for operation in an integrated tow, design calculations must show that the barge can survive damage—

(1) At any location on the bottom of the tank barge except on a transverse watertight bulkhead; and

(2) At any location on the side of the tank barge including on a transverse watertight bulkhead.

(c) Type II barge hull. If a Type II hull is required, design calculations must show that a barge can survive damage at any location except on a transverse watertight bulkhead.

§172.105   Extent of damage.

For the purpose of §172.103, design calculations must include both side and bottom damage, applied separately. Damage must consist of the most disabling penetration up to and including penetrations having the following dimensions:

(a) Side damage must be assumed to be as follows:

(1) Longitudinal extent—6 feet (183 centimeters).

(2) Transverse extent—30 inches (76 centimeters).

(3) Vertical extent—from the baseline upward without limit.

(b) Bottom damage must be assumed to be 15 inches (38 centimeters) from the baseline upward.

§172.110   Survival conditions.

(a) Paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section apply to a hopper barge and paragraphs (e) through (i) apply to all other tank barges.

(b) A barge is presumed to survive assumed damage if it meets the following conditions in the final stage of flooding:

(c) A hopper barge must not heel or trim beyond the angle at which—

(1) The deck edge is first submerged; or

(2) If the barge has a coaming that is at least 36 inches (91.5 centimeters) in height, the intersection of the deck and the coaming is first submerged, except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section.

(d) A hopper barge must not heel beyond the angle at which the deck edge is first submerged by more than “fa” as defined in §172.090(c).

(e) Except as provided in paragraphs (h) and (i) of this section, each tank barge must not heel beyond the angle at which—

(1) The deck edge is first submerged; or

(2) If the barge has one or more watertight trunks, the deck edge is first submerged by more than “fa” as defined in §172.090(c).

(f) Except as provided in paragraphs (h) and (i) of this section, a tank barge must not trim beyond the angle at which—

(1) The deck edge is first submerged; or

(2) If the barge has one or more watertight trunks, the intersection of the deck and the trunk is first submerged.

(g) If a tank barge experiences simultaneous heel and trim, the trim requirements in paragraph (f) of this section apply only at the centerline.

(h) Except as provided in paragraph (i) of this section, in no case may any part of the actual cargo tank top be underwater in the final condition of equilibrium.

(i) If a barge has a “step-down” in hull depth on either or both ends and all cargo tank openings are located on the higher deck level, the deck edge and tank top in the stepped-down area may be submerged.

Need assistance?