e-CFR banner

Home
gpo.gov
govinfo.gov

e-CFR Navigation Aids

Browse

Simple Search

Advanced Search

 — Boolean

 — Proximity

 

Search History

Search Tips

Corrections

Latest Updates

User Info

FAQs

Agency List

Incorporation By Reference

eCFR logo

Related Resources

 

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR data is current as of December 5, 2019

Title 40Chapter ISubchapter CPart 82 → Subpart F


Title 40: Protection of Environment
PART 82—PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE


Subpart F—Recycling and Emissions Reduction


Contents
§82.150   Purpose and scope.
§82.152   Definitions.
§82.154   Prohibitions.
§82.155   Safe disposal of appliances.
§82.156   Proper evacuation of refrigerant from appliances.
§82.157   Appliance maintenance and leak repair.
§82.158   Standards for recovery and/or recycling equipment.
§82.160   Approved equipment testing organizations.
§82.161   Technician certification.
§82.162   [Reserved]
§82.164   Reclaimer certification.
§82.166   Reporting and recordkeeping requirements for leak repair.
§82.168   Incorporation by Reference.
§82.169   Suspension and revocation procedures.
Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 82—Specifications for Refrigerants
Appendix A1 to Subpart F of Part 82—Generic Maximum Contaminant Levels
Appendix B1 to Subpart F of Part 82—Performance of Refrigerant Recovery, Recycling and/or Reclaim Equipment
Appendix B2 to Subpart F of Part 82—Performance of Refrigerant Recovery, Recycling, and/or Reclaim Equipment
Appendix B3 to Subpart F of Part 82—Performance of Refrigerant Recovery, Recycling, and/or Reclaim Equipment
Appendix B4 to Subpart F of Part 82—Performance and Safety of Flammable Refrigerant Recovery and/or Recycling Equipment
Appendix C to Subpart F of Part 82—Method for Testing Recovery Devices for Use With Small Appliances
Appendix D to Subpart F of Part 82—Standards for Becoming a Certifying Program for Technicians
Appendix E to Subpart F of Part 82—Test Procedure for Leaks From Containers Holding Two Pounds or Less of Refrigerant for Use in an MVAC

Source: 58 FR 28712, May 14, 1993, unless otherwise noted.

§82.150   Purpose and scope.

(a) The purpose of this subpart is to reduce emissions of class I and class II refrigerants and their non-exempt substitutes to the lowest achievable level by maximizing the recapture and recycling of such refrigerants during the maintenance, service, repair, and disposal of appliances and restricting the sale of refrigerants consisting in whole or in part of a class I or class II ozone-depleting substance or their non-exempt substitutes in accordance with Title VI of the Clean Air Act.

(b) This subpart applies to any person maintaining, servicing, or repairing appliances containing class I, class II or non-exempt substitute refrigerants. This subpart also applies to persons disposing of such appliances (including small appliances and motor vehicle air conditioners), refrigerant reclaimers, technician certifying programs, appliance owners and operators, manufacturers of appliances, manufacturers of recovery and/or recycling equipment, approved recovery and/or recycling equipment testing organizations, and persons buying, selling, or offering to sell class I, class II, or non-exempt substitute refrigerants.

[81 FR 82349, Nov. 11, 2016}

§82.152   Definitions.

Appliance means any device which contains and uses a class I or class II substance or substitute as a refrigerant and which is used for household or commercial purposes, including any air conditioner, motor vehicle air conditioner, refrigerator, chiller, or freezer. For a system with multiple circuits, each independent circuit is considered a separate appliance.

Apprentice means any person who is currently registered as an apprentice in maintenance, service, repair, or disposal of appliances with the U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Apprenticeship (or a State Apprenticeship Council recognized by the Office of Apprenticeship). A person may only be an apprentice for two years from the date of first registering with that office.

Approved equipment testing organization means any organization which has applied for and received approval from the Administrator pursuant to §82.160.

Batch means a single bulk cylinder of refrigerant after all reclamation has been completed prior to packaging or shipping to the market.

Class I refers to an ozone-depleting substance that is listed in 40 CFR part 82 subpart A, appendix A.

Class II refers to an ozone-depleting substance that is listed in 40 CFR part 82 subpart A, appendix B.

Certified refrigerant recovery or recycling equipment means equipment manufactured before November 15, 1993, that meets the standards in §82.158(c), (e), or (g); equipment certified by an approved equipment testing organization to meet the standards in §82.158(b), (d), or (f); or equipment certified pursuant to §82.36(a).

Comfort cooling means the air-conditioning appliances used to provide cooling in order to control heat and/or humidity in occupied facilities including but not limited to residential, office, and commercial buildings. Comfort cooling appliances include but are not limited to chillers, commercial split systems, and packaged roof-top units.

Commercial refrigeration means the refrigeration appliances used in the retail food and cold storage warehouse sectors. Retail food appliances include the refrigeration equipment found in supermarkets, convenience stores, restaurants and other food service establishments. Cold storage includes the refrigeration equipment used to store meat, produce, dairy products, and other perishable goods.

Component means a part of the refrigerant circuit within an appliance including, but not limited to, compressors, condensers, evaporators, receivers, and all of its connections and subassemblies.

Custom-built means that the industrial process equipment or any of its components cannot be purchased and/or installed without being uniquely designed, fabricated and/or assembled to satisfy a specific set of industrial process conditions.

Disposal means the process leading to and including:

(1) The discharge, deposit, dumping or placing of any discarded appliance into or on any land or water;

(2) The disassembly of any appliance for discharge, deposit, dumping or placing of its discarded component parts into or on any land or water;

(3) The vandalism of any appliance such that the refrigerant is released into the environment or would be released into the environment if it had not been recovered prior to the destructive activity;

(4) The disassembly of any appliance for reuse of its component parts; or

(5) The recycling of any appliance for scrap.

Follow-up verification test means those tests that involve checking the repairs to an appliance after a successful initial verification test and after the appliance has returned to normal operating characteristics and conditions to verify that the repairs were successful. Potential methods for follow-up verification tests include, but are not limited to, the use of soap bubbles as appropriate, electronic or ultrasonic leak detectors, pressure or vacuum tests, fluorescent dye and black light, infrared or near infrared tests, and handheld gas detection devices.

Full charge means the amount of refrigerant required for normal operating characteristics and conditions of the appliance as determined by using one or a combination of the following four methods:

(1) Use of the equipment manufacturer's determination of the full charge;

(2) Use of appropriate calculations based on component sizes, density of refrigerant, volume of piping, and other relevant considerations;

(3) Use of actual measurements of the amount of refrigerant added to or evacuated from the appliance, including for seasonal variances; and/or

(4) Use of an established range based on the best available data regarding the normal operating characteristics and conditions for the appliance, where the midpoint of the range will serve as the full charge.

High-pressure appliance means an appliance that uses a refrigerant with a liquid phase saturation pressure between 170 psia and 355 psia at 104 °F. Examples include but are not limited to appliances using R-22, R-407A, R-407C, R-410A, and R-502.

Industrial process refrigeration means complex customized appliances that are directly linked to the processes used in, for example, the chemical, pharmaceutical, petrochemical, and manufacturing industries. This sector also includes industrial ice machines, appliances used directly in the generation of electricity, and ice rinks. Where one appliance is used for both industrial process refrigeration and other applications, it will be considered industrial process refrigeration equipment if 50 percent or more of its operating capacity is used for industrial process refrigeration.

Industrial process shutdown means when an industrial process or facility temporarily ceases to operate or manufacture whatever is being produced at that facility.

Initial verification test means those leak tests that are conducted after the repair is finished to verify that a leak or leaks have been repaired before refrigerant is added back to the appliance.

Leak inspection means the examination of an appliance to determine the location of refrigerant leaks. Potential methods include, but are not limited to, ultrasonic tests, gas-imaging cameras, bubble tests as appropriate, or the use of a leak detection device operated and maintained according to manufacturer guidelines. Methods that determine whether the appliance is leaking refrigerant but not the location of a leak, such as standing pressure/vacuum decay tests, sight glass checks, viewing receiver levels, pressure checks, and charging charts, must be used in conjunction with methods that can determine the location of a leak.

Leak rate means the rate at which an appliance is losing refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges. The leak rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the current rate of loss were to continue over that period. The rate must be calculated using one of the following methods. The same method must be used for all appliances subject to the leak repair requirements located at an operating facility.

(1) Annualizing Method. (i) Step 1. Take the number of pounds of refrigerant added to the appliance to return it to a full charge, whether in one addition or if multiple additions related to same leak, and divide it by the number of pounds of refrigerant the appliance normally contains at full charge;

(ii) Step 2. Take the shorter of the number of days that have passed since the last day refrigerant was added or 365 days and divide that number by 365 days;

(iii) Step 3. Take the number calculated in Step 1 and divide it by the number calculated in Step 2; and

(iv) Step 4. Multiply the number calculated in Step 3 by 100 to calculate a percentage. This method is summarized in the following formula:

eCFR graphic er18no16.074.gif

View or download PDF

(2) Rolling Average Method. (i) Step 1. Take the sum of the pounds of refrigerant added to the appliance over the previous 365-day period (or over the period that has passed since the last successful follow-up verification test showing all identified leaks in the appliance were repaired, if that period is less than one year);

(ii) Step 2. Divide the result of Step 1 by the pounds of refrigerant the appliance normally contains at full charge; and

(iii) Step 3. Multiply the result of Step 2 by 100 to obtain a percentage. This method is summarized in the following formula:

eCFR graphic er18no16.075.gif

View or download PDF

Low-loss fitting means any device that is intended to establish a connection between hoses, appliances, or recovery and/or recycling machines and that is designed to close automatically or to be closed manually when disconnected, minimizing the release of refrigerant from hoses, appliances, and recovery and/or recycling machines.

Low-pressure appliance means an appliance that uses a refrigerant with a liquid phase saturation pressure below 45 psia at 104 °F. Examples include but are not limited to appliances using R-11, R-123, R-113, and R-245fa.

Major maintenance, service, or repair means any maintenance, service, or repair that involves the removal of any or all of the following appliance components: compressor, condenser, evaporator, or auxiliary heat exchange coil; or any maintenance, service, or repair that involves uncovering an opening of more than four (4) square inches of “flow area” for more than 15 minutes.

Medium-pressure appliance means an appliance that uses a refrigerant with a liquid phase saturation pressure between 45 psia and 170 psia at 104 °F. Examples include but are not limited to appliances using R-114, R-124, R-12, R-134a, and R-500.

Mothball means to evacuate refrigerant from an appliance, or the affected isolated section or component of an appliance, to at least atmospheric pressure, and to temporarily shut down that appliance.

Motor vehicle air conditioner (MVAC) means any appliance that is a motor vehicle air conditioner as defined in 40 CFR part 82, subpart B.

MVAC-like appliance means a mechanical vapor compression, open-drive compressor appliance with a full charge of 20 pounds or less of refrigerant used to cool the driver's or passenger's compartment of off-road vehicles or equipment. This includes, but is not limited to, the air-conditioning equipment found on agricultural or construction vehicles. This definition is not intended to cover appliances using R-22 refrigerant.

Normal operating characteristics and conditions means appliance operating temperatures, pressures, fluid flows, speeds, and other characteristics, including full charge of the appliance, that would be expected for a given process load and ambient condition during normal operation. Normal operating characteristics and conditions are marked by the absence of atypical conditions affecting the operation of the appliance.

One-time expansion device means an appliance that relies on the release of its refrigerant charge to the environment in order to provide a cooling effect. These are typically single releases but could also include products that are designed to release refrigerant to the environment through multiple individual charges.

Opening an appliance means any maintenance, service, repair, or disposal of an appliance that would release any refrigerant in the appliance to the atmosphere. Connecting and disconnecting hoses and gauges to measure pressures, add refrigerant, or recover refrigerant from the appliance are not considered “opening an appliance.”

Parent company means an individual, corporation, partnership, association, joint-stock company, or an unincorporated organization that can direct or cause the direction of management and policies of another entity, through the ownership of shares or otherwise.

Person means any individual or legal entity, including an individual, corporation, partnership, association, state, municipality, political subdivision of a state, Indian tribe, and any agency, department, or instrumentality of the United States, and any officer, agent, or employee thereof.

Process stub means a length of tubing that provides access to the refrigerant inside a small appliance or room air conditioner and that can be resealed at the conclusion of repair or service.

Reclaim means to reprocess recovered refrigerant to all of the specifications in appendix A of this subpart (based on AHRI Standard 700-2016, Specifications for Refrigerants) that are applicable to that refrigerant and to verify that the refrigerant meets these specifications using the analytical methodology prescribed in section 5 of appendix A of this subpart.

Recover means to remove refrigerant in any condition from an appliance and to store it in an external container without necessarily testing or processing it in any way.

Recovery efficiency means the percentage of refrigerant in an appliance that is recovered by a piece of recovery and/or recycling equipment.

Recycle, when referring to refrigerant, means to extract refrigerant from an appliance (except MVACs) and clean it for reuse in equipment of the same owner without meeting all of the requirements for reclamation. In general, recycled refrigerant is cleaned using oil separation and single or multiple passes through devices, such as replaceable core filter-driers, which reduce moisture, acidity, and particulate matter.

Refrigerant means, for purposes of this subpart, any substance, including blends and mixtures, consisting in part or whole of a class I or class II ozone-depleting substance or substitute that is used for heat transfer purposes and provides a cooling effect.

Refrigerant circuit means the parts of an appliance that are normally connected to each other (or are separated only by internal valves) and are designed to contain refrigerant.

Retire, when referring to an appliance, means the removal of the refrigerant and the disassembly or impairment of the refrigerant circuit such that the appliance as a whole is rendered unusable by any person in the future.

Retrofit means to convert an appliance from one refrigerant to another refrigerant. Retrofitting includes the conversion of the appliance to achieve system compatibility with the new refrigerant and may include, but is not limited to, changes in lubricants, gaskets, filters, driers, valves, o-rings or appliance components.

Seasonal variance means the removal of refrigerant from an appliance due to a change in ambient conditions caused by a change in season, followed by the subsequent addition of an amount that is less than or equal to the amount of refrigerant removed in the prior change in season, where both the removal and addition of refrigerant occurs within one consecutive 12-month period.

Self-contained recovery equipment means refrigerant recovery and/or recycling equipment that is capable of removing the refrigerant from an appliance without the assistance of components contained in the appliance.

Self-sealing valve means a valve affixed to a container of refrigerant that automatically seals when not dispensing refrigerant and meets or exceeds established performance criteria as identified in §82.154(c)(2).

Small appliance means any appliance that is fully manufactured, charged, and hermetically sealed in a factory with five (5) pounds or less of refrigerant, including, but not limited to, refrigerators and freezers (designed for home, commercial, or consumer use), medical or industrial research refrigeration equipment, room air conditioners (including window air conditioners, portable air conditioners, and packaged terminal air heat pumps), dehumidifiers, under-the-counter ice makers, vending machines, and drinking water coolers.

Substitute means any chemical or product, whether existing or new, that is used as a refrigerant to replace a class I or II ozone-depleting substance. Examples include, but are not limited to hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluoroolefins, hydrofluoroethers, hydrocarbons, ammonia, carbon dioxide, and blends thereof. As used in this subpart, the term “exempt substitutes” refers to certain substitutes when used in certain end-uses that are specified in §82.154(a)(1) as exempt from the venting prohibition and the requirements of this subpart, and the term “non-exempt substitutes” refers to all other substitutes and end-uses not so specified in §82.154(a)(1).

System-dependent recovery equipment means refrigerant recovery equipment that requires the assistance of components contained in an appliance to remove the refrigerant from the appliance.

System receiver means the isolated portion of the appliance, or a specific vessel within the appliance, that is used to hold the refrigerant charge during the servicing or repair of that appliance.

Technician means any person who in the course of maintenance, service, or repair of an appliance (except MVACs) could be reasonably expected to violate the integrity of the refrigerant circuit and therefore release refrigerants into the environment. Technician also means any person who in the course of disposal of an appliance (except small appliances, MVACs, and MVAC-like appliances) could be reasonably expected to violate the integrity of the refrigerant circuit and therefore release refrigerants from the appliances into the environment. Activities reasonably expected to violate the integrity of the refrigerant circuit include but are not limited to: Attaching or detaching hoses and gauges to and from the appliance; adding or removing refrigerant; adding or removing components; and cutting the refrigerant line. Activities such as painting the appliance, rewiring an external electrical circuit, replacing insulation on a length of pipe, or tightening nuts and bolts are not reasonably expected to violate the integrity of the refrigerant circuit. Activities conducted on appliances that have been properly evacuated pursuant to §82.156 are not reasonably expected to release refrigerants unless the activity includes adding refrigerant to the appliance. Technicians could include but are not limited to installers, contractor employees, in-house service personnel, and owners and/or operators of appliances.

Very high-pressure appliance means an appliance that uses a refrigerant with a critical temperature below 104 °F or with a liquid phase saturation pressure above 355 psia at 104 °F. Examples include but are not limited to appliances using R-13, R-23, R-503, R-508A, and R-508B.

[58 FR 28712, May 14, 1993, as amended at 59 FR 42956, Aug. 19, 1994; 59 FR 55925, Nov. 9, 1994; 60 FR 40439, Aug. 8, 1995; 68 FR 43806, July 24, 2003; 69 FR 11978, Mar. 12, 2004; 70 FR 1991, Jan. 11, 2005; 70 FR 19278, Apr. 13, 2005; 81 FR 82349, Nov. 18, 2016]

§82.154   Prohibitions.

(a) Venting prohibition. (1) No person maintaining, servicing, repairing, or disposing of an appliance or industrial process refrigeration may knowingly vent or otherwise release into the environment any refrigerant from such appliances. Notwithstanding any other provision of this subpart, the following substitutes in the following end-uses are exempt from this prohibition and from the requirements of this subpart:

(i) Carbon dioxide in any application;

(ii) Nitrogen in any application;

(iii) Water in any application;

(iv) Ammonia in commercial or industrial process refrigeration or in absorption units;

(v) Chlorine in industrial process refrigeration (processing of chlorine and chlorine compounds);

(vi) Hydrocarbons in industrial process refrigeration (processing of hydrocarbons);

(vii) Ethane (R-170) in very low temperature refrigeration equipment and equipment for non-mechanical heat transfer;

(viii) Propane (R-290) in retail food refrigerators and freezers (stand-alone units only); household refrigerators, freezers, and combination refrigerators and freezers; self-contained room air conditioners for residential and light commercial air-conditioning and heat pumps; vending machines; and effective January 3, 2017, self-contained commercial ice machines, very low temperature refrigeration equipment, and water coolers;

(ix) Isobutane (R-600a) in retail food refrigerators and freezers (stand-alone units only); household refrigerators, freezers, and combination refrigerators and freezers; and vending machines;

(x) R-441A in retail food refrigerators and freezers (stand-alone units only); household refrigerators, freezers, and combination refrigerators and freezers; self-contained room air conditioners for residential and light commercial air-conditioning; heat pumps; and vending machines.

(2) De minimis releases associated with good faith attempts to recycle or recover refrigerants are not subject to this prohibition. Except for exempt substitutes, refrigerant releases are de minimis only if they occur when:

(i) The applicable practices in §82.155, §82.156, and §82.157 are observed, recovery and/or recycling machines that meet the requirements in §82.158 are used whenever refrigerant is removed from an appliance, the technician certification provisions in §82.161 are observed, and the reclamation requirements in §82.164 are observed; or

(ii) The requirements in subpart B of this part are observed.

(3) The knowing release of a class I or class II refrigerant or a non-exempt substitute refrigerant after its recovery from an appliance is a violation of the venting prohibition.

(b) No person may maintain, service, repair, or dispose of an appliance containing a class I or class II refrigerant or a non-exempt substitute refrigerant without:

(1) Observing the applicable practices in §82.155, §82.156, and §82.157; and

(2) Using recovery and/or recycling equipment that is certified for that type of refrigerant and appliance under §82.158.

(c) Sales Restriction. (1) No person may sell or distribute, or offer for sale or distribution, any substance that consists in whole or in part of a class I or class II substance or, starting on January 1, 2018, any non-exempt substitute for use as a refrigerant unless:

(i) The buyer has been certified as a Type I, Type II, Type III, or Universal technician under §82.161;

(ii) The buyer employs at least one technician who is certified as a Type I, Type II, Type III, or Universal technician under §82.161 and provides proof of such to the seller;

(iii) The buyer has been certified in accordance with 40 CFR part 82, subpart B and the refrigerant is acceptable for use in MVACs under 40 CFR part 82, subpart G;

(iv) The buyer employs at least one person who is certified under 40 CFR part 82, subpart B, and provides proof of such to the seller and the refrigerant is acceptable for use in MVACs under 40 CFR part 82, subpart G. Nothing in this provision relieves persons of the requirements of §82.34(b) or §82.42(b);

(v) The refrigerant is sold only for eventual resale to persons certified under §82.161 or 40 CFR part 82, subpart B or to appliance manufacturers (e.g., sold by a manufacturer to a wholesaler, sold by a technician to a reclaimer);

(vi) The refrigerant is sold to an appliance manufacturer;

(vii) The refrigerant is contained in an appliance with a fully assembled refrigerant circuit or an appliance component;

(viii) The refrigerant is charged into an appliance by a certified technician or an apprentice during maintenance, service, or repair of the appliance; or

(ix) The non-exempt substitute refrigerant is intended for use in an MVAC and is sold in a container designed to hold two pounds or less of refrigerant, has a unique fitting, and, if manufactured or imported on or after January 1, 2018, has a self-sealing valve that complies with the requirements of paragraph (c)(2) of this section.

(2) Self-sealing valve specifications. This provision applies starting January 1, 2018, for all containers holding two pounds or less of non-exempt substitute refrigerant for use in an MVAC that are manufactured or imported on or after that date.

(i) Each container holding two pounds or less of non-exempt substitute refrigerant for use in an MVAC must be equipped with a single self-sealing valve that automatically closes and seals when not dispensing refrigerant.

(ii) The leakage rate from each container must not exceed 3.00 grams per year when the self-sealing valve is closed. This leakage rate applies to new, full containers as well as containers that may be partially full.

(iii) The leakage rate must be determined using the standards described in appendix E (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

(iv) All testing to demonstrate compliance with this paragraph must be conducted by an independent test laboratory in the United States. For purposes of this requirement, an independent test laboratory is one that is not owned, operated, or affiliated with the applicant certifying equipment and/or products.

(3) Recordkeeping. (i) Persons who sell or distribute, or offer to sell or distribute, any class I or class II refrigerant, or, starting on January 1, 2018, any non-exempt substitute refrigerant must keep invoices that indicate the name of the purchaser, the date of sale, and the quantity of refrigerant purchased unless they are selling exempt substitutes (those substitutes used in the end-uses specified as exempt in paragraph (a)(1) of this section) or small cans of MVAC refrigerant in accordance with paragraph (c)(1)(ix) of this section. In instances where the buyer employs a person certified under §82.161 or 40 CFR part 82, subpart B, the seller must keep the documentation provided by the buyer to demonstrate such employment. All records must be kept for three years.

(ii) Electronic or paper copies of all records described in appendix E must be maintained by manufacturers of containers holding two pounds or less of non-exempt substitute refrigerant for use in an MVAC to verify self-sealing valves meet the requirements specified in paragraph (c)(2) of this section. All records must be kept for three years after each purchase.

(d) Sale of Used Refrigerant. No person may sell or distribute, or offer for sale or distribution, for use as a refrigerant any class I or class II substance or non-exempt substitute consisting wholly or in part of used refrigerant unless the refrigerant:

(1) Has been reclaimed by a person who has been certified as a reclaimer under §82.164;

(2) was used only in an MVAC or MVAC-like appliance and is to be used only in an MVAC or MVAC-like appliance and recycled in accordance with 40 CFR part 82, subpart B;

(3) is contained in an appliance that is sold or offered for sale together with a fully assembled refrigerant circuit;

(4) is being transferred between or among a parent company and one or more of its subsidiaries, or between or among subsidiaries having the same parent company; or

(5) is being transferred between or among a Federal agency or department and a facility or facilities owned by the same Federal agency or department.

(e) Manufacture and Sale of Appliances. (1) No person may sell or distribute, or offer for sale or distribution, any appliance (except small appliances and appliances containing only refrigerants that have been exempted under paragraph (a)(1) of this section) unless it is equipped with a servicing aperture to facilitate the removal of refrigerant at servicing and disposal.

(2) No person may sell or distribute, or offer for sale or distribution, any small appliance (except appliances containing only refrigerants that have been exempted under paragraph (a)(1) of this section) unless it is equipped with a process stub to facilitate the removal of refrigerant at servicing and disposal.

(f) One-time expansion devices. No person may manufacture or import a one-time expansion device unless the only refrigerants it contains have been exempted under paragraph (a)(1) of this section.

(g) Rules stayed for consideration. Notwithstanding any other provisions of this subpart, the effectiveness of 40 CFR 82.154(c), only as it applies to refrigerant contained in appliances without fully assembled refrigerant circuits, is stayed from April 27, 1995, until EPA takes final action on its reconsideration of these provisions. EPA will publish any such final action in the Federal Register.

[81 FR 82352, Nov. 18, 2016, as amended at 81 FR 86881, Dec. 1, 2016; 82 FR 61184, Dec. 27, 2017]

§82.155   Safe disposal of appliances.

Until January 1, 2018, this section applies only to disposal of appliances containing class I and class II refrigerants. Starting on January 1, 2018, this section applies to disposal of appliances containing any class I or class II refrigerant or any non-exempt substitute refrigerant.

(a) Persons recovering refrigerant from a small appliance, MVAC, or MVAC-like appliance for purposes of disposal of these appliances must evacuate refrigerant to the levels in §82.156(b) through (d) using recovery equipment that meets the standards in §82.158(e) through (g), or 40 CFR part 82 subpart B, as applicable.

(b) The final processor—i.e., persons who take the final step in the disposal process (including but not limited to scrap recyclers and landfill operators) of a small appliance, MVAC, or MVAC-like appliance—must either:

(1) Recover any remaining refrigerant from the appliance in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section; or

(2) Verify using a signed statement or a contract that all refrigerant that had not leaked previously has been recovered from the appliance or shipment of appliances in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section. If using a signed statement, it must include the name and address of the person who recovered the refrigerant and the date the refrigerant was recovered. If using a signed contract between the supplier and the final processor, it must either state that the supplier will recover any remaining refrigerant from the appliance or shipment of appliances in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section prior to delivery or verify that the refrigerant had been properly recovered prior to receipt by the supplier.

(i) It is a violation of this subpart to accept a signed statement or contract if the person receiving the statement or contract knew or had reason to know that the signed statement or contract is false.

(ii) The final processor must notify suppliers of appliances that refrigerant must be properly recovered in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section before delivery of the items to the facility. The form of this notification may be signs, letters to suppliers, or other equivalent means.

(iii) If all the refrigerant has leaked out of the appliance, the final processor must obtain a signed statement that all the refrigerant in the appliance had leaked out prior to delivery to the final processor and recovery is not possible. “Leaked out” in this context means those situations in which the refrigerant has escaped because of system failures, accidents, or other unavoidable occurrences not caused by a person's negligence or deliberate acts such as cutting refrigerant lines.

(c) Recordkeeping. The final processor of a small appliance, MVAC, or MVAC-like appliance must keep a copy of all the signed statements or contracts obtained under paragraph (b)(2) of this section on site, in hard copy or in electronic format, for three years.

{81 FR 82353, Nov. 18, 2016]

§82.156   Proper evacuation of refrigerant from appliances.

Until January 1, 2018, this section applies only to evacuation of refrigerant from appliances containing class I or class II refrigerants. Starting on January 1, 2018, this section applies to evacuation of refrigerant from appliances containing any class I or class II refrigerant or any non-exempt substitute refrigerant, excluding paragraph (i) of this section which applies only to appliances containing class I or class II refrigerants until January 1, 2019. Starting January 1, 2019, the provisions in §82.157 apply in lieu of paragraph (i) of this section.

(a) Appliances (except small appliances, MVACs, and MVAC-like appliances). Before opening appliances (except small appliances, MVACs, and MVAC-like appliances) or disposing of such appliances, technicians must evacuate the refrigerant, including all the liquid refrigerant, to the levels in Table 1 using a recovery and/or recycling machine certified pursuant to §82.158 unless the situations in paragraphs (a)(1) or (2) of this section apply. Technicians may evacuate either the entire appliance or the part to be serviced, if the refrigerant in the part can be isolated to a system receiver. A technician must verify that the applicable level of evacuation has been reached in the appliance or the part before it is opened.

(1) If evacuation of the appliance to the atmosphere is not to be performed after completion of the maintenance, service, or repair, and if the maintenance, service, or repair is not major as defined at §82.152, the appliance must:

(i) Be evacuated to a pressure no higher than 0 psig before it is opened if it is a medium-, high- or very high-pressure appliance;

(ii) Be pressurized to a pressure no higher than 0 psig before it is opened if it is a low-pressure appliance. Persons must cover openings when isolation is not possible. Persons pressurizing low-pressure appliances that use refrigerants with boiling points at or below 85 degrees Fahrenheit at 29.9 inches of mercury (standard atmospheric pressure), must not use methods such as nitrogen that require subsequent purging. Persons pressurizing low-pressure appliances that use refrigerants with boiling points above 85 degrees Fahrenheit at 29.9 inches of mercury, must use heat to raise the internal pressure of the appliance as much as possible, but may use nitrogen to raise the internal pressure of the appliance from the level attainable through use of heat to atmospheric pressure; or

(iii) For the purposes of oil changes, be evacuated or pressurized to a pressure no higher than 5 psig, before it is opened; or drain the oil into a system receiver to be evacuated or pressurized to a pressure no higher than 5 psig.

(2) If leaks in the appliance make evacuation to the levels in Table 1 unattainable or would substantially contaminate the refrigerant being recovered, persons opening or disposing of the appliance must:

(i) Isolate leaking from non-leaking components wherever possible;

(ii) Evacuate non-leaking components to be opened or disposed of to the levels specified in Table 1; and

(iii) Evacuate leaking components to be opened or disposed of to the lowest level that can be attained without substantially contaminating the refrigerant. This level may not exceed 0 psig.

(3) Recordkeeping. As of January 1, 2018, technicians evacuating refrigerant from appliances with a full charge of more than 5 and less than 50 pounds of refrigerant for purposes of disposal of that appliance must keep records documenting the following for three years:

(i) The company name, location of the appliance, date of recovery, and type of refrigerant recovered for each appliance;

(ii) The total quantity of refrigerant, by type, recovered from all disposed appliances in each calendar month; and

(iii) The quantity of refrigerant, by type, transferred for reclamation and/or destruction, the person to whom it was transferred, and the date of transfer.

Table 1—Required Levels of Evacuation for Appliances

[Except for small appliances, MVACs, and MVAC-like appliances]

Type of applianceInches of Hg vacuum
(relative to standard atmospheric pressure of 29.9 inches Hg)
Using recovery and/or recycling equipment manufactured or
imported before
November 15, 1993
Using recovery and/or recycling equipment manufactured or
imported on or after
November 15, 1993
Very high-pressure appliance00.
High-pressure appliance, or isolated component of such appliance, with a full charge of less than 200 pounds of refrigerant00.
High-pressure appliance, or isolated component of such appliance, with a full charge of 200 pounds or more of refrigerant410.
Medium-pressure appliance, or isolated component of such appliance, with a full charge of less than 200 pounds of refrigerant410.
Medium-pressure appliance, or isolated component of such appliance, with a full charge of 200 pounds or more of refrigerant415.
Low-pressure appliance25 mm Hg absolute25 mm Hg absolute.

