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Title 40Chapter ISubchapter CPart 62 → Subpart JJJ


Title 40: Protection of Environment
PART 62—APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS


Subpart JJJ—Federal Plan Requirements for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999


Contents

Introduction

§62.15000   What is the purpose of this subpart?
§62.15005   What are the principal components of this subpart?

Applicability of this Subpart

§62.15010   Is my municipal waste combustion unit covered by this subpart?
§62.15015   Can my small municipal waste combustion unit be covered by both a State plan and this subpart?
§62.15020   Can my small municipal waste combustion unit be exempt from this subpart?
§62.15025   How do I determine if my small municipal waste combustion unit is covered by an approved and effective State or Tribal Plan?
§62.15030   What are my obligations under this subpart if I reduce my small municipal waste combustion unit's combustion capacity to less than 35 tons per day?
§62.15035   Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant capacity?

Compliance Schedule and Increments of Progress

§62.15040   What are the requirements for meeting increments of progress and achieving final compliance?
§62.15045   When must I complete each increment of progress?
§62.15050   What must I include in the notifications of achievement of my increments of progress?
§62.15055   When must I submit the notifications of achievement of increments of progress?
§62.15060   What if I do not meet an increment of progress?
§62.15065   How do I comply with the increment of progress for submittal of a final control plan?
§62.15070   How do I comply with the increment of progress for awarding contracts?
§62.15075   How do I comply with the increment of progress for initiating onsite construction?
§62.15080   How do I comply with the increment of progress for completing onsite construction?
§62.15085   How do I comply with the increment of progress for achieving final compliance?
§62.15090   What must I do if I close my municipal waste combustion unit and then restart my municipal waste combustion unit?
§62.15095   What must I do if I plan to permanently close my municipal waste combustion unit and not restart it?

Good Combustion Practices: Operator Training

§62.15100   What types of training must I do?
§62.15105   Who must complete the operator training course? By when?
§62.15110   Who must complete the plant-specific training course?
§62.15115   What plant-specific training must I provide?
§62.15120   What information must I include in the plant-specific operating manual?
§62.15125   Where must I keep the plant-specific operating manual?

Good Combustion Practices: Operator Certification

§62.15130   What types of operator certification must the chief facility operator and shift supervisor obtain and by when must they obtain it?
§62.15135   After the required date for operator certification, who may operate the municipal waste combustion unit?
§62.15140   What if all the certified operators must be temporarily offsite?

Good Combustion Practices: Operating Requirements

§62.15145   What are the operating practice requirements for my municipal waste combustion unit?
§62.15150   What happens to the operating requirements during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

Emission Limits

§62.15155   What pollutants are regulated by this subpart?
§62.15160   What emission limits must I meet?
§62.15165   What happens to the emission limits during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

Continuous Emission Monitoring

§62.15170   What types of continuous emission monitoring must I perform?
§62.15175   What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?
§62.15180   How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?
§62.15185   How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?
§62.15190   Am I exempt from any 40 CFR part 60 appendix B or appendix F requirements to evaluate continuous emission monitoring systems?
§62.15195   What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?
§62.15200   What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?
§62.15205   What minimum amount of monitoring data must I collect with my continuous emission monitoring systems and is this requirement enforceable?
§62.15210   How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?
§62.15215   What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?
§62.15220   What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system?
§62.15225   What must I do if my continuous emission monitoring system is temporarily unavailable to meet the data collection requirements?

Stack Testing

§62.15230   What types of stack tests must I conduct?
§62.15235   How are the stack test data used?
§62.15240   What schedule must I follow for the stack testing?
§62.15245   What test methods must I use to stack test?
§62.15250   May I conduct stack testing less often?
§62.15255   May I deviate from the 13-month testing schedule if unforeseen circumstances arise?

Other Monitoring Requirements

§62.15260   What other requirements must I meet for continuous monitoring?
§62.15265   How do I monitor the load of my municipal waste combustion unit?
§62.15270   How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?
§62.15275   How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?
§62.15280   What minimum amount of monitoring data must I collect with my continuous parameter monitoring systems and is this requirement enforceable?

Recordkeeping

§62.15285   What records must I keep?
§62.15290   Where must I keep my records and for how long?
§62.15295   What records must I keep for operator training and certification?
§62.15300   What records must I keep for stack tests?
§62.15305   What records must I keep for continuously monitored pollutants or parameters?
§62.15310   What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

Reporting

§62.15315   What reports must I submit and in what form?
§62.15320   What are the appropriate units of measurement for reporting my data?
§62.15325   When must I submit the initial report?
§62.15330   What must I include in the initial report?
§62.15335   When must I submit the annual report?
§62.15340   What must I include in the annual report?
§62.15345   What must I do if I am out of compliance with these standards?
§62.15350   If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it?
§62.15355   What must I include in the semiannual out-of-compliance reports?
§62.15360   Can reporting dates be changed?

Air Curtain Incinerators that Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste

§62.15365   What is an air curtain incinerator?
§62.15370   What is yard waste?
§62.15375   What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?
§62.15380   How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?
§62.15385   What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

Equations

§62.15390   What equations must I use?

Title V Requirements

§62.15395   Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act?
§62.15400   When must I submit a title V permit application for my existing small municipal waste combustion unit?

Delegation of Authority

§62.15405   What authorities are retained by the Administrator?

Definitions

§62.15410   What definitions must I know?
Table 1 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Generic Compliance Schedules and Increments of Progress
Table 2 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Class I Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Limits
Table 3 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Class I Nitrogen Oxides Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units
Table 4 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Class II Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units
Table 5 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Carbon Monoxide Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units
Table 6 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)
Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)
Table 8 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Requirements for Stack Tests
Table 9 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Site-specific Compliance Schedules and Increments of Progress

Source: 68 FR 5158, Jan. 31, 2003, unless otherwise noted.

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Introduction

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§62.15000   What is the purpose of this subpart?

(a) This subpart establishes emission requirements and compliance schedules for the control of emissions from existing small municipal waste combustion units that are not covered by an EPA approved and effective State plan. The pollutants addressed by these emission requirements are listed in tables 2, 3, 4, and 5 of this subpart. These emission requirements are developed in accordance with sections 111(d) and 129 of the Clean Air Act and subpart B of 40 CFR part 60.

(b) In this subpart, “you” means the owner or operator of a small municipal waste combustion unit.

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§62.15005   What are the principal components of this subpart?

This subpart contains five major components:

(a) Increments of progress toward compliance.

(b) Good combustion practices:

(1) Operator training.

(2) Operator certification.

(3) Operating requirements.

(c) Emission limits.

(d) Monitoring and stack testing.

(e) Recordkeeping and reporting.

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Applicability of this Subpart

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§62.15010   Is my municipal waste combustion unit covered by this subpart?

(a) This subpart applies to your small municipal waste combustion unit if the unit meets the criteria in paragraphs (a)(1) and (a)(2) and the criteria in either paragraph (a)(3) or (a)(4) of this section:

(1) Your municipal waste combustion unit has the capacity to combust at least 35 tons per day of municipal solid waste or refuse-derived fuel but no more than 250 tons per day of municipal solid waste or refuse-derived fuel.

(2) Your municipal waste combustion unit commenced construction on or before August 30, 1999.

(3) Your municipal waste combustion unit is not regulated by an EPA approved and effective State or Tribal plan.

(4) Your municipal waste combustion unit is located in any State whose approved State plan is subsequently vacated in whole or in part, or the municipal waste combustion unit is located in Indian country if the approved tribal plan for that area is subsequently vacated in whole or in part.

(b) If you make a change to your municipal waste combustion unit that meets the definition of modification or reconstruction after June 6, 2001, your municipal waste combustion unit becomes subject to subpart AAAA of 40 CFR part 60 (New Source Performance Standards for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units) and this subpart no longer applies to your unit.

(c) If you make physical or operational changes to your existing municipal waste combustion unit primarily to comply with this subpart, then subpart AAAA of 40 CFR part 60 (New Source Performance Standards for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units) does not apply to your unit. Such changes do not constitute modifications or reconstructions under subpart AAAA of 40 CFR part 60.