(b) Small appliances. Before opening a small appliance or when disposing of a small appliance, persons must recover refrigerant, using a recovery and/or recycling machine certified pursuant to §82.158, according to the following conditions:

(1) When using recovery equipment manufactured before November 15, 1993, recover 80 percent of the refrigerant in the small appliance; or

(2) When using recovery equipment manufactured on or after November 15, 1993, recover 90 percent of the refrigerant in the appliance when the compressor in the appliance is functioning, or 80 percent of the refrigerant in the appliance when the compressor in the appliance is not functioning; or

(3) Evacuate the appliance to four inches of mercury vacuum.

(c) MVAC-like appliances. Persons may only open MVAC-like appliances while properly using, as defined at §82.32(e), recovery and/or recycling equipment certified pursuant to §82.158(f) or §82.36, as applicable. All persons recovering refrigerant from MVAC-like appliances for purposes of disposal of these appliances must evacuate the appliance in accordance with 40 CFR part 82, subpart B or reduce the system pressure to or below 102 mm of mercury vacuum.

(d) MVACs. All persons recovering refrigerant from MVACs for purposes of disposal of these appliances must evacuate the appliance in accordance with 40 CFR part 82, subpart B or reduce the system pressure to or below 102 mm of mercury vacuum.

(e) System-dependent equipment may not be used with appliances with a full charge of more than 15 pounds of refrigerant, unless the system-dependent equipment is permanently attached to the appliance as a pump-out unit.

(f) Persons who maintain, service, repair, or dispose of only appliances that they own and that contain pump-out units are exempt from the requirement to use certified, self-contained recovery and/or recycling equipment.

(g) All recovery and/or recycling equipment must be used in accordance with the manufacturer's directions unless such directions conflict with the requirements of this subpart.

(h) Refrigerant may be returned to the appliance from which it is recovered or to another appliance owned by the same person without being recycled or reclaimed, unless the appliance is an MVAC or MVAC-like appliance.

(i) The provisions in this paragraph (i) apply to owners and operators of appliances containing 50 or more pounds of class I and class II refrigerants only until January 1, 2019. The definitions in paragraph (j) of this section apply for purposes of this paragraph (i) in lieu of the definitions in §82.152.

(1) Owners or operators of commercial refrigeration equipment normally containing more than 50 pounds of refrigerant must have leaks repaired in accordance with paragraph (i)(9) of this section, if the appliance is leaking at a rate such that the loss of refrigerant will exceed 35 percent of the total charge during a 12-month period, except as described in paragraphs (i)(6), (i)(8), and (i)(10) of this section and paragraphs (i)(1)(i), (i)(1)(ii), and (i)(1)(iii) of this section. Repairs must bring the annual leak rate to below 35 percent.

(i) If the owners or operators of the federally-owned commercial refrigerant appliances determine that the leaks cannot be repaired in accordance with paragraph (i)(9) of this section and that an extension in accordance with the requirements discussed in this paragraph (i)(1)(i) of this section apply, they must document all repair efforts, and notify EPA of their inability to comply within the 30-day repair requirement, and the reason for the inability must be submitted to EPA in accordance with §82.166(n). Such notification must be made within 30 days of discovering the leaks. EPA will determine if the extension requested in accordance with the requirements discussed in paragraph (i)(1)(i) of this section is justified. If the extension is not justified, EPA will notify the owner/operator within 30 days of receipt of the notification.

(ii) Owners or operators of federally-owned commercial refrigeration equipment may have more than 30 days to repair leaks if the refrigeration appliance is located in an area subject to radiological contamination or where the shutting down of the appliance will directly lead to radiological contamination. Only the additional time needed to conduct and complete repairs in a safe working environment will be permitted.

(iii) Owners or operators of federally-owned commercial refrigeration equipment requesting or who are granted time extensions under this paragraph must comply with paragraphs (i)(3) and (i)(4) of this section.

(2) The owners or operators of industrial process refrigeration equipment normally containing more than 50 pounds of refrigerant must have leaks repaired if the appliance is leaking at a rate such that the loss of refrigerant will exceed 35 percent of the total charge during a 12-month period in accordance with paragraph (i)(9) of this section, except as described in paragraphs (i)(6), (i)(7) and (i)(10) of this section, and paragraphs (i)(2)(i) and (i)(2)(ii) of this section. Repairs must bring annual leak rates to below 35 percent during a 12-month period. If the owners or operators of the industrial process refrigeration equipment determine that the leak rate cannot be brought to below 35 percent during a 12-month period within 30 days (or 120 days, where an industrial process shutdown in accordance with paragraph (i)(2)(ii) of this section is required,) and in accordance with paragraph (i)(9) of this section, and that an extension in accordance with the requirements discussed in this paragraph apply, the owners or operators of the appliance must document all repair efforts, and notify EPA of the reason for the inability in accordance with §82.166(n) within 30 days of making this determination. Owners or operators who obtain an extension pursuant to this section or elect to utilize the additional time provided in paragraph (i)(2)(i) of this section, must conduct all necessary leak repairs, if any, that do not require any additional time beyond the initial 30 or 120 days.

(i) The owners or operators of industrial process refrigeration equipment are permitted more than 30 days (or 120 days where an industrial process shutdown in accordance with paragraph (i)(2)(ii) of this section is required) to repair leaks, if the necessary parts are unavailable or if requirements of other applicable federal, state, or local regulations make a repair within 30 or 120 days impossible. Only the additional time needed to receive delivery of the necessary parts or to comply with the pertinent regulations will be permitted.

(ii) Owners or operators of industrial process refrigeration equipment will have a 120-day repair period, rather than a 30-day repair period, to repair leaks in instances where an industrial process shutdown is needed to repair a leak or leaks from industrial process refrigeration equipment.

(3) Owners or operators of industrial process refrigeration equipment and owners or operators of federally-owned commercial refrigeration equipment or of federally-owned comfort cooling appliances who are granted additional time under paragraphs (i)(1) or (i)(5) of this section, must have repairs performed in a manner that sound professional judgment indicates will bring the leak rate below the applicable allowable leak rate. When an industrial process shutdown has occurred or when repairs have been made while an appliance is mothballed, the owners or operators shall conduct an initial verification test at the conclusion of the repairs and a follow-up verification test. The follow-up verification test shall be conducted within 30 days of completing the repairs or within 30 days of bringing the appliance back on-line, if taken off-line, but no sooner than when the appliance has achieved normal operating characteristics and conditions. When repairs have been conducted without an industrial process shutdown or system mothballing, an initial verification test shall be conducted at the conclusion of the repairs, and a follow-up verification test shall be conducted within 30 days of the initial verification test. In all cases, the follow-up verification test shall be conducted at normal operating characteristics and conditions, unless sound professional judgment indicates that tests performed at normal operating characteristics and conditions will produce less reliable results, in which case the follow-up verification test shall be conducted at or near the normal operating pressure where practicable, and at or near the normal operating temperature where practicable.

(i) If the owners or operators of industrial process refrigeration equipment takes the appliance off-line, or if the owners or operators of federally-owned commercial refrigeration or of federally-owned comfort cooling appliances who are granted additional time under paragraphs (i)(1) or (i)(5) of this section take the appliance off-line, they cannot bring the appliance back on-line until an initial verification test indicates that the repairs undertaken in accordance with paragraphs (i)(1)(i), (ii), (iii), or (i)(2)(i) and (ii), or (5)(i), (ii), and (iii) of this section have been successfully completed, demonstrating the leak or leaks are repaired. The owners or operators of the industrial process refrigeration equipment, federally-owned commercial refrigeration appliances, or federally-owned comfort cooling appliances are exempted from this requirement only where the owners or operators will retrofit or retire the industrial process refrigeration equipment, federally-owned commercial refrigeration appliance, or federally-owned comfort cooling appliance in accordance with paragraph (i)(6) of this section. Under this exemption, the owner or operators may bring the industrial process refrigeration equipment, federally-owned commercial refrigeration appliance, or federally-owned comfort cooling appliance back on-line without successful completion of an initial verification test.

(ii) If the follow-up verification test indicates that the repairs to industrial process refrigeration equipment, federally-owned commercial refrigeration equipment, or federally-owned comfort cooling appliances have not been successful, the owner or operator must retrofit or retire the equipment in accordance with paragraph (i)(6) and any such longer time period as may apply under paragraphs (i)(7)(i), (ii) and (iii) or (i)(8)(i) and (ii) of this section. The owners and operators of the industrial process refrigeration equipment, federally-owned commercial refrigeration equipment, or federally-owned comfort cooling appliances are relieved of this requirement if the conditions of paragraphs (i)(3)(iv) and/or (i)(3)(v) of this section are met.

(iii) The owner or operator of industrial process refrigeration equipment that fails a follow-up verification test must notify EPA within 30 days of the failed follow-up verification test in accordance with §82.166(n).

(iv) The owner or operator is relieved of the obligation to retrofit or replace the industrial process refrigeration equipment as discussed in paragraph (i)(6) of this section if second repair efforts to fix the same leaks that were the subject of the first repair efforts are successfully completed within 30 days or 120 days where an industrial process shutdown is required, after the initial failed follow-up verification test. The second repair efforts are subject to the same verification requirements of paragraphs (i)(3), (i)(3) (i) and (ii) of this section. The owner or operator is required to notify EPA within 30 days of the successful follow-up verification test in accordance with §82.166(n) and the owner or operator is no longer subject to the obligation to retrofit or replace the appliance that arose as a consequence of the initial failure to verify that the leak repair efforts were successful.

(v) The owner or operator of industrial process refrigeration equipment is relieved of the obligation to retrofit or replace the equipment in accordance with paragraph (i)(6) of this section if within 180 days of the initial failed follow-up verification test, the owner or operator establishes that the appliance's annual leak rate does not exceed the applicable allowable annual leak rate, in accordance with paragraph (i)(4) of this section. If the appliance's owner or operator establishes that the appliance's annual leak rate does not exceed the applicable allowable annual leak rate, the owner or operator is required to notify EPA within 30 days of that determination in accordance with §82.166(n) and the owner or operator would no longer be subject to the obligation to retrofit or replace the equipment that arose as a consequence of the initial failure to verify that the leak repair efforts were successful.

(4) In the case of a failed follow-up verification test subject to paragraph (i)(3)(v) of this section, the determination of whether industrial process refrigeration equipment has an annual leak rate that exceeds the applicable allowable annual leak rate will be made in accordance with parameters identified by the owner or operator in its notice to EPA regarding the failure of the initial follow-up verification test, if those parameters are acceptable to EPA; otherwise by parameters selected by EPA. The determination must be based on the full charge for the affected industrial process refrigeration equipment. The leak rate determination parameters in the owner's or operator's notice will be considered acceptable unless EPA notifies the owners or operators within 30 days of receipt of the notice. Where EPA does not accept the parameters identified by the owner or operator in its notice, EPA will not provide additional time beyond the additional time permitted in paragraph (i)(3)(v) of this section unless specifically stated in the parameters selected by EPA.

(5) Owners or operators of comfort cooling appliances normally containing more than 50 pounds of refrigerant and not covered by paragraph (i)(1) or (i)(2) of this section must have leaks repaired in accordance with paragraph (i)(9) of this section if the appliance is leaking at a rate such that the loss of refrigerant will exceed 15 percent of the total charge during a 12-month period, except as described in paragraphs (i)(6), (i)(8) and (i)(10) of this section and paragraphs (i)(5)(i), (i)(5)(ii) and (i)(5)(iii) of this section. Repairs must bring the annual leak rate to below 15 percent.

(i) If the owners or operators of federally-owned comfort-cooling appliances determine that the leaks cannot be repaired in accordance with paragraph (i)(9) of this section and that an extension in accordance with the requirements discussed in paragraph (i)(5) of this section apply, they must document all repair efforts, and notify EPA of their inability to comply within the 30-day repair requirement, and the reason for the inability must be submitted to EPA in accordance with §82.166(n). Such notification must be made within 30 days of discovering that leak repair efforts cannot be completed within 30 days.

(ii) Owners or operators of federally-owned comfort-cooling appliances may have more than 30 days to repair leaks where the refrigeration appliance is located in an area subject to radiological contamination or where the shutting down of the appliance will directly lead to radiological contamination. Only the additional time needed to conduct and complete work in a safe environment will be permitted.

(iii) Owners or operators of federally-owned comfort-cooling appliances requesting, or who are granted, time extensions under this paragraph must comply with paragraphs (i)(3) and (i)(4) of this section.

(6) Owners or operators are not required to repair leaks as provided in paragraphs (i)(1), (i)(2), and (i)(5) of this section if, within 30 days of discovering a leak greater than the applicable allowable leak rate, or within 30 days of a failed follow-up verification test, or after making good faith efforts to repair the leaks as described in paragraph (i)(6)(i) of this section, they develop a one-year retrofit or retirement plan for the leaking appliance. Owners or operators who decide to retrofit the appliance must use a refrigerant or substitute with a lower or equivalent ozone-depleting potential than the previous refrigerant and must include such a change in the retrofit plan. Owners or operators who retire and replace the appliance must replace the appliance with an appliance that uses a refrigerant or substitute with a lower or equivalent ozone-depleting potential and must include such a change in the retirement plan. The retrofit or retirement plan (or a legible copy) must be kept at the site of the appliance. The original plan must be made available for EPA inspection upon request. The plan must be dated, and all work performed in accordance with the plan must be completed within one year of the plan's date, except as described in paragraphs (i)(6)(i), (i)(7), and (i)(8) of this section. Owners or operators are temporarily relieved of this obligation if the appliance has undergone system mothballing as defined in §82.152.

(i) If the owner or operator has made good faith efforts to repair leaks from the appliance in accordance with paragraphs (i)(1), (i)(2), or (i)(5) of this section and has decided prior to completing a follow-up verification test, to retrofit or retire the appliance in accordance with paragraph (i)(6) of this section, the owner or operator must develop a retrofit or retirement plan within 30 days of the decision to retrofit or retire the appliance. The owner or operator must complete the retrofit or retirement of the appliance within one year and 30 days of when the owner or operator discovered that the leak rate exceeded the applicable allowable leak rate, except as provided in paragraphs (i)(7) and (i)(8) of this section.

(ii) In all cases, subject to paragraph (i)(6)(i) of this section, the written plan shall be prepared no later than 30 days after the owner or operator has determined to proceed with retrofitting or retiring the appliance. All reports required under §82.166(o) shall be due at the time specified in the paragraph imposing the specific reporting requirement, or no later than 30 days after the decision to retrofit or retire the appliance, whichever is later.

(iii) In cases where the owner or operator of industrial process refrigeration equipment has made good faith efforts to retrofit or retire industrial process refrigeration equipment prior to August 8, 1995, and where these efforts are not complete, the owner or operator must develop a retrofit or retirement plan that will complete the retrofit or retirement of the affected appliance by August 8, 1996. This plan (or a legible copy) must be kept at the site of the appliance. The original must be made available for EPA inspection upon request. Where the conditions of paragraphs (i)(7) and (i)(8) of this section apply, and where the length of time necessary to complete the work is beyond August 8, 1996, all records must be submitted to EPA in accordance with §82.166(o), as well as maintained on-site.

(7) The owners or operators of industrial process refrigeration equipment will be allowed additional time to complete the retrofit or retirement of industrial process refrigeration equipment if the conditions described in paragraphs (i)(7)(i) or (i)(7)(ii) of this section are met. The owners or operators of industrial process refrigeration equipment will be allowed additional time beyond the additional time provided in paragraph (i)(7)(ii) of this section if the conditions described in paragraph (i)(7)(iii) of this section are met.

(i) Additional time, to the extent reasonably necessary will be allowed for retrofitting or retiring industrial process refrigeration equipment due to delays occasioned by the requirements of other applicable federal, state, or local laws or regulations, or due to the unavailability of a suitable replacement refrigerant with a lower ozone depletion potential. If these circumstances apply, the owner or operator of the facility must notify EPA within six months after the 30-day period following the discovery of an exceedance of the 35 percent leak rate. Records necessary to allow EPA to determine that these provisions apply and the length of time necessary to complete the work must be submitted to EPA in accordance with §82.166(o), as well as maintained on-site. EPA will notify the owner or operator of its determination within 60 days of receipt the submittal.

(ii) An additional one-year period beyond the initial one-year retrofit period is allowed for industrial process refrigeration equipment where the following criteria are met:

(A) The new or the retrofitted industrial process refrigerant equipment is custom-built;

(B) The supplier of the appliance or one or more of its critical components has quoted a delivery time of more than 30 weeks from when the order is placed;

(C) The owner or operator notifies EPA within six months of the expiration of the 30-day period following the discovery of an exceedance of the 35 percent leak rate to identify the owner or operator, describe the appliance involved, explain why more than one year is needed, and demonstrate that the first two criteria are met in accordance with §82.166(o); and

(D) The owner or operator maintains records that are adequate to allow a determination that the criteria are met.

(iii) The owners or operators of industrial process refrigeration equipment may request additional time to complete retrofitting or retiring industrial process refrigeration equipment beyond the additional one-year period if needed and where the initial additional one year was granted in accordance with paragraph (i)(7)(ii) of this section. The request shall be submitted to EPA before the end of the ninth month of the first additional year and shall include revisions of information required under §82.166(o). Unless EPA objects to this request submitted in accordance with §82.166(o) within 30 days of receipt, it shall be deemed approved.

(8) Owners or operators of federally-owned commercial or comfort-cooling appliances will be allowed an additional year to complete the retrofit or retirement of the appliances if the conditions described in paragraph (i)(8)(i) of this section are met, and will be allowed one year beyond the additional year if the conditions in paragraph (i)(8)(ii) of this section are met.

(i) Up to one additional one-year period beyond the initial one-year retrofit period is allowed for such equipment where the following criteria are met:

(A) Due to complications presented by the federal agency appropriations and/or procurement process, a delivery time of more than 30 weeks from the beginning of the official procurement process is quoted, or where the appliance is located in an area subject to radiological contamination and creating a safe working environment will require more than 30 weeks;

(B) The operator notifies EPA within six months of the expiration of the 30-day period following the discovery of an exceedance of the applicable allowable annual leak rate to identify the operator, describe the appliance involved, explain why more than one year is needed, and demonstrate that the first criterion is met in accordance with §82.166(o); and

(C) The operator maintains records adequate to allow a determination that the criteria are met.

(ii) The owners or operators of federally-owned commercial or comfort-cooling appliances may request additional time to complete retrofitting, replacement or retiring such appliances beyond the additional one-year period if needed and where the initial additional one year was granted in accordance with paragraph (i)(8)(i) of this section. The request shall be submitted to EPA before the end of the ninth month of the first additional year and shall include revisions of information earlier submitted as required under §82.166(o). Unless EPA objects to this request submitted in accordance with §82.166(o) within 30 days of receipt, it shall be deemed approved.

(9) Owners or operators must repair leaks pursuant to paragraphs (i)(1), (i)(2) and (i)(5) of this section within 30 days after discovery, or within 30 days after when the leaks should have been discovered if the owners intentionally shielded themselves from information which would have revealed a leak, unless granted additional time pursuant to §82.156(i).

(10) The amount of time for owners and operators to complete repairs, retrofit plans or retrofits/replacements/ retirements under paragraphs (i)(1), (i)(2), (i)(5), (i)(6), (i)(7), (i)(8), and (i)(9) of this section is temporarily suspended at the time an appliance is mothballed as defined in §82.152. The time for owners and operators to complete repairs, retrofit plans, or retrofits/replacements will resume on the day the appliance is brought back on-line and is no longer considered mothballed. All initial and follow-up verification tests must be performed in accordance with paragraphs (i)(3), (i)(3)(i), and (i)(3)(ii) of this section.

(11) In calculating annual leak rates, purged refrigerant that is destroyed at a verifiable destruction efficiency of 98 percent or greater will not be counted toward the leak rate. Owners or operators destroying purged refrigerants must maintain information as set forth in §82.166(p)(1) and submit to EPA, within 60 days after the first time such exclusion is used by that facility, information set forth in §82.166(p)(2).

(j) Definitions for the leak repair provisions in 82.156(i). These definitions are not applicable to any other portion of subpart F other than 82.156(i). Along with paragraph (i) of this section, the definitions in this section apply only until January 1, 2019.

Appliance means, for the purposes of paragraph (i) of this section, any device which contains and uses a refrigerant and which is used for household or commercial purposes, including any air conditioner, refrigerator, chiller, or freezer.

Commercial refrigeration means, for the purposes of paragraph (i) of this section, the refrigeration appliances utilized in the retail food and cold storage warehouse sectors. Retail food includes the refrigeration equipment found in supermarkets, convenience stores, restaurants and other food service establishments. Cold storage includes the equipment used to store meat, produce, dairy products, and other perishable goods. All of the equipment contains large refrigerant charges, typically over 75 pounds.

Critical component means, for the purposes of paragraph (i) of this section, a component without which industrial process refrigeration equipment will not function, will be unsafe in its intended environment, and/or will be subject to failures that would cause the industrial process served by the refrigeration appliance to be unsafe.

Custom-built means, for the purposes of paragraph (i) of this section, that the equipment or any of its critical components cannot be purchased and/or installed without being uniquely designed, fabricated and/or assembled to satisfy a specific set of industrial process conditions.

Follow-up verification test means, for the purposes of paragraph (i) of this section, those tests that involve checking the repairs within 30 days of the appliance's returning to normal operating characteristics and conditions. Follow-up verification tests for appliances from which the refrigerant charge has been evacuated means a test conducted after the appliance or portion of the appliance has resumed operation at normal operating characteristics and conditions of temperature and pressure, except in cases where sound professional judgment dictates that these tests will be more meaningful if performed prior to the return to normal operating characteristics and conditions. A follow-up verification test with respect to repairs conducted without evacuation of the refrigerant charge means a reverification test conducted after the initial verification test and usually within 30 days of normal operating conditions. Where an appliance is not evacuated, it is only necessary to conclude any required changes in pressure, temperature or other conditions to return the appliance to normal operating characteristics and conditions.

Full charge means, for the purposes of paragraph (i) of this section, the amount of refrigerant required for normal operating characteristics and conditions of the appliance as determined by using one or a combination of the following four methods:

(i) Use the equipment manufacturer's determination of the correct full charge for the equipment;

(ii) Determine the full charge by making appropriate calculations based on component sizes, density of refrigerant, volume of piping, and other relevant considerations;

(iii) Use actual measurements of the amount of refrigerant added or evacuated from the appliance; and/or

(iv) Use an established range based on the best available data regarding the normal operating characteristics and conditions for the appliance, where the midpoint of the range will serve as the full charge, and where records are maintained in accordance with §82.166(q).

Industrial process refrigeration means, for the purposes of paragraph (i) of this section, complex customized appliances used in the chemical, pharmaceutical, petrochemical and manufacturing industries. These appliances are directly linked to the industrial process. This sector also includes industrial ice machines, appliances used directly in the generation of electricity, and ice rinks. Where one appliance is used for both industrial process refrigeration and other applications, it will be considered industrial process refrigeration equipment if 50 percent or more of its operating capacity is used for industrial process refrigeration.

Industrial process shutdown means, for the purposes of paragraph (i) of this section, that an industrial process or facility temporarily ceases to operate or manufacture whatever is being produced at that facility.

Initial verification test means, for the purposes of paragraph (i) of this section, those leak tests that are conducted as soon as practicable after the repair is completed. An initial verification test, with regard to the leak repairs that require the evacuation of the appliance or portion of the appliance, means a test conducted prior to the replacement of the full refrigerant charge and before the appliance or portion of the appliance has reached operation at normal operating characteristics and conditions of temperature and pressure. An initial verification test with regard to repairs conducted without the evacuation of the refrigerant charge means a test conducted as soon as practicable after the conclusion of the repair work.

Leak rate means, for the purposes of paragraph (i) of this section, the rate at which an appliance is losing refrigerant, measured between refrigerant charges. The leak rate is expressed in terms of the percentage of the appliance's full charge that would be lost over a 12-month period if the current rate of loss were to continue over that period. The rate is calculated using only one of the following methods for all appliances located at an operating facility.

(i) Method 1. (A) Step 1. Take the number of pounds of refrigerant added to the appliance to return it to a full charge and divide it by the number of pounds of refrigerant the appliance normally contains at full charge;

(B) Step 2. Take the shorter of the number of days that have passed since the last day refrigerant was added or 365 days and divide that number by 365 days;

(C) Step 3. Take the number calculated in Step 1. and divide it by the number calculated in Step 2.; and

(D) Step 4. Multiply the number calculated in Step 3. by 100 to calculate a percentage. This method is summarized in the following formula:

eCFR graphic er18no16.076.gif

View or download PDF

(ii) Method 2. (A) Step 1. Take the sum of the quantity of refrigerant added to the appliance over the previous 365-day period (or over the period that has passed since leaks in the appliance were last repaired, if that period is less than one year),

(B) Step 2. Divide the result of Step 1. by the quantity (e.g., pounds) of refrigerant the appliance normally contains at full charge, and

(C) Step 3. Multiply the result of Step 2. by 100 to obtain a percentage. This method is summarized in the following formula:

eCFR graphic er18no16.077.gif

View or download PDF

Normal operating characteristics or conditions means, for the purposes of paragraph (i) of this section, temperatures, pressures, fluid flows, speeds and other characteristics that would normally be expected for a given process load and ambient condition during operation. Normal operating characteristics and conditions are marked by the absence of atypical conditions affecting the operation of the refrigeration appliance.

Normally containing a quantity of refrigerant means, for the purposes of paragraph (i) of this section, containing the quantity of refrigerant within the appliance or appliance component when the appliance is operating with a full charge of refrigerant.

Refrigerant means, for the purposes of paragraph (i) of this section, any substance consisting in part or whole of a class I or class II ozone-depleting substance that is used for heat transfer purposes and provides a cooling effect.

Substitute means, for the purposes of paragraph (i) of this section, any chemical or product, whether existing or new, that is used by any person as an EPA approved replacement for a class I or II ozone-depleting substance in a given refrigeration or air-conditioning end-use.

Suitable replacement refrigerant means, for the purposes of paragraph (i) of this section, a refrigerant that is acceptable under section 612(c) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and all regulations promulgated under that section, compatible with other materials with which it may come into contact, and able to achieve the temperatures required for the affected industrial process in a technically feasible manner.

System mothballing means, for the purposes of paragraph (i) of this section, the intentional shutting down of a refrigeration appliance undertaken for an extended period of time by the owners or operators of that facility, where the refrigerant has been evacuated from the appliance or the affected isolated section of the appliance, at least to atmospheric pressure.

[58 FR 28712, May 14, 1993, as amended at 59 FR 42956, 42962, Aug. 19, 1994; 59 FR 55926, Nov. 9, 1994; 60 FR 40440, Aug. 8, 1995; 68 FR 43807, July 24, 2003; 69 FR 11979, Mar. 12, 2004; 70 FR 1991, Jan. 11, 2005; 79 FR 29690, May 23, 2014; 8a FR 82354, Nov. 18, 2016]

§82.157   Appliance maintenance and leak repair.

(a) Applicability. This section applies as of January 1, 2019. This section applies only to appliances with a full charge of 50 or more pounds of any class I or class II refrigerant or any non-exempt substitute refrigerant. Unless otherwise specified, the requirements of this section apply to the owner or operator of the appliance.

(b) Leak Rate Calculation. Persons adding or removing refrigerant from an appliance must, upon conclusion of that service, provide the owner or operator with documentation that meets the applicable requirements of paragraph (l)(2) of this section. The owner or operator must calculate the leak rate every time refrigerant is added to an appliance unless the addition is made immediately following a retrofit, installation of a new appliance, or qualifies as a seasonal variance.

(c) Requirement to Address Leaks through Appliance Repair, or Retrofitting or Retiring an Appliance. (1) Owners or operators must repair appliances with a leak rate over the applicable leak rate in this paragraph in accordance with paragraphs (d) through (f) of this section unless the owner or operator elects to retrofit or retire the appliance in compliance with paragraphs (h) and (i) of this section. If the owner or operator elects to repair leaks, but fails to bring the leak rate below the applicable leak rate, the owner or operator must create and implement a retrofit or retirement plan in accordance with paragraphs (h) and (i) of this section.

(2) Leak Rates:

(i) 20 percent leak rate for commercial refrigeration equipment;

(ii) 30 percent leak rate for industrial process refrigeration equipment; and

(iii) 10 percent leak rate for comfort cooling appliances or other appliances with a full charge of 50 or more pounds of refrigerant not covered by (c)(2)(i) or (ii) of this section.

(d) Appliance Repair. Owners or operators must identify and repair leaks in accordance with this paragraph within 30 days (or 120 days if an industrial process shutdown is required) of when refrigerant is added to an appliance exceeding the applicable leak rate in paragraph (c) of this section.

(1) A certified technician must conduct a leak inspection, as described in paragraph (g) of this section, to identify the location of leaks.

(2) Leaks must be repaired such that the leak rate is brought below the applicable leak rate. This must be confirmed by the leak rate calculation performed upon the next refrigerant addition. The leaks will be presumed to be repaired if there is no further refrigerant addition for 12 months after the repair or if the leak inspections required under paragraph (g) do not find any leaks in the appliance. Repair of leaks must be documented by both an initial and a follow-up verification test or tests.

(3) The time frames in paragraphs (d) through(f) of this section are temporarily suspended when an appliance is mothballed. The time will resume on the day additional refrigerant is added to the appliance (or component of an appliance if the leaking component was isolated).

(e) Verification tests. The owner or operator must conduct both initial and follow-up verification tests on each leak that was repaired under paragraph (d) of this section.

(1) Initial verification test. Unless granted additional time, an initial verification test must be performed within 30 days (or 120 days if an industrial process shutdown is required) of an appliance exceeding the applicable leak rate in paragraph (c) of this section. An initial verification test must demonstrate that leaks where a repair attempt was made are repaired.

(i) For repairs that can be completed without the need to open or evacuate the appliance, the test must be performed after the conclusion of the repair work and before any additional refrigerant is added to the appliance.

(ii) For repairs that require the evacuation of the appliance or portion of the appliance, the test must be performed before adding any refrigerant to the appliance.

(iii) If the initial verification test indicates that the repairs have not been successful, the owner or operator may conduct as many additional repairs and initial verification tests as needed within the applicable time period.

(2) Follow-up verification test. A follow-up verification test must be performed within 10 days of the successful initial verification test or 10 days of the appliance reaching normal operating characteristics and conditions (if the appliance or isolated component was evacuated for the repair(s)). Where it is unsafe to be present or otherwise impossible to conduct a follow-up verification test when the system is operating at normal operating characteristics and conditions, the verification test must, where practicable, be conducted prior to the system returning to normal operating characteristics and conditions.

(i) A follow-up verification test must demonstrate that leaks where a repair attempt was made are repaired. If the follow-up verification test indicates that the repairs have not been successful, the owner or operator may conduct as many additional repairs and verification tests as needed to bring the appliance below the leak rate within the applicable time period and to verify the repairs.

(f) Extensions to the appliance repair deadlines. Owners or operators are permitted more than 30 days (or 120 days if an industrial process shutdown is required) to comply with paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section if they meet the requirements of (f)(1) through (4) of this section or the appliance is mothballed. The request will be considered approved unless EPA notifies the owners or operators otherwise.

(1) One or more of the following conditions must apply:

(i) The appliance is located in an area subject to radiological contamination or shutting down the appliance will directly lead to radiological contamination. Additional time is permitted to the extent needed to conduct and finish repairs in a safe working environment.

(ii) Requirements of other applicable Federal, state, or local regulations make a repair within 30 days (or 120 days if an industrial process shutdown is required) impossible. Additional time is permitted to the extent needed to comply with the pertinent regulations.