(d) Upon approval of the State or tribal plan, this subpart will no longer apply, except for the provisions of this subpart that may have been incorporated by reference under the State or Tribal plan, or delegated to the State by the Administrator.

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§62.15015   Can my small municipal waste combustion unit be covered by both a State plan and this subpart?

(a) If your municipal waste combustion unit is located in a State that has a State plan that has not been approved by the EPA or has not become effective, then this subpart applies and the State plan would not apply to your municipal waste combustion unit. However, the State could enforce the requirements of a State regulation while your municipal waste combustion unit is still subject to this subpart.

(b) After the State plan is approved by the EPA and becomes effective, your municipal waste combustion unit is no longer subject to this subpart and will only be subject to the approved and effective State plan.

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§62.15020   Can my small municipal waste combustion unit be exempt from this subpart?

(a) Small municipal waste combustion units that combust less than 11 tons per day. Your unit is exempt from this subpart if four requirements are met:

(1) Your municipal waste combustion unit is subject to a federally enforceable permit limiting municipal solid waste combustion to less than 11 tons per day.

(2) You notify the Administrator that the unit qualifies for this exemption.

(3) You submit to the Administrator a copy of the federally enforceable permit.

(4) You keep daily records of the amount of municipal solid waste combusted.

(b) Small power production units. Your unit is exempt from this subpart if four requirements are met:

(1) Your unit qualifies as a small power production facility under section 3(17)(C) of the Federal Power Act (16 U.S.C. 796(17)(C)).

(2) Your unit combusts homogeneous waste (excluding refuse-derived fuel) to produce electricity.

(3) You notify the Administrator that the unit qualifies for this exemption.

(4) You submit to the Administrator documentation that the unit qualifies for this exemption.

(c) Cogeneration units. Your unit is exempt from this subpart if four requirements are met:

(1) Your unit qualifies as a cogeneration facility under section 3(18)(B) of the Federal Power Act (16 U.S.C. 796(18)(B)).

(2) Your unit combusts homogeneous waste (excluding refuse-derived fuel) to produce electricity and steam or other forms of energy used for industrial, commercial, heating, or cooling purposes.

(3) You notify the Administrator that the unit qualifies for this exemption.

(4) You submit to the Administrator documentation that the unit qualifies for this exemption.

(d) Municipal waste combustion units that combust only tires. Your unit is exempt from this subpart if three requirements are met:

(1) Your municipal waste combustion unit combusts a single-item waste stream of tires and no other municipal waste (the unit can cofire coal, fuel oil, natural gas, or other nonmunicipal solid waste).

(2) You notify the Administrator that the unit qualifies for this exemption.

(3) You provide the Administrator documentation that the unit qualifies for this exemption.

(e) Hazardous waste combustion units. Your unit is exempt from this subpart if the unit has received a permit under section 3005 of the Solid Waste Disposal Act.

(f) Materials recovery units. Your unit is exempt from this subpart if the unit combusts waste mainly to recover metals. Primary and secondary smelters may qualify for this exemption.

(g) Cofired units. Your unit is exempt from this subpart if four requirements are met:

(1) Your unit has a federally enforceable permit limiting municipal solid waste combustion to 30 percent of the total fuel input by weight.

(2) You notify the Administrator that the unit qualifies for this exemption.

(3) You provide the Administrator with a copy of the federally enforceable permit.

(4) You record the weights, each quarter, of municipal solid waste and of all other fuels combusted.

(h) Plastics/rubber recycling units. Your unit is exempt from this subpart if four requirements are met:

(1) Your pyrolysis/combustion unit is an integrated part of a plastics/rubber recycling unit as defined under “Definitions” (§62.15410).

(2) You record the weight, each quarter, of plastics, rubber, and rubber tires processed.

(3) You record the weight, each quarter, of feed stocks produced and marketed from chemical plants and petroleum refineries.

(4) You keep the name and address of the purchaser of the feed stocks.

(i) Units that combust fuels made from products of plastics/rubber recycling plants. Your unit is exempt from this subpart if two requirements are met:

(1) Your unit combusts gasoline, diesel fuel, jet fuel, fuel oils, residual oil, refinery gas, petroleum coke, liquified petroleum gas, propane, or butane produced by chemical plants or petroleum refineries that use feed stocks produced by plastics/rubber recycling units.

(2) Your unit does not combust any other municipal solid waste.

(j) Cement kilns. Your unit is exempt from this subpart if your cement kiln combusts municipal solid waste.

(k) Air curtain incinerators. If your air curtain incinerator (see §62.15410 for definition) combusts 100 percent yard waste, then you must meet only the requirements under “Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste” (§§62.15365 through 62.15385) and the title V operating permit requirements of this subpart. However, if your air curtain incinerator combusts municipal solid waste other than yard waste, it is subject to all provisions of this subpart.

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§62.15025   How do I determine if my small municipal waste combustion unit is covered by an approved and effective State or Tribal Plan?

This part (40 CFR part 62) contains a list of all States and tribal areas with approved Clean Air Act section 111(d) and section 129 plans in effect. However, this part is only updated once per year. Thus, if this part does not indicate that your State or tribal area has an approved and effective plan, you should contact your State environmental agency's air director or your EPA Regional Office to determine if approval has occurred since publication of the most recent version of this part.

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§62.15030   What are my obligations under this subpart if I reduce my small municipal waste combustion unit's combustion capacity to less than 35 tons per day?

If you reduce your small municipal waste combustion unit's combustion capacity to less than 35 tons per day by the final compliance date, you must comply only with the following requirements:

(a) You must submit a final control plan according to the schedule in table 1 of this subpart and comply with §62.15065(b).

(b) The final control plan must, at a minimum, include two items:

(1) A description of the physical changes that will be made to accomplish the reduction in combustion capacity. A permit restriction or a change in the method of operation does not qualify as a reduction in combustion capacity.

(2) Calculations of the current maximum combustion capacity and the planned maximum combustion capacity after the reduction. Use the equations specified under §62.15390(d) and (e) to calculate the combustion capacity of a municipal waste combustion unit.

(c) You must complete the physical changes to accomplish the reduction in combustion capacity by the final compliance date specified in table 1 of this subpart.

(d) If you comply with all of the requirements specified in paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) of this section, you are no longer subject to this subpart.

(e) You must comply with the requirements specified in §62.15395 and §62.15400 regarding title V permitting. If you comply with all of the requirements specified in paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) of this section, you are no longer subject to title V permitting requirements as a result of this subpart. You will remain subject to title V permitting requirements, however, if you are subject as a result of one or more of the applicability criteria in 40 CFR 70.3(a) and (b) or 71.3(a) and (b).

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§62.15035   Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant capacity?

This subpart specifies different requirements for two different subcategories of municipal waste combustion units. These two subcategories are based on aggregate capacity of the municipal waste combustion plant as defined in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section.

(a) Class I units. These are small municipal waste combustion units that are located at municipal waste combustion plants with aggregate plant combustion capacity greater than 250 tons per day of municipal solid waste. (See the definition of municipal waste combustion plant capacity in §62.15410 for specification of which units at a plant are included in the aggregate capacity calculation.)

(b) Class II units. These are small municipal waste combustion units that are located at municipal waste combustion plants with aggregate plant combustion capacity of no more than 250 tons per day of municipal solid waste. (See the definition of municipal waste combustion plant capacity in §62.15410 for specification of which units at a plant are included in the aggregate capacity calculation.)

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Compliance Schedule and Increments of Progress

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§62.15040   What are the requirements for meeting increments of progress and achieving final compliance?

(a) Class I units. If you plan to achieve compliance more than 1 year following the effective date of this subpart and a permit modification is not required, or more than 1 year following the date of issuance of a revised construction or operation permit if a permit modification is required, you must meet five increments of progress:

(1) Submit a final control plan.

(2) Submit a notification of retrofit contract award.

(3) Initiate onsite construction.

(4) Complete onsite construction.

(5) Achieve final compliance.

(b) Class II units. If you plan to achieve compliance more than 1 year following the effective date of this subpart and a permit modification is not required, or more than 1 year following the date of issuance of a revised construction or operation permit if a permit modification is required, you must meet two increments of progress:

(1) Submit a final control plan.

(2) Achieve final compliance.

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§62.15045   When must I complete each increment of progress?

(a) You must complete each increment of progress according to the compliance schedule in table 1 of this subpart for Class I and II units. If your Class I or Class II unit is listed in table 9 of this subpart, then you must complete each increment of progress according to the schedule in table 9 of this subpart. (See §62.15410 for definitions of classes.)

(b) For Class I units (see definition in §62.15410) that must meet the five increments of progress, you must submit dioxins/furans stack test results for at least one test conducted during or after 1990. The stack tests must have been conducted according to the procedures specified under §62.15245 and you must submit the stack test results when the final control plan is due for your Class I MWC unit according to the schedule in table 1 or table 9 of this subpart.

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§62.15050   What must I include in the notifications of achievement of my increments of progress?

Your notification of achievement of increments of progress must include three items:

(a) Notification that the increment of progress has been achieved.

(b) Any items required to be submitted with the increment of progress (§§62.15065 through 62.15085).

(c) The notification must be signed by the owner or operator of the municipal waste combustion unit.

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§62.15055   When must I submit the notifications of achievement of increments of progress?

Notifications of the achievement of increments of progress must be postmarked no later than 10 days after the compliance date for the increment.

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§62.15060   What if I do not meet an increment of progress?

If you fail to meet an increment of progress, you must submit a notification to the Administrator postmarked within 10 business days after the specified date in table 1 of this subpart for achieving that increment of progress. This notification must inform the Administrator that you did not meet the increment. You must include in the notification an explanation of why the increment of progress was not met and your plan for meeting the increment as expeditiously as possible. You must continue to submit reports each subsequent month until the increment of progress is met.

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§62.15065   How do I comply with the increment of progress for submittal of a final control plan?

For your final control plan increment of progress, you must complete two items:

(a) Submit the final control plan describing the devices for air pollution control and process changes that you will use to comply with the emission limits and other requirements of this subpart. If you plan to reduce your small municipal waste combustion unit's combustion capacity to less than 35 tons per day by the final compliance date, see §62.15030.

(b) You must maintain an onsite copy of the final control plan.

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§62.15070   How do I comply with the increment of progress for awarding contracts?

You must submit a signed copy of the contracts awarded to initiate onsite construction, initiate onsite installation of emission control equipment, and incorporate process changes. Submit the copy of the contracts with the notification that this increment of progress has been achieved. You do not need to include documents incorporated by reference or the attachments to the contracts.

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§62.15075   How do I comply with the increment of progress for initiating onsite construction?

You must initiate onsite construction and installation of emission control equipment and initiate the process changes outlined in the final control plan.

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§62.15080   How do I comply with the increment of progress for completing onsite construction?

You must complete onsite construction and installation of emission control equipment and complete process changes outlined in the final control plan.

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§62.15085   How do I comply with the increment of progress for achieving final compliance?

For the final compliance increment of progress, you must complete two items:

(a) Complete all process changes and complete retrofit construction as specified in the final control plan.

(b) Connect the air pollution control equipment with the municipal waste combustion unit identified in the final control plan and complete process changes to the municipal waste combustion unit so that if the affected municipal waste combustion unit is brought online, all necessary process changes and air pollution control equipment are operating as designed.

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§62.15090   What must I do if I close my municipal waste combustion unit and then restart my municipal waste combustion unit?

(a) If you close your municipal waste combustion unit but will reopen it prior to the applicable final compliance date in table 1 of this subpart, you must meet the increments of progress specified in §62.15040.

(b) If you close your municipal waste combustion unit but restart it after the applicable final compliance date in table 1 of this subpart, you must complete the emission control retrofit and meet the emission limits and good combustion practices on the date your municipal waste combustion unit restarts operation.

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§62.15095   What must I do if I plan to permanently close my municipal waste combustion unit and not restart it?

(a) If you plan to close your municipal waste combustion unit rather than comply with this subpart, you must submit a closure notification, including the date of closure, to the Administrator by the date your final control plan is due.

(b) If the closure date is later than 1 year after the effective date of this subpart, you must enter into a legally binding closure agreement with the Administrator by the date your final control plan is due. The agreement must include two items:

(1) The date by which operation will cease. The closure date can be no later than the applicable final compliance date in table 1 of this subpart.

(2) For Class I units only, dioxins/furans stack test results for at least one test conducted during or after 1990. The stack tests must have been conducted according to the procedures specified under §62.15245.

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Good Combustion Practices: Operator Training

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§62.15100   What types of training must I do?

There are two types of required training:

(a) Training of operators of municipal waste combustion units using the EPA or a State-approved training course.

(b) Training of plant personnel using a plant-specific training course.

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§62.15105   Who must complete the operator training course? By when?

(a) Three types of employees must complete the EPA operator training course:

(1) Chief facility operators.

(2) Shift supervisors.

(3) Control room operators.

(b) These employees must complete the operator training course by the later of three dates:

(1) One year after the effective date of this subpart.

(2) Six months after your municipal waste combustion unit starts up.

(3) The date before an employee assumes responsibilities that affect operation of the municipal waste combustion unit.

(c) The requirement in paragraph (a) of this section does not apply to chief facility operators, shift supervisors, and control room operators who have obtained full certification from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers on or before the effective date of this subpart.

(d) You may request that the EPA Administrator waive the requirement in paragraph (a) of this section for chief facility operators, shift supervisors, and control room operators who have obtained provisional certification from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers on or before the effective date of this subpart.

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§62.15110   Who must complete the plant-specific training course?

All employees with responsibilities that affect how a municipal waste combustion unit operates must complete the plant-specific training course. Include at least six types of employees:

(a) Chief facility operators.

(b) Shift supervisors.

(c) Control room operators.

(d) Ash handlers.

(e) Maintenance personnel.

(f) Crane or load handlers.

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§62.15115   What plant-specific training must I provide?

For plant-specific training, you must do four things:

(a) For training at a particular plant, develop a specific operating manual for that plant by the later of two dates:

(1) Six months after your municipal waste combustion unit starts up.

(2) One year after the effective date of this subpart.

(b) Establish a program to review the plant-specific operating manual with people whose responsibilities affect the operation of your municipal waste combustion unit. Complete the initial review by the later of three dates:

(1) One year after the effective date of this subpart.

(2) Six months after your municipal waste combustion unit starts up.

(3) The date before an employee assumes responsibilities that affect operation of the municipal waste combustion unit.

(c) Update your manual annually.

(d) Review your manual with staff annually.

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§62.15120   What information must I include in the plant-specific operating manual?

You must include 11 items in the operating manual for your plant:

(a) A summary of all applicable standards in this subpart.

(b) A description of the basic combustion principles that apply to municipal waste combustion units.

(c) Procedures for receiving, handling, and feeding municipal solid waste.

(d) Procedures to be followed during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction of the municipal waste combustion unit.

(e) Procedures for maintaining a proper level of combustion air supply.

(f) Procedures for operating the municipal waste combustion unit within the standards contained in this subpart.

(g) Procedures for responding to periodic upset or off-specification conditions.

(h) Procedures for minimizing carryover of particulate matter.

(i) Procedures for handling ash.

(j) Procedures for monitoring emissions from the municipal waste combustion unit.

(k) Procedures for recordkeeping and reporting.

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§62.15125   Where must I keep the plant-specific operating manual?

You must keep your operating manual in an easily accessible location at your plant. It must be available for review or inspection by all employees who must review it and by the Administrator.

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Good Combustion Practices: Operator Certification

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§62.15130   What types of operator certification must the chief facility operator and shift supervisor obtain and by when must they obtain it?