(iii) Components that must be replaced as part of the repair are not available within 30 days (or 120 days if an industrial process shutdown is required). Additional time is permitted up to 30 days after receiving delivery of the necessary components, not to exceed 180 days (or 270 days if an industrial process shutdown is required) from the date the appliance exceeded the applicable leak rate.

(2) Repairs to leaks that the technician has identified as significantly contributing to the exceedance of the leak rate and that do not require additional time must be completed and verified within the initial 30 day repair period (or 120 day repair period if an industrial process shutdown is required);

(3) The owner or operator must document all repair efforts and the reason for the inability to make the repair within the initial 30 day repair period (or 120 day repair period if an industrial process shutdown is required); and

(4) The owner or operator must request an extension from EPA at the address specified in paragraph (m) of this section within 30 days (or 120 days if an industrial process shutdown is required) of the appliance exceeding the applicable leak rate in paragraph (c) of this section. Extension requests must include: Identification and address of the facility; the name of the owner or operator of the appliance; the leak rate; the method used to determine the leak rate and full charge; the date the appliance exceeded the applicable leak rate; the location of leak(s) to the extent determined to date; any repair work that has been performed thus far, including the date that work was completed; the reasons why more than 30 days (or 120 days if an industrial process shutdown is required) are needed to complete the repair; and an estimate of when the work will be completed. If the estimated completion date is to be extended, a new estimated date of completion and documentation of the reason for that change must be submitted to EPA within 30 days of identifying that the completion date must be extended. The owner or operator must keep a dated copy of this submission.

(g) Leak Inspections. (1) The owner or operator must conduct a leak inspection in accordance with the following schedule on any appliance exceeding the applicable leak rate in paragraph (c)(2) of this section.

(i) For commercial refrigeration and industrial process refrigeration appliances with a full charge of 500 or more pounds, leak inspections must be conducted once every three months until the owner or operator can demonstrate through the leak rate calculations required under paragraph (b) of this section that the appliance has not leaked in excess of the applicable leak rate for four quarters in a row.

(ii) For commercial refrigeration and industrial process refrigeration appliances with a full charge of 50 or more pounds but less than 500 pounds, leak inspections must be conducted once per calendar year until the owner or operator can demonstrate through the leak rate calculations required under paragraph (b) of this section that the appliance has not leaked in excess of the applicable leak rate for one year.

(iii) For comfort cooling appliances and other appliances not covered by paragraphs (g)(1)(i) and (ii) of this section, leak inspections must be conducted once per calendar year until the owner or operator can demonstrate through the leak rate calculations required under paragraph (b) of this section that the appliance has not leaked in excess of the applicable leak rate for one year.

(2) Leak inspections must be conducted by a certified technician using method(s) determined by the technician to be appropriate for that appliance.

(3) All visible and accessible components of an appliance must be inspected, with the following exceptions:

(i) Where components are insulated, under ice that forms on the outside of equipment, underground, behind walls, or are otherwise inaccessible;

(ii) Where personnel must be elevated more than two meters above a support surface; or

(iii) Where components are unsafe to inspect, as determined by site personnel.

(4) Quarterly or annual leak inspections are not required on appliances, or portions of appliances, continuously monitored by an automatic leak detection system that is audited or calibrated annually. An automatic leak detection system may directly detect refrigerant in air, monitor its surrounding in a manner other than detecting refrigerant concentrations in air, or monitor conditions of the appliance.

(i) For systems that directly detect the presence of a refrigerant in air, the system must:

(A) Only be used to monitor components located inside an enclosed building or structure;

(B) Have sensors or intakes placed so that they will continuously monitor the refrigerant concentrations in air in proximity to the compressor, evaporator, condenser, and other areas with a high potential for a refrigerant leak;

(C) Accurately detect a concentration level of 10 parts per million of vapor of the specific refrigerant or refrigerants used in the refrigeration appliance(s); and

(D) Alert the owner or operator when a refrigerant concentration of 100 parts per million of vapor of the specific refrigerant or refrigerants used in the refrigeration appliance(s) is reached.

(ii) For a system that monitors its surrounding in a manner other than detecting refrigerant concentrations in air or monitor conditions of the appliance, the system must automatically alert the owner or operator when measurements indicate a loss of 50 pounds of refrigerant or 10 percent of the full charge, whichever is less.

(iii) When automatic leak detection equipment is only being used to monitor portions of an appliance, the remainder of the appliance continues to be subject to any applicable leak inspection requirements.

(h) Retrofit or retirement plans. (1) The owner or operator must create a retrofit or retirement plan within 30 days of:

(i) an appliance leaking above the applicable leak rate in paragraph (c) of this section if the owner or operator intends to retrofit or retire rather than repair the leak;

(ii) an appliance leaking above the applicable leak rate in paragraph (c) of this section if the owner or operator fails to take any action to identify or repair the leak; or

(iii) an appliance continues to leak above the applicable leak rate after having conducted the required repairs and verification tests under paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section.

(2) A retrofit or retirement plan must, at a minimum, contain the following information:

(i) Identification and location of the appliance;

(ii) Type and full charge of the refrigerant used in the appliance;

(iii) Type and full charge of the refrigerant to which the appliance will be converted, if retrofitted;

(iv) Itemized procedure for converting the appliance to a different refrigerant, including changes required for compatibility with the new substitute, if retrofitted;

(v) Plan for the disposition of recovered refrigerant;

(vi) Plan for the disposition of the appliance, if retired; and

(vii) A schedule, not to exceed one-year, for completion of the appliance retrofit or retirement.

(3) The retrofit or retirement plan must be signed by an authorized company official, dated, accessible at the site of the appliance in paper copy or electronic format, and available for EPA inspection upon request.

(4) All identified leaks must be repaired as part of any retrofit under such a plan.

(5)(i) Unless granted additional time, all work performed in accordance with the plan must be finished within one year of the plan's date (not to exceed 13 months from when the plan was required in paragraph (h)(1) of this section).

(ii) The owner or operator may request that EPA relieve it of the obligation to retrofit or retire an appliance if the owner or operator can establish within 180 days of the plan's date that the appliance no longer exceeds the applicable leak rate and if the owner or operator agrees in writing to repair all identified leaks within one year of the plan's date consistent with paragraph (h)(4) and (h)(5)(i) of this section. The owner or operator must submit to EPA the retrofit or retirement plan as well as the following information: The date that the requirement to develop a retrofit or retirement plan was triggered; the leak rate; the method used to determine the leak rate and full charge; the location of the leak(s) identified in the leak inspection; a description of repair work that has been completed; a description of repair work that has not been completed; a description of why the repair was not conducted within the time frames required under paragraphs (d) and (f) of this section; and a statement signed by an authorized official that all identified leaks will be repaired and an estimate of when those repairs will be completed (not to exceed one year from date of the plan). The request will be considered approved unless EPA notifies the owners or operators within 60 days of receipt of the request that it is not approved.

(i) Extensions to the one-year retrofit or retirement schedule. Owners or operators may request more than one year to comply with paragraph (h) of this section if they meet the requirements of this paragraph. The request will be considered approved unless EPA notifies the owners or operators within 60 days of receipt of the request that it is not approved. The request must be submitted to EPA at the address specified in §82.157(m) within seven months of discovering the appliance exceeded the applicable leak rate. The request must include the identification of the appliance; name of the owner or operator; the leak rate; the method used to determine the leak rate and full charge; the date the appliance exceeded the applicable leak rate; the location of leaks(s) to the extent determined to date; any repair work that has been finished thus far, including the date that work was finished; a plan to finish the retrofit or retirement of the appliance; the reasons why more than one year is necessary to retrofit or retire the appliance; the date of notification to EPA; and an estimate of when retrofit or retirement work will be finished. A dated copy of the request must be available on-site in either electronic or paper copy. If the estimated completion date is to be revised, a new estimated date of completion and documentation of the reason for that change must be submitted to EPA at the address specified in §82.157(m) within 30 days. Additionally, the time frames in paragraphs (h) and (i) of this section are temporarily suspended when an appliance is mothballed. The time will resume running on the day additional refrigerant is added to the appliance (or component of an appliance if the leaking component was isolated).

(1) Extensions available to any appliance. Owners or operators of commercial refrigeration, industrial process refrigeration, comfort-cooling, or other equipment are automatically allowed 18 months to retire an appliance if the replacement appliance uses a substitute refrigerant exempted under §82.154(a).

(2) Extensions available to industrial process refrigeration. Owners or operators of industrial process refrigeration equipment may request additional time beyond the one-year period in paragraph (h) of this section to finish the retrofit or retirement under the following circumstances.

(i) Requirements of other applicable Federal, state, or local regulations make a retrofit or retirement within one year impossible. Additional time is permitted to the extent needed to comply with the pertinent regulations;

(ii) The new or the retrofitted equipment is custom-built as defined in this subpart and the supplier of the appliance or one of its components has quoted a delivery time of more than 30 weeks from when the order is placed. The appliance or appliance components must be installed within 120 days after receiving delivery of the necessary parts; or

(iii) After receiving an extension under paragraph (i)(2)(ii) of this section, owners or operators may request additional time if necessary to finish the retrofit or retirement of equipment. The request must be submitted to EPA before the end of the ninth month of the initial extension and must include the same information submitted for that extension, with any necessary revisions. A dated copy of the request must be available on-site in either electronic or paper copy. The request will be considered approved unless EPA notifies the owners or operators within 60 days of receipt of the request that it is not approved.

(3) Extensions available to Federally owned equipment. Owners or operators of federally owned commercial or comfort-cooling equipment may request an additional year beyond the one-year period in paragraph (h) of this section to finish the retrofit or retirement under the following circumstances:

(i) A delivery time of more than 30 weeks from the beginning of the official procurement process is quoted due to complications presented by the Federal agency appropriations and/or procurement process;

(ii) The appliance is located in an area subject to radiological contamination and creating a safe working environment will require more than 30 weeks; or

(iii) After receiving a one-year extension under paragraphs (i)(3)(i) or (ii) of this section, additional time may be requested if necessary to finish the retrofit or retirement of equipment. The request must be submitted to EPA before the end of the ninth month of the one-year extension and must include the same information submitted for that one-year extension, with any necessary revisions. A dated copy of the request must be available on-site in either electronic or paper copy. The request will be considered approved unless EPA notifies the owners or operators within 60 days of receipt of the request that it is not approved.

(j) Chronically leaking appliances. Owners or operators of appliances containing 50 pounds or more of refrigerant that leak 125 percent or more of the full charge in a calendar year must submit a report to EPA at the address in paragraph (m) of this section. This report must be submitted by March 1 of the subsequent year and describe efforts to identify leaks and repair the appliance.

(k) Purged refrigerant. In calculating annual leak rates, purged refrigerant that is destroyed at a verifiable destruction efficiency of 98 percent or greater will not be counted toward the leak rate.

(l) Recordkeeping. All records identified in this paragraph must be kept for at least three years in electronic or paper format, unless otherwise specified.

(1) Owners or operators must determine the full charge of all appliances with 50 or more pounds of refrigerant and maintain the following information for each appliance until three years after the appliance is retired:

(i) The identification of the owner or operator of the appliance;

(ii) The address where the appliance is located;

(iii) The full charge of the appliance and the method for how the full charge was determined;

(iv) If using method 4 (using an established range) for determining full charge, records must include the range for the full charge of the appliance, its midpoint, and how the range was determined;

(v) Any revisions of the full charge, how they were determined, and the dates such revisions occurred.

(2) Owners or operators must maintain a record including the following information for each time an appliance with a full charge of 50 or more pounds is maintained, serviced, repaired, or disposed of, when applicable. If the maintenance, service, repair, or disposal is done by someone other than the owner or operator, that person must provide a record containing the following information, with the exception of (l)(2)(vii) and (viii) of this section, to the owner or operator:

(i) The identity and location of the appliance;

(ii) The date of the maintenance, service, repair, or disposal performed;

(iii) The part(s) of the appliance being maintained, serviced, repaired, or disposed;

(iv) The type of maintenance, service, repair, or disposal performed for each part;

(v) The name of the person performing the maintenance, service, repair, or disposal;

(vi) The amount and type of refrigerant added to, or in the case of disposal removed from, the appliance;

(vii) The full charge of the appliance; and

(viii) The leak rate and the method used to determine the leak rate (not applicable when disposing of the appliance, following a retrofit, installing a new appliance, or if the refrigerant addition qualifies as a seasonal variance).

(3) Owners or operators must keep records of leak inspections that include the date of inspection, the method(s) used to conduct the leak inspection, a list of the location of each leak that was identified, and a certification that all visible and accessible parts of the appliance were inspected. Technicians conducting leak inspections must, upon conclusion of that service, provide the owner or operator of the appliance with documentation that meets these requirements.

(4) If using an automatic leak detection system, the owner or operator must maintain records regarding the installation and the annual audit and calibration of the system, a record of each date the monitoring system identified a leak, and the location of the leak.

(5) Owners or operators must maintain records of the dates and results of all initial and follow-up verification tests. Records must include the location of the appliance, the date(s) of the verification tests, the location(s) of all repaired leaks that were tested, the type(s) of verification test(s) used, and the results of those tests. Technicians conducting initial or follow-up verification tests must, upon conclusion of that service, provide the owner or operator of the appliance with documentation that meets these requirements.

(6) Owners or operators must maintain retrofit or retirement plans developed in accordance with paragraph (h) of this section.

(7) Owners or operators must maintain retrofit and/or extension requests submitted to EPA in accordance with paragraph (i) of this section.

(8) Owners or operators that suspend the deadlines in this section by mothballing an appliance must keep records documenting when the appliance was mothballed and when additional refrigerant was added to the appliance (or isolated component).

(9) Owners or operators who exclude purged refrigerants that are destroyed from annual leak rate calculations must maintain records to support the amount of refrigerant claimed as sent for destruction. Records must be based on a monitoring strategy that provides reliable data to demonstrate that the amount of refrigerant claimed to have been destroyed is not greater than the amount of refrigerant actually purged and destroyed and that the 98 percent or greater destruction efficiency is met. Records must include flow rate, quantity or concentration of the refrigerant in the vent stream, and periods of purge flow. Records must include:

(i) The identification of the facility and a contact person, including the address and telephone number;

(ii) A description of the appliance, focusing on aspects relevant to the purging of refrigerant and subsequent destruction;

(iii) A description of the methods used to determine the quantity of refrigerant sent for destruction and type of records that are being kept by the owners or operators where the appliance is located;

(iv) The frequency of monitoring and data-recording; and

(v) A description of the control device, and its destruction efficiency.

(10) Owners or operators that exclude additions of refrigerant due to seasonal variance from their leak rate calculation must maintain records stating that they are using the seasonal variance flexibility and documenting the amount added and removed under §82.157(l)(2).

(11) Owners or operators that submit reports to EPA in accordance with paragraph (m) of this section must maintain copies of the submitted reports and any responses from EPA.

(m) Reporting. All notifications must be submitted electronically to 608reports@epa.gov unless the notification contains confidential business information. If the notification contains confidential business information, the information should be submitted to: Section 608 Program Manager; Stratospheric Protection Division; Mail Code: 6205T; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20460.

(1) Owners or operators must notify EPA at this address in accordance with paragraph (f) of this section when seeking an extension of time to complete repairs.

(2) Owners or operators must notify EPA at this address in accordance with paragraph (h)(5)(ii) of this section when seeking relief from the obligation to retrofit or retire an appliance.

(3) Owners or operators must notify EPA at this address in accordance with paragraph (i) of this section when seeking an extension of time to complete the retrofit or retirement of an appliance.

(4) Owners or operators must notify EPA at this address in accordance with paragraph (j) of this section for any appliance that leaks 125 percent or more of the full charge in a calendar year.

(5) When excluding purged refrigerants that are destroyed from annual leak rate calculations, owners or operators must notify EPA at this address within 60 days after the first time the exclusion is used by the facility where the appliance is located. The report must include the information included in paragraph (l)(9) of this section.

[81 FR 82356, Nov. 18, 2016]

§82.158   Standards for recovery and/or recycling equipment.

Starting January 1, 2017, this section applies to recovery and/or recycling equipment for use during the maintenance, service, repair, or disposal of appliances containing any class I or class II refrigerant or any non-exempt substitute refrigerant.

(a) No person may manufacture or import recovery and/or recycling equipment for use during the maintenance, service, repair, or disposal of appliances unless the equipment is certified in accordance with this section.

(b) No person may alter the design of certified refrigerant recovery and/or recycling equipment in a way that would affect the equipment's ability to meet the certification standards in this section without resubmitting the altered design for certification testing. Until it is tested and shown to meet the certification standards in this section, equipment so altered will be considered uncertified.

(c) Recovery and/or recycling equipment manufactured or imported before November 15, 1993, intended for use during the maintenance, service, repair, or disposal of appliances (except small appliances, MVACs, and MVAC-like appliances) will be considered certified if it is capable of achieving the level of evacuation specified in Table 2 of this section when tested using a properly calibrated pressure gauge.

(d) Manufacturers and importers of recovery and/or recycling equipment must have such equipment certified by an approved equipment testing organization as follows:

(1) Recovery and/or recycling equipment manufactured or imported on or after November 15, 1993, and before September 22, 2003, intended for use during the maintenance, service, repair, or disposal of appliances (except small appliances, MVACs, and MVAC-like appliances) must be certified by an approved equipment testing organization as being capable of achieving the level of evacuation specified in Table 2 of this section under the conditions of appendix B1 of this subpart (based upon the ARI Standard 740-1993, Performance of Refrigerant Recovery, Recycling and/or Reclaim Equipment).

(2) Recovery and/or recycling equipment manufactured or imported on or after September 22, 2003, and before January 1, 2017, intended for use during the maintenance, service, repair, or disposal of appliances (except small appliances, MVACs, and MVAC-like appliances) must be certified by an approved equipment testing organization as being capable of achieving the level of evacuation specified in Table 2 of this section under the conditions of appendix B2 of this subpart (based upon the ARI Standard 740-1995, Performance of Refrigerant Recovery, Recycling and/or Reclaim Equipment).

(3) Recovery and/or recycling equipment manufactured or imported on or after January 1, 2017, intended for use during the maintenance, service, repair, or disposal of appliances (except small appliances, MVACs, and MVAC-like appliances) must be certified by an approved equipment testing organization as being capable of achieving the level of evacuation specified in Table 2 of this section under the conditions of appendix B3 (for non-flammable refrigerants) based upon AHRI Standard 740-2016 or appendix B4 (for flammable refrigerants) of this subpart.

Table 2—Levels of Evacuation Which Must Be Achieved by Recovery and/or Recycling Equipment

[Except for small appliances, MVACs, and MVAC-like appliances.]

Type of appliance with which recovery and/or recycling machine is intended to be usedInches of Hg vacuum
(relative to standard atmospheric pressure of 29.9 inches Hg)
Manufactured or
imported before
November 15, 1993
Manufactured or
imported on or after
November 15, 1993
HCFC-22 appliances, or isolated component of such appliances, with a full charge of less than 200 pounds of refrigerant00.
HCFC-22 appliances, or isolated component of such appliances, with a full charge of 200 pounds or more of refrigerant410.
Very high-pressure appliances00.
Other high-pressure appliances, or isolated component of such appliances, with a full charge of less than 200 pounds of refrigerant410.
Other high-pressure appliances, or isolated component of such appliances, with a full charge of 200 pounds or more of refrigerant415.
Medium-pressure appliances, or isolated component of such appliances, with a full charge of less than 200 pounds of refrigerant410.
Medium-pressure appliances, or isolated component of such appliances, with a full charge of 200 pounds or more of refrigerant415.
Low-pressure appliances25 mm Hg absolute25 mm Hg absolute.

(4) Recovery and/or recycling equipment whose recovery efficiency cannot be tested according to the procedures in appendix B1, B2, B3, or B4 of this subpart as applicable may be certified if an approved third-party testing organization adopts and performs a test that demonstrates, to the satisfaction of the Administrator, that the recovery efficiency of that equipment is equal to or better than that of equipment that:

(i) Is intended for use with the same type of appliance; and

(ii) Achieves the level of evacuation in Table 2. The manufacturer's instructions must specify how to achieve the required recovery efficiency, and the equipment must be tested when used according to these instructions.

(5) The equipment must meet the minimum requirements for certification under appendix B1, B2, B3, or B4 of this subpart as applicable.

(6) If the equipment is equipped with a noncondensables purge device, the equipment must not release more than 3 percent of the quantity of refrigerant being recycled through noncondensables purging under the conditions of appendix B1, B2, B3, or B4 of this subpart as applicable.

(7) The equipment must be equipped with low-loss fittings on all hoses.

(8) The equipment must have its liquid recovery rate and its vapor recovery rate measured under the conditions of appendix B1, B2, B3, or B4 as applicable, unless the equipment has no inherent liquid or vapor recovery rate.

(e) Small Appliances. Equipment used during the maintenance, service, repair, or disposal of small appliances must be certified by an approved equipment testing organization to be capable of recovering 90 percent of the refrigerant in the test stand when the compressor of the test stand is operational and 80 percent of the refrigerant when the compressor of the test stand is not operational, when used in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions under the conditions of appendix C, Method for Testing Recovery Devices for Use with Small Appliances.

(1) Equipment manufactured or imported before November 15, 1993, will be considered certified if it is capable of either recovering 80 percent of the refrigerant in the system, whether or not the compressor of the test stand is operational, or achieving a four-inch vacuum when tested using a properly calibrated pressure gauge.

(2) Equipment manufactured or imported on or after November 15, 1993, may also be certified if it is capable of achieving a four-inch vacuum under the conditions of appendix B1 of this subpart, based upon ARI Standard 740-1993.

(3) Equipment manufactured or imported on or after September 22, 2003, and before January 1, 2017, may also be certified if it is capable of achieving a four-inch vacuum under the conditions of appendix B2 of this subpart, based upon ARI Standard 740-1995.

(4) Equipment manufactured or imported on or after January 1, 2017, may also be certified if it is capable of achieving a four-inch vacuum under the conditions of appendix B3 of this subpart (for non-flammable refrigerants), based upon AHRI Standard 740-2016 or appendix B4 of this subpart (for flammable refrigerants), based upon both AHRI Standard 740-2016 and UL 1963, Supplement SB, Requirements for Refrigerant Recovery/Recycling Equipment Intended for Use with a Flammable Refrigerant, Fourth Edition, June 1, 2011.

(5) Equipment used to evacuate any class I or class II refrigerant or any non-exempt substitute refrigerant from small appliances before they are disposed of may also be certified if it is capable of achieving a four-inch vacuum when tested using a properly calibrated pressure gauge.

(f) MVAC-like appliances. (1) Manufacturers and importers of recovery and/or recycling equipment intended for use during the maintenance, service, repair, or disposal of MVAC-like appliances must certify such equipment in accordance with subpart B of this part.

(2) Equipment manufactured or imported before November 15, 1993, intended for use during the maintenance, service, or repair of MVAC-like appliances must be capable of reducing the system pressure to 102 mm of mercury vacuum under the conditions of appendix A of subpart B of this part.

(g) MVACs. Manufacturers and importers of recovery and/or recycling equipment intended for use during the maintenance, service, repair, or disposal of MVACs must certify such equipment in accordance with subpart B of this part.

(h) Labeling. (1) Manufacturers and importers of equipment certified under paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section must place a label on each piece of equipment stating the following:

THIS EQUIPMENT HAS BEEN CERTIFIED BY [APPROVED EQUIPMENT TESTING ORGANIZATION] TO MEET EPA's MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR RECYCLING OR RECOVERY EQUIPMENT INTENDED FOR USE WITH [APPROPRIATE CATEGORY OF APPLIANCE].

(2) The label must also show the date of manufacture and the serial number (if applicable) of the equipment. The label must be affixed in a readily visible or accessible location, be made of a material expected to last the lifetime of the equipment, present required information in a way that it is likely to remain legible for the lifetime of the equipment, and be affixed in such a way that it cannot be removed from the equipment without damage to the label.

(i) Retesting. At least once every three years, manufacturers or importers of certified recovery and/or recycling equipment intended for use during the maintenance, service, or repair of appliances (except MVACs or MVAC-like appliances) or during the disposal of appliances (except small appliances, MVACs, and MVAC-like appliances) must have approved equipment testing organizations conduct either:

(1) Retests of certified recovery and/or recycling equipment in accordance with paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section; or

(2) Inspections of recovery and/or recycling equipment at manufacturing facilities to ensure that each equipment model line that has been certified under this section continues to meet the certification criteria.

(j) Revocation. An equipment model line that has been certified under this section may have its certification revoked if it is subsequently determined to fail to meet the certification criteria. In such cases, the Administrator must give notice to the manufacturer or importer setting forth the basis for the determination.

(k) Equipment that is advertised or marketed as “recycling equipment” must be capable of recycling the standard contaminated refrigerant sample of appendix B2, B3, or B4 of this subpart (as applicable) to the levels in the following table when tested under the conditions of appendix B2, B3 or B4 of this subpart:

Maximum Levels of Contaminants Permissible in Refrigerant Processed Through Equipment Advertised as “Recycling” Equipment

ContaminantsLow-pressure (R-11, R-123, R-113) systemsR-12 systemsAll other systems
Acid Content (by wt.)1.0 PPM1.0 PPM1.0 PPM.
Moisture (by wt.)20 PPM10 PPM20 PPM.
Noncondensable Gas (by vol.)N/A2.0%2.0%.
High Boiling Residues (by vol.)1.0%0.02%0.02%.
Chlorides by Silver Nitrate TestNo turbidityNo turbidityNo turbidity.
ParticulatesVisually cleanVisually cleanVisually clean.

[81 FR 82360, Nov. 18, 2016]

§82.160   Approved equipment testing organizations.

(a) Any equipment testing organization may apply for approval by the Administrator to certify equipment under the standards in §82.158 and appendices B2, B3, B4, or C of this subpart. Applications must be sent to 608reports@epa.gov, or if containing confidential business information, mailed to: Section 608 Program Manager, Stratospheric Protection Division, Mail Code: 6205T, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20460.

(b) Applications for approval must include:

(1) A list of equipment present at the organization that will be used for equipment testing.

(2) Verification of the organization's expertise in equipment testing and the technical experience of the organization's personnel.

(3) Verification of the organization's knowledge of the standards and recordkeeping and reporting requirements of this subpart.

(4) A description of the organization's program for verifying the performance of certified recovery and/or recycling equipment manufactured over the long term, specifying whether retests of equipment or inspections of equipment at manufacturing facilities will be used.

(5) Verification that the organization has no conflict of interest and receives no direct or indirect financial benefit from the outcome of certification testing.

(6) Agreement to allow the Administrator access to records and personnel to verify the information contained in the application.

(c) Organizations may not certify equipment before receiving approval from EPA. If approval is denied under this section, the Administrator must give written notice to the organization setting forth the basis for the determination.

(d) If an approved testing organization conducts certification tests in a way not consistent with the representations made in its application or with the provisions of this subpart, the Administrator may revoke approval in accordance with §82.169. In such cases, the Administrator must give notice to the organization setting forth the basis for the determination.

(e) Recordkeeping and reporting. (1) Approved equipment testing organizations must maintain records of equipment testing and performance and a list of equipment that meets EPA requirements. This list must include the name of the manufacturer and the name and/or serial number of the model line. Approved equipment testing organizations must publish online a list of all certified equipment that includes the information specified above and update the list annually.

(2) Approved equipment testing organizations must notify EPA at 608reports@epa.gov if retests of equipment or inspections of manufacturing facilities conducted under to §82.158(i) show that a previously certified model line fails to meet EPA requirements. Such notification must be received within thirty days of the retest or inspection.

(3) All records must be maintained for three years after the equipment is no longer offered for sale. Online lists must contain certified equipment until three years after that equipment is no longer offered for sale.

[81 FR 82362, Nov. 18, 2016]

§82.161   Technician certification.

Until January 1, 2018, this section applies only to technicians and organizations certifying technicians that maintain, service, or repair appliances containing class I or class II refrigerants. Starting on January 1, 2018, this section applies to technicians and organizations certifying technicians that maintain, service, or repair appliances containing any class I or class II refrigerant or any non-exempt substitute refrigerant.

(a) Certification Requirements. (1) Any person who could be reasonably expected to violate the integrity of the refrigerant circuit during the maintenance, service, repair, or disposal of appliances (as follows in this paragraph) containing a class I or class II refrigerant or a non-exempt substitute refrigerant must pass a certification exam offered by an approved technician certification program.

(i) Persons who maintain, service, or repair small appliances must be certified as Type I technicians.

(ii) Persons who maintain, service, repair, or dispose of medium-, high-, or very high-pressure appliances (except small appliances, MVACs, and MVAC-like appliances) must be certified as Type II technicians.

(iii) Persons who maintain, service, repair, or dispose of low-pressure appliances must be certified as Type III technicians.

(iv) Persons who maintain, service, repair, or dispose of all appliances described in paragraph (a)(1)(i) through (iii) of this section must be certified as Universal technicians.

(v) Technicians who maintain, service, or repair MVAC-like appliances must either be certified as Type II technicians or be certified in accordance with 40 CFR part 82, subpart B.

(vi) Persons who maintain, service, or repair MVAC appliances for consideration must be certified in accordance with 40 CFR part 82, subpart B.

(vii) Persons who dispose of small appliances, MVACs, and MVAC-like appliances are not required to be certified.

(2) Apprentices are exempt from the requirement in paragraph (a)(1) of this section provided the apprentice is closely and continually supervised by a certified technician while performing any maintenance, service, repair, or disposal that could reasonably be expected to release refrigerant from an appliance into the environment, except those substitute refrigerants exempted under paragraph (a)(1) of this section. The supervising certified technician and the apprentice have the responsibility to ensure that the apprentice complies with this subpart.

(3) The Administrator may require technicians to demonstrate at their place of business their ability to perform proper procedures for recovering and/or recycling refrigerant, except those substitute refrigerants exempted under paragraph (a)(1) of this section. Failure to demonstrate or failure to properly use the equipment may result in revocation or suspension of the certificate. Failure to abide by any of the provisions of this subpart may also result in revocation or suspension of the certificate. If a technician's certificate is revoked, the technician would need to recertify before maintaining, servicing, repairing, or disposing of any appliances.

(4) (i) Technicians certified under this section must keep a copy of their certificate at their place of business.

(ii) Technicians must maintain a copy of their certificate until three years after no longer operating as a technician.

(5) Recertification. The Administrator reserves the right to specify a requirement for technician recertification at some future date, if necessary, by placing a notice in the Federal Register.

(b) Requirements for Technician Certification Programs. (1) No technician training or testing program may issue certificates under this section unless the program complies with all the standards of this section and appendix D, and has been granted approval by the Administrator.

(2) Program Approval. Persons may seek approval of any technician certification program (program), in accordance with this paragraph, by submitting to the Administrator at the address in §82.160(a) verification that the program meets all the standards listed in appendix D of this subpart. The Administrator reserves the right to consider other relevant factors to ensure the effectiveness of certification programs. If approval is denied under this section, the Administrator must give written notice to the program setting forth the basis for the determination.

(3) Alternative Examinations. Programs are encouraged to make provisions for non-English speaking technicians by providing tests in other languages or allowing the use of a translator when taking the test. A test may be administered orally to any person who makes this request, in writing, to the program at least 30 days before the scheduled date for the examination. The written request must explain why the request is being made.

(4) Proof of Certification. Programs certifying technicians must provide technicians with identification cards in accordance with section (f) of appendix D of this subpart.

(5) Programs certifying technicians must maintain records in accordance with section (g) of appendix D of this subpart.

(6) Starting January 1, 2018, programs certifying technicians, excluding Federally-run programs, must publish online a list of all technicians they have certified on or after January 1, 2017. Certifying organizations must update these lists at least annually.

(i) The list must include the first name, middle initial, and last name of the certified technician, the technician's city of residence when taking the test, the type(s) of certification received, and the date each certification was received.

(ii) Programs certifying technicians must provide notice to technicians that such information will be published online in compliance with any other Federal, state or local regulations, and allow technicians to opt out of being included in such lists.

(7) If an approved program violates any of the above requirements, the Administrator may revoke approval in accordance with §82.169. In such cases, the Administrator must give notice to the organization setting forth the basis for the determination.

(c) Test Subject Material. A bank of test questions developed by the Administrator consists of groups, including a core group and technical groups. The Administrator will release this bank of questions only to approved technician certification programs. Each test for each type of certification must include at least 25 questions drawn from the core group and at least 25 questions drawn from each relevant technical group. These questions must address the subject areas in appendix D of this subpart.

[81 FR 82363, Nov. 18, 2016]

§82.162   [Reserved]

§82.164   Reclaimer certification.

(a) All persons reclaiming used class I or II refrigerant or non-exempt substitute refrigerant for sale to a new owner must meet the following requirements:

(1) Reclaim such refrigerant to all the specifications in appendix A of this subpart (based on AHRI Standard 700-2016, Specifications for Refrigerants) that are applicable to that refrigerant;

(2) Verify that each batch of such refrigerant reclaimed meets these specifications using the analytical methodology prescribed in appendix A of this subpart, which includes the primary methodologies included in appendix A of AHRI Standard 700-2016;

(3) Release no more than 1.5 percent of the refrigerant during the reclamation process;

(4) Dispose of wastes from the reclamation process in accordance with all applicable laws and regulations; and

(5) Maintain records and submit reports in accordance with paragraph (d) of this section.

(b) The owner or a responsible officer reclaiming used refrigerant for sale to a new owner, except for persons who properly certified under this section before May 11, 2004, must certify to the Administrator at the address in §82.160(a) that they will meet the requirements in paragraph (a) of this section. The certification must include the name and address of the reclaimer and a list of equipment used to reclaim the refrigerant to the required standard, and to analyze the refrigerant to ensure it meets these specifications.

(c) Certificates are not transferable. In the event of a change in ownership of an entity which reclaims refrigerant, the new owner of the entity must certify with the Administrator within 30 days of the change that they will meet the reclaimer certification requirements. In the event of a change in business management, location, or contact information, the owner of the entity must notify EPA within 30 days of the change at the address in §82.160(a).

(d) Recordkeeping and reporting. (1) Reclaimers must maintain records, by batch, of the results of the analysis conducted to verify that reclaimed refrigerant meets the necessary specifications in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.

(2) Reclaimers must maintain records of the names and addresses of persons sending them material for reclamation and the quantity of the material (the combined mass of refrigerant and contaminants) by refrigerant type sent to them for reclamation. Such records must be maintained on a transactional basis for three years.

(3) Reclaimers must report to the Administrator annually by February 1 of the next calendar year the total annual quantity of material (the combined mass of refrigerant and contaminants) by refrigerant type sent to them for reclamation, the total annual mass of each refrigerant reclaimed, and the total annual mass of waste products.

(e) Failure to abide by any of the provisions of this subpart may result in revocation or suspension of the certification of the reclaimer in accordance with §82.169. In such cases, the Administrator must give notice to the organization setting forth the basis for the determination.

[81 FR 82364, Nov. 18, 2016]

§82.166   Reporting and recordkeeping requirements for leak repair.

This section contains leak repair reporting and recordkeeping requirements that apply to owners and operators of appliances containing 50 or more pounds of class I or class II refrigerants until January 1, 2019. Starting January 1, 2019, the recordkeeping and reporting requirements in the leak repair provisions in §82.157(l) and (m) apply to owners and operators of appliances containing 50 or more pounds of class I or class II refrigerants or non-exempt substitutes.

(a)-(i) [Reserved]

(j) Persons servicing appliances normally containing 50 or more pounds of refrigerant must provide the owner/operator of such appliances with an invoice or other documentation, which indicates the amount of refrigerant added to the appliance.

(k) Owners/operators of appliances normally containing 50 or more pounds of refrigerant must keep servicing records documenting the date and type of service, as well as the quantity of refrigerant added. The owner/operator must keep records of refrigerant purchased and added to such appliances in cases where owners add their own refrigerant. Such records should indicate the date(s) when refrigerant is added.

(l) [Reserved]

(m) All records required to be maintained pursuant to this section must be kept for a minimum of three years unless otherwise indicated.

(n) The owners or operators of appliances must maintain on-site and report to EPA Headquarters at the address listed in §82.160 the information specified in paragraphs (n)(1), (n)(2), and (n)(3) of this section, within the timelines specified under §82.156 (i)(1), (i)(2), (i)(3) and (i)(5) where such reporting or recordkeeping is required. This information must be relevant to the affected appliance.

(1) An initial report to EPA under §82.156(i)(1)(i), (i)(2), or (i)(5)(i) regarding why more than 30 days are needed to complete repairs must include: Identification of the facility; the leak rate; the method used to determine the leak rate and full charge; the date a leak rate above the applicable leak rate was discovered; the location of leak(s) to the extent determined to date; any repair work that has been completed thus far and the date that work was completed; the reasons why more than 30 days are needed to complete the work and an estimate of when the work will be completed. If changes from the original estimate of when work will be completed result in extending the completion date from the date submitted to EPA, the reasons for these changes must be documented and submitted to EPA within 30 days of discovering the need for such a change.

(2) If the owners or operators intend to establish that the appliance's leak rate does not exceed the applicable allowable leak rate in accordance with §82.156(i)(3)(v), the owner or operator must submit a plan to fix other outstanding leaks for which repairs are planned but not yet completed to achieve a rate below the applicable allowable leak rate. A plan to fix other outstanding leaks in accordance with §82.156(i)(3)(v) must include the following information: The identification of the facility; the leak rate; the method used to determine the leak rate and full charge; the date a leak rate above the applicable allowable leak rate was discovered; the location of leak(s) to the extent determined to date; and any repair work that has been completed thus far, including the date that work was completed. Upon completion of the repair efforts described in the plan, a second report must be submitted that includes the date the owner or operator submitted the initial report concerning the need for additional time beyond the 30 days and notification of the owner or operator's determination that the leak rate no longer exceeds the applicable allowable leak rate. This second report must be submitted within 30 days of determining that the leak rate no longer exceeds the applicable allowable leak rate.

(3) Owners or operators must maintain records of the dates, types, and results of all initial and follow-up verification tests performed under §82.156(i)(3). Owners or operators must submit this information to EPA within 30 days after conducting each test only where required under §82.156 (i)(1), (i)(2), (i)(3) and (i)(5). These reports must also include: Identification and physical address of the facility; the leak rate; the method used to determine the leak rate and full charge; the date a leak rate above the applicable allowable leak rate was discovered; the location of leak(s) to the extent determined to date; and any repair work that has been completed thus far and the date that work was completed. Submitted reports must be dated and include the name of the owner or operator of the appliance, and must be signed by an authorized company official.

(o) The owners or operators of appliances must maintain on-site and report to EPA at the address specified in §82.160 the following information where such reporting and recordkeeping is required and in the timelines specified in §82.156 (i)(7) and (i)(8), in accordance with §82.156 (i)(7) and (i)(8). This information must be relevant to the affected appliance and must include:

(1) The identification of the industrial process facility;

(2) The leak rate;

(3) The method used to determine the leak rate and full charge;

(4) The date a leak rate above the applicable allowable rate was discovered.

(5) The location of leaks(s) to the extent determined to date;

(6) Any repair work that has been completed thus far and the date that work was completed;

(7) A plan to complete the retrofit or retirement of the system;

(8) The reasons why more than one year is necessary to retrofit or retire the system;

(9) The date of notification to EPA; and

(10) An estimate of when retrofit or retirement work will be completed. If the estimated date of completion changes from the original estimate and results in extending the date of completion, the owner or operator must submit to EPA the new estimated date of completion and documentation of the reason for the change within 30 days of discovering the need for the change, and must retain a dated copy of this submission.

(p)(1) Owners or operators who wish to exclude purged refrigerants that are destroyed from annual leak rate calculations must maintain records on-site to support the amount of refrigerant claimed as sent for destruction. Records shall be based on a monitoring strategy that provides reliable data to demonstrate that the amount of refrigerant claimed to have been destroyed is not greater than the amount of refrigerant actually purged and destroyed and that the 98 percent or greater destruction efficiency is met. Records shall include flow rate, quantity or concentration of the refrigerant in the vent stream, and periods of purge flow.

(2) Owners or operators who wish to exclude purged refrigerants that are destroyed from annual leak rate calculations must maintain on-site and make available to EPA upon request the following information after the first time the exclusion is utilized by the facility:

(i) The identification of the facility and a contact person, including the address and telephone number;

(ii) A general description of the refrigerant appliance, focusing on aspects of the appliance relevant to the purging of refrigerant and subsequent destruction;

(iii) A description of the methods used to determine the quantity of refrigerant sent for destruction and type of records that are being kept by the owners or operators where the appliance is located;

(iv) The frequency of monitoring and data-recording; and

(v) A description of the control device, and its destruction efficiency.

This information must also be included, where applicable, in any reporting requirements required for compliance with the leak repair and retrofit requirements for industrial process refrigeration equipment, as set forth in paragraphs (n) and (o) of this section.

(q) Owners or operators choosing to determine the full charge as defined in §82.156(j) of an affected appliance by using an established range or using that methodology in combination with other methods for determining the full charge as defined in §82.156(j) must maintain the following information:

(1) The identification of the owner or operator of the appliance;

(2) The location of the appliance;

(3) The original range for the full charge of the appliance, its midpoint, and how the range was determined;

(4) Any and all revisions of the full charge range and how they were determined; and

(5) The dates such revisions occurred.

[58 FR 28712, May 14, 1993, as amended at 59 FR 42957, Aug. 19, 1994; 60 FR 40443, Aug. 8, 1995; 69 FR 11981, Mar. 12, 2004; 70 FR 1992, Jan. 11, 2005; 79 FR 64290, Oct. 28, 2014; 81 FR 82364, Nov. 18, 2016]

§82.168   Incorporation by Reference.

(a) Certain material is incorporated by reference into this subpart part with the approval of the Director of the Federal Register under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You can obtain the material from the sources listed below. You may inspect a copy of the approved material at U.S. EPA's Air and Radiation Docket; EPA West Building, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC, or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call (202) 741-6030 or go to http://www.archives.gov/federal__register/code__of__federal__regulations/ibr__locations.html.

(b) Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI), 2111 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 500, Arlington, VA 22201, www.ahrinet.org.

(1) AHRI Standard 110-2016, 2016 Standard for Air-Conditioning, Heating and Refrigerating Equipment Nameplate Voltages, copyright 2016, into Appendix B3 to subpart F.

(2) 2008 Appendix C to AHRI Standard 700-2014, 2008 Appendix C for Analytical Procedures for AHRI Standard 700-2014Normative, copyright 2008, into Appendix A to subpart F.

(3) 2008 Appendix D to AHRI Standard 700-2014, 2012 Appendix D for Gas Chromatograms for AHRI Standard 700-2014—Informative, copyright 2012, into Appendix A to subpart F.

(c) American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc., (ASHRAE), 1791 Tullie Circle NE., Atlanta, GA 30329, U.S.A.

(1) ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 63.2-1996 (RA 2010), Method of Testing Liquid-Line Filter Drier Filtration Capability, Reaffirmed June 26, 2010, into Appendix B3 to subpart F.

(d) ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, P.O. Box C700, West Conshohocken, PA 19428-2959, www.astm.org.

(1) ASTM D1296-01 (Reapproved 2012), Standard Test Method for Odor of Volatile Solvents and Diluents, approved July 1, 2012, into Appendix A to subpart F.

(2) [Reserved]

(e) Gas Processors Association, 6526 East 60th Street, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74145.

(1) GPA Standard STD-2177-13, Analysis of Natural Gas Liquid Mixtures Containing Nitrogen and Carbon Dioxide by Gas Chromatography, Revised, copyright 2013, into Appendix A to subpart F.

(2) [Reserved]

(f) General Services Administration, 301 7th St. SW., Washington, DC 20410.

(1) BB-F-1421B, Federal Specification for “Fluorocarbon Refrigerants,” dated March 5, 1982, IBR approved for Appendix A to subpart F.

(2) [Reserved]

(g) International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), 3, rue de Varembé, P.O. Box 131. CH-1211 Geneva 20—Switzerland, 41 22 919 02 11, http://www.iec.ch.

(1) IEC 60038, IEC Standard Voltages, Edition 7.0, 2009-06, into Appendix B3 to subpart F.

(2) [Reserved]

(h) Underwriters Laboratories (UL), 333 Pfingsten Road, Northbrook, IL 60062, 847-272-8800, http://www.ul.com.

(1) UL 1963, Standard for Safety Requirements for Refrigerant Recovery/Recycling Equipment, Fourth Edition (with revisions through October 13, 2013), June 1, 2011, in appendix B3 to subpart F, appendix B4 to subpart F.

(2) [Reserved]

[81 FR 82364, Nov. 18, 2016]

§82.169   Suspension and revocation procedures.

(a) Failure to abide by any of the provisions of this subpart may result in the revocation or suspension of the approval to certify technicians (under §82.161), approval to act as a recovery/recycling equipment testing organization (under §82.160), or reclaimer certification (under §82.164), hereafter referred to as the “organization.” In such cases, the Administrator or her or his designated representative shall give notice of an impending suspension to the person or organization setting forth the facts or conduct that provide the basis for the revocation or suspension.

(b) Any organization that has received notice of an impending suspension or revocation may choose to request a hearing and must file that request in writing within 30 days of the date of the Agency's notice at the address listed in §82.160 and shall set forth their objections to the revocation or suspension and data to support the objections.

(c) If the Agency does not receive a written request for a hearing within 30 days of the date of the Agency's notice, the revocation will become effective upon the date specified in the notice of an impending suspension.

(d) If after review of the request and supporting data, the Administrator or her or his designated representative finds that the request raises a substantial factual issue, she or he shall provide the organization with a hearing.

(e) After granting a request for a hearing the Administrator or her or his designated representative shall designate a Presiding Officer for the hearing.

(f) The hearing shall be held as soon as practicable at a time and place determined by the Administrator, the designated representative, or the Presiding Officer.

(g) The Administrator or her or his designated representative may, at his or her discretion, direct that all argument and presentation of evidence be concluded within a specified period established by the Administrator or her or his designated representative. Said period may be no less than 30 days from the date that the first written offer of a hearing is made to the applicant. To expedite proceedings, the Administrator or her or his designated representative may direct that the decision of the Presiding Officer (who need not be the Administrator) shall be the final EPA decision.

(h) Upon appointment pursuant to paragraph (e) of this section, the Presiding Officer will establish a hearing file. The file shall consist of the following:

(1) The notice issued by the Administrator under §82.169(a);

(2) the request for a hearing and the supporting data submitted therewith;

(3) all documents relating to the request for certification and all documents submitted therewith; and

(4) correspondence and other data material to the hearing.

(i) The hearing file will be available for inspection by the petitioner at the office of the Presiding Officer.

(j) An applicant may appear in person or may be represented by counsel or by any other duly authorized representative.

(k) The Presiding Officer, upon the request of any party or at his or her discretion, may arrange for a pre-hearing conference at a time and place he or she specifies. Such pre-hearing conferences will consider the following:

(1) Simplification of the issues;

(2) Stipulations, admissions of fact, and the introduction of documents;

(3) Limitation of the number of expert witnesses;

(4) Possibility of agreement disposing of any or all of the issues in dispute; and

(5) Such other matters as may aid in the disposition of the hearing, including such additional tests as may be agreed upon by the parties.

(l) The results of the conference shall be reduced to writing by the Presiding Officer and made part of the record.

(m) Hearings shall be conducted by the Presiding Officer in an informal but orderly and expeditious manner. The parties may offer oral or written evidence, subject to the exclusion by the Presiding Officer of irrelevant, immaterial, and repetitious evidence.

(n) Witnesses will not be required to testify under oath. However, the Presiding Officer shall call to the attention of witnesses that their statements may be subject to the provisions of 18 U.S.C. 1001, which imposes penalties for knowingly making false statements or representations or using false documents in any matter within the jurisdiction of any department or agency of the United States.

(o) Any witness may be examined or cross-examined by the Presiding Officer, the parties, or their representatives.

(p) Hearings shall be reported verbatim. Copies of transcripts of proceedings may be purchased by the petitioner from the reporter.

(q) All written statements, charts, tabulations, and similar data offered in evidence at the hearings shall, upon a showing satisfactory to the Presiding Officer of their authenticity, relevancy, and materiality, be received in evidence and shall constitute a part of the record.

(r) Oral argument may be permitted at the discretion of the Presiding Officer and shall be reported as part of the record unless otherwise ordered by the Presiding Officer.

(s) The Presiding Officer shall make an initial decision that shall include written findings and conclusions and the reasons or basis regarding all the material issues of fact, law, or discretion presented on the record. The findings, conclusions, and written decision shall be provided to the parties and made a part of the record. The initial decision shall become the decision of the Administrator without further proceedings, unless there is an appeal to the Administrator or motion for review by the Administrator within 20 days of the date the initial decision was filed.

(t) On appeal from or review of the initial decision, the Administrator or her or his designated representative shall have all the powers which he or she would have in making the initial decision, including the discretion to require or allow briefs, oral argument, the taking of additional evidence, or a remand to the Presiding Officer for additional proceedings. The decision by the Administrator or her or his designated representative shall include written findings and conclusions and the reasons or basis therefore on all the material issues of fact, law, or discretion presented on the appeal or considered in the review.

[68 FR 43809, July 24, 2003]

Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 82—Specifications for Refrigerants

This appendix is based on the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute Standard 700-2016, Specifications for Refrigerants.

Section 1. Purpose

1.1   Purpose. The purpose of this standard is to evaluate and accept/reject refrigerants regardless of source (i.e., new, reclaimed and/or repackaged) for use in new and existing refrigeration and air-conditioning products as required under 40 CFR part 82.

1.1.1   Intent. This standard is intended for the guidance of the industry including manufacturers, refrigerant reclaimers, repackagers, distributors, installers, servicemen, contractors and for consumers.

1.1.2   Review and Amendment. This standard is subject to review and amendment as the technology advances.

Section 2. Scope

2.1   Scope. This standard specifies acceptable levels of contaminants (purity requirements) for various fluorocarbon and other refrigerants regardless of source and lists acceptable test methods. These refrigerants are as referenced in the ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 34 with Addenda:

2.1.1   Single-Component Fluorocarbon Refrigerants: R-11, R-12, R-13, R-22, R-23, R-32, R-113, R-114, R-115, R-116, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134a, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-218, R-227ea, R-236fa, R-245fa, R-1233zd(E), R-1234yf, R-1234ze(E);

2.1.2   Single Component Hydrocarbon Refrigerants: R-50, R-170, R-E170, R-290, R-600, R-600a, R-601, R-601a, R-610, R-1150, R-1270;

2.1.3   Carbon Dioxide Refrigerant: R-744;

2.1.4   Zeotropic Blend Refrigerants: R-401A, R-401B, R-402A, R-402B, R-403A, R-403B, R-404A, R-405A, R-406A, R-407A, R-407B, R-407C, R-407D, R-407E, R-407F, R-408A, R-409A, R-409B, R-410A, R-410B, R-411A, R-411B, R-412A, R-413A, R-414A, R-414B, R-415A, R-415B, R-416A, R-417A, R-417B, R-417C, R-418A, R-419A, R-419B, R-420A, R-421A, R-421B, R-422A, R-422B, R-422C, R-422D, R-422E, R-423A, R-424A, R-425A, R-426A, R-427A, R-428A, R-429A, R-430A, R-431A, R-434A, R-435A, R-437A, R-438A, R-439A, R-440A, R-442A, R-444A, R-444B, R-445A, R-446A, R-447A, R-448A, R-449A, R-450A;

2.1.5   Zeotropic Hydrocarbon Blend Refrigerants: R-432A, R-433A, R-433B, R-433C, R-436A, R-436B, R-441A, R-443A; and

2.1.6   Azeotropic Blend Refrigerants: R-500, R-502, R-503, R-507A, R-508A, R-508B, R-509A, R-510A, R-511A, and R-512A.

Section 3. Definitions

3.1   Definitions. All terms in this appendix will follow the definitions in §82.152 unless otherwise defined in this appendix.

3.2   Shall, Should, Recommended, or It Is Recommended shall be interpreted as follows:

3.2.1   Shall. Where “shall” or “shall not” is used for a provision specified, that provision is mandatory if compliance with this appendix is claimed.

3.2.2   Should, Recommended, or It is Recommended is used to indicate provisions which are not mandatory but which are desirable as good practice.

Section 4. Characterization of Refrigerants and Contaminants

4.1   Characterization. Characterization of single component fluorocarbon (Table 1A) and zeotropic/azeotropic blend (Table 2A/3) refrigerants and contaminants are listed in the following general classifications:

4.1.1   Isomer content (see Table 1A)

4.1.2   Air and other non-condensables (see Tables 1A, 2A, 3)

4.1.3   Water (see Tables 1A, 2A, 3)

4.1.4   All other volatile impurities (see Tables 1A, 2A, 3)

4.1.5   High boiling residue (see Tables 1A, 2A, 3)

4.1.6   Halogenated unsaturated volatile impurities (see Table 1A)

4.1.7   Particulates/solids (see Tables 1A, 2A, 3)

4.1.8   Acidity (see Tables 1A, 2A, 3)

4.1.9   Chloride (see Tables 1A, 2A, 3)

4.2   Hydrocarbon Characterization. Characterization of hydrocarbon refrigerants (Tables 1B and 2B) and contaminants are listed in the following general classifications:

4.2.1   Nominal composition

4.2.2   Other allowable impurities

4.2.3   Air and other non-condensables

4.2.4   Sulfur odor

4.2.5   High boiling residue

4.2.6   Particulates/solids

4.2.7   Acidity

4.2.8   Water

4.2.9   All other volatile impurities

4.2.10   Total C3, C4, and C5 polyolefins

4.3   Carbon Dioxide Characterization. Characterization of carbon dioxide (Table 1C) and its contaminants are listed in the following general classifications:

4.3.1   Purity

4.3.2   Air and other non-condensables

4.3.3   Water

4.3.4   High boiling residue

4.3.5   Particulates/solids

Section 5. Sampling and Summary of Test Procedures

5.1   Referee Test. The referee test methods for the various contaminants are summarized in the following paragraphs. Detailed test procedures are included in 2008 Appendix C to AHRI Standard 700-2014 (incorporated by reference, see §82.168). If alternative test methods are employed, the user must be able to demonstrate that they produce results at least equivalent to the specified referee test method.

5.2   Refrigerant Sampling

5.2.1   Sampling Precautions. Special precautions should be taken to ensure that representative samples are obtained for analysis. Sampling shall be done by qualified personnel following accepted sampling and safety procedures. Refrigerants with critical temperatures near or below ambient temperature cannot be reliably sampled for both liquid and vapor phase without special handling.

Note: Flammable refrigerants which are ASHRAE 34 class 2L, 2, or 3 present additional safety challenges and require additional measures for sampling safety procedures compared to nonflammable halocarbons documented in this standard.

5.2.2   Cylinder Preparation. Place a clean, empty sample cylinder with the valve open in an oven at 110 °C (230 °F) for one hour. Remove it from the oven while hot, immediately connect it to an evacuation system and evacuate to less than 56 kPa. Close the valve and allow it to cool. Weigh the empty cylinder.

5.2.3   Vapor Phase Sampling. A vapor phase sample shall be obtained for determining the non-condensables. The source temperature shall be measured and recorded at the time the sample is taken.

5.2.3.1   Special Handling for Low Critical Temperature Refrigerant. A vapor phase sample is required to determine non-condensables and volatile impurities, including other refrigerants. The vapor phase sample is obtained by regulating the sample container temperature to 5 K or more above the refrigerant critical temperature.

5.2.3.2   Handling for Liquid Refrigerants with Boiling Points Near or Above Room Temperature. Since R-11, R-113, R-123, R-141b, R-245fa, and R-1233zd(E) have normal boiling points near or above room temperature, non-condensable determination is not required for these refrigerants.

Note: Non-condensable gases, if present, will concentrate in the vapor phase of the refrigerant; care must be exercised to eliminate introduction of either air or liquid phase refrigerant during the sample transfer.

5.2.4   Liquid Phase Sampling. A liquid phase sample is required for all tests listed in this standard except the test for non-condensables.

5.2.4.1   Liquid Sampling. Accurate analysis requires that the sample cylinder, at ambient temperature, be filled to at least 60 percent by volume; however, under no circumstances should the cylinder be filled to more than 80 percent by volume. This can be accomplished by weighing the empty cylinder and then the cylinder with refrigerant. When the desired amount of refrigerant has been collected, close the valve(s) and immediately disconnect the sample cylinder.

Note: Care should be taken to ensure that all connections and transfer lines are dry and evacuated to avoid contaminating the sample.

Note: Low critical temperature refrigerants can have extremely high pressure and the sampling vessel, all connections, and transfer lines must be designed to handle high pressures.

5.2.4.2   Special Handling for Low Critical Temperature Refrigerant. A liquid phase sample is required for all testing except volatile impurities, including other refrigerants. The liquid phase sample is obtained by regulating the sample cylinder temperature to 2 °C below the critical temperature of the refrigerant.

Note: If free water is present in the sample, cooling to below 0 °C may result in the formation of ice. Clathrates may form at temperatures above 0 °C with some fluorocarbon refrigerants.

5.2.4.3   Record Weight. Check the sample cylinder for leaks and record the gross weight.

5.3   Refrigerant Identification. The required method shall be gas chromatography (GC) as described in 2008 Appendix C to AHRI Standard 700-2014 (incorporated by reference, see §82.168) with the corresponding gas chromatogram figures as illustrated in 2012 Appendix D to AHRI Standard 700-2014 (incorporated by reference, see §82.168). The chromatogram of the sample shall be compared to known standards.

5.3.2   Alternative Method. Determination of the boiling point and boiling point range is an acceptable alternative test method which can be used to characterize refrigerants. The test method shall be that described in section 4.4.3 of BB-F-1421B (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

5.3.3   Required Values. The required values for boiling point and boiling point range are given in Table 1A, Physical Properties of Single Component Refrigerants; Table 1B, Physical Properties of Zeotropic Blends (400 Series Refrigerants); and Table 1C, Physical Properties of Azeotropic Blends (500 Series Refrigerants).

5.4   Water Content.

5.4.1   Method. The Coulometric Karl Fischer Titration shall be the primary test method for determining the water content of refrigerants. This method is described in 2008 Appendix C to AHRI Standard 700-2014 (incorporated by reference, see §82.168). This method can be used for refrigerants that are either a liquid or a gas at room temperature. For all refrigerants, the sample for water analysis shall be taken from the liquid phase of the container to be tested.

5.4.2   Limits. The value for water content shall be expressed in parts per million (ppm) by weight and shall not exceed the maximum specified in Tables 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, and 3.

5.5   Conductivity. (Alternative to chloride and acidity tests).

5.5.1   Method. A refrigerant may be tested for conductivity as an indication of the presence of acids, metal chlorides, and any compound that ionizes in water. This alternative procedure is intended for use with new or reclaimed refrigerants, however, significant amounts of oil can interfere with the test results.

5.5.2   Limits. The value for conductivity shall be converted to and expressed in ppm by weight calculated as HCl and shall be compared with the maximum acidity value specified (see in Tables 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, and 3). If the conductivity is above this amount, then the chloride and acidity tests shall be conducted. If the conductivity is not greater than this amount, then the chloride and acidity tests may be omitted.

5.6   Chloride. The refrigerant shall be tested for chloride as an indication of the presence of hydrochloric acid and/or metal chlorides. The referee procedure is intended for use with new or reclaimed halogenated refrigerants; however, high boiling residue in excess of the amounts in Tables 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, and 3 can interfere with the test results.

5.6.1   Method. The test method shall be that described in 2008 Appendix C to AHRI Standard 700-2014 (incorporated by reference, see §82.168). The test will show noticeable turbidity at chloride levels of about 3 ppm or greater by weight.

5.5.2   Limits. The results of the test shall not exhibit any sign of turbidity. Report the results as “pass” or “fail.”

5.7   Acidity.

5.7.1   Method. The acidity test uses the titration principle to detect any compound that is soluble in water and ionizes as an acid. The test method shall be that described in 2008 Appendix C to AHRI Standard 700-2014 (incorporated by reference, see §82.168). This test may not be suitable for determination of high molecular weight organic acids; however these acids will be found in the high boiling residue test outlined in Section 5.8. The test requires a 50 to 60 gram sample and has a detection limit of 0.1 ppm by weight calculated as HCl.

5.7.2   Limits. The value for acidity shall be expressed in ppm by weight as HCl and shall not exceed the limits in Tables 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, and 3.

5.8   High Boiling Residue.

5.8.1   Method. High boiling residue shall be determined by either volume or weight. The volume method measures the residue from a standard volume of refrigerant after evaporation. The gravimetric method is described in 2008 Appendix C to AHRI Standard 700-2014 (incorporated by reference, see §82.168). Oils and/or organic acids will be captured by these methods.

5.8.2   Limits. The value for high boiling residue shall be expressed as a percentage by volume or weight and shall not exceed the maximum percent specified in Tables 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, and 3.

5.9   Particulates and Solids.

5.9.1   Method. A measured amount of sample shall be placed in a Goetz bulb under controlled temperature conditions. The particulates/solids shall be determined by visual examination of the Goetz bulb prior to the evaporation of refrigerant. For details of this test method, refer to Part 3 of 2008 Appendix C to AHRI Standard 700-2014 (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

Note: R-744 will partially sublimate when measuring a known amount of liquid sample into the dry Goetz bulb and the solid R-744 will interfere with the visual examination of particulates/solids. Determining the particulates/solids shall be completed by visual examination of the Goetz bulb after the evaporation of the refrigerant.

5.9.2   Limits. Visual presence of dirt, rust, or other particulate contamination is reported as “fail.”

5.10   Non-Condensables.

5.10.1   Method. A vapor phase sample shall be used for determination of non-condensables. Non-condensable gases consist primarily of air accumulated in the vapor phase of refrigerants where the solubility of air in the refrigerant liquid phase is extremely low and air is not significant as a liquid phase contaminant. The presence of non-condensable gases may reflect poor quality control in transferring refrigerants to storage tanks and cylinders.

The test method shall be gas chromatography with a thermal conductivity detector as described in 2008 Appendix C to AHRI Standard 700-2014 (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

5.10.2   Limits. The maximum level of non-condensables in the vapor phase of a test sample shall not exceed the maximum at 25 °C as shown in Tables 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, and 3.

5.11   All Other Volatile Impurities and/or Other Refrigerants.

5.11.1   Method. The amount of volatile impurities including other refrigerants in the subject refrigerant shall be determined by gas chromatography as described in 2008 Appendix C to AHRI Standard 700-2014 (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

5.11.2   Limits. The test sample shall not contain more than 0.5 percent by weight of volatile impurities including other refrigerants as shown in Tables 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B and 3.

5.12   Total C3, C4 and C5 Polyolefins in Hydrocarbon Refrigerants.

5.12.1   Method. The amount of polyolefin impurities in the hydrocarbon shall be determined by gas chromatography as described in GPA Standard 2177-13 (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

5.12.2   Limits. The test sample shall not contain more than 0.05 percent by weight in the hydrocarbon sample as shown in Tables 1B and 2B. Report the results as “pass” or “fail.”

5.13   Sulfur Odor in Hydrocarbon Refrigerants.

5.13.1   Method. The amount of sulfur containing compounds or other compounds with an odor shall be determined by ASTM D1296-01 (Reapproved 2012) (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

5.13.2   Limits. The test sample paper shall not emit a residual sulfur odor as shown in Tables 1B and 2B.

Section 6. Reporting Procedure

6.1   Reporting Procedure. The source (manufacturer, reclaimer, or repackager) of the packaged refrigerant shall be identified. The refrigerant shall be identified by its accepted refrigerant number and/or its chemical name. Maximum allowable levels of contaminants are shown in Tables 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, and 3. Test results shall be tabulated in a similar manner.

eCFR graphic er18no16.078.gif

View or download PDF

eCFR graphic er18no16.079.gif

View or download PDF

eCFR graphic er18no16.080.gif

View or download PDF

eCFR graphic er18no16.081.gif

View or download PDF

eCFR graphic er18no16.082.gif

View or download PDF

eCFR graphic er18no16.083.gif

View or download PDF

eCFR graphic er18no16.084.gif

View or download PDF

eCFR graphic er18no16.085.gif

View or download PDF

eCFR graphic er18no16.086.gif

View or download PDF

eCFR graphic er18no16.087.gif

View or download PDF

eCFR graphic er18no16.088.gif

View or download PDF

eCFR graphic er18no16.089.gif

View or download PDF

eCFR graphic er18no16.090.gif

View or download PDF

eCFR graphic er18no16.091.gif

View or download PDF

eCFR graphic er18no16.092.gif

View or download PDF

Section 7.0   References—Normative

Listed here are all standards, handbooks, and other publications essential to the formation and implementation of the standard. All references in this appendix are considered as part of this standard.

ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 34-2013, Designation and Safety Classification of Refrigerants, with Addenda, American National Standards Institute/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers.

2008 Appendix C to AHRI Standard 700-2014, 2008 Appendix C for Analytical Procedures for AHRI Standard 700-2014—Normative, copyright 2008 (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

ASTM D1296-01 (Reapproved 2012), Standard Test Method for Odor of Volatile Solvents and Diluents, approved July 1, 2012, (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

BB-F-1421B, Federal Specification for “Fluorocarbon Refrigerants,” dated March 5, 1982, (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

GPA Standard 2177-13, Analysis of Natural Gas Liquid Mixtures Containing Nitrogen and Carbon Dioxide by Gas Chromatography, Revised, copyright 2013, (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

REFPROP Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties NIST Standard Reference Database 23 version 9.1, 2013, U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Section 8.0   References—Informative

Listed here are standards, handbooks, and other publications which may provide useful information and background but are not considered essential.

2012 Appendix D to AHRI Standard 700-2014, 2012 Appendix D for Gas Chromatograms for AHRI Standard 700-2014—Informative, copyright 2012, (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

{81 FR 82365, Nov. 18, 2016]

Appendix A1 to Subpart F of Part 82—Generic Maximum Contaminant Levels

Contaminant Reporting units
Air and Other Non-condensables1.5% by volume @ 25 °C (N/A for refrigerants used in low-pressure appliances1).
Water10 ppm by weight 20 ppm by weight (for refrigerants used in low-pressure appliances1).
Other Impurities Including Refrigerant0.50% by weight.
High boiling residue0.01% by volume.
Particulates/solidsvisually clean to pass.
Acidity1.0 ppm by weight.
Chlorides (chloride level for pass/fail is 3ppm)No visible turbidity.

1Low-pressure appliances means an appliance that uses a refrigerant with a liquid phase saturation pressure below 45 psia at 104 °F.

Blend Compositions (Where Applicable)

Nominal
composition
(by weight%)
Allowable
composition
(by weight%)
Component constitutes 25% or more±2.0
Component constitutes less than 25% but greater than 10%±1.0
Component constitutes less than or equal to 10%±0.5

[69 FR 11988, Mar. 12, 2004]

Appendix B1 to Subpart F of Part 82—Performance of Refrigerant Recovery, Recycling and/or Reclaim Equipment

This appendix is based on the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute Standard 740-1993.

Refrigerant Recovery/Recycling Equipment

Section 1. Purpose

1.1   Purpose. The purpose of this standard is to establish methods of testing for rating and evaluating the performance of refrigerant recovery, and/or recycling equipment, and general equipment requirements (herein referred to as “equipment”) for containment or purity levels, capacity, speed, and purge loss to minimize emission into the atmosphere of designated refrigerants.

1.1.1   This standard is intended for the guidance of the industry, including manufacturers, refrigerant reclaimers, repackers, distributors, installers, servicemen, contractors and for consumers.

1.1.2   This standard is not intended to be used as a guide in defining maximum levels of contaminants in recycled or reclaimed refrigerants used in various applications.

1.2   Review and Amendment. This standard is subject to review and amendment as the technology advances.

Section 2. Scope

2.1   Scope. This standard defines general equipment requirements and the test apparatus, test mixtures, sampling and analysis techniques that will be used to determine the performance of recovery and/or recycling equipment for various refrigerants including R11, R12, R13, R22, R113, R114, R123, R134a, R500, R502, and R503, as referenced in the ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 34-1992, “Number Designation of Refrigerants” (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers, Inc.).

Section 3. Definitions

3.1   Recovered refrigerant. Refrigerant that has been removed from a system for the purpose of storage, recycling, reclamation or transportation.

3.2   Recover. Reference 40 CFR 82.152.

3.3   Recycle. Reference 40 CFR 82.152.

3.4   Reclaim. Reference 40 CFR 82.152.

3.5   Standard Contaminated Refrigerant Sample. A mixture of new and/or reclaimed refrigerant and specified quantities of identified contaminants which are representative of field obtained, used refrigerant samples and which constitute the mixture to be processed by the equipment under test.

3.6   Push/Pull Method. The push/pull refrigerant recovery method is defined as the process of transferring liquid refrigerant from a refrigeration system to a receiving vessel by lowering the pressure in the vessel and raising the pressure in the system, and by connecting a separate line between the system liquid port and the receiving vessel.

3.7   Recycle Rate. The amount of refrigerant processed (in pounds) divided by the time elapsed in the recycling mode in pounds per minute. For equipment which uses a separate recycling sequence, the recycle rate does not include the recovery rate (or elapsed time). For equipment which does not use a separate recycling sequence, the recycle rate is a maximum rate based solely on the higher of the liquid or vapor recovery rate, by which the rated contaminant levels can be achieved.

3.8   Equipment Classification.

3.8.1   Self Contained Equipment. A refrigerant recovery or recycling system which is capable of refrigerant extraction without the assistance of components contained within an air conditioning or refrigeration system.

3.8.2   System Dependent Equipment. Refrigerant recovery equipment which requires for its operation the assistance of components contained in an air conditioning or refrigeration system.

3.9   “Shall”, “Should”, “Recommended” or “It is Recommended”, “Shall” “Should”, “recommended”, or “it is recommended” shall be interpreted as follows:

3.9.1   Shall. Where “shall” or “shall not” is used for a provision specified, that provision is mandatory if compliance with the standard is claimed.

3.9.2   Should, Recommended, or It is Recommended, “Should”, “recommended”, is used to indicate provisions which are not mandatory but which are desirable as good practice.

Section 4. General Equipment Requirements

4.1   The equipment manufacturer shall provide operating instructions, necessary maintenance procedures, and source information for replacement parts and repair.

4.2   The equipment shall indicate when any filter/drier(s) needs replacement. This requirement can be met by use of a moisture transducer and indicator light, by use of a sight glass/moisture indicator, or by some measurement of the amount of refrigerant processed such as a flow meter or hour meter. Written instructions such as “to change the filter every 400 pounds, or every 30 days” shall not be acceptable except for equipment in large systems where the Liquid Recovery Rate is greater than 25 lbs/min [11.3 Kg/min] where the filter/drier(s) would be changed for every job.

4.3   The equipment shall either automatically purge non-condensables if the rated level is exceeded or alert the operator that the non-condensable level has been exceeded. While air purge processes are subject to the requirements of this section, there is no specific requirement to include an air purge process for “recycle” equipment.

4.4   The equipment's refrigerant loss due to non-condensable purging shall not be exceeded 5% by weight of total recovered refrigerant. (See Section 9.4)

4.5   Internal hose assemblies shall not exceed a permeation rate of 12 pounds mass per square foot [5.8 g/cm2] of internal surface per year at a temperature of 120 F [48.8 °C] for any designated refrigerant.

4.6   The equipment shall be evaluated at 75 F [24 °C] per 7.1. Normal operating conditions range from 50 °F to 104 F [10 °C to 40 °C].

4.7   Exemptions:

4.7.1   Equpment intended for recovery only shall be exempt from sections 4.2 and 4.3.

Table 1—Standard Contaminated Refrigerant Samples

   R11R12R13R22R113R114R123R134aR500R502R503
Moisture content:
PPM by weight of pure refrigerant10080302001008510020020020030
Particulate content:
PPM by weight of pure refrigerant characterized by18080808080808080808080
Acid content:
PPM by weight of pure refrigerant—(mg KOH per kg refrig.) characterized by2500100NA500400200500100100100NA
Mineral oil content:
% by weight of pure refrigerant205NA5202020555NA
Viscosity (SUS)300150300300300300150150150
Non condensable gases air content % volume3>NA333NA333333

1Particulate content shall consist of inert materials and shall comply with particulate requirements in ASHRAE Standard 63.2, “Method of Testing of Filtration Capacity of Refrigerant Liquid Line Filters and Filter Driers.”

2Acid consists of 60% oleic acid and 40% hydrochloric acid on a total number basis.

3Synthetic ester based oil.

Section 5. Contaminated Refrigerants

5.1   The standard contaminated refrigerant sample shall have the characteristics specified in Table 1, except as provided in 5.2

5.2   Recovery equipment not rated for any specific contaminant can be tested with new or reclaimed refrigerant.

Section 6. Test Apparatus

6.1   Self Contained Equipment Test Apparatus. The apparatus as shown in Figure 1 consists of a 3 cubic foot [0.085 m3] mixing chamber with a conical-shaped bottom, although a larger mixing chamber is permissible. The size of the mixing chamber depends upon the size of the equipment. The outlet at the bottom of the cone and all restrictions and valves for liquid and vapor refrigerant lines in the test apparatus shall be a minimum of 0.375 in. [9.5 mm] inside diameter or equivalent. The minimum inside diameter for large equipment for use on chillers shall be 1.5 in. [38 mm.]. The mixing chamber shall contain various ports for receiving liquid refrigerant, oil, and contaminants. A recirculating line connected from the bottom outlet through a recirculating pump and then to a top vapor port shall be provided for stirring of the mixture. Isolation valves may be required for the pump. Alternative stirring means may be used if demonstrated to be equally effective.

6.1.1   For liquid refrigerant feed, the liquid valve is opened. For vapor refrigerant feed, the vapor valve is opened and refrigerant passes through an evaporator coil. Flow is controlled by a thermostatic expansion valve to create 5 F [3 °C] superheat at an evaporator temperature of 70 F ±3 F[21 °C±2°]. The evaporator coil or equivalent evaporator means shall be either sized large enough for the largest system or be sized for each system.

6.1.2   An alternative method for vapor refrigerant feed is to pass through a boiler and then an automatic pressure regulating valve set at refrigerant saturation pressure at 75 F ±3 F [24 °C ±2 °C].

6.2   System Dependent Equipment Test Apparatus. This test apparatus is to be used for final recovery vacuum rating of all system dependent equipment.

6.2.1   The test apparatus shown in Figure 2 consists of a complete refrigeration system. The manufacturer shall identify the refrigerants to be tested. The test apparatus can be modified to facilitate operation or testing of the system dependent equipment if the modifications to the apparatus are specifically described within the manufacturer's literature. (See Figure 2.) A 14 inch [6.3 mm] balance line shall be connected across the test apparatus between the high and low pressure sides, with an isolation valve located at the connection to the compressor high side. A 14 inch [6.3 mm] access port with a valve core shall be located in the balance line for the purpose of measuring final recovery vacuum at the conclusion of the test.

eCFR graphic ec01my92.107.gif

View or download PDF

eCFR graphic ec01my92.108.gif

View or download PDF

Section 7. Performance Testing

7.1   Contaminant removal and performance testing shall be conducted at 75 F ±2 F [23.9 °C ±1.1 °C].

7.1.1   The equipment shall be prepared for operation per the instruction manual.

7.1.2   The contaminated sample batch shall consist of not less than the sum of the amounts required to complete steps 7.1.2.2 and 7.1.2.3 below.

7.1.2.1   A liquid sample shall be drawn from the mixing chamber prior to starting the test to assure quality control of the mixing process.

7.1.2.2   Vapor refrigerant feed testing, if elected, shall normally be processed first. After the equipment reaches stabilized conditions of condensing temperature and/or storage tank pressure, the vapor feed recovery rate shall be measured. One method is to start measuring the vapor refrigerant recovery rate when 85% of refrigerant remains in the mixing chamber and continue for a period of time sufficient to achieve the accuracy in 9.2. If liquid feed is not elected, complete Step 7.1.2.4.

7.1.2.3   Liquid refrigerant feed testing, if elected, shall be processed next. After the equipment reaches stabilized conditions, the liquid feed recovery rate shall be measured. One method is to wait 2 minutes after starting liquid feed and then measure the liquid refrigerant recovery rate for a period of time sufficient to achieve the accuracy in 9.1. Continue liquid recovery operation as called for in 7.1.2.4.

7.1.2.4   Continue recovery operation until all liquid is removed from the mixing chamber and vapor is removed to the point where the equipment shuts down per automatic means or is manually stopped per the operating instructions.

7.1.2.5   After collecting the first contaminated refrigerant sample batch, the liquid and vapor value of the apparatus shall be closed and the mixing chamber pressure recorded after 1 minute as required in 9.5. After preparing a second contaminated refrigerant sample batch, continue recovery until the storage container reaches 80% liquid fill level. After recycling and measuring the recycle rate per section 7.1.3, set this container aside for the vapor sample in 8.2.2.

7.1.2.6   Interruptions in equipment operations as called for in instruction manual are allowable.

7.1.3   Recycle as called for in equipment operating instructions. Determine recycle rate by appropriate means as required in 9.3.

7.1.4   Repeat steps 7.1.2, 7.1.2.4, and 7.1.3 with contaminated refrigerant sample until equipment indicator(s) show need to change filter(s). It will not be necessary to repeat the recycle rate determination in 7.1.3.

7.1.4.1   For equipment with a multiple pass recirculating filter system, analyze the contents of the previous storage container.

7.1.4.2   For equipment with a single pass filter system, analyze the contents of the current storage container.

7.1.5   Refrigerant loss due to the equipment's non-condensable gas purge shall be determined by appropriate means. (See Section 9.4.)

7.2   System Dependent Equipment. This procedure shall be used for vacuum rating of all system dependent equipment. Liquid refrigerant recovery rate, vapor refrigerant recovery rate, and recycle rate are not tested on system dependent systems.

7.2.1   The apparatus operation and testing shall be conducted at 75 F ±2 F. [23.9 °C. ±/1.1. °C.].

7.2.2   The apparatus shall be charged with refrigerant per its system design specifications.

7.2.3   For measurement of final recovery vacuum as required in 9.5, first shut the balance line isolation valve and wait 1 minute for pressure to balance. Then connect and operate the recovery system per manufacturers recommendations. When the evacuation is completed, open the balance line isolation valve and measure the pressure in the balance line.

Section 8. Sampling and Chemical Analysis Methods

8.1   The referee test methods for the various contaminants are summarized in the following paragraphs. Detailed test procedures are included in Appendix A “Test Procedures for ARI STD 700.” If alternate test methods are employed, the user must be able to demonstrate that they produce results equivalent to the specified referee method.

8.2 Refrigerant Sampling.

8.2.1   Sampling Precautions. Special precautions should be taken to assure that representative samples are obtained for analysis. Sampling shall be done by trained laboratory personnel following accepted sampling and safety procedures.

8.2.2   Gas Phase Sample. A gas phase sample shall be obtained for determining the non-condensables. Since non-condensable gases, if present, will concentrate in the vapor phase of the refrigerant, care must be exercised to eliminate introduction of air during the sample transfer. Purging is not and acceptable procedure for a gas phase sample since it may introduce a foreign product. Since R11, R113 and R123 have normal boiling points at or above room temperature, noncondensable determination is not required for these refrigerants.

8.2.2.1   The sample cylinder shall be connected to an evacuated gas sampling bulb by means of a manifold. The manifold should have a valve arrangement that facilitates evacuation of all connecting tubing leading to the sampling bulb.

8.2.2.2   After the manifold has been evacuated, close the valve to the pump and open the valve on the system. Allow the pressure to equilibrate and close valves.

8.2.3   Liquid Phase Sample. A liquid phase sample is required for all tests listed in this standard, except the test for non-condensables.

8.2.3.1   Place an empty sample cylinder with the valve open in an oven at 230 F [110 °C] for one hour. Remove it from the oven while hot, immediately connect to an evacuation system and evacuate to less than 1mm. mercury (1000 microns). Close the valve and allow it to cool.

8.2.3.2   The valve and lines from the unit to be sampled shall be clean and dry. Connect the line to the sample cylinder loosely. Purge through the loose connection. Make the connection tight at the end of the purge period. Take the sample as a liquid by chilling the sample cylinder slightly. Accurate analysis requires that the sample container be filled to at least 60% by volume; however under no circumstances should the cylinder be filled to more than 80% by volume. This can be accomplished by weighing the empty cylinder and then the cylinder with refrigerant. When the desired amount of refrigerant has been collected, close the valve(s) and disconnect the sample cylinder immediately.

8.2.3.3   Check the sample cylinder for leaks and record the gross weight.

8.3 Water Content.

8.3.1.   The Coulometric Karl Fischer Titration shall be the primary test method for determining the water content of refrigerants. This method is described in Appendix A. This method can be used for refrigerants that are either a liquid or a gas at room temperature, including Refrigerants 11 and 13. For all refrigerants, the sample for water analysis shall be taken from the liquid phase of the container to be tested. Proper operation of the analytical method requires special equipment and an experienced operator. The precision of the results is excellent if proper sampling and handling procedures are followed. Refrigerants containing a colored dye can be successfully analyzed for water using this method.

8.3.2   The Karl Fischer Test Method is an acceptable alternative test method for determining the water content of refrigerants. This method is described in ASTM Standard for “Water in gases Using Karl Fisher Reagent” E700-79, reapproved 1984 (American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia, PA).

8.3.3   Report the moisture level in parts per million by weight if a sample is required.

8.4   Chloride. The refrigerant shall be tested for chlorides as an indication of the presence of hydrochloric or similar acids. The recommended procedure is intended for use with new or reclaimed refrigerants. Significant amounts of oil may interfere with the results by indicating a failure in the absence of chlorides.

8.4.1   The test method shall be that described in Appendix A “Test Procedures for ARI-700.” The test will show noticeable turbidity at equivalent chloride levels of about 3 ppm by weight or higher.

8.4.2   The results of the test shall not exhibit any sign of turbity. Report results as “pass” or “fail.”

8.5   Acidity.

8.5.1   The acidity test uses the titration principle to detect any compound that is highly soluble in water and ionizes as an acid. The test method shall be that described in Appendix A. “Test Procedures for ARI-700.” The test may not be suitable for determination of high molecular weight organic acids; however these acids will be found in the high boiling residue test outlined in Section 5.7. The test requires about a 100 to 120 gram sample and has a low detection limit of 0.1 ppm by weight as HC1.

8.6   High Boiling Residue.

8.6.1   High boiling residue will be determined by measuring the residue of a standard volume of refrigerant after evaporation. The refrigerant sample shall be evaporated at room temperature or a temperature 50 F [10°.0C], above the boiling point of the sample using a Goetz tube as specified in Appendix A “Test Procedures for ARI-700.” Oils and or organic acids will be captured by this method.

8.6.2   The value for high boiling residue shall be expressed as a percentage by volume.

8.7   Particulates/Solids.

8.7.1   A measured amount of sample is evaporated from a Goetz bulb under controlled temperature conditions. The particulates/solids shall be determined by visual examination of the empty Goetz bulb after the sample has evaporated completely. Presence of dirt, rust or other particulate contamination is reported a “fail.” For details of this test method, refer to Appendix B “Test Procedures for ARI-700.”

8.8   Non-Condensables

8.8.1   A vapor phase sample shall be used for determination of non-condensables. Non-condensable gases consist primarily of air accumulated in the vapor phase of refrigerant containing tanks. The solubility of air in the refrigerants liquid phase is extremely low and air is not significant as a liquid phase contaminant. The presence of non-condensable gases may reflect poor quality control in transferring refrigerants to storage tanks and cylinders.

8.8.2   The test method shall be gas chromatography with a thermal conductivity detector as described in Appendix A “Test Procedures for ARI-700.”

8.8.2.1   The Federal Specification for “Fluorocarbon Refrigerants,” BB-F-1421B, dated March 5, 1992, section 4.4.2 (perchloroethylene method) is an acceptable alternate test method.

8.8.3   Report the level of non-condensable as percent by volume.

Section 9.   Performance Calculation and Rating

9.1   The liquid refrigerant recovery rate shall be expressed in pounds per minute [kg/min] and measured by weight change at the mixing chamber (See Figure 1) divided by elapsed time to an accuracy within .02 lbs/min. [.009 kg/min]. Ratings using the Push/Pull method shall be identified “Push/Pull”. Equipment may be rated by both methods.

9.2   The vapor refrigerant recovery rate shall be expressed in pounds per minute [kg/min] and measured by weight change at the mixing chamber (See Figure 1) divided by elapsed time to an accuracy within .02 lbs/min. [.0.009 kg/min].

9.3   The recycle rate is defined in 3.7 and expressed in pounds per minute [kg/min] of flow and shall be per ASHRAE 41.7-84 “Procedure For Fluid Measurement Of Gases” or ASHRAE 41.8-89 “Standard Method of Flow of Fluids—Liquids.”

9.3.1   For equipment using multipass recycling or a separate sequence, the recycle rate shall be determined by dividing the net weight W of the refrigerant to be recycled by the actual time T required to recycle the refrigerant. Any set-up or operator interruptions shall not be included in the time T. The accuracy of the recycle rate shall be within .02 lbs/min. [.009 kg/min].

9.3.2   If no separate recycling sequence is used, the recycle rate shall be the higher of the vapor refrigerant recovery rate or the liquid refrigerant recovery rate. The recycle rate shall match a process which leads to contaminant levels in 9.6. Specifically, a recovery rate determined from bypassing a contaminant removal device cannot be used as a recycle rate when the contaminant levels in 9.6 are determined by passing the refrigerant through the containment removal device.

9.4   Refrigerant loss due to non-condensable purging shall be less than 5%. This rating shall be expressed as “passed” if less than 5%.

This calculation will be based upon net loss of non-condensables and refrigerant due to the purge divided by the initial net content. The net loss shall be determined by weighing before and after the purge, by collecting purged gases, or an equivalent method.

9.5   The final recovery vacuum shall be the mixing chamber pressure called for in 7.1.2.5 expressed in inches of mercury vacuum, [mm Hg or kP]. The accuracy of the measurement shall be within ±.1 inch [±2.5mm] of Hg and rounding down to the nearest whole number.

9.6   The contaminant levels remaining after testing shall be published as follows:

Moisture content, PPM by weight

Chloride ions, Pass/Fail

Acidity, PPM by weight

High boiling residue, percentage by volume

Particulate/solid, Pass/Fail

Non-condensables, % by volume

9.7   Product Literature: Except as provided under product labelling in Section 11. performance ratings per 9.1, 9.2, 9.3, and 9.5 must be grouped together and shown for all listed refrigerants (11.2) subject to limitations of 9.8. Wherever any contaminant levels per 9.6 are rated, all ratings in 9.6 must be shown for all listed refrigerants subject to limitations of 9.8. The type of equipment in 11.1 must be included with either grouping. Optional ratings in 9.8 need not be shown.

9.8   Ratings shall include all of the parameters for each designed refrigerant in 11.2 as shown in Tables 2 and 3.

Table 2—Performance

Parameter/type of equipmentRecoveryRecovery/ recycleRecycleSystem dependent equipment
Liquid refrigerant recovery rate(2)(2)N/AN/A
Vapor refrigerant recovery rate(2)(2)N/AN/A
Final recovery vacuum(1)(1)N/A(1)
Recycle rateN/A(1)(1)N/A
Refrigerant loss due to non-condensable purging(3)(1)(1)N/A

1Mandatory rating.

2For a recovery or recovery/recycle unit, one must rate for either liquid feed only or vapor feed only or can rate for both. If rating only the one, the other shall be indicated by “N/A.”

3For Recovery Equipment, these parameters are optional. If not rated, use N/A.

Table 3—Contaminants

Contaminant/type of equipment Recovery Recovery/recycle Recycle System dependent equipment
Moisture content(*)xxNA.
Chloride ions(*)xxNA.
Acidity(*)xxNA.
High boiling residue(*)xxNA.
Particulates(*)xxNA.
Non-condensables(*)xxNA.

*For Recovery Equipment, these parameters are optional. If not rated, use N/A.

xMandatory rating.

Section 10. Tolerances

10.1   Any equipment tested shall produce contaminant levels not higher than the published ratings. The liquid refrigerant recovery rate, vapor refrigerant recovery rate, final recovery vacuum and recycle rate shall not be less than the published ratings.

Section 11. Product Labelling

11.1   Type of equipment. The type of equipment shall be as listed:

11.1.1   Recovery only

11.1.2   System Dependent Recovery

11.1.3   Recovery/Recycle

11.1.4   Recycle only

11.2   Designated refrigerants and the following as applicable for each:

11.2.1   Liquid Recovery Rate

11.2.2   Vapor Recovery Rate

11.2.3   Final Recovery Vacuum

11.2.4   Recycle Rate

11.3   The nameplate shall also conform to the labeling requirements established for certified recycling and recovery equipment established at 40 CFR 82.158(h).

Attachment to Appendix B1

Particulate Used in Standard Contaminated Refrigerant Sample.

1. Particulate Specification

1.1   The particulate material pm will be a blend of 50% coarse air cleaner dust as received, and 50% retained on a 200-mesh screen. The coarse air cleaner dust is available from: AC Spark Plug Division, General Motors Corporation, Flint, Michigan.

1.2   Preparation of Particulate Materials

To prepare the blend of contaminant, first wet screen a quantity of coarse air cleaner dust on a 200-mesh screen (particle retention 74 pm). This is done by placing a portion of the dust on a 200-mesh screen and running water through the screen while stirring the dust with the fingers. The fine contaminant particles passing through the screen are discarded. The +200 mesh particles collected on the screen are removed and dried for one hour at 230 F [110 °C]. The blend of standard contaminant is prepared by mixing 50% by weight of coarse air cleaner dust as received after drying for one hour at 230 F [110 °C] with 50% by weight of the +200 mesh screened dust.

1.3   The coarse air cleaner dust as received and the blend used as the standard contaminant have the following approximate particle size analysis: Wt. % in various size ranges, pm.

Size range As received Blend
  0-5126
  5-10126
10-20147
20-402311
40-803032
80-200938

[58 FR 28712, May 14, 1993, as amended at 59 FR 42960, Aug. 19, 1994. Redesignated and amended at 68 FR 43815, July 24, 2003]

Appendix B2 to Subpart F of Part 82—Performance of Refrigerant Recovery, Recycling, and/or Reclaim Equipment

This appendix is based on the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute Standard 740-1995.

Section 1. Purpose

1.1   Purpose. The purpose of this standard is to establish methods of testing for rating and evaluating the performance of refrigerant recovery, and/or recycling equipment and general equipment requirements (herein referred to as “equipment”) for contaminant or purity levels, capacity, speed and purge loss to minimize emission into the atmosphere of designated refrigerants.

Section 2. Scope

2.1   Scope. This standard applies to equipment for recovering and/or recycling single refrigerants, azeotropics, zeotropic blends, and their normal contaminants from refrigerant systems. This standard defines the test apparatus, test gas mixtures, sampling procedures and analytical techniques that will be used to determine the performance of refrigerant recovery and/or recycling equipment (hereinafter, “equipment”).

Section 3. Definitions

3.1   Definitions. All terms in this appendix will follow the definitions in §82.152 unless otherwise defined in this appendix.

3.2   Clearing Refrigerant. Procedures used to remove trapped refrigerant from equipment before switching from one refrigerant to another.

3.3   High Temperature Vapor Recovery Rate. For equipment having at least one designated refrigerant (see 11.2) with a boiling point in the range of −50 to +10 °C, the rate will be measured for R-22, or the lowest boiling point refrigerant if R-22 is not a designated refrigerant.

3.4   Published Ratings. A statement of the assigned values of those performance characteristics, under stated rating conditions, by which a unit may be chosen to fit its application. These values apply to all units of like nominal size and type (identification) produced by the same manufacturer. As used herein, the term “published rating” includes the rating of all performance characteristics shown on the unit or published in specifications, advertising or other literature controlled by the manufacturer, at stated rating conditions.

3.5   Push/Pull Method. The push/pull refrigerant recovery method is defined as the process of transferring liquid refrigerant from a refrigeration system to a receiving vessel by lowering the pressure in the vessel and raising the pressure in the system, and by connecting a separate line between the system liquid port and the receiving vessel.

3.6   Recycle Flow Rate. The amount of refrigerant processed divided by the time elapsed in the recycling mode. For equipment which uses a separate recycling sequence, the recycle rate does not include the recovery rate (or elapsed time). For equipment which does not use a separate recycling sequence, the recycle rate is a rate based solely on the higher of the liquid or vapor recovery rate, by which the contaminant levels were measured.

3.7   Residual Trapped Refrigerant. Refrigerant remaining in equipment after clearing.

3.8   Shall, Should, Recommended or It Is Recommended shall be interpreted as follows:

3.8.1   Shall. Where “shall” or “shall not” is used for a provision specified, that provision is mandatory if compliance with this appendix is claimed.

3.8.2   Should, Recommended or It Is Recommended is used to indicate provisions which are not mandatory but which are desirable as good practice.

3.9   Standard Contaminated Refrigerant Sample. A mixture of new or reclaimed refrigerant and specified quantities of identified contaminants which constitute the mixture to be processed by the equipment under test. These contaminant levels are expected only from severe service conditions.

3.10   Trapped Refrigerant. The amount of refrigerant remaining in the equipment after the recovery or recovery/recycling operation but before clearing.

3.11   Vapor Recovery Rate. The average rate that refrigerant is withdrawn from the mixing chamber between two pressures as vapor recovery rate is changing pressure and temperature starting at saturated conditions either 24 °C or at the boiling point 100 kPa (abs), whichever is higher. The final pressure condition is 10% of the initial pressure, but not lower than the equipment final recovery vacuum and not higher than 100 kPa (abs).

Section 4. General Equipment Requirements

4.1   Equipment Information. The equipment manufacturer shall provide operating instructions, necessary maintenance procedures and source information for replacement parts and repair.

4.2   Filter Replacement. The equipment shall indicate when any filter/drier(s) needs replacement. This requirement can be met by use of a moisture transducer and indicator light, by use of a sight glass/moisture indicator or by some measurement of the amount of refrigerant processed such as a flow meter or hour meter. Written instructions such as “to change the filter every 181 kg, or every 30 days” shall not be acceptable except for equipment in large systems where the liquid recovery rate is greater than 11.3 kg/min where the filter/drier(s) would be changed for every job.

4.3   Purge of Non-Condensable. If non-condensables are purged, the equipment shall either automatically purge non-condensables or provide indicating means to guide the purge process.

4.4   Purge Loss. The total refrigerant loss due to purging non-condensables, draining oil and clearing refrigerant (see 9.5) shall be less than 3% (by weight) of total processed refrigerant.

4.5   Permeation Rate. High pressure hose assemblies 58 in. [16 mm] nominal and smaller shall not exceed a permeation rate of 3.9 g/cm2/yr (internal surface) at a temperature of 48.8 °C. Hose assemblies that UL recognized as having passed ANSI/UL 1963 requirements shall be accepted without testing. See 7.1.4.

4.6   Clearing Trapped Refrigerant. For equipment rated for more than one refrigerant, the manufacturer shall provide a method and instructions which will accomplish connections and clearing within 15 minutes. Special equipment, other than a vacuum pump or manifold gauge set shall be furnished. The clearing procedure shall not rely upon the storage cylinder below saturated pressure conditions at ambient temperature.

4.7   Temperature. The equipment shall be evaluated at 24 °C with additional limited evaluation at 40 °C. Normal operating conditions range from 10 °C to 40 °C.

4.8   Exemptions. Equipment intended for recovery only shall be exempt from 4.2 and 4.3.

Section 5. Contaminated Refrigerants

5.1   Sample Characteristics. The standard contaminated refrigerant sample shall have the characteristics specified in Table 1, except as provided in 5.2.

5.2   Recovery-Only Testing. Recovery equipment not rated for any specific contaminant shall be tested with new or reclaimed refrigerant.

Section 6. Test Apparatus

6.1   General Recommendations. The recommended test apparatus is described in the following paragraphs. If alternate test apparatus are employed, the user shall be able to demonstrate that they produce results equivalent to the specified referee apparatus.

6.2   Self-Contained Equipment Test Apparatus. The apparatus, shown in Figure 1, shall consist of:

6.2.1   Mixing Chamber. A mixing chamber consisting of a tank with a conical-shaped bottom, a bottom port and piping for delivering refrigerant to the equipment, various ports and valves for adding refrigerant to the chamber and stirring means for mixing.

6.2.2   Filling Storage Cylinder. The storage cylinder to be filled by the refrigerant transferred shall be cleaned and at the pressure of the recovered refrigerant at the beginning of the test. It will not be filled over 80%, by volume.

6.2.3   Vapor Feed. Vapor refrigerant feed consisting of evaporator, control valves and piping to create a 3.0 °C superheat condition at an evaporating temperature of 21 °C ±2K.

6.2.4   Alternative Vapor Feed. An alternative method for vapor feed shall be to pass the refrigerant through a boiler and then through an automatic pressure regulating valve set at different saturation pressures, moving from saturated pressure at 24 °C to final pressure of recovery.

6.2.5   Liquid Feed. Liquid refrigerant feed consisting of control valves, sampling port and piping.

6.2.6   Instrumentation. Instrumentation capable of measuring weight, temperature, pressure and refrigerant loss, as required.

Table 1—Standard Contaminated Refrigerant Samples

   R11 R12 R13 R22 R113 R114 R123 R134a R500 R502 R503
Moisture Content: ppm by Weight of Pure refrigerant10080302001008520020020020030
Particulate Content: ppm by Weight of Pure Refrigerant Characterized by18080NA80808080808080NA
Acid Content: ppm by Weight of Pure Refrigerant—(mg KOH per kg Refrigerant) Characterized by2500100NA500400200500100100100NA
Mineral Oil Content:
% by Weight of Pure Refrigerant205NA5202020555NA
Viscosity (SUS)3001503003003003001503150150
Non-Condensable Gases (Air Content): % by VolumeNA333NA3NA3333

1Particulate content shall consist of inert materials and shall comply with particulate requirements in appendix B.

2Acid consists of 60% oleic acid and 40% hydrochloric acid on a total number basis.

3Synthetic ester-based oil.

eCFR graphic er24jy03.007.gif

View or download PDF

6.3   Size. The size of the mixing chamber shall be a minimum of .09 m3. The bottom port and the refrigerant feed shall depend on the size of the equipment. Typically, the mixing valves and piping shall be 9.5 mm. For large equipment to be used on chillers, the minimum inside diameter of ports, valves and pipings shall be the smaller of the manufacturer's recommendation or 37 mm.

6.4   System Dependent Equipment Test Apparatus. This test apparatus is to be used for final recovery vacuum rating of all system dependent equipment.

6.4.1   Test Setup. The test apparatus shown in Figure 2 consists of a complete refrigeration system. The manufacturer shall identify the refrigerants to be tested. The test apparatus can be modified to facilitate operation or testing of the system dependent equipment if the modifications to the apparatus are specifically described within the manufacturer's literature. (See Figure 2.) A 6.3 mm balance line shall be connected across the test apparatus between the high and low-pressure sides, with an isolation valve located at the connection to the compressor high side. A 6.3 mm access port with a valve core shall be located in the balance line for the purpose of measuring final recovery vacuum at the conclusion of the test.

Section 7. Performance Testing

7.1   General Testing.

7.1.1   Temperatures. Testing shall be conducted at an ambient temperature of 24 °C ±1K except high temperature vapor recovery shall be at 40 °C ±1K. The evaporator conditions of 6.2.3 shall be maintained as long as liquid refrigerant remains in the mixing chamber.

7.1.2   Refrigerants. The equipment shall be tested for all designated refrigerants (see 11.2). All tests in Section 7 shall be completed for each refrigerant before starting tests with the next refrigerant.

7.1.3   Selected Tests. Tests shall be as appropriate for the equipment type and ratings parameters selected (see 9.9, 11.1 and 11.2).

7.1.4   Hose Assemblies. For the purpose of limiting refrigerant emissions to the atmosphere, hose assemblies shall be tested for permeation according to ANSI/UL Standard 1963, Section 40.10.

7.2   Equipment Preparation and Operation. The equipment shall be prepared and operated per the operating instructions.

7.3   Test Batch. The test batch consisting of refrigerant sample (see Section 5) of the test refrigerant shall be prepared and thoroughly mixed. Continued mixing or stirring shall be required during the test while liquid refrigerant remains in the mixing chamber. The mixing chamber shall be filled to 80% level by volume.

7.3.1   Control Test Batch. Prior to starting the test for the first batch for each refrigerant, a liquid sample will be drawn from the mixing chamber and analyzed per Section 8 to assure that contaminant levels match Table 1 within ±10 ppm for moisture, ±20 ppm for particulate, ±20 ppm for oleic acid and ±0.5% for oil.

7.4   Recovery Tests (Recovery and Recovery/Recycle Equipment).

7.4.1   Determining Recovery Rates. The liquid and vapor refrigerant recovery rates shall be measured during the first test batch for each refrigerant (see 9.1, 9.2 and 9.4). Equipment preparation and recovery cylinder changeover shall not be included in elapsed time measurements for determining vapor recovery rate and liquid refrigerant recovery rate. Operations such as subcooling the recovery cylinder shall be included. Recovery cylinder shall be the same size as normally furnished or specified in the instructions by the equipment manufacturer. Oversized tanks shall not be permitted.

7.4.1.1   Liquid Refrigerant Recovery Rate. If elected, the recovery rate using the liquid refrigerant feed means (see 6.2.5) shall be determined. After the equipment reaches stabilized conditions of condensing temperature and/or recovery cylinder pressure, the recovery process shall be stopped and an initial weight shall be taken of the mixing chamber (see 9.2). The recovery process shall be continued for a period of time sufficient to achieve the accuracy in 9.4. The recovery process shall be stopped and a final weight shall be taken of the mixing chamber.

eCFR graphic er24jy03.008.gif

View or download PDF

7.4.1.2   Vapor Refrigerant Recovery Rate. If elected, the average vapor flow rate shall be measured to accuracy requirements in clause 9.4 under conditions with no liquid refrigerant in the mixing chamber. The liquid recovery feed means shall be used. At initial conditions of saturated vapor at the higher of 24 °C or the boiling temperature (100 kPa absolute pressure), the weight of the mixing chamber and the pressure shall be recorded. At final conditions representing pressure in the mixing chamber of 10% of the initial condition, but not less than the final recovery vacuum (see 9.6) nor more than 100 kPa, measure the weight of the mixing chamber and the elapsed time.

7.4.1.3   High Temperature Vapor Recovery Rate. Applicable for equipment having at least one designated refrigerant (see 11.2) with a boiling point between −50 °C and +10 °C. Measure the rate for R-22, or the refrigerant with the lowest boiling point if R-22 is not a designated refrigerant. Repeat the test in 7.4.1.2 at saturated conditions at 40 °C and continue to operate equipment to assure it will achieve the final recovery vacuum (see 7.4.3).

7.4.2   Recovery Operation. This test is for determining the final recovery vacuum and the ability to remove contaminants as appropriate. If equipment is rated for liquid recovery (see 7.4.1.3), liquid recovery feed means described in 6.2.5 shall be used. If not, vapor recovery means described in 6.2.3 or 6.2.4 shall be used. Continue recovery operation until all liquid is removed from the test apparatus and vapor is removed to the point where equipment shuts down by automatic means or is manually shut off per operating instructions.

7.4.2.1   Oil Draining. Capture oil from the equipment at intervals as required in the instructions. Record the weight of the container. Completely remove refrigerant from oil by evacuation or other appropriate means. The weight difference shall be used in 9.5.2.

7.4.3   Final Recovery Vacuum. At the end of the first test batch for each refrigerant, the liquid valve and vapor valve of the apparatus shall be closed. After waiting 1 minute, the mixing chamber pressure shall be recorded (see 9.6).

7.4.4   Residual Refrigerant. This test will measure the mass of remaining refrigerant in the equipment after clearing and therefore the potential for mixing refrigerants (see 4.6).

7.4.4.1   Initial Conditions. At the end of the last test for each batch for each refrigerant, the equipment shall be disconnected from the test apparatus (Figure 1). Recycle per 7.5, if appropriate. Perform refrigerant clearing operations as called for in the instruction manual. Capture and record the weight of any refrigerant which would have been emitted to the atmosphere during the clearing process for use in 9.5. If two loops are used for recycling, trapped refrigerant shall be measured for both.

7.4.4.2   Residual Trapped Refrigerant. Evacuate an empty test cylinder to 1.0 kPa absolute. Record the empty weight of the test cylinder. Open all valves to the equipment so as to provide access to all trapped refrigerant. Connect the equipment to the test cylinder and operate valves to recover the residual refrigerant. Record the weight of the test cylinder using a recovery cylinder pressure no less than specified in 6.2.2. Place the test cylinder in liquid nitrogen for a period of 30 minutes or until a vacuum of 1000 microns is reached, whichever occurs first.

7.5   Recycling Tests (Recovery/Recycle Equipment).

7.5.1   Recycling Operation. As each recovery cylinder is filled in 7.4.2, recycle according to operating instructions. There will not necessarily be a separate recycling sequence. Note non-condensable purge measurement in 9.5.

7.5.1.1   Recycle Flow Rate. While recycling the first recovery cylinder for each refrigerant, determine the recycling flow rate by appropriate means (see 9.3) to achieve the accuracy required in 9.4.

7.5.2   Non-Condensable Sample. After completing 7.4.3, prepare a second test batch (7.3). Recover per 7.4.2 until the current recovery cylinder is filled to 80% level by volume. Recycle per 7.5.1. Mark this cylinder and set aside for taking the vapor sample. For equipment having both an internal tank of at least 3 kg refrigerant capacity and an external recovery cylinder, two recovery cylinders shall be marked and set aside. The first is the cylinder described above. The second cylinder is the final recovery cylinder after filling it to 80% level by volume and recycling.

7.5.3   Liquid Sample for Analysis. Repeat steps 7.3, 7.4.2 and 7.5.1 with further test batches until indication means in 4.2 show the filter/drier(s) need replacing.

7.5.3.1   Multiple Pass. For equipment with a separate recycling circuit (multiple pass), set aside the current cylinder and draw the liquid sample (see 7.4) from the previous cylinder.

7.5.3.2   Single Pass. For equipment with the single pass recycling circuit, draw the liquid sample (see 7.4) from the current cylinder.

7.6   Measuring Refrigerant Loss. Refrigerant loss due to non-condensables shall be determined by appropriate means (see 9.5.1). The loss could occur in 7.4.1, 7.4.2 and 7.5.1.

Section 8. Sampling and Chemical Analysis Methods

8.1   Chemical Analysis. Chemical analysis methods shall be specified in appropriate standards such as ARI 700-95 and Appendix C to ARI Standard 700-95.

8.2   Refrigerant Sampling.

8.2.1   Water Content. The water content in refrigerant shall be measured by the Karl Fischer Analytical Method or by the Karl Fischer Coulometric techniques. Report the moisture level in parts per million by weight.

8.2.2   Chloride Ions. Chloride ions shall be measured by turbidity tests. At this time, quantitative results have not been defined. Report chloride content as “pass” or “fail.” In the future, when quantitative results are possible, report chloride content as parts per million by weight.

8.2.3   Acidity. The acidity test uses the titration principle. Report the acidity in parts per million by weight (mg KOH/kg) of sample.

8.2.4   High Boiling Residue. High boiling residues shall use measurement of the volume of residue after evaporating a standard volume of refrigerant. Using weight measurement and converting to volumetric units is acceptable. Report high boiling residues as percent by volume.

8.2.5   Particulates/Solids. The particulates/solids measurement employs visual examination. Report results as “pass” or “fail.”

8.2.6   Non-condensables. The level of contamination by non-condensable gases in the base refrigerant being recycled shall be determined by gas chromatography. Report results as percent by volume.

Section 9. Performance Calculation and Rating

9.1   Vapor Refrigerant Recovery Rate. This rate shall be measured by weight change of the mixing chamber divided by elapsed time (see 7.4.1.2). The units shall be kg/min and the accuracy shall be per 9.4.

9.1.1   High Temperature Vapor Recovery Rate.

9.2   Liquid Refrigerant Recovery Rate. This rate shall be measured by weight change of the mixing chamber divided by elapsed time (see 7.4.1.3). The units shall be kg/min and the accuracy shall be per 9.4.

9.3   Recycle Flow Rate. The recycle flow rate shall be as defined in 3.10, expressed in kg/min, and the accuracy shall be per 9.4.

9.3.1   For equipment using multi-pass recycling or a separate sequence, the recycle rate shall be determined by dividing the net weight W of the refrigerant to be recycled by the actual time T required to recycle. Any set-up or operator interruptions shall not be included in the time T.

9.3.2   If no separate recycling sequence is used, the recycle rate shall be the higher of the vapor refrigerant recovery rate or the liquid refrigerant recovery rate. The recycle rate shall match a process which leads to contaminant levels in 9.9. Specifically, a recovery rate determined from bypassing a contaminant removal device cannot be used as a recycle rate when the contaminant levels in 9.9 are determined by passing the refrigerant through the contaminant removal device.

9.4   Accuracy of Flow Rates. The accuracy of test measurements in 9.1, 9.2 and 9.3 shall be ±008 kg/min or flow rates up to .42 kg/min and ±2.0% for flow rates larger than .42 kg/min. Ratings shall be expressed to the nearest .02 kg/min.

9.5   Refrigerant Loss. This calculation will be based upon the net loss of refrigerant which would have been eliminated in the non-condensable purge process (see 7.5.1), the oil draining process (see 7.4.2.1) and the refrigerant clearing process (see 7.4.4.1), all divided by the net refrigerant content of the test batches. The refrigerant loss shall not exceed 3% by weight.

9.5.1   Non-Condensable Purge. Evacuate an empty container to 2 kPa absolute. Record the empty weight of the container. Place the container in a dry ice bath. Connect the equipment purge connection to the container and operate purge according to operating instructions so as to capture the non-condensables and lost refrigerant. Weigh the cylinder after the recycling is complete. Equivalent means are permissible.

9.5.2   Oil Draining. Refrigerant removed from the oil after draining shall be collected and measured in accordance with 7.4.2.1.

9.5.3   Clearing Unit. Refrigerant captured during the clearing process shall be measured in accordance with 7.4.4.1.

9.6   Final Recovery Vacuum. The final recovery vacuum shall be the mixing chamber pressure in 7.4.3 expressed in kPa. The accuracy of the measurement shall be within 0.33 kPa.

9.7   Residual Trapped Refrigerant. The amount of residual trapped refrigerant shall be the final weight minus the initial weight of the test cylinder in 7.4.4.2, expressed in kg. The accuracy shall be ±0.02 kg and reported to the nearest 0.05 kg.

9.8   Quantity Recycled. The amount of refrigerant processed before changing filters (see 7.5.3) shall be expressed in kg to an accuracy of ±1%.

9.9   Contaminant Levels. The contaminant levels remaining after testing shall be published as follows:

Moisture content, ppm by weight

Chloride ions, pass/fail

Acidity, ppm by weight

High boiling residue, % (by volume)

Particulates-solid, pass/fail (visual examination)

Non-condensables, % (by volume)

9.10   Minimum Data Requirements for Published Ratings. Published ratings shall include all of the parameters as shown in Tables 2 and 3 for each refrigerant designated by the manufacturer.

Section 10. Tolerances

10.1   Tolerances. Performance related parameters shall not be less favorable than the published ratings.

Section 11. Marking and Nameplate Data

11.1   Marking and Nameplate Data. The nameplate shall display the manufacturer's name, model designation, type of equipment, designated refrigerants, capacities and electrical characteristics where applicable. The nameplate shall also conform to the labeling requirements established for certified recycling and recovery equipment established at 40 CFR 82.158(h).

Recommended nameplate voltages for 60 Hertz systems shall include one or more of the utilization voltages shown in Table 1 of ARI Standard 110-90. Recommended nameplate voltages for 50 Hertz systems shall include one or more of the utilization voltages shown in Table 1 of IEC Standard Publication 38, IEC Standard Voltages.

11.2   Data for Designated Refrigerants. For each refrigerant designated, the manufacturer shall include all the following that are applicable per Table 2:

a. Liquid Recovery Rate

b. Vapor Recovery Rate

c. High Temperature Vapor Recovery Rate

d. Final Recovery Vacuum

e. Recycle Flow Rate

f. Residual Trapped Refrigerant

g. Quantity Recycled

Table 2—Performance

Parameter/Type of equipment Recovery Recovery/Recycle Recycle System
dependent
equipment
Liquid Refrigerant Recovery Rate(1)(1)N/AN/A
Vapor Refrigerant Recovery Rate(1)(1)N/AN/A
High Temp. Vapor Recovery Rate(1)(1)N/AN/A
Final Recovery Vacuum(X)(X)N/A(X)
Recycle Flow RateN/A(X)(X)N/A
Refrigerant Loss(3)(X)(X)(3)
Residual Trapped Refrigerant(2)(2)(2)(2)
Quantity RecycledN/A(X)(X)N/A

XMandatory rating.

1For a recovery or recovery/recycle unit, one must rate either liquid refrigerant recovery rate or vapor refrigerant recovery rate or one can rate for both. If rating only the one, the other shall be indicated by N/A, “not applicable.”

2Mandatory rating for equipment tested for multiple refrigerants.

3Mandatory rating if multiple refrigerants, oil separation or non-condensable purge are rated.

Note: For recovery equipment, these parameters are optional. If not rated use N/A, “not applicable.”

Table 3—Contaminants

Contaminant/Type of equipment Recovery Recovery/Recycle Recycle System
dependent
equipment
Moisture Content(*)(X)(X)N/A
Chloride Ions(*)(X)(X)N/A
Acidity(*)(X)(X)N/A
High Boiling Residue(*)(X)(X)N/A
Particulates(*)(X)(X)N/A
Non-Condensables(*)(X)(X)N/A

*For recovery equipment, these parameters are optional. If not rated, use N/A, “not applicable.”

XMandatory rating.

Attachment 1 to Appendix B2 to Subpart F of Part 82—References

Listed here are all standards, handbooks, and other publications essential to the formation and implementation of the standard. All references in this appendix are considered as part of this standard.

  ANSI/UL Standard 1963, Refrigerant Recovery/Recycling Equipment, First Edition, 1989, American National Standards Institute/Underwriters Laboratories, Inc.

  ARI Standard 110-90, Air-Conditioning and Refrigerating Equipment Nameplate Voltages, Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute

  ARI Standard 700-95, Specifications for Fluorocarbon and Other Refrigerants, Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute

  ASHRAE Terminology of Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, & Refrigeration, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc., 1991

  IEC Standard Publication 38, IEC Standard Voltages, International Electrotechnical Commission, 1983

Attachment 2 to Appendix B2 to Subpart F of Part 82-Particulate Used in Standard Contaminated Refrigerant Sample

1. Particulate Specification

B1.1   The particulate material (pm) will be a blend of 50% coarse air cleaner dust as received, and 50% retained on a 200-mesh screen. The coarse air cleaner dust is available from: AC Spark Plug Division; General Motors Corporation; Flint, Michigan.

B1.2   Preparation of Particulate Materials.

To prepare the blend of contaminant, first wet screen a quantity of coarse air cleaner dust on a 200-mesh screen (particle retention 74 pm). This is done by placing a portion of the dust on a 200-mesh screen and running water through the screen while stirring the dust with the fingers. The fine contaminant particles passing through the screen are discarded. The +200-mesh particles collected on the screen are removed and dried for one hour at 110 °C. The blend of standard contaminant is prepared by mixing 50% by weight of coarse air cleaner dust as received (after drying for one hour at 110 °C) with 50% by weight of the +200 mesh screened dust.

B1.3   Particle Size Analysis.

The coarse air cleaner dust as received and the blend used as the standard contaminant have the following approximate particle size analysis:

Wt. % in various size ranges, pm.

Size range As received Blend
0-5126
5-10126
10-20147
20-402311
40-803032
80-200938

[68 FR 43815, July 24, 2003; 68 FR 54678, Sept. 18, 2003]

Appendix B3 to Subpart F of Part 82—Performance of Refrigerant Recovery, Recycling, and/or Reclaim Equipment

This appendix is based on the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute Standard 740-2016, Performance Rating of Refrigerant Recovery Equipment and Recovery/Recycling Equipment.

Section 1. Purpose

1.1   The purpose of this standard is to establish methods of testing for rating and evaluating the performance of refrigerant recovery, and/or recycling equipment and general equipment requirements (herein referred to as “equipment”) for contaminant or purity levels, capacity, speed and purge loss to minimize emission into the atmosphere of designated refrigerants.

Section 2. Scope

2.1   This standard applies to equipment for recovering and/or recycling single refrigerants, azeotropes, zeotropic blends, and their normal contaminants from refrigerant systems. This standard defines the test apparatus, test gas mixtures, sampling procedures and analytical techniques that will be used to determine the performance of refrigerant recovery and/or recycling equipment (hereinafter, “equipment”). Appendix B4 of this subpart establishes standards for recovery/recycling equipment used with flammable refrigerants.

Section 3. Definitions

3.1   Definitions. All terms in this appendix will follow the definitions in §82.152 unless otherwise defined in this appendix.

3.2   Clearing Refrigerant. Procedures used to remove trapped refrigerant(s) from equipment before switching from one refrigerant to another.

3.3   High Temperature Vapor Recovery Rate. For equipment having at least one designated refrigerant (see Section 11.2 of this appendix) with a boiling point in the range of −50 to +10 °C, the rate will be measured for R-22, or the lowest boiling point refrigerant if R-22 is not a designated refrigerant.

3.4   Published Ratings. A statement of the assigned values of those performance characteristics, under stated rating conditions, by which a unit may be chosen to fit its application. These values apply to all units of like nominal size and type (identification) produced by the same manufacturer. As used herein, the term “published rating” includes the rating of all performance characteristics shown on the unit or published in specifications, advertising, or other literature controlled by the manufacturer, at stated rating conditions.

3.5   Push/Pull Liquid Recovery. The push/pull refrigerant recovery method is defined as the process of transferring liquid refrigerant from a refrigeration system to a receiving vessel by lowering the pressure in the vessel and raising the pressure in the system, and by connecting a separate line between the system liquid port and the receiving vessel.

3.6   Recycle Flow Rate. The amount of refrigerant processed divided by the time elapsed in the recycling mode. For equipment which uses a separate recycling sequence, the recycle rate does not include the recovery rate (or elapsed time). For equipment which does not use a separate recycling sequence, the recycle rate is a rate based solely on the higher of the liquid or vapor recovery rate, by which the contaminant levels were measured.

3.7   Residual Trapped Refrigerant. Refrigerant remaining in equipment after clearing refrigerant.

3.8   Shall, Should, Recommended or It Is Recommended shall be interpreted as follows:

3.8.1   Shall. Where “shall” or “shall not” is used for a provision specified, that provision is mandatory if compliance with this appendix is claimed.

3.8.2   Should, Recommended or It Is Recommended is used to indicate provisions which are not mandatory but which are desirable as good practice.

3.9   Standard Contaminated Refrigerant Sample. A mixture of new or reclaimed refrigerant and specified quantities of identified contaminants which constitute the mixture to be processed by the equipment under test. These contaminant levels are expected only from severe service conditions.

3.10   Trapped Refrigerant. The amount of refrigerant remaining in the equipment after the recovery or recovery/recycling operation but before clearing refrigerant.

3.11   Vapor Recovery Rate. The average rate that refrigerant is withdrawn from the mixing chamber between two pressures as vapor recovery rate is changing depending on the pressure. The initial condition is vapor only at saturation pressure and temperature at either 24 °C or at the boiling point at 100 kPa, whichever is higher. The final pressure condition is 10 percent of the initial pressure, but not lower than the equipment final recovery vacuum and not higher than 100 kPa.

Section 4. General Equipment Requirements

4.1   Equipment Information. The equipment manufacturer shall provide operating instructions, necessary maintenance procedures, and source information for replacement parts and repair.

4.2   Filter Replacement. The equipment shall indicate when any filter/drier(s) needs replacement. This requirement can be met by use of a moisture transducer and indicator light, by use of a sight glass/moisture indicator, or by some measurement of the amount of refrigerant processed such as a flow meter or hour meter. The equipment manufacturer must provide maximum quantity recycled or filter change interval in its written instructions.

4.3   Purge of Non-Condensable. If non-condensables are purged, the equipment shall either automatically purge non-condensables or provide an indicating means to guide the purge process. Recycling equipment must provide purge means.

4.4   Purge Loss. The total refrigerant loss due to purging non-condensables, draining oil, and clearing refrigerant (see Section 9.5) shall be less than 3 percent (by weight) of total processed refrigerant.

4.5   Permeation Rate. High pressure hose assemblies 58 in. (16 mm) nominal and smaller shall not exceed a permeation rate of 3.9 g/cm2/yr (internal surface) at a temperature of 48.8 °C. Hose assemblies that UL recognized as having passed UL 1963, 2011 requirements shall be accepted without testing. See Section 7.1.4 of this appendix.

4.6   Clearing Trapped Refrigerant. For equipment rated for more than one refrigerant, the manufacturer shall provide a method and instructions which will accomplish connections and clearing within 15 minutes. Special equipment, other than a vacuum pump or manifold gauge set, shall be furnished. The clearing procedure shall not rely upon the storage cylinder below saturated pressure conditions at ambient temperature.

4.7   Temperature. The equipment shall be evaluated at 24 °C with additional limited evaluation at 40 °C. Normal operating conditions range from 10 °C to 40 °C.

4.8   Exemptions. Equipment intended for recovery only shall be exempt from Sections 4.2 and 4.3.

Section 5. Contaminated Refrigerants

5.1   Sample Characteristics. The standard contaminated refrigerant sample shall have the characteristics specified in Table 1, except as provided in Section 5.2 of this appendix. Testing shall be conducted at an ambient temperature of 24 °C ± 1 °C except high temperature vapor recovery shall be 40 °C ± 1 °C.

5.2   Recovery-only Testing. Recovery equipment not rated for removal of contaminants shall be tested with new or reclaimed refrigerant.

eCFR graphic er18no16.093.gif

View or download PDF

Section 6. Test Apparatus

6.1   General Recommendations. The recommended test apparatus is described in the following paragraphs. If alternate test apparatus are employed, the user shall be able to demonstrate that they produce results equivalent to the specified reference apparatus.

6.2   Self-Contained Equipment Test Apparatus. The apparatus, shown in Figure 1, shall consist of:

6.2.1   Mixing Chamber. A mixing chamber consisting of a tank with a conical-shaped bottom, a bottom port and piping for delivering refrigerant to the equipment, various ports and valves for adding refrigerant to the chamber, and stirring means for mixing.

6.2.2   Filling Storage Cylinder. The storage cylinder to be filled by the refrigerant transferred shall be cleaned and at the pressure of the recovered refrigerant at the beginning of the test. It will not be filled over 80 percent, by volume.

6.2.3   Vapor Feed. Vapor refrigerant feed consisting of evaporator, control valves and piping to create a 3.0 °C superheat condition at an evaporating temperature of 21 °C ± 2 °C.

6.2.4   Alternative Vapor Feed. An alternative method for vapor feed shall be to pass the refrigerant through a boiler and then through an automatic pressure regulating valve set at different saturation pressures, moving from saturated pressure at 24 °C to final pressure of recovery.

6.2.5   Liquid Feed. Liquid refrigerant feed consisting of control valves, sampling port, and piping.

6.2.6   Instrumentation. Instrumentation capable of measuring weight, temperature, pressure, and refrigerant loss, as required.

eCFR graphic er18no16.094.gif

View or download PDF

6.3   Size. The size of the mixing chamber and filling storage cylinder used during testing shall correspond to the size of the equipment being tested per Section 6.3.1 or 6.3.2:

6.3.1   For equipment utilizing nominal 14 or 38 flare ports and hoses, the mixing chamber shall be 0.09 m3 and all ports, valves, mixing valves, and piping shall be 12 or larger, reduced down to the port size of the equipment by fittings at the connection ports of the mixing chamber. The filling storage cylinder used during testing shall be a nominal 50-pound water capacity DOT 4Bx cylinder with 14 flare liquid and vapor ports.

6.3.2   For equipment utilizing 12 or larger flare ports and hoses, the mixing chamber shall be 0.45 m3 (or nominal 1000-pound water capacity DOT 4Bx cylinder) and all ports, valves, mixing valves, and piping shall be 112 or larger, reduced down to the port size of the equipment by fittings at the connection ports of the mixing chamber. The filling storage cylinder used during testing shall be a nominal 1000-pound water capacity DOT 4Bx cylinder with liquid and vapor ports, valves and piping sized 34 NPT and reduced or increased to the port size of the equipment by fittings at the connection ports of the filling storage cylinder.

6.4   System Dependent Equipment Test Apparatus. This test apparatus is to be used for final recovery vacuum rating of all system dependent equipment.

6.4.1   Test Setup. The test apparatus shown in Figure 2 consists of a complete refrigeration system. The manufacturer shall identify the refrigerants to be tested. The test apparatus can be modified to facilitate operation or testing of the system dependent equipment if the modifications to the apparatus are specifically described within the manufacturer's literature. A 6.3 mm balance line shall be connected across the test apparatus between the high- and low-pressure sides, with an isolation valve located at the connection to the compressor high side. A 6.3 mm access port with a valve core shall be located in the balance line for the purpose of measuring final recovery vacuum at the conclusion of the test.

eCFR graphic er18no16.095.gif

View or download PDF

Section 7. Performance Testing Procedures

7.1   General Testing.

7.1.1   Temperatures. Testing shall be conducted at an ambient temperature of 24 °C ± 1 °C except high temperature vapor recovery shall be at 40 °C ± 1 °C. The evaporator conditions of Section 6.2.3 shall be maintained as long as liquid refrigerant remains in the mixing chamber.

7.1.2   Refrigerants. The equipment shall be tested for all designated refrigerants (see Section 11.2). All tests in Section 7 shall be completed for each refrigerant before starting tests with the next refrigerant.

7.1.3   Selected Tests. Tests shall be as appropriate for the equipment type and ratings parameters selected (see Sections 9.9, 11.1 and 11.2).

7.1.4   Hose Assemblies. For the purpose of limiting refrigerant emissions to the atmosphere, hose assemblies shall be tested for permeation according to UL Standard 1963 (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

7.2   Equipment Preparation and Operation. The equipment shall be prepared and operated per the operating instructions.

7.3   Test Batch. The test batch consisting of refrigerant sample (see Section 5) of the test refrigerant shall be prepared and thoroughly mixed. Continued mixing or stirring shall be required during the test while liquid refrigerant remains in the mixing chamber. The mixing chamber shall be filled to 80 percent level by volume.

7.3.1   Control Test Batch. Prior to starting the test for the first batch for each refrigerant, a liquid sample will be drawn from the mixing chamber and analyzed per Section 8 to assure that contaminant levels match Table 1 within ±10 ppm for moisture, ±20 ppm for oleic acid and ±0.5 percent for oil.

7.4   Recovery Tests (Recovery and Recovery/Recycling Equipment)

7.4.1   Determining Recovery Rates. The liquid and vapor refrigerant recovery rates shall be measured during the first test batch for each refrigerant (see Sections 9.1, 9.2 and 9.4). Equipment preparation and recovery cylinder changeover shall not be included in elapsed time measurements for determining vapor recovery rate and liquid refrigerant recovery rate. Operations such as subcooling the recovery cylinder shall be included. The recovery cylinder shall be the same size as per Section 6.3 or as furnished by the equipment manufacturer. Oversized tanks shall not be permitted.

7.4.1.1   Liquid Refrigerant Recovery Rate. If elected, the recovery rate using the liquid refrigerant feed means (see Section 6.2.5) shall be determined. After the equipment reaches stabilized conditions of condensing temperature and/or recovery cylinder pressure, the recovery process shall be stopped and an initial weight shall be taken of the mixing chamber (see Section 9.2). The recovery process shall be continued for a period of time sufficient to achieve the accuracy in Section 9.4. The recovery process shall be stopped and a final weight of the mixing chamber shall be taken.

7.4.1.2   Vapor Refrigerant Recovery Rate. If elected, the average vapor flow rate shall be measured to accuracy requirements in Section 9.4 under conditions with no liquid refrigerant in the mixing chamber. The liquid recovery feed means shall be used. At initial conditions of saturated vapor at the higher of 24 °C or the boiling temperature (100 kPa), the weight of the mixing chamber and the pressure shall be recorded. At final conditions representing pressure in the mixing chamber of 10 percent of the initial condition, but not less than the final recovery vacuum (see Section 9.6) nor more than 100 kPa, measure the weight of the mixing chamber and the elapsed time. At initial conditions, the recovery cylinder shall be at saturation pressure at ambient conditions.

7.4.1.3   High Temperature Vapor Recovery Rate. This is applicable for equipment having at least one designated refrigerant (see Section 11.2) with a boiling point between −50 °C and +10 °C. Measure the rate for R-22, or the refrigerant with the lowest boiling point if R-22 is not a designated refrigerant. Repeat the test in Section 7.4.1.2 at saturated conditions at 40 °C and continue to operate equipment to assure it will operate at this condition (see Section 7.4.3). At initial conditions, the recovery cylinder shall be at saturated pressure at 40 °C.

7.4.1.4   Push/Pull Liquid Refrigerant Recovery Rate. If elected, the average liquid push/pull flow rate shall be measured to accuracy requirements in Section 9.4. The mixing chamber and filling storage cylinder shall be filled with refrigerant vapor at initial conditions of saturated vapor at the higher of 24 °C or the boiling temperature at 100 kPa. An amount of liquid refrigerant shall be added to the mixing chamber equivalent to 80 percent by weight of the capacity of the filling storage cylinder. The pressure between the mixing chamber and filling storage cylinder shall be equalized and stabilized at initial conditions of saturated vapor at the higher of 24 °C or the boiling temperature at 100 kPa. The initial weight of the mixing chamber and the pressure shall be recorded. The equipment is then operated in push/pull liquid recovery mode and the weight change of the mixing chamber is recorded over time until all of the liquid has been transferred.

7.4.2   Recovery Operation. This test is for determining the final recovery vacuum and the ability to remove contaminants as appropriate. If equipment is rated for liquid recovery (see Section 7.4.1.3), liquid recovery feed means described in Section 6.2.5 shall be used. If not, vapor recovery means described in Sections 6.2.3 or 6.2.4 shall be used. Continue recovery operation until all liquid is removed from the test apparatus and vapor is removed to the point where equipment shuts down by automatic means or is manually shut off per operating instructions.

7.4.2.1   Oil Draining. Capture oil from the equipment at intervals as required in the instructions. Record the weight of the container. Completely remove refrigerant from oil by evacuation or other appropriate means. The weight difference shall be used in Section 7.5.2.

7.4.3   Final Recovery Vacuum. At the end of the first test batch for each refrigerant, the liquid valve and vapor valve of the apparatus shall be closed. After waiting 1 minute, the mixing chamber pressure shall be recorded (see Section 9.6).

7.4.4   Residual Refrigerant. This test will measure the mass of remaining refrigerant in the equipment after clearing and therefore the extent of mixing different refrigerants (see Section 9.6).

7.4.4.1   Initial Conditions. At the end of the last test for each batch for each refrigerant, the equipment shall be disconnected from the test apparatus (Figure 1). Recycle per Section 7.5, if appropriate. Perform refrigerant clearing operations as called for in the instruction manual. Capture and record the weight of any refrigerant which would have been emitted to the atmosphere during the clearing process for use in Section 9.5. If two loops are used for recycling, trapped refrigerant shall be measured for both.

7.4.4.2   Residual Trapped Refrigerant. Evacuate an empty test cylinder to 1.0 kPa. Record the empty weight of the test cylinder. Open all valves to the equipment so as to provide access to all trapped refrigerant. Connect the equipment to the test cylinder and operate valves to recover the residual refrigerant. Record the weight of the test cylinder using a recovery cylinder pressure no less than specified in Section 6.2.2. Place the test cylinder in liquid nitrogen for a period of 30 minutes or until a vacuum of 1000 microns is reached, whichever occurs first.

7.5   Recycling Tests (Recovery/Recycling Equipment).

7.5.1   Recycling Operation. As each recovery cylinder is filled in Section 7.4.2, recycle according to operating instructions. There will not necessarily be a separate recycling sequence. Note non-condensable purge measurement in Section 9.5.

7.5.1.1   Recycle Flow Rate. While recycling the first recovery cylinder for each refrigerant, determine the recycling flow rate by appropriate means (see Section 9.3) to achieve the accuracy required in Section 9.4.

7.5.2   Non-Condensable Sample. After completing Section 7.4.3, prepare a second test batch (see Section 7.3). Recover per Section 7.4.2 until the current recovery cylinder is filled to 80 percent level by volume. Recycle per Section 7.5.1. Mark this cylinder and set aside for taking the vapor sample. For equipment having both an internal tank of at least 3 kg refrigerant capacity and an external recovery cylinder, two recovery cylinders shall be marked and set aside. The first is the cylinder described above. The second cylinder is the final recovery cylinder after filling it to 80 percent level by volume and recycling.

7.5.2.1   Push/Pull Liquid Refrigerant Recovery Rate. This rate shall be measured by weight change of the mixing chamber divided by elapsed time (see Section 7.4.1.4). The units shall be kg/min and the accuracy shall be per Section 9.4.

7.5.3   Liquid Sample for Analysis. Repeat steps in Sections 7.3, 7.4.2 and 7.5.1 with further test batches until indication means in Section 4.2 show the filter/drier(s) need replacing.

7.5.3.1   Multiple Pass. For equipment with a separate recycling circuit (multiple pass), set aside the current cylinder and draw the liquid sample (see Section 7.4) from the previous cylinder.

7.5.3.2   Single Pass. For equipment with the single pass recycling circuit, draw the liquid sample (see Section 7.4) from the current cylinder.

7.6   Measuring Refrigerant Loss. Refrigerant loss due to non-condensables shall be determined by appropriate means (see Section 9.5.1). The loss could occur in Sections 7.4.1, 7.4.2 and 7.5.1.

Section 8. Sampling and Chemical Analysis Methods

8.1   Chemical Analysis. Chemical analysis methods shall be specified in appropriate standards such as AHRI Standard 700, 2008 Appendix C for Analytical Procedures for AHRI Standard 700-2014- Normative, and Addendum 700-1 to Appendix C. If alternate test methods are employed, the laboratory must be able to demonstrate that they produce results equivalent to the specified referee method.

8.2   Refrigerant Sampling.

8.2.1   Moisture Content. The water content in refrigerant shall be measured by the Karl Fischer Coulometric Titration technique. Report the moisture level in parts per million by weight.

8.2.2   Chloride Ions. Chloride ions shall be measured by turbidity tests. At this time, quantitative results have not been defined. Report chloride content as “pass” or “fail.” In the future, when quantitative results are possible, report chloride content as parts per million by weight.

8.2.3   Acid Content. The acidity test uses the titration principle. Report the acidity in parts per million by weight (mg KOH/kg) of sample.

8.2.4   High Boiling Residue. High boiling residues shall use measurement of the volume of residue after evaporating a standard volume of refrigerant. Using weight measurement and converting to volumetric units is acceptable. Report high boiling residues as percent by volume.

8.2.5   Particulates/Solids. The particulates/solids measurement employs visual examination. Report results as “pass” or “fail.”

8.2.6   Non-condensables. The level of contamination by non-condensable gases in the base refrigerant being recycled shall be determined by gas chromatography. Report results as percent by volume.

Section 9. Performance Calculations for Ratings

9.1   Vapor Refrigerant Recovery Rate. This rate shall be measured by weight change of the mixing chamber divided by elapsed time (see 7.4.1.2). The units shall be kg/min and the accuracy shall be per Section 9.4.

9.1.1   High Temperature Vapor Recovery Rate. This rate shall be measured by measured weight change of the mixing chamber divided by elapsed time (see Section 7.4.1.3). The units shall be kg/min and the accuracy shall be per Section 9.4.

9.2   Liquid Refrigerant Recovery Rate. This rate shall be measured by weight change of the mixing chamber divided by elapsed time (see 7.4.1.3). The units shall be kg/min and the accuracy shall be per Section 9.4.

9.3   Recycle Flow Rate. The recycle flow rate shall be as defined in Section 3.12, expressed in kg/min, and the accuracy shall be per Section 9.4.

9.3.1   For equipment using multi-pass recycling or a separate sequence, the recycle rate shall be determined by dividing the net weight, W, of the refrigerant to be recycled by the actual time T required to recycle. Any set-up or operator interruptions shall not be included in the time T.

9.3.2   If no separate recycling sequence is used, the recycle rate shall be the higher of the vapor refrigerant recovery rate or the liquid refrigerant recovery rate. The recycle rate shall match a process which leads to contaminant levels in Section 9.9. Specifically, a recovery rate determined from bypassing a contaminant removal device cannot be used as a recycle rate when the contaminant levels in Section 9.9 are determined by passing the refrigerant through the contaminant removal device.

9.4   Accuracy of Flow Rates. The accuracy of test measurements in Sections 9.1, 9.2 and 9.3 shall be ±008 kg/min for flow rates up to 0.42 kg/min and ±2.0 percent for flow rates larger than 0.42 kg/min. Ratings shall be expressed to the nearest 0.02 kg/min.

9.5   Refrigerant Loss. This calculation will be based upon the net loss of refrigerant which would have been eliminated in the non-condensable purge process (see Section 7.5.1), the oil draining process (see Section 7.4.2.1) and the refrigerant clearing process (see Section 7.4.4.1), all divided by the net refrigerant content of the test batches. The refrigerant loss shall not exceed 3 percent by weight.

9.5.1   Non-Condensable Purge. Evacuate an empty container to 2 kPa. Record the empty weight of the container. Place the container in a dry ice bath. Connect the equipment purge connection to the container and operate purge according to operating instructions so as to capture the non-condensables and lost refrigerant. Weigh the cylinder after the recycling is complete. Equivalent means are permissible.

For units which either recycle or publish (list) non-condensable removal, non-condensable gases are purged, operating the recycle device per the manufacturer's instructions through an evaporator pressure regulator (EPR) valve into a liquid nitrogen-chilled cylinder. This combination will simulate the atmosphere while allowing the capture of purge gases. The cylinder is weighed before and after the purge procedure.

9.5.2   Oil Draining. Refrigerant removed from the oil after draining shall be collected and measured in accordance with Section 7.4.2.1.

9.5.3   Clearing Unit. Refrigerant captured during the clearing process shall be measured in accordance with Section 7.4.4.1.

9.6   Final Recovery Vacuum. The final recovery vacuum shall be the mixing chamber pressure in Section 7.4.3 expressed in kPa at 24 °C. The accuracy of the measurement shall be within 0.33 kPa.

9.7   Residual Trapped Refrigerant. The amount of residual trapped refrigerant shall be the final weight minus the initial weight of the test cylinder in Section 7.4.4.2, expressed in kg. The accuracy shall be ±0.02 kg and reported to the nearest 0.05 kg.

9.8   Refrigerant Processed. The amount of refrigerant processed before changing filters (see Section 7.5.3) shall be expressed in kg to an accuracy of ±1 percent.

9.9   Contaminant Levels. The contaminant levels remaining after testing shall be published as follows:

Moisture content, ppm by weight

Chloride ions, pass/fail

Acid Content, ppm by weight

High boiling residue, percent (by volume)

Particulates/solids, pass/fail (visual examination)

Non-condensables, percent (by volume)

9.10   Minimum Data Requirements for Published Ratings. Published ratings shall include all of the parameters as shown in Tables 2 and 3 for each refrigerant designated by the manufacturer.

Section 10. Tolerances

10.1   Tolerances. Performance related parameters shall be equal to or better than the published ratings.

Section 11. Marking and Nameplate Data

11.1   Marking and Nameplate Data. The nameplate shall display the manufacturer's name, model designation, type of equipment (Recovery or Recovery/Recycling and Self-Contained or System Dependent), designated refrigerant(s), capacities, and electrical characteristics where applicable. The nameplate shall also conform to the labeling requirements established for certified recycling and recovery equipment established at 40 CFR 82.158(h).

Recommended nameplate voltages for 60 Hertz systems shall include one or more of the equipment nameplate voltages shown in Table 1 of AHRI 110-2016 (incorporated by reference, see §82.168). Recommended nameplate voltages for 50 Hertz systems shall include one or more of the utilization voltages shown in Table 1 of IEC 60038 (English version) (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

11.2   Data for Designated Refrigerants. For each refrigerant designated, the manufacturer shall include all the following that are applicable per Table 2:

a. Liquid Recovery Rate, kg/min

b. Vapor Recovery Rate, kg/min

c. High Temperature Vapor Recovery Rate, kg/min

d. Push/Pull Liquid Recovery Rate, kg/min

e. Final Recovery Vacuum Level, kPa

f. Recycle Flow Rate, kg/min

g. Refrigerant Loss, kg

h. Residual Trapped Refrigerant, kg

i. Quantity of Refrigerant Processed at Rated Conditions, kg

Table 2—Performance Ratings for Refrigerant Recovery and Recovery/Recycling Equipment4 5

ParameterType of equipment
RecoveryRecovery/
recycling
RecyclingSystem
dependent
equipment
Liquid Refrigerant Recovery Rate, kg/minX1 4X1N/A5N/A
Vapor Refrigerant Recovery Rate, kg/minX1X1N/AN/A
High Temperature Vapor Recovery Rate, kg/minX1X1N/AN/A
Push/Pull Liquid Recovery Rate, kg/minX1X1N/AN/A
Final Recovery Vacuum Level, kPaXXN/AX
Recycle Flow Rate, kg/minN/AXXN/A
Refrigerant Loss, kgX2XXX3
Residual Trapped Refrigerant, kgX3X2X2X2
Quantity of Refrigerant Processed at Rated Conditions, kgN/AXXN/A

1For a recovery or recovery/recycle unit, one must rate either liquid refrigerant recovery rate or vapor refrigerant recovery rate or one can rate for both. If rating only one, the other shall be indicated by N/A, “not applicable.”

2Mandatory rating if multiple refrigerants, oil separation or non-condensable purge are rated.

3Mandatory rating for equipment tested for multiple refrigerants.

4“X” denotes mandatory rating or equipment requirements.

5“N/A” indicates “Not Applicable” for a parameter that does not have a rating.

Table 3—Contaminant Removal Ratings for Refrigerant Recovery and Recovery/Recycling Equipment1 2

ContaminantType of equipment
RecoveryRecovery/
recycling
RecyclingSystem
dependent
equipment
Moisture Content, ppm by weightN/A2X1XN/A
Chloride Ions, pass/failN/AXXN/A
Acid Content, ppm by weightN/AXXN/A
High Boiling Residue, % by volumeN/AXXN/A
Particulates/solids, pass/failN/AXXN/A
Non-condensables, % by volumeN/AXXN/A

1“X” denotes mandatory rating.

2“N/A” indicates “Not Applicable” for a parameter that does not have a rating.

Section 12. References

Listed here are all standards, handbooks, and other publications essential to the formation and implementation of the standard. All references in this appendix are considered as part of this standard.

  UL 1963, Standard for Safety Refrigerant Recovery/Recycling Equipment, Fourth Edition (with revisions through October 13, 2013), dated June 1, 2011, (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

  AHRI 110-2016, 2016 Standard for Air-Conditioning, Heating and Refrigerating Equipment Nameplate Voltages, copyright 2016 (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

  AHRI Standard 700-2015, Specifications for Refrigerants, Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute

  IEC 60038 IEC Standard Voltages, Edition 7.0, 2009-06 (English version) (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

Section 13.0. Particulate Used in Standard Contaminated Refrigerant Sample

13.1   Particulate Specification

13.1.1   The particulate material (pm) will be a blend of 50 percent coarse air cleaner dust as received, and 50 percent retained on a 200-mesh screen. The coarse air cleaner dust is available from: AC Spark Plug Division; General Motors Corporation; Flint, Michigan.

13.1.2   Preparation of Particulate Materials. To prepare the blend of contaminant per ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 63.2-1996 (RA 2010), first wet screen a quantity of coarse air cleaner dust on a 200-mesh screen (particle retention 74 µm). This is done by placing a portion of the dust on a 200-mesh screen and running water through the screen while stirring the dust with the fingers. The fine contaminant particles passing through the screen are discarded. The larger than 200-mesh particles collected on the screen are removed and dried for one hour at 110 °C. The blend of standard contaminant is prepared by mixing 50 percent by weight of coarse air cleaner dust as received (after drying for one hour at 110 °C) with 50 percent by weight of the larger than 200-mesh screened dust.

13.1.3   Particle Size Analysis. The coarse air cleaner dust as received and the blend used as the standard contaminant have the following approximate particle size analysis:

Table B1—Weight Percentage in Various µm Size Ranges for Particle Size Analysis

Size range
(µm)
As
received
(wt %)
Blend
(wt %)
0-5126
5-10126
10-20147
20-402311
40-803032
80-200938

[81 FR 82383, Nov. 18, 2016]

Appendix B4 to Subpart F of Part 82—Performance and Safety of Flammable Refrigerant Recovery and/or Recycling Equipment

This appendix is based on the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute Standard 740-2016, Performance Rating of Refrigerant Recovery Equipment and Recovery/Recycling Equipment, and Underwriters Laboratories Standard 1963-2011 (Fourth Edition), Standard for Safety: Refrigerant Recovery/Recycling Equipment, including Supplement SB (added October 11, 2013), Requirements for Refrigerant Recovery/Recycling Equipment Intended for Use with a Flammable Refrigerant.

Section 1. Purpose

1.1   The purpose of this standard is to establish methods of testing for rating and evaluating the performance and safety of refrigerant recovery and/or recycling equipment and general equipment requirements (herein referred to as “equipment”) for contaminant or purity levels, capacity, speed and purge loss to minimize emission into the atmosphere of designated refrigerants, as well as safety for use with flammable refrigerants.

Section 2. Scope

2.1   This standard applies to equipment for recovering and/or recycling flammable single refrigerants, azeotropes, zeotropic blends, and their normal contaminants from refrigerant systems. This standard defines the test apparatus, test gas mixtures, sampling procedures, analytical techniques, and equipment construction that will be used to determine the performance and safety of refrigerant recovery and/or recycling equipment (hereinafter, “equipment”).

Section 3. Definitions

3.1   All terms in this appendix will follow the definitions in §82.152 and Appendix B3 to Subpart F of Part 82 unless otherwise defined in this appendix.

3.2   All definitions used in UL 1963, including the definitions in Supplement SB, as applicable, are incorporated by reference, see §82.168.

Section 4. Evaluation of Performance

4.1   Performance Ratings. All recovery and/or recycling equipment to be tested under this appendix must follow the procedures and meet all requirements established in Appendix B3 to Subpart F of Part 82 to determine the performance ratings in addition to the safety evaluation conducted under the rest of this appendix.

4.2   Safety. All recovery and/or recycling equipment to be tested under this appendix must follow the procedures and meet all requirements in Supplement SB (added October 11, 2013), Requirements for Refrigerant Recovery/Recycling Equipment Intended for Use with a Flammable Refrigerant in Underwriters Laboratories Standard 1963-2011 (Fourth Edition), Standard for Safety: Refrigerant Recovery/Recycling Equipment (incorporated by reference, see §82.168).

[81 FR 82390, Nov. 18, 2016]

Appendix C to Subpart F of Part 82—Method for Testing Recovery Devices for Use With Small Appliances

Recovery Efficiency Test Procedure for Refrigerant Recovery Equipment Used on Small Appliances

The following test procedure is utilized to evaluate the efficiency of equipment designed to recover ozone depleting refrigerants (or any substitute refrigerant subject to the recycling rules promulgated pursuant to section 608 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990) from small appliances when service of those appliances requires entry into the sealed refrigeration system or when those appliances are destined for disposal. This procedure is designed to calculate on a weight or mass basis the percentage of a known charge of CFC-12 refrigerant removed and captured from a test stand refrigeration system. Captured refrigerant is that refrigerant delivered to a container suitable for shipment to a refrigerant reclaimer plus any refrigerant remaining in the recovery system in a manner that it will be transferred to a shipping container after additional recovery operations.

The test stand refrigeration system required for this procedure is constructed with standard equipment utilized in currently produced household refrigerator and freezer products. The procedure also accounts for compressor oils that might be added to or removed from the test stand compressor or any compressor used in the recovery system.

I. Test Stand

Test stands are constructed in accordance with the following standards.

1. Evaporator— 516 in. outside dia. with 30 cu. in. volume.

2. Condenser— 14 in. outside dia. with 20 cu. in volume.

3. Suction line capillary heat exchanger—appropriate for compressor used.

4. An 800-950 Btu/hr high side case (rotary) compressor; or (depending on the test senario);

5. An 800-9500 Btu/hr low side case (reciprocating) compressor.

A person seeking to have its recovery system certified shall specify the compressors by manufacturer and model that are to be used in test stands constructed for evaluation of its equipment, and the type and quantity of compressor to be used in those compressors. Only a compressor oil approved for use by the compressor's manufacturer may be specified, and the quantity of compressor oil specified shall be an appropriate quantity for the type of oil and compressor to be used. In order to reduce the cost of testing, the person seeking certification of its recovery system may supply an EPA approved third party testing laboratory with test stands meeting these standards for use in evaluating its recovery system.

II. Test Conditions

Tests are to be conducted at 75 degrees F, plus or minus 2 degrees F (23.9 C ±1.1 C). Separate tests are conducted on both high side case compressor stands and low side case compressor stands. Separate tests are also conducted with the test stand compressor running during the recovery operation, and without the test stand compressor running during the recovery operation, to calculate the system's recovery efficiency under either condition.

These tests are to be performed using a representative model of all equipment used in the recovery system to deliver recovered refrigerant to a container suitable for shipment to a refrigerant reclaimer. The test stands are to be equipped with access valves permanently installed as specific by the recovery system's vendor to represent the valves used with that system in actual field operations.

A series of five (5) recovery operations are to be performed for each compressor scenario and a recovery efficiency is calculated based on the total quantity of refrigerant captured during all five (5) recoveries. Alternatively, at the request of the recovery system's vendor, a recovery efficiency is to be calculated for each recovery event. In this case, a statistically significant number of recovery operations are to be performed. Determination of what is a statistically significant number of recoveries is to be calculated as set out below. These individual recovery efficiencies are then averaged.

There are four (4) compressor scenarios to be tested. These are a high side case compressor in working condition; a high side case compressor in nonworking condition; a low side case compressor in working condition; and a low side case compressor in nonworking condition. Recovery efficiencies calculated for the two working compressor scenarios are to be averaged to report a working compressor performance. The two nonworking compressor efficiencies are also to be averaged to report a nonworking compressor performance.

If large scale equipment is required in the system to deliver recovered refrigerant to a refrigerant reclaimer (eg. carbon desorption equipment) and it is not possible to have that equipment evaluated under the procedure, the system's vendor shall obtain engineering data on the performance of that large scale equipment that will reasonably demonstrate the percentage refrigerant lost when processed by that equipment. That data will be supplied to any person required to evaluate the performance of those systems. The following procedure will also be modified as needed to determine the weight of refrigerant recovered from a test stand and delivered to a container for shipment to the large process equipment for further processing. The percentage loss documented to occur during processing is then to be applied to the recovery efficiencies calculated in this modified procedure to determine the overall capture efficiency for the entire system.

The following are definitions of symbols used in the test procedure.

Test Stand:

“TSO” means an original test stand weight.

“TSC” means a charged test stand weight.

Shipping Containers:

“SCO” means the original or empty weight of shipping container(s).

“SCF” means the final or full weight of shipping container(s).

Recover/Transfer System:

“RSO” means the original weight of a recovery/transfer system.

“RSF” means the final weight of a recovery/transfer system.

“OL” means the net amount of oil added/removed from the recovery device and/or transfer device between the beginning and end of the test for one compressor scenario.

Weighing steps are conducted with precision and accuracy of plus or minus 1.0 gram.

III. Test Procedure

1. Evacuate the test stand to 20 microns vacuum (pressure measured at a vacuum pump) for 12 hours.

2. Weigh the test stand (TSO).

3. If this is the first recovery operation being performed for a compressor scenario (or if a recovery efficiency is to be calculated for each recovery event), then weigh all devices used in the recovery system to deliver recovered refrigerant to a container suitable for shipment or delivery to a refrigerant reclaimer. Weigh only devices that can retain refrigerant in a manner that it will ultimately be transferred to a shipping container without significant release to the atmosphere (RSO).

4. Weigh final shipping containers (SCO).

5. Charge the test stand with an appropriate CFC-12 charge (either 6 oz. or 9 oz.).

6. Run the test stand for four (4) hours with 100% run time.

7. Turn off the test stand for twelve (12) hours. During this period evaporate all condensation that has collected on the test stand during step 6.

8. Weigh the test stand (TSC).

9. Recover CFC-12 from the test stand and perform all operations needed to transfer the recovered refrigerant to one of the shipping containers weighed in step 4. All recovery and transfer operations are to be performed in accordance with the operating instructions provided by the system's vendor. The compressor in the test stand is to remain “off” or be turned “on” during the recovery operation depending on whether the test is for a nonworking or working compressor performance evaluation. If a recovery efficiency is to be calculated for each recovery event, transfer the captured refrigerant to a shipping container and then skip to step 13. Otherwise continue. If the system allows for multiple recovery operations to be performed before transferring recovered refrigerant to a shipping container, the transfer operation can be delayed until either the maximum number of recovery operations allowed before a transfer is required have been performed, or the last of the five (5) recovery operations has been performed.

10. Perform any oil removal or oil addition operations needed to properly maintain the test stand and the devices used for recovery or transfer operations. Determine the net weight of the oil added or removed from the recovery device and/or transfer device. (OP1 for oil added, OP2 for oil removed).

11. Evacuate the test stand to 20 microns vacuum for 4 hours.

12. Return to step 2 unless five (5) recovery operations have been performed.

13. Weigh all final shipping containers that received recovered refrigerant (SCF).

14. Weigh the equipment weighed in step three (3) above (RSF). If a recovery efficiency is to be calculated for each recovery event, perform calculations and return to step one (1) for additional recoveries.

IV. Calculations

A. For Five (5) Consecutive Recoveries

Refrigerant Recoverable equals the summation of charged test stand weights minus original test stand weights.

eCFR graphic 82-412a.gif

View or download PDF

Oil Loss equals the net weight of oil added to and removed from the recovery device and/or transfer device.

eCFR graphic 82-412b.gif

View or download PDF

Refrigerant Recovered equals the final weight of shipping containers minus the initial weight of final shipping containers, plus final recovery system weight, minus original recovery system weight, plus the net value of all additions and removals of oil from the recovery and transfer devices.

eCFR graphic en30au93.001.gif

View or download PDF

n = number of shipping containers used.

Recovery Efficiency equals Refrigerant Recovered divided by Refrigerant Recoverable times 100%.

eCFR graphic en30au93.002.gif

View or download PDF

B. For Individual Recoveries

Refrigerant Recoverable equals the charged test stand weight minus the original test stand weight.

eCFR graphic en30au93.003.gif

View or download PDF

Refrigerant Recovered equals the final weight of the shipping container minus the initial weight of the shipping container plus the final weight of the recovery system minus the original recovery system weight.

eCFR graphic en30au93.004.gif

View or download PDF

Recovery Efficiency equals Refrigerant Recovered divided by Refrigerant Recoverable times 100 percent.

eCFR graphic en30au93.005.gif

View or download PDF

C. Calculation of a Statistically Significant Number of Recoveries

eCFR graphic en30au93.006.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

Nadd = the number of additional samples required to achieve 90% confidence.

sd = Standard deviation, or (X/(N−1)5)

X = Sample average

N = Number of samples tested

Number of samplest for 90% confidence
  26.814
  32.920
  42.353
  52.132
  62.015
  71.943
  81.895
  91.860
101.833

Procedure:

1. Compute Nadd after completing two recoveries.

2. If Nadd>0, then run an additional test.

3. Re-compute Nadd. Continue to test additional samples until Nadd<0.

V. Test Procedure Approval and Certification

Each vendor of capture equipment for small appliances desiring certification will provide a representative model of its capture system and its recommended recovery procedures to an EPA approved third party laboratory for testing in accordance with this procedure. The third party laboratory will certify recovery systems that when tested in accordance with this procedure demonstrate a sufficient recovery efficiency to meet EPA regulatory requirements.

Appendix D to Subpart F of Part 82—Standards for Becoming a Certifying Program for Technicians

a. Test Preparation. Technicians must pass an EPA-approved test, provided by an EPA-approved certifying program to be certified as a Type I technician. Organizations providing Type I certification only may choose either an on-site format or a mail-in format similar to what is permitted under the MVACs program.

Technicians must pass a closed-book, proctored test, administered in a secure environment, by an EPA-approved certifying program to be certified as a Type II or Type III technician.

Technicians must pass a closed-book, proctored test (or series of tests), administered in a secure environment, by an EPA-approved certifying program to be certified as a Universal technician. Mail-in format Type I tests cannot be used toward a Universal certification.

Each certifying program must assemble tests by choosing a prescribed subset from the EPA test bank. EPA will have a test bank with more questions than are needed for an individual test, which will enable the certifying program to generate multiple tests in order to discourage cheating. Each test must include 25 questions drawn from Group 1 and 25 questions drawn from each relevant technical Group. Tests for Universal technicians will include 100 questions (25 from Group 1 and 25 from each relevant technical Group). Universal tests may be taken all at once, or by combining passing scores on separate Type I, Type II, and Type III tests. Questions should be divided in order to sufficiently cover each topic within the Group.

Certifying programs must provide a paper hand-out or electronic form of communication to technicians after they have completed their certification test that contains the following information:

—Which certifying program is providing the testing;

—Contact information for the certifying program;

—The name and contact information of the proctor; and

—When they should expect to receive their score and, if they passed, their certification card.

Each certifying program must show a method of randomly choosing which questions will be on the tests. Multiple versions of the test must be used during each testing event. Test answer sheets must include the name and address of the applicant, the name and address of the certifying program, and the date and location at which the test was administered.

Training material accompanying mail-in Type I tests must not include sample test questions mimicking the language of the certification test. All mail-in material will be subject to review by EPA.

Certifying programs may charge individuals reasonable fees for the administration of the tests. EPA will publish a list of all approved certifying programs.

b. Proctoring. A certifying program for Type I (if in-person), Type II, Type III, and Universal technicians must designate at least one proctor registered for every 50 people taking tests at the same time at a given site.

The certification test for Type I (if taken as part of a Universal certification), Type II, Type III, and Universal technicians is a closed-book exam. The proctors must ensure that the applicants for certification do not use any notes or training materials during testing. Desks or work space must be placed in a way that discourages cheating. The space and physical facilities are to be conducive to continuous surveillance by the proctors and monitors during testing.

The proctor may not receive any benefit from the outcome of the testing other than a fee for proctoring. Proctors cannot know in advance which questions are on the tests they are proctoring.

Proctors are required to verify the identity of individuals taking the test by examining photo identification. Acceptable forms of identification include but are not limited to drivers' licenses, government identification cards, passports, and military identification.

Certifying programs for Type I technicians using the mail-in format, must take sufficient measures at the test site to ensure that tests are completed honestly by each technician. Each test for Type I certification must provide a means of verifying the identification of the individual taking the test. Acceptable forms of identification include but are not limited to drivers' licenses and passports.

c. Test Security. A certifying program must demonstrate the ability to ensure the confidentiality and security of the test questions and answer keys through strict accountability procedures. An organization interested in developing a technician certification program will be required to describe these test security procedures to EPA.

After the completion of a test, proctors must collect all test forms, answer sheets, scratch paper and notes. These items are to be placed in a sealed envelope.

d. Test Content. All Type I, Type II and Type III, certification tests will include 25 questions from Group I and 25 questions from Group II. Universal certification tests will include 25 questions from Group I and 75 questions from Group II (with 25 from each of the three sector-specific areas).

Group I will ask questions in the following areas:

1. Environmental impact of CFCs, HCFCs, and substitute refrigerants

2. Laws and regulations

3. Changing industry outlook

Group II will ask questions covering sector-specific (i.e., Type I, Type II, Type III) issues in the following areas:

4. Leak detection

5. Recovery Techniques

6. Safety

7. Shipping

8. Disposal

e. Grading. Tests must be graded objectively. Certifying programs must inform the applicant of their test results no later than 30 days from the date of the test. Type I certifying programs using the mail-in format must notify the applicants of their test results no later than 30 days from the date the certifying programs received the completed test and any required documentation.

The passing score for the closed-book Type I, Type II, Type III and Universal certification test is 70 percent. The passing score for Type I certification tests using the mail-in format is 84 percent.

f. Proof of Certification. Certifying programs must issue a standard wallet-sized identification card no later than 30 days from the date of the test. Type I certifying programs using mail-in formats must issue cards to certified technicians no later than 30 days from the date the certifying program receives the completed test and any required documentation.

Each wallet-sized identification card must include, at a minimum, the name of the certifying program including the date the certifying program received EPA approval, the name of the person certified, the type of certification, a unique number for the certified person that does not include a technician's social security number, and the following text:

[name of person] has successfully passed a [Type I, Type II, Type III and/or Universal—as appropriate] exam on how to responsibly handle refrigerants as required by EPA's National Recycling and Emissions Reduction Program.

g. Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements. Certifying programs must maintain records of the names and addresses of all individuals taking the tests, the scores of all certification tests administered, and the dates and locations of all tests administered. These records must be maintained indefinitely, unless transferred to another certifying program or EPA.

EPA must receive an activity report from all approved certifying programs by every January 30 and July 30, which covers the previous six months of certifications. The first report must be submitted following the first full six-month period for which the program has been approved by EPA. This report includes the pass/fail rate. If the certifying program believes a test bank question needs to be modified, information about that question should also be included.

Approved certifying programs will receive a letter of approval from EPA. Each testing center must display a copy of that letter at their place of business.

Approved technician certification programs that voluntarily plan to stop providing the certification test must forward all records required by this appendix and §82.161 to another program currently approved by EPA in accordance with this appendix and with §82.161. Approved technician certification programs that receive records of certified technicians from a program that no longer offers the certification test, and the program that is voluntarily withdrawing from being a technician certification program must inform EPA at the address listed in §82.160 within 30 days of receiving or transferring these records. The notification must include the name and address of the program to which the records have been transferred. If another currently approved program willing to accept the records cannot be located, these records must be submitted to EPA at the address listed at §82.160.

Technician certification programs that have had their certification revoked in accordance with §82.169 must forward all records required by this appendix and §82.161 to EPA at the address listed in §82.160. Failure to do so is a violation of 40 CFR part 82, subpart F.

h. Additional Requirements. EPA may periodically inspect testing sites to ensure compliance with EPA regulations. If testing center discrepancies are found, they must be corrected within a specified time period. If discrepancies are not corrected, EPA may suspend or revoke the certifying program's approval. The inspections will include but are not limited to a review of the certifying program's provisions for test security, the availability of space and facilities to conduct the administrative requirements and ensure the security of the tests, the availability of adequate testing facilities and spacing of the applicants during testing, a review of the proper procedures regarding accountability, and that there is no evidence of misconduct on the part of the certifying programs, their representatives and proctors, or the applicants for certification.

If the certifying programs offer training or provide review materials to the applicants, these endeavors are to be considered completely separate from the administration of the certification test.

[81 FR 82390, Nov. 18, 2016]

Appendix E to Subpart F of Part 82—Test Procedure for Leaks From Containers Holding Two Pounds or Less of Refrigerant for Use in an MVAC

This appendix is based on the California Air Resources Board (CARB) standard TP-503: Test Procedure for Leaks from Small Cans of Automotive Refrigerant, as amended on January 5, 2010; and CARB standard BP-A1: Balance Protocol for Gravimetric Determination of Sample Weights using a Precision Balance, as amended January 5, 2010.

Section 1. Applicability

This test procedure is used by manufacturers of containers holding two pounds or less of refrigerant for use in a motor vehicle air conditioner (MVAC) to determine the leakage rate of small containers of automotive refrigerant that are subject to the requirements of 40 CFR part 82, subpart F. Specifically, this test procedure will specify the equipment, procedures, and calculations to determine if a container holding two pounds or less of refrigerant for use in an MVAC complies with the leakage rate specified in §82.154(c)(2)(ii). All terms in this appendix will follow the definitions in §82.152 unless otherwise defined in this appendix.

All containers holding two pounds or less of refrigerant for use in an MVAC must comply with other applicable codes and regulations such as local, state, or Federal safety codes and regulations.

This test procedure involves the use of materials under pressure and operations and should only be used by or under the supervision of those familiar and experienced in the use of such materials and operations. Appropriate safety precautions should be observed at all times while performing this test procedure.

Section 2. Principle and Summary of Test Procedure

This procedure is used to determine the leakage rate of containers holding two pounds or less of refrigerant for use in an MVAC (small cans). Testing will involve subjecting both full and partially empty cans in both upright and inverted positions at two temperatures: 73 °F and 130 °F.

Thirty small cans are tested under each condition for a total of 240 small cans tested. Small cans are brought to temperature stability, weighed, then stored for 30 days under specified conditions of temperature, orientation, and state of fill, then re-weighed. Leakage rate (grams/year) is estimated by (weight loss in grams) x 365/(days duration). The leakage rate is then compared to a standard of 3.00 grams/year to determine if a given small can complies with the leakage rate specified in §82.154(c)(2)(ii).

Section 3. Biases and Interferences

3.1   Contaminants on the operator's hands can affect the weight of the small can and the ability of the small can to absorb moisture. To avoid contamination of the small can, the balance operator should wear gloves while handling the small cans.

3.2   Weight determinations can be interfered with by moisture condensing on the small can and by thermal currents generated by temperature differences between the small can and the room temperature. The small cans cool during discharge and could cause condensation. For these reasons, small cans must be equilibrated to balance room temperature for at least four hours before weighing.

3.3   Variations in the temperature, pressure, and humidity of the ambient air will cause variations in the buoyancy of the small can. These variations should typically be less than 25 mg for a small can. If the small can is not leaking at all, then the uncorrected weight changes will be within the range of 0 ± 25 mg, which is about ten percent of the 247 mg loss expected after thirty days for a can leaking at 3 g/yr. In that case buoyancy corrections can be omitted. If the absolute value of the uncorrected weight change exceeds 25 mg, then all calculations must be made using weights corrected for buoyancy based on the temperature, pressure, and humidity of the weighing room.

3.4   Some electronic balances are sensitive to the effects of small static charges. The small can should be placed directly on the balance pan, ensuring metal to metal contact. If the balance pan is not grounded, the small can and balance pan should be statically discharged before weighing.

Section 4. Sensitivity and Range

The mass of a full small can could range from roughly 50 g to 1000 g depending on the container capacity. A top loading balance, capable of a maximum weight measurement of not less than 1,000 g and having a minimum readability of 0.001 g, reproducibility and linearity of ± 0.002 g, must be used to perform mass measurements.

Section 5. Equipment

5.1   A top loading balance that meets the requirements of Section 4 above.

5.2   A NIST traceable working standard mass for balance calibration. A NIST traceable working standard mass for a balance linearity check. A reference mass to serve as a “blank” small can.

5.3   An enclosure capable of controlling the internal air temperature from 73 °F ± 5 °F, and an enclosure capable of controlling the internal air temperature to 130 °F ± 5 °F.

5.4   A temperature instrument capable of measuring the internal temperature of the temperature conditioning enclosures and the balance room with a sensitivity of ± 2 °F.

5.5   A barometric pressure instrument capable of measuring atmospheric pressure at the location of the balance to within ± 0.02 inches of mercury.

5.6   A relative humidity measuring instrument capable of measuring the relative humidity (RH) at the location of the balance with a sensitivity of ± 2 percent RH.

5.7   A hose with appropriate fitting for dispensing refrigerant from the small can to a recovery machine.

5.8   A refrigerant recovery machine to collect the discharged refrigerant from small cans being tested.

Section 6. Calibration Procedures

6.1   Calibrations are applied to the balance and to the support equipment such as temperature, humidity, and pressure monitoring equipment. Procedures for calibration are not spelled out here. General calibration principals for the support equipment and the balance are described in Section 11, Quality Assurance/Quality Control. Detailed calibration procedures for measurements made using the balance are contained in Attachment A: “Balance Protocol for Gravimetric Determination of Sample Weights using a Precision Balance.”

Section 7. Small Can Preparation

7.1   Receive a batch of 240 small cans of one design to be tested. These may include several SKUs from different manufacturers if the container and valve combination are the same.

7.2   Clean small cans with Alkanox solution or equivalent and dry with a lint free towel.

7.3   Confirm that the sample ID sticker on the small can matches the sample ID on the chain of custody forms.

7.4   Select a reference mass similar to the weight of a full small can. If multiple sets of similar sized small cans are being tested, only one reference mass is needed; it can be used with all sets. Store the reference mass in the balance area.

7.5   Evacuate the contents of one half of the small cans (120 cans) into the refrigerant recovery machine using normal DIY dispensing procedures until each small can is approximately half full.

7.6   Select a reference mass similar to the weight of the half-full small can. If multiple sets of similar size small cans are being tested, only one reference mass is needed; it can be used with all sets. Store the reference mass in the balance area.

Section 8. Small Can Weighing

Weighing cans on the balance is done in accordance with Attachment A to this appendix. Attachment A describes how to conduct weight determinations including appropriate calibration and QC data. This section, “Small Can Weighing,” describes the overall process, not the details of how to use the balance.

Initial Weights

8.1   Put on gloves. Check the small cans for contamination.

8.2   Place the 240 small cans into a location where they can equilibrate to balance room temperature. Record the small can test IDs and the equilibration start time on the Small Can Test Data Forms available on EPA's Web site in sets of thirty, one form for each of the eight test conditions.

8.3   Let cans equilibrate for at least four hours.

8.4   Weigh the set of 240 small cans and the reference weights using Attachment A and log the results to the Balance Weighing Log Form available on EPA's Web site.

8.5   Transfer data from the Balance Weighing Log Form to the Small Can Test Data Form in sets of 30, one set for each of the eight conditions to be tested.

Thirty-Day Soak

8.6   Place each set of 30 small cans into the appropriate orientation and temperature for soaking:

30 full small cans—73 °F, upright

30 full small cans—73 °F, inverted

30 full small cans—130 °F, upright

30 full small cans—130 °F, inverted

30 half-full small cans—73 °F, upright

30 half-full small cans—73 °F, inverted

30 half-full small cans—130 °F, upright

30 half-full small cans—130 °F, inverted

8.7   Soak the small cans for 30 days undisturbed.

Final Weighing

8.8   Place the 240 small cans into a location where they can equilibrate to balance room temperature.

8.9   Let the small cans equilibrate for at least four hours.

8.10   Weigh the set of 240 small cans, the reference weights, and any additional sets of small cans using Attachment A.

8.11   Transfer data from the Balance Weighing Log Form to the corresponding Small Can Test Data Forms.

Section 9. Calculations

Corrections for Buoyancy

The calculations in this section are described in terms of “weight.” Mass is a property of the small can, whereas weight is a force due to the effects of buoyancy and gravity. Procedures for correcting the effect of buoyancy are given in Attachment B of this appendix. Ignoring buoyancy, i.e., using weight data uncorrected for buoyancy effects, is acceptable for a thirty day test if the absolute magnitude of the weight change is less than 25 mg. If the uncorrected weight change exceeds 25 mg for any small can, then correct all small can weights for buoyancy using the procedures in Attachment B before performing the calculations described below.

Calculation of Leak Rate

The emission rate in grams/day for each small can is calculated by subtracting the final weight from the initial weight and then dividing the weight difference by the time difference measured in days to the nearest hour (nearest 1/24 of a day). The emission rate in g/day is multiplied by 365 to determine emission rate in grams/yr. If the annual emission rate for any small can exceeds the entire small can contents, then the annual emission rate for that small can is adjusted to equal the entire small can contents/year (e.g., about 350 g/yr for a 12 ounce small can). The annual emission rate for the purpose of the test is calculated by averaging the 240 individual adjusted annual emission rates and rounding to two decimal places. The cans fail the test if the adjusted annual emission rate averaged over 240 cans is greater than 3.00 g/yr. The calculations are described below.

Loss rate for each small can

Eidaily = (Wifinal − Wiinitial)/(Difinal − Diinitial)   g/day

Eiannual = 365 × Eidaily   g/year

Eiadjusted = Minimum of (Eiadjusted, Ci/year)   g/yr

Where,

Ei = emission rate

Wifinal = weight of can i after soaking (grams)

Wiinitial = weight of can I before soaking (grams)

Difinal = date/time of final weight measurements (days)

Diinitial = date/time of initial weight measurements (days)

Ci = original factory mass of refrigerant in can i

Note: Date/Times are measured in days. Microsoft Excel stores dates and times in days, and the calculations can be made directly in Excel. If calculations are made manually, calculate serial days to the nearest hour for each date and time as follows:

D = Julday + Hour/24

Where,

Julday = serial day of the year: Jan 1 = 1, Jan 31 = 31, Feb 1 = 32, etc.

Hour = hour of day using 24-hour clock, 0 to 23

Calculate the average loss rate for the 240 small cans as follows:

Emean = [Sum (Eadjustedi), i = 1 to 240]/240

Section 10. Recordkeeping

During small can weighing, record the small can weights and date/times on the Balance Weighing Log Form. After each weighing session, transfer the measured weights and date/times from the Balance Weighing Log Form to the Small Can Test Data Form.

At the end of the test, complete the calculations described in Section 9, Calculations, and record the results on the Small Can Test Data Form.

Section 11. Quality Assurance/Quality Control

11.1   All temperature, pressure, and humidity instruments should be calibrated annually against NIST traceable laboratory standards. The main purpose of the NIST traceable calibration is to establish the absolute accuracy of the device. The instruments should also be checked periodically such as weekly, monthly, or quarterly against intermediate standards or against independent instruments. For example, a thermocouple can be checked weekly against a wall thermometer. A barometer or pressure gauge can be checked weekly by adjusting to sea level and comparing with local airport data. The main purpose of the frequent checks is to verify that the device has not failed in some way. This is especially important for electronic devices such as a digital thermometer, but even a liquid filled thermometer can develop a problem such as a bubble.

11.2   The balance should be serviced and calibrated annually by an independent balance service company or agency using NIST traceable reference masses. Servicing verifies accuracy and linearity, and the maintenance performed helps ensure that a malfunction does not develop.

11.3   The balance must also be calibrated and its linearity checked with working standards before and after each weighing session, or before and after each group of 24 small cans if more than 24 small cans are weighed in a session. Procedures for calibrating and using the balance, as well as recording balance data, are described in the accompanying balance weighing protocol. These procedures include zero checks, calibration checks, and reference mass checks. Procedures for calculating quality control data from those checks are described in Attachment A.

11.4   The small cans are cleaned then handled using gloves to prevent contamination. All equilibration and soaking must be done in a dust free area.

Section 12. Balance Protocol for Gravimetric Determination of Sample Weights Using a Precision Balance

12.1   Scope and application

This Protocol summarizes a set of procedures and tolerances for weighing objects in the range of 0 to 1,000 g with a resolution of 0.001 g. This protocol only addresses balance operations, it does not address project requirements for equilibration, sample hold time limits, sample collection etc.

12.2   Summary of method

The balance is zeroed and calibrated using procedures defined herein. Object weight determinations are conducted along with control object weight determinations, zero checks, calibration checks, sensitivity checks, and replicate weightings in a defined sequence designed to control and quantitatively characterize precision and accuracy.

12.3   Definitions

N/A.

12.4   Interferences

Object weights can be affected by temperature and relative humidity of their environment, air currents, static electricity, gain and loss of water vapor, gain or loss of and loss of volatile compounds directly from the sample or from contaminants such as finger prints, marker ink, and adhesive tape.

Contamination, transfer of material to or from the samples, is controlled by conducting operations inside a clean area dedicated to the purpose and having a filtered laminar air flow where possible; by wearing gloves while handling all samples and related balance equipment; by using forceps to handle small objects, and by keeping the balance and all related equipment inside the clean area.

Air currents are controlled by conducting weighing operations inside a closed chamber or glove box and by allowing the substrates to reach temperature and relative humidity equilibrium. The chamber is maintained at 40 percent relative humidity and 25 °C by a continuous humidity and temperature control system. The temperature and RH conditions are recorded at least once per weighing sessions. Equilibration times for samples that are particularly sensitive to humidity or to loss of semi-volatiles species are specified by project requirements.

Static electric charges on the walls of the balance and the weighed objects, including samples, controls, and calibration weights, can significantly affect balance readings. Static is avoided by the operator ground himself and test objects as described in the balance manual.

12.5   Personnel health and safety

N/A

12.6   Equipment and supplies

  Filtered, temperature and humidity controlled weighing chamber.

  Precision Balance

  Plastic forceps

  Nylon fabric gloves.

  Working calibration weights: ANSI Class 2, 1000g and 500 g

  Working sensitivity weight: 50 mg

  Reference objects: references are one or more objects that are typical of the objects to be weighed during a project, but that are stored permanently inside the balance glove box. Reference objects are labeled Test1, Test2, Test3, etc.

12.7   Reagents and standard

N/A

12.8   Sample collection, preservation, and storage

N/A. See relevant project requirements and SOPs.

12.9   Quality control

Data quality is controlled by specifying frequencies and tolerances for Zero, Calibration, Linearity, and Sensitivity checks. If checks do not meet tolerance criteria, then samples must be re-weighed. In addition, the procedures specify frequencies for Control Object Checks.

Data quality is quantitatively characterized using Zero Check, Calibration Check, and Control Check data. These data are summarized monthly in statistics and QC charts.

12.10   Calibration and standardization

The absolute accuracy of the balance is established by calibration against an ANSI Class 2, stainless steel working weight: 1000.000 g ± 0.0025 g. Linearity is established checking the midpoint against an ANSI Class 2 stainless steel working weight: 500.000 ± 0.0012 g. Sensitivity is established using and ANSI Class 2 stainless steel or aluminum working weight: 50 mg. Precision is checked by periodically checking zero, calibration, and reference object weights.

12.11   Procedure

12.11.1   Overview of Weighing Sequence

Weighing a series of substrates consists of performing the following procedures in sequence, while observing the procedures for handling and the procedures for reading the balance:

1. Initial Adjustment

2. Weigh eight samples

3. Zero Check

4. Weigh eight samples

5. Zero Check

6. Weigh eight samples

7. Calibration Check

8. Return to step 2.

9. If less than 24 cans are weighed, perform a final Calibration Check at the end of weighing.

This sequence is interrupted and samples are reweighed if QC check tolerances are not met. Each of these procedures along with procedures for handling and reading the balance are described below. The QC tolerances referred to in these procedures are listed in Table 1.

12.11.2   Handling

1. Never touch samples, weights, balance pans, etc. with bare hands. Wear powder free gloves to handle the weights, controls, and samples.

12.11.3   Reading the Balance

1. Close the door. Wait for the balance stabilization light to come on, and note the reading.

2. Watch the balance reading for 30 sec (use a clock). If the reading has not changed by more than 0.001 g from the reading noted in step 1, then record the reading observed at the end of the 30 sec period.

3. If the reading has drifted more than 0.001 g note the new balance reading and go to step 2.

4. If the balance reading is flickering back and forth between two consecutive values choose the value that is displayed more often than the other.

5. If the balance reading is flickering equally back and forth between two consecutive values choose the higher value.

12.11.4   Initial Adjustment

1. Empty the sample pan Close the door. Select Range 1000 g

2. Wait for a stable reading

3. Record the reading with QC code IZC (initial zero check)

4. Press the Tare button

5. Record the reading in the logbook with QC code IZA (initial zero adjust)

6. Place the 1,000 g working calibration weight on the balance pan

7. Wait for a stable reading.

8. Record the reading with QC code ICC (initial cal check)

9. Press the Calibrate button

10. Record the reading with QC code ICA (initial cal adjust)

11. Remove the calibration weight.

12. Wait for a stable reading.

13. Record the reading with QC code IZC.

14. If the zero reading exceeds ± 0.002 g, go to step 4.

15. Place the 500 g calibration weight on the balance pan

16. After a stable reading, record the reading with QC code C500. Do not adjust the balance.

17. Add the 0.050 g weight to 500 g weight on the balance pan.

18. After a stable reading, record the reading with QC code C0.05. Do not adjust the balance.

19. Weigh reference object TEST1, record reading with QC code T1.

20. Weigh the reference object TEST2, TEST3, etc. that is similar in weight to the samples that you will be weighing. Record with QC code T2, T3, etc.

12.11.5   Zero Check

1. Empty the sample pan. Close the door.

2. Wait for a stable reading

3. Record the reading with QC code ZC

4. If the ZC reading is less than or equal to the zero adjustment tolerance shown in Table 1, return to weighing and do not adjust the zero. If the ZC reading exceeded the zero adjustment tolerance, proceed with steps 5 through 7.

5. Press the Tare button

6. Record the reading in the logbook with QC code ZA.

7. If the ZC reading exceeded the zero re-weigh tolerance, change the QC code recorded in step 3 from ZC to FZC. Then enter a QC code of FZ into the QC code column of all samples weights obtained after the last valid zero check. Re- weigh all of those samples, recording new data in new rows of the logbook.

12.11.6   Calibration Check

1. First, follow procedures for Zero Check. If the ZC was within tolerance, tare the balance anyway (i.e., follow steps 5 and 6 of the Zero Check method)

2. Place the 1,000 g working calibration weight on the sample pan, wait for a stable reading.

3. Record the reading with QC code C1000

4. If the C1000 reading is less than or equal to the calibration adjustment tolerances, skip steps 5 through 8 and proceed to step 9. Do not adjust the calibration.

5. If the C100 reading exceeded the calibration adjust tolerance, press the Calibrate button.

6. Record the reading in the logbook with QC code CA

7. Perform a Zero Check (follow the Zero Check method)

8. If the C1000 reading exceeded the calibration re-weigh tolerance, change the code recorded in step 3 from C1000 to FC1000. Enter FC into the QC column for all sample weights obtained after the last valid calibration check. Re-weigh all of those samples, recording new data in new rows of the logbook.

12.11.7   Replicate Weighing Check

1. This protocol does not include reweigh samples to obtain replicates. The projects for which this protocol is intended already include procedures multiple weightings of each sample.

Table 1—QC Tolerances and Frequencies for Balance Protocol

Reading Tolerance:
0.001 g, stable for 30 sec.
Adjustment Tolerances:
Zero:−0.003 to +0.003 g.
Calibration:999.997 to 1000.003 g.
Controls:none.
Replicates:none.
Re-weigh Tolerances:
Zero:−0.005 to +0.005 g.
Calibration:999.995 to 1000.005 g.
Controls:none.
Replicates:none.
Reference Objects:
Test 1—A reference object weighing about 400 g.
Test 2—A reference object weighing about 200 g.
Test 3—A reference object weighing about 700 g.
QC Frequencies:
Zero Checks:once per 8 samples.
Calibration Checks:once per 24 samples.
Repeat weighings:none (test method includes replicate determinations).
Control objects:once per weighing session.

12.12   Data analysis and calculations

For Zero Checks, let Z equal the recorded Zero Check value. For control checks let T1, T2, etc. equal the recorded value for control object Test 1, Test 2, etc. For Calibration Checks, let C1000 equal C1000 reading minus 1000, M = C500—500, S = .C.050—C500—.050. For Replicate Checks, let D equal the loss that occurred between the first and second measurements. In summary:

T1 = T1

T2 = T2

T3 = T3

Z = ZC—0

C = C1000—1000

M = C500—500

G = C050—C500—.050

Tabulate the mean and standard deviation for each of the following: Z, C, M, G. T1, T2, T3. Depending on the number of operators using the balance and the number of protocols in use, analyze the data by subcategories to determine the effects of balance operator and protocol. Each of these standard deviations, SZ, SC, etc. is an estimate of the precision of single weight measurement.

For Z, C, M, and G, check the mean value for statistical difference from 0. If the means are statistically different than zero, troubleshooting to eliminate bias may be called for. For Z, C, M, G, T1, T2, T3, check that the standard deviations are all comparable. If there are systematic differences, then troubleshooting to eliminate the problem may be called for.

Note that the precision of a weight gain, involves two weight determinations, and therefore is larger than S by a factor of sqrt(2). On the other hand replicate weighings improves the precision of the determinations by a factor of sqrt(N). If N = 2, i.e., duplicates, then the factors cancel each other.

To estimate the overall uncertainty in a weight determination, a conservative estimate might be to combine the imprecision contributed by the zero with the imprecision contributed by the calibration.

U = Sqrt(SZ2 + SC2)

The uncertainty in a weight gain from N replicates is then given by:

Ugain = Sqrt(2) × Sqrt(SZ2 + SC2)/Sqrt(N)

But due to the balance adjustment and reweigh tolerances, we expect SZ to approximately equal SC, to approximately equal SM, etc. tolerances, so that the equation above becomes:

Ugain = 2 × S/Sqrt(N)

Where S is any individual standard deviation; or better, a pooled standard deviation.

12.13   Method performance

The data necessary to characterize the accuracy and precision of this method are still being collected. The method is used primarily to weigh objects before and after a period of soaking to determine weight loss by subtraction. Given the reweigh tolerances, we expect that the precision of weight gain determinations will be on the order of 0.006 g at the 1-sigma level. Bias in the weight gain determination, due to inaccuracy of the calibration weight and to fixed non-linearity of the balance response is on the order 0.005 percent of the gain.

12.14   Pollution prevention

When discharging half the can contents during can preparation, do not vent the contents of the small can to the atmosphere. Use an automotive recovery machine to transfer small can contest to a recovery cylinder.

12.15   Waste management

Dispose of the contents of the recycle cylinder through a service that consolidates waste for shipment to EPA certified facilities for reclaiming or destruction.

Section 13. Compensation of Weight Data for Buoyancy and Gravity Effects

13.1   Gravity

Variations in gravity are important only when weighing objects under different gravitational fields, i.e., at different locations or at different heights. Since the balance procedures calibrate the balance against a known mass (the calibration “weight”) at the same location where sample objects are weighed, there is no need to correct for location. Although both the sample and the calibration weight are used at the same location, there will be a difference in the height of the center of gravity of the sample object (small can) and the center of gravity of the reference mass (calibration weight). However, this difference in height is maintained during both the initial weights and final weights, affecting the initial and final weights by the same amount, and affecting the scale of the weight difference by only a few ppm. In any event, the magnitude of this correction is on the order of 0.3 ug per kg per mm of height difference. A difference on the order of 100 mm would thus yield a weight difference of about 0.03 mg, which is insignificant compared to our balance resolution which is 0.001 g or 1 mg.

Based on the discussion above, no corrections for gravity are necessary when determining weight changes in small cans.

13.2   Buoyancy

Within a weighing session, the difference in density between the sample object and the calibration weight will cause the sample object weight value to differ from its mass value due to buoyancy. For a 1-liter object in air at 20 °C and at 1 atm, the buoyant force is about 1.2 g. The volume of a 1 kg object with a density of 8 g/cm3 (e.g., a calibration weight), is about 0.125 liters, and the buoyancy force is about 0.15 g. Variations in air density will affect both of these values in proportion. The net value being affected by variations in air density is thus on the order of 1.2 − 0.15 = 1.05 g. Air density can vary up or down by 2 percent or more due to variations in barometric pressure, temperature, and humidity. The buoyancy force will then vary up or down by 0.02 g, or 20 mg. This is significant compared to the weight change expected after one week for a can leaking at 3 grams per year, which is 57 mg.

Based on the discussion above, buoyancy corrections must be made.

Variables measured or calculated:

Vcan = volume of can (cm3). Estimate to within 10 percent by measuring the can dimensions or by water displacement. Error in the can volume will cause an error in the absolute amount of the buoyancy force, but will have only a small effect on the change in buoyancy force from day to day.

Wcan = nominal weight of a can (g), used to calculate the nominal density of the can.

ρcan = nominal density of a small can (g/cm3). The nominal values can be applied to corrections for all cans. It is not necessary to calculate a more exact density for each can. Calculate once for a full can and once for a half full can as follows:

ρcan = Wcan /Vcan

T = Temperature in balance chamber (degrees Celsius).

RH = Relative humidity in balance chamber (expressed a number between 0 and 100).

Pbaro = Barometric pressure in balance chamber (millibar). Use actual pressure, NOT pressure adjusted to sea level.

ρair = density of air in the balance chamber (g/cm3). Calculate using the following approximation:

ρair = 0.001*[0.348444*Pbaro−(RH/100) × (0.252 × T−2.0582)]/(T + 273.15)

ρref = the reference density of the calibration weight (g/cm3). Should be 8.0 g/cm3.

Equation to correct for buoyancy: Wcorrected = Wreading × (1—ρairref)/(1—ρaircan)

[81 FR 82392, Nov. 18, 2016]

Need assistance?