(a) Each chief facility operator and shift supervisor must obtain and maintain a current provisional operator certification from either the American Society of Mechanical Engineers QRO-1-1994 or a State certification program in Connecticut and Maryland (if the affected facility is located in either of the respective States). If ASME certification is chosen, proceed in accordance with ASME QRO-1-1994. Standard for the Qualification and Certification of Resource Recovery Facility Operators. The Director of the Federal Register approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C.552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Service Center, 22 Law Drive, Post Office Box 2900, Fairfield, NJ 07007. You may inspect a copy at the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards Air Docket, EPA, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, Room C521C, RTP, NC 27709 or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal__register/code__of__federal__regulations/ibr__locations.html.

(b) Each chief facility operator and shift supervisor must obtain a provisional certification by the later of three dates:

(1) For Class I units, 12 months after the effective date of this subpart. For Class II units, 18 months after the effective date of this subpart.

(2) Six months after the municipal waste combustion unit starts up.

(3) Six months after they transfer to the municipal waste combustion unit or 6 months after they are hired to work at the municipal waste combustion unit.

(c) Each chief facility operator and shift supervisor must take one of two actions:

(1) Obtain a full certification from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

(2) Schedule a full certification exam with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (QRO-1-1994 (incorporated by reference in §60.17 of subpart A of 40 CFR part 60)).

(d) The chief facility operator and shift supervisor must obtain the full certification or be scheduled to take the certification exam by the later of the following dates:

(1) For Class I units, 12 months after the effective date of this subpart. For Class II units, 18 months after the effective date of this subpart.

(2) Six months after the municipal waste combustion unit starts up.

(3) Six months after they transfer to the municipal waste combustion unit or 6 months after they are hired to work at the municipal waste combustion unit.

[68 FR 5158, Jan. 31, 2003, as amended at 69 FR 18803, Apr. 9, 2004]

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§62.15135   After the required date for operator certification, who may operate the municipal waste combustion unit?

After the required date for full or provisional certification, you must not operate your municipal waste combustion unit unless one of four employees is on duty:

(a) A fully certified chief facility operator.

(b) A provisionally certified chief facility operator who is scheduled to take the full certification exam.

(c) A fully certified shift supervisor.

(d) A provisionally certified shift supervisor who is scheduled to take the full certification exam.

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§62.15140   What if all the certified operators must be temporarily offsite?

If the certified chief facility operator and certified shift supervisor both are unavailable, a provisionally certified control room operator at the municipal waste combustion unit may fulfill the certified operator requirement. Depending on the length of time that a certified chief facility operator and certified shift supervisor is away, you must meet one of three criteria:

(a) When the certified chief facility operator and certified shift supervisor are both offsite for 12 hours or less and no other certified operator is onsite, the provisionally certified control room operator may perform those duties without notice to, or approval by, the Administrator.

(b) When the certified chief facility operator and certified shift supervisor are offsite for more than 12 hours, but for 2 weeks or less, and no other certified operator is onsite, the provisionally certified control room operator may perform those duties without notice to, or approval by, the Administrator. However, you must record the periods when the certified chief facility operator and certified shift supervisor are offsite and include this information in the annual report as specified under §62.15340(l).

(c) When the certified chief facility operator and certified shift supervisor are offsite for more than 2 weeks and no other certified operator is onsite, the provisionally certified control room operator may perform those duties without notice to, or approval by, the Administrator. However, you must take two actions:

(1) Notify the Administrator in writing. In the notice, state what caused the absence and what you are doing to ensure that a certified chief facility operator or certified shift supervisor is onsite.

(2) Submit a status report and corrective action summary to the Administrator every 4 weeks following the initial notification. If the Administrator notifies you that your status report or corrective action summary is disapproved, the municipal waste combustion unit may continue operation for 90 days, but then must cease operation. If corrective actions are taken in the 90-day period such that the Administrator withdraws the disapproval, municipal waste combustion unit operation may continue.

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Good Combustion Practices: Operating Requirements

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§62.15145   What are the operating practice requirements for my municipal waste combustion unit?

(a) You must not operate your municipal waste combustion unit at loads greater than 110 percent of the maximum demonstrated load of the municipal waste combustion unit (4-hour block average), as specified under “Definitions” (§62.15410).

(b) You must not operate your municipal waste combustion unit so that the temperature at the inlet of the particulate matter control device exceeds 17 °C above the maximum demonstrated temperature of the particulate matter control device (4-hour block average), as specified under “Definitions” (§62.15410).

(c) If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must maintain an 8-hour block average carbon feed rate at or above the highest average level established during the most recent dioxins/furans or mercury test.

(d) If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must evaluate total carbon usage for each calendar quarter. The total amount of carbon purchased and delivered to your municipal waste combustion plant must be at or above the required quarterly usage of carbon. At your option, you may choose to evaluate required quarterly carbon usage on a municipal waste combustion unit basis for each individual municipal waste combustion unit at your plant. Calculate the required quarterly usage of carbon using the appropriate equation in §62.15390.

(e) Your municipal waste combustion unit is exempt from limits on load level, temperature at the inlet of the particulate matter control device, and carbon feed rate during any of five situations:

(1) During your annual tests for dioxins/furans.

(2) During your annual mercury tests (for carbon feed rate requirements only).

(3) During the 2 weeks preceding your annual tests for dioxins/furans.

(4) During the 2 weeks preceding your annual mercury tests (for carbon feed rate requirements only).

(5) Whenever the Administrator permits you to do any of five activities:

(i) Evaluate system performance.

(ii) Test new technology or control technologies.

(iii) Perform diagnostic testing.

(iv) Perform other activities to improve the performance of your municipal waste combustion unit.

(v) Perform other activities to advance the state of the art for emission controls for your municipal waste combustion unit.

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§62.15150   What happens to the operating requirements during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

(a) The operating requirements of this subpart apply at all times except during periods of municipal waste combustion unit startup, shutdown, or malfunction.

(b) Each startup, shutdown, or malfunction must not last for longer than 3 hours.

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Emission Limits

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§62.15155   What pollutants are regulated by this subpart?

Eleven pollutants, in four groupings, are regulated:

(a) Organics. Dioxins/furans.

(b) Metals. (1) Cadmium.

(2) Lead.

(3) Mercury.

(4) Opacity.

(5) Particulate matter.

(c) Acid gases. (1) Hydrogen chloride.

(2) Nitrogen oxides.

(3) Sulfur dioxide.

(d) Other. (1) Carbon monoxide.

(2) Fugitive ash.

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§62.15160   What emission limits must I meet?

(a) After the date the initial stack test and continuous emission monitoring system evaluation are required or completed (whichever is earlier), you must meet the applicable emission limits specified in the four tables of this section:

(1) For Class I units, see tables 2 and 3 of this subpart.

(2) For Class II units, see table 4 of this subpart.

(3) For carbon monoxide emission limits for both classes of units, see table 5 of this subpart.

(b) If your Class I municipal waste combustion unit began construction, reconstruction, or modification after June 26, 1987, then you must comply with the dioxins/furans and mercury emission limits specified in table 2 of this subpart as applicable by the later of the following two dates:

(1) One year after the effective date of this subpart.

(2) One year after the issuance of a revised construction or operating permit, if a permit modification is required. Final compliance with the dioxins/furans limits must be achieved no later than November 6, 2005, even if the date one year after the issuance of a revised construction or operating permit is later than November 6, 2005.

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§62.15165   What happens to the emission limits during periods of startup, shutdown, and malfunction?

(a) The emission limits of this subpart apply at all times except during periods of municipal waste combustion unit startup, shutdown, or malfunction.

(b) Each startup, shutdown, or malfunction must not last for longer than 3 hours.

(c) A maximum of 3 hours of test data can be dismissed from compliance calculations during periods of startup, shutdown, or malfunction.

(d) During startup, shutdown, or malfunction periods longer than 3 hours, emissions data cannot be discarded from compliance calculations and all provisions under §60.11(d) of subpart A of 40 CFR part 60 apply.

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Continuous Emission Monitoring

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§62.15170   What types of continuous emission monitoring must I perform?

To continuously monitor emissions, you must perform four tasks:

(a) Install continuous emission monitoring systems for certain gaseous pollutants.

(b) Make sure your continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly.

(c) Make sure you obtain the minimum amount of monitoring data.

(d) Install a continuous opacity monitoring system.

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§62.15175   What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

(a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide. If you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, also install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a continuous emission monitoring system for nitrogen oxides. Install the continuous emission monitoring system for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the outlet of the air pollution control device.

(b) You must install, evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring system according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in §60.13 of subpart A of 40 CFR part 60.

(c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon dioxide) concentration at each location where you monitor sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide. Additionally, if you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, you must also monitor the oxygen (or carbon dioxide) concentration at the location where you monitor nitrogen oxides.

(d) You may choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas. If you choose to monitor carbon dioxide, then an oxygen monitor is not required and you must follow the requirements in §62.15200.

(e) If you choose to demonstrate compliance by monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, you must also install a continuous emission monitoring system for sulfur dioxide and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the inlet of the air pollution control device.

(f) If you prefer to use an alternative sulfur dioxide monitoring method, such as parametric monitoring, or cannot monitor emissions at the inlet of the air pollution control device to determine percent reduction, you can apply to the Administrator for approval to use an alternative monitoring method under §60.13(i) of subpart A of 40 CFR part 60.

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§62.15180   How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide to demonstrate continuous compliance with the applicable emission limits specified in tables 2, 3, 4, and 5 of this subpart. To demonstrate compliance for dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash, see §62.15235.

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§62.15185   How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

(a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units only), and carbon monoxide.

(b) Complete your initial evaluation of the continuous emission monitoring systems within 180 days after your final compliance date.

(c) For initial and annual evaluations, collect data concurrently (or within 30 to 60 minutes) using your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system, your sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, or carbon monoxide continuous emission monitoring systems, as appropriate, and the appropriate test methods specified in table 6 of this subpart. Collect these data during each initial and annual evaluation of your continuous emission monitoring systems following the applicable performance specifications in appendix B of 40 CFR part 60. Table 7 of this subpart shows the performance specifications that apply to each continuous emission monitoring system.

(d) Follow the quality assurance procedures in Procedure 1 of appendix F of 40 CFR part 60 for each continuous emission monitoring system. These procedures include daily calibration drift and quarterly accuracy determinations.

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§62.15190   Am I exempt from any 40 CFR part 60 appendix B or appendix F requirements to evaluate continuous emission monitoring systems?

Yes, the accuracy tests for your sulfur dioxide continuous emission monitoring system require you to also evaluate your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system. Therefore, your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system is exempt from two requirements:

(a) Section 2.3 of Performance Specification 3 in appendix B of 40 CFR part 60 (relative accuracy requirement).

(b) Section 5.1.1 of appendix F of 40 CFR part 60 (relative accuracy test audit).

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§62.15195   What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

(a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted.

(b) Evaluate your continuous emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of 40 CFR part 60.

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§62.15200   What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission monitoring system. You may reestablish the relationship during annual evaluations. To establish the relationship use three procedures:

(a) Use EPA Reference Method 3A or 3B in appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 to determine oxygen concentration at the location of your carbon dioxide monitor.

(b) Conduct at least three test runs for oxygen. Make sure each test run represents a 1-hour average and that sampling continues for at least 30 minutes in each hour.

(c) Use the fuel-factor equation in EPA Reference Method 3B to determine the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide.

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§62.15205   What minimum amount of monitoring data must I collect with my continuous emission monitoring systems and is this requirement enforceable?

(a) Where continuous emission monitoring systems are required, obtain 1-hour arithmetic averages. Make sure the averages for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units only), and carbon monoxide are in parts per million by dry volume at 7 percent oxygen (or the equivalent carbon dioxide level). Use the 1-hour averages of oxygen (or carbon dioxide) data from your continuous emission monitoring system to determine the actual oxygen (or carbon dioxide) level and to calculate emissions at 7 percent oxygen (or the equivalent carbon dioxide level).

(b) Obtain at least two data points per hour in order to calculate a valid 1-hour arithmetic average. Section 60.13(e)(2) of subpart A of 40 CFR part 60 requires your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation (sampling, analyzing, and data recording) for each 15-minute period.

(c) Obtain valid 1-hour averages for 75 percent of the operating hours per day for 90 percent of the operating days per calendar quarter. An operating day is any day the unit combusts any municipal solid waste or refuse-derived fuel.

(d) If you do not obtain the minimum data required in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, you are in violation of this data collection requirement regardless of the emission level monitored, and you must notify the Administrator according to §62.15340(e).

(e) If you do not obtain the minimum data required in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, you must still use all valid data from the continuous emission monitoring systems in calculating emission concentrations and percent reductions in accordance with §62.15210.

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§62.15210   How do I convert my 1-hour arithmetic averages into appropriate averaging times and units?

(a) Use the equation in §62.15390(a) to calculate emissions at 7 percent oxygen.

(b) Use EPA Reference Method 19 in appendix A of 40 CFR part 60, section 4.3, to calculate the daily geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions. If you are monitoring the percent reduction of sulfur dioxide, use EPA Reference Method 19, section 5.4, to determine the daily geometric average percent reduction of potential sulfur dioxide emissions.

(c) If you operate a Class I municipal waste combustion unit, use EPA Reference Method 19, section 4.1, to calculate the daily arithmetic average for concentrations of nitrogen oxides.

(d) Use EPA Reference Method 19, section 4.1, to calculate the 4-hour or 24-hour daily block averages (as applicable) for concentrations of carbon monoxide.

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§62.15215   What is required for my continuous opacity monitoring system and how are the data used?

(a) Install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a continuous opacity monitoring system.

(b) Install, evaluate, and operate each continuous opacity monitoring system according to §60.13 of subpart A 40 CFR part 60.

(c) Complete an initial evaluation of your continuous opacity monitoring system according to Performance Specification 1 in appendix B of 40 CFR part 60. Complete this evaluation by 180 days after your final compliance date.

(d) Complete each annual evaluation of your continuous opacity monitoring system no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation.

(e) Use tests conducted according to EPA Reference Method 9, as specified in §62.15245, to determine compliance with the applicable opacity limit in tables 2 or 4 of this subpart. The data obtained from your continuous opacity monitoring system are not used to determine compliance with the opacity limit.

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§62.15220   What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system?

Use the required span values and applicable performance specifications in table 8 of this subpart.

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§62.15225   What must I do if my continuous emission monitoring system is temporarily unavailable to meet the data collection requirements?

Refer to table 8 of this subpart. It shows alternate methods for collecting data when these systems malfunction or when repairs, calibration checks, or zero and span checks keep you from collecting the minimum amount of data.

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Stack Testing

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§62.15230   What types of stack tests must I conduct?

Conduct initial and annual stack tests to measure the emission levels of dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash.

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§62.15235   How are the stack test data used?

You must use results of stack tests for dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash to demonstrate compliance with the applicable emission limits in tables 2 and 4 of this subpart. To demonstrate compliance for carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and sulfur dioxide, see §62.15180.

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§62.15240   What schedule must I follow for the stack testing?

(a) Conduct initial stack tests for the pollutants listed in §62.15230 by 180 days after your final compliance date.

(b) Conduct annual stack tests for these pollutants after the initial stack test. Conduct each annual stack test no later than 13 months after the previous stack test.

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§62.15245   What test methods must I use to stack test?

(a) Follow table 8 of this subpart to establish the sampling location and to determine pollutant concentrations, number of traverse points, individual test methods, and other specific testing requirements for the different pollutants.

(b) Make sure that stack tests for all these pollutants consist of at least three test runs, as specified in §60.8 (Performance Tests) of subpart A of 40 CFR part 60. Use the average of the pollutant emission concentrations from the three test runs to determine compliance with the applicable emission limits in tables 2 and 4 of this subpart.

(c) Obtain an oxygen (or carbon dioxide) measurement at the same time as your pollutant measurements to determine diluent gas levels, as specified in §62.15175.

(d) Use the equations in §62.15390(a) to calculate emission levels at 7 percent oxygen (or an equivalent carbon dioxide basis), the percent reduction in potential hydrogen chloride emissions, and the reduction efficiency for mercury emissions. See the individual test methods in table 6 of this subpart for other required equations.

(e) You can apply to the Administrator for approval under §60.8(b) of subpart A of 40 CFR part 60 to

(1) Use a reference method with minor changes in methodology;

(2) Use an equivalent method;

(3) Use an alternative method the results of which the Administrator has determined are adequate for demonstrating compliance;

(4) Waive the requirement for a performance test because you have demonstrated by other means that you are in compliance; or

(5) Use a shorter sampling time or smaller sampling volume.

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§62.15250   May I conduct stack testing less often?

(a) You may test less often if you own or operate a Class II municipal waste combustion unit and if all stack tests for a given pollutant over 3 consecutive years show you comply with the emission limit. In this case, you are not required to conduct a stack test for that pollutant for the next 2 years. However, you must conduct another stack test within 36 months of the anniversary date of the third consecutive stack test that shows you comply with the emission limit. Thereafter, you must perform stack tests every third year but no later than 36 months following the previous stack tests. If a stack test shows noncompliance with an emission limit, you must conduct annual stack tests for that pollutant until all stack tests over 3 consecutive years show compliance with the emission limit for that pollutant. This provision applies to all pollutants subject to stack testing requirements: dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash.

(b) You can test less often for dioxins/furans emissions if you own or operate a municipal waste combustion plant that meets two conditions. First, you have multiple municipal waste combustion units onsite that are subject to this subpart. Second, all these municipal waste combustion units have demonstrated levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal to 15 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter (total mass) for Class I units, or 30 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter (total mass) for Class II units, for 2 consecutive years. In this case, you may choose to conduct annual stack tests on only one municipal waste combustion unit per year at your plant. This provision only applies to stack testing for dioxins/furans emissions.

(1) Conduct the stack test no more than 13 months following a stack test on any municipal waste combustion unit subject to this subpart at your plant. Each year, test a different municipal waste combustion unit subject to this subpart and test all municipal waste combustion units subject to this subpart in a sequence that you determine. Once you determine a testing sequence, it must not be changed without approval by the Administrator.

(2) If each annual stack test shows levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal to 15 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter (total mass) for Class I units, or 30 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter (total mass) for Class II units, you may continue stack tests on only one municipal waste combustion unit subject to this subpart per year.

(3) If any annual stack test indicates levels of dioxins/furans emissions greater than 15 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter (total mass) for Class I units, or 30 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter (total mass) for Class II units, conduct subsequent annual stack tests on all municipal waste combustion units subject to this subpart at your plant. You may return to testing one municipal waste combustion unit subject to this subpart per year if you can demonstrate dioxins/furans emission levels less than or equal to 15 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter (total mass) for Class I units, or 30 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter (total mass) for Class II units, for all municipal waste combustion units at your plant subject to this subpart for 2 consecutive years.

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§62.15255   May I deviate from the 13-month testing schedule if unforeseen circumstances arise?

You may not deviate from the 13-month testing schedules specified in §§62.15240(b) and 62.15250(b)(1) unless you apply to the Administrator for an alternative schedule, and the Administrator approves your request for alternate scheduling prior to the date on which you would otherwise have been required to conduct the next stack test.

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Other Monitoring Requirements

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§62.15260   What other requirements must I meet for continuous monitoring?

You must also monitor three operating parameters:

(a) Load level of each municipal waste combustion unit.

(b) Temperature of flue gases at the inlet of your particulate matter air pollution control device.

(c) Carbon feed rate if activated carbon is used to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions.

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§62.15265   How do I monitor the load of my municipal waste combustion unit?

(a) If your municipal waste combustion unit generates steam, you must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a steam flowmeter or a feed water flowmeter and meet five requirements:

(1) Continuously measure and record the measurements of steam (or feed water) in kilograms per hour (or pounds per hour).

(2) Calculate your steam (or feed water) flow in 4-hour block averages.

(3) Calculate the steam (or feed water) flow rate using the method in “American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME PTC 4.1—1964): Test Code for Steam Generating Units, Power Test Code 4.1-1964 (Reaffirmed 1991),” section 4. The Director of the Federal Register approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Service Center, 22 Law Drive, Post Office Box 2900, Fairfield, NJ 07007. You may inspect a copy at the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards Air Docket, EPA, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, Room C521C, RTP, NC 27709 or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal__register/code__of__federal__regulations/ibr__locations.html.

(4) Design, construct, install, calibrate, and use nozzles or orifices for flow rate measurements, using the recommendations in “American Society of Mechanical Engineers Interim Supplement 19.5 on Instruments and Apparatus: Application, Part II of Fluid Meters”, 6th Edition (1971), chapter 4. The Director of the Federal Register approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Service Center, 22 Law Drive, Post Office Box 2900, Fairfield, NJ 07007. You may inspect a copy at the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards Air Docket, EPA, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, Room C521C, RTP, NC 27709 or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal__register/code__of__federal__regulations/ibr__locations.html.

(5) Before each dioxins/furans stack test, or at least once a year, calibrate all signal conversion elements associated with steam (or feed water) flow measurements according to the manufacturer instructions.

(b) If your municipal waste combustion unit does not generate steam, or, if your municipal waste combustion units have shared steam systems and steam load cannot be estimated per unit, you must determine, to the satisfaction of the Administrator, one or more operating parameters that can be used to continuously estimate load level (for example, the feed rate of municipal solid waste or refuse-derived fuel). You must continuously monitor the selected parameters.

[68 FR 5158, Jan. 31, 2003, as amended at 69 FR 18803, Apr. 9, 2004]

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§62.15270   How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a device to continuously measure the temperature of the flue gas stream at the inlet of each particulate matter control device.

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§62.15275   How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet three requirements:

(a) Select a carbon injection system operating parameter that can be used to calculate carbon feed rate (for example, screw feeder speed).

(b) During each dioxins/furans and mercury stack test, determine the average carbon feed rate in kilograms (or pounds) per hour. Also, determine the average operating parameter level that correlates to the carbon feed rate. Establish a relationship between the operating parameter and the carbon feed rate in order to calculate the carbon feed rate based on the operating parameter level.

(c) Continuously monitor the selected operating parameter during all periods when the municipal waste combustion unit is operating and combusting waste and calculate the 8-hour block average carbon feed rate in kilograms (or pounds) per hour, based on the selected operating parameter. When calculating the 8-hour block average, do two things:

(1) Exclude hours when the municipal waste combustion unit is not operating.

(2) Include hours when the municipal waste combustion unit is operating but the carbon feed system is not working correctly.

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§62.15280   What minimum amount of monitoring data must I collect with my continuous parameter monitoring systems and is this requirement enforceable?

(a) Where continuous parameter monitoring systems are used, obtain 1-hour arithmetic averages for three parameters:

(1) Load level of the municipal waste combustion unit.

(2) Temperature of the flue gases at the inlet of your particulate matter control device.

(3) Carbon feed rate if activated carbon is used to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions.

(b) Obtain at least two data points per hour in order to calculate a valid 1-hour arithmetic average.

(c) Obtain valid 1-hour averages for at least 75 percent of the operating hours per day for 90 percent of the operating days per calendar quarter. An operating day is any day the unit combusts any municipal solid waste or refuse-derived fuel.

(d) If you do not obtain the minimum data required in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, you are in violation of this data collection requirement and you must notify the Administrator according to §62.15340(e).

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Recordkeeping

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§62.15285   What records must I keep?

You must keep four types of records:

(a) Operator training and certification.

(b) Stack tests.

(c) Continuously monitored pollutants and parameters.

(d) Carbon feed rate.

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§62.15290   Where must I keep my records and for how long?

(a) Keep all records onsite in paper copy or electronic format unless the Administrator approves another format.

(b) Keep all records on each municipal waste combustion unit for at least 5 years.

(c) Make all records available for submittal to the Administrator, or for onsite review by an inspector.

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§62.15295   What records must I keep for operator training and certification?

You must keep records of six items:

(a) Records of provisional certifications. Include three items:

(1) For your municipal waste combustion plant, names of the chief facility operator, shift supervisors, and control room operators who are provisionally certified by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

(2) Dates of the initial provisional certifications.

(3) Documentation showing current provisional certifications.

(b) Records of full certifications. Include three items:

(1) For your municipal waste combustion plant, names of the chief facility operator, shift supervisors, and control room operators who are fully certified by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers or an equivalent State-approved certification program.

(2) Dates of initial and renewal full certifications.

(3) Documentation showing current full certifications.

(c) Records showing completion of the operator training course. Include three items:

(1) For your municipal waste combustion plant, names of the chief facility operator, shift supervisors, and control room operators who have completed the EPA or State municipal waste combustion operator training course.

(2) Dates of completion of the operator training course.

(3) Documentation showing completion of operator training course.

(d) Records of reviews for plant-specific operating manuals. Include three items:

(1) Names of persons who have reviewed the operating manual.

(2) Date of the initial review.

(3) Dates of subsequent annual reviews.

(e) Records of when a certified operator is temporarily offsite. Include two main items:

(1) If the certified chief facility operator and certified shift supervisor are offsite for more than 12 hours but for 2 weeks or less and no other certified operator is onsite, record the dates that the certified chief facility operator and certified shift supervisor were offsite.

(2) When all certified chief facility operators and certified shift supervisors are offsite for more than 2 weeks and no other certified operator is onsite, keep records of four items:

(i) Your notice that all certified persons are offsite.

(ii) The conditions that cause these people to be offsite.

(iii) The corrective actions you are taking to ensure a certified chief facility operator or certified shift supervisor is onsite.

(iv) Copies of the written reports submitted every 4 weeks that summarize the actions taken to ensure that a certified chief facility operator or certified shift supervisor will be onsite.

(f) Records of calendar dates. Include the calendar date on each record.

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§62.15300   What records must I keep for stack tests?

For stack tests required under §62.15230, you must keep records of four items:

(a) The results of the stack tests for eight pollutants or parameters recorded in the appropriate units of measure specified in tables 2 or 4 of this subpart:

(1) Dioxins/furans.

(2) Cadmium.

(3) Lead.

(4) Mercury.

(5) Opacity.

(6) Particulate matter.

(7) Hydrogen chloride.

(8) Fugitive ash.

(b) Test reports including supporting calculations that document the results of all stack tests.

(c) The maximum demonstrated load of your municipal waste combustion units and maximum temperature at the inlet of your particulate matter control device during all stack tests for dioxins/furans emissions.

(d) The calendar date of each record.

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§62.15305   What records must I keep for continuously monitored pollutants or parameters?

You must keep records of eight items.

(a) Records of monitoring data. Document six parameters measured using continuous monitoring systems:

(1) All 6-minute average levels of opacity.

(2) All 1-hour average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions.

(3) For Class I municipal waste combustion units only, all 1-hour average concentrations of nitrogen oxides emissions.

(4) All 1-hour average concentrations of carbon monoxide emissions.

(5) All 1-hour average load levels of your municipal waste combustion unit.

(6) All 1-hour average flue gas temperatures at the inlet of the particulate matter control device.

(b) Records of average concentrations and percent reductions. Document five parameters:

(1) All 24-hour daily block geometric average concentrations of sulfur dioxide emissions or average percent reductions of sulfur dioxide emissions.

(2) For Class I municipal waste combustion units only, all 24-hour daily arithmetic average concentrations of nitrogen oxides emissions.

(3) All 4-hour block or 24-hour daily block arithmetic average concentrations of carbon monoxide emissions.

(4) All 4-hour block arithmetic average load levels of your municipal waste combustion unit.

(5) All 4-hour block arithmetic average flue gas temperatures at the inlet of the particulate matter control device.

(c) Records of exceedances. Document three items:

(1) Calendar dates whenever any of the five pollutants or parameter levels recorded in paragraph (b) of this section or the opacity level recorded in paragraph (a)(1) of this section did not meet the emission limits or operating levels specified in this subpart.

(2) Reasons you exceeded the applicable emission limits or operating levels.

(3) Corrective actions you took, or are taking, to meet the emission limits or operating levels.

(d) Records of minimum data. Document three items:

(1) Calendar dates for which you did not collect the minimum amount of data required under §§62.15205 and 62.15280. Record these dates for five types of pollutants and parameters:

(i) Sulfur dioxide emissions.

(ii) For Class I municipal waste combustion units only, nitrogen oxides emissions.

(iii) Carbon monoxide emissions.

(iv) Load levels of your municipal waste combustion unit.

(v) Temperatures of the flue gases at the inlet of the particulate matter control device.

(2) Reasons you did not collect the minimum data.

(3) Corrective actions you took or are taking to obtain the required amount of data.

(e) Records of exclusions. Document each time you have excluded data from your calculation of averages for any of the following five pollutants or parameters and the reasons the data were excluded:

(1) Sulfur dioxide emissions.

(2) For Class I municipal waste combustion units only, nitrogen oxides emissions.

(3) Carbon monoxide emissions.

(4) Load levels of your municipal waste combustion unit.

(5) Temperatures of the flue gases at the inlet of the particulate matter control device.

(f) Records of drift and accuracy. Document the results of your daily drift tests and quarterly accuracy determinations according to Procedure 1 of appendix F of 40 CFR part 60. Keep these records for the sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units only), and carbon monoxide continuous emissions monitoring systems.

(g) Records of the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide. If you choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas, document the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide, as specified in §62.15200.

(h) Records of calendar dates. Include the calendar date on each record.

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§62.15310   What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must keep records of five items:

(a) Records of average carbon feed rate. Document five items:

(1) Average carbon feed rate (in kilograms or pounds per hour) during all stack tests for dioxins/furans and mercury emissions. Include supporting calculations in the records.

(2) For the operating parameter chosen to monitor carbon feed rate, average operating level during all stack tests for dioxins/furans and mercury emissions. Include supporting data that document the relationship between the operating parameter and the carbon feed rate.

(3) All 8-hour block average carbon feed rates in kilograms (pounds) per hour calculated from the monitored operating parameter.

(4) Total carbon purchased and delivered to the municipal waste combustion plant for each calendar quarter. If you choose to evaluate total carbon purchased and delivered on a municipal waste combustion unit basis, record the total carbon purchased and delivered for each individual municipal waste combustion unit at your plant. Include supporting documentation.

(5) Required quarterly usage of carbon for the municipal waste combustion plant, calculated using the appropriate equation in §62.15390(f). If you choose to evaluate required quarterly usage for carbon on a municipal waste combustion unit basis, record the required quarterly usage for each municipal waste combustion unit at your plant. Include supporting calculations.

(b) Records of low carbon feed rates. Document three items:

(1) The calendar dates when the average carbon feed rate over an 8-hour block was less than the average carbon feed rates determined during the most recent stack test for dioxins/furans or mercury emissions (whichever has a higher feed rate).

(2) Reasons for the low carbon feed rates.

(3) Corrective actions you took or are taking to meet the 8-hour average carbon feed rate requirement.

(c) Records of minimum carbon feed rate data. Document three items:

(1) Calendar dates for which you did not collect the minimum amount of carbon feed rate data required under §62.15280.

(2) Reasons you did not collect the minimum data.

(3) Corrective actions you took or are taking to get the required amount of data.

(d) Records of exclusions. Document each time you have excluded data from your calculation of average carbon feed rates and the reasons the data were excluded.

(e) Records of calendar dates. Include the calendar date on each record.

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Reporting

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§62.15315   What reports must I submit and in what form?

(a) Submit an initial report and annual reports, plus semiannual reports for any emission or parameter level that does not meet the limits specified in this subpart.

(b) Submit all reports on paper, postmarked on or before the submittal dates in §§62.15325, 62.15335, and 62.15350. If the Administrator agrees, you may submit electronic reports.

(c) Keep a copy of all reports required by §§62.15330, 62.15340, and 62.15355 onsite for 5 years.

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§62.15320   What are the appropriate units of measurement for reporting my data?

See tables 2, 3, 4, and 5 of this subpart for appropriate units of measurement.

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§62.15325   When must I submit the initial report?

As specified in §60.7(c) of subpart A of 40 CFR part 60, submit your initial report within 180 days after your final compliance date.

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§62.15330   What must I include in the initial report?

You must include seven items:

(a) The emission levels measured on the date of the initial evaluation of your continuous emission monitoring systems for all of the following five pollutants or parameters as recorded in accordance with §62.15305(b).

(1) The 24-hour daily geometric average concentration of sulfur dioxide emissions or the 24-hour daily geometric percent reduction of sulfur dioxide emissions.

(2) For Class I municipal waste combustion units only, the 24-hour daily arithmetic average concentration of nitrogen oxides emissions.

(3) The 4-hour block or 24-hour daily arithmetic average concentration of carbon monoxide emissions.

(4) The 4-hour block arithmetic average load level of your municipal waste combustion unit.

(5) The 4-hour block arithmetic average flue gas temperature at the inlet of the particulate matter control device.

(b) The results of the initial stack tests for eight pollutants or parameters (use appropriate units as specified in tables 2 or 4 of this subpart):

(1) Dioxins/furans.

(2) Cadmium.

(3) Lead.

(4) Mercury.

(5) Opacity.

(6) Particulate matter.

(7) Hydrogen chloride.

(8) Fugitive ash.

(c) The test report that documents the initial stack tests including supporting calculations.

(d) The initial performance evaluation of your continuous emissions monitoring systems. Use the applicable performance specifications in appendix B of 40 CFR part 60 in conducting the evaluation.

(e) The maximum demonstrated load of your municipal waste combustion unit and the maximum demonstrated temperature of the flue gases at the inlet of the particulate matter control device. Use values established during your initial stack test for dioxins/furans emissions and include supporting calculations.

(f) If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, the average carbon feed rates that you recorded during the initial stack tests for dioxins/furans and mercury emissions. Include supporting calculations as specified in §62.15310(a)(1) and (2).

(g) If you choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas, documentation of the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide, as specified in §62.15200.

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§62.15335   When must I submit the annual report?

Submit the annual report no later than February 1 of each year that follows the calendar year in which you collected the data. (As with all other requirements in this subpart, the requirement to submit an annual report does not modify or replace the operating permits requirements of 40 CFR parts 70 and 71.)

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§62.15340   What must I include in the annual report?

Summarize data collected for all pollutants and parameters regulated under this subpart. Your summary must include 12 items:

(a) The results of the annual stack test, using appropriate units, for eight pollutants, as recorded under §62.15300(a):

(1) Dioxins/furans.

(2) Cadmium.

(3) Lead.

(4) Mercury.

(5) Opacity.

(6) Particulate matter.

(7) Hydrogen chloride.

(8) Fugitive ash.

(b) A list of the highest average emission levels recorded, in the appropriate units. List these values for five pollutants or parameters:

(1) Sulfur dioxide emissions.

(2) For Class I municipal waste combustion units only, nitrogen oxides emissions.

(3) Carbon monoxide emissions.

(4) Load level of the municipal waste combustion unit.

(5) Temperature of the flue gases at the inlet of the particulate matter air pollution control device (4-hour block average).

(c) The highest 6-minute opacity level measured. Base this value on all 6-minute average opacity levels recorded by your continuous opacity monitoring system (§62.15305(a)(1)).

(d) For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon for controlling dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, include four records:

(1) The average carbon feed rates recorded during the most recent dioxins/furans and mercury stack tests.

(2) The lowest 8-hour block average carbon feed rate recorded during the year.

(3) The total carbon purchased and delivered to the municipal waste combustion plant for each calendar quarter. If you choose to evaluate total carbon purchased and delivered on a municipal waste combustion unit basis, record the total carbon purchased and delivered for each individual municipal waste combustion unit at your plant.

(4) The required quarterly carbon usage of your municipal waste combustion plant calculated using the appropriate equation in §62.15390(f). If you choose to evaluate required quarterly usage for carbon on a municipal waste combustion unit basis, record the required quarterly usage for each municipal waste combustion unit at your plant.

(e) The total number of days that you did not obtain the minimum number of hours of data for six pollutants or parameters. Include the reasons you did not obtain the data and corrective actions that you have taken to obtain the data in the future. Include data on:

(1) Sulfur dioxide emissions.

(2) For Class I municipal waste combustion units only, nitrogen oxides emissions.

(3) Carbon monoxide emissions.

(4) Load level of the municipal waste combustion unit.

(5) Temperature of the flue gases at the inlet of the particulate matter air pollution control device.

(6) Carbon feed rate.

(f) The number of hours you have excluded data from the calculation of average levels (include the reasons for excluding it). Include data for six pollutants or parameters:

(1) Sulfur dioxide emissions.

(2) For Class I municipal waste combustion units only, nitrogen oxides emissions.

(3) Carbon monoxide emissions.

(4) Load level of the municipal waste combustion unit.

(5) Temperature of the flue gases at the inlet of the particulate matter air pollution control device.

(6) Carbon feed rate.

(g) A notice of your intent to begin a reduced stack testing schedule for dioxins/furans emissions during the following calendar year if you are eligible for alternative scheduling (§62.15250(a) or (b)).

(h) A notice of your intent to begin a reduced stack testing schedule for other pollutants during the following calendar year if you are eligible for alternative scheduling (§62.15250(a)).

(i) A summary of any emission or parameter level that did not meet the limits specified in this subpart.

(j) A summary of the data in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section from the year preceding the reporting year. This summary gives the Administrator a summary of the performance of the municipal waste combustion unit over a 2-year period.

(k) If you choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas, documentation of the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide, as specified in §62.15200.

(l) Documentation of periods when all certified chief facility operators and certified shift supervisors are offsite for more than 12 hours.

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§62.15345   What must I do if I am out of compliance with these standards?

You must submit a semiannual report on any recorded emission or parameter level that does not meet the requirements specified in this subpart.

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§62.15350   If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it?

(a) For data collected during the first half of a calendar year, submit your semiannual report by August 1 of that year.

(b) For data you collected during the second half of the calendar year, submit your semiannual report by February 1 of the following year.

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§62.15355   What must I include in the semiannual out-of-compliance reports?

You must include three items in the semiannual report:

(a) For any of the following six pollutants or parameters that exceeded the limits specified in this subpart, include the calendar date they exceeded the limits, the averaged and recorded data for that date, the reasons for exceeding the limits, and your corrective actions:

(1) Concentration or percent reduction of sulfur dioxide emissions.

(2) For Class I municipal waste combustion units only, concentration of nitrogen oxides emissions.

(3) Concentration of carbon monoxide emissions.

(4) Load level of your municipal waste combustion unit.

(5) Temperature of the flue gases at the inlet of your particulate matter air pollution control device.

(6) Average 6-minute opacity level. The data obtained from your continuous opacity monitoring system are not used to determine compliance with the limit on opacity emissions.

(b) If the results of your annual stack tests (as recorded in §62.15300(a)) show emissions above the limits specified in table 2 or 4 of this subpart as applicable for dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash, include a copy of the test report that documents the emission levels and your corrective actions.

(c) For municipal waste combustion units that apply activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, include two items:

(1) Documentation of all dates when the 8-hour block average carbon feed rate (calculated from the carbon injection system operating parameter) is less than the highest carbon feed rate established during the most recent mercury and dioxins/furans stack test (as specified in §62.15310(a)(1)). Include four items:

(i) Eight-hour average carbon feed rate.

(ii) Reasons for these occurrences of low carbon feed rates.

(iii) The corrective actions you have taken to meet the carbon feed rate requirement.

(iv) The calendar date.

(2) Documentation of each quarter when total carbon purchased and delivered to the municipal waste combustion plant is less than the total required quarterly usage of carbon. If you choose to evaluate total carbon purchased and delivered on a municipal waste combustion unit basis, record the total carbon purchased and delivered for each individual municipal waste combustion unit at your plant. Include five items:

(i) Amount of carbon purchased and delivered to the plant.

(ii) Required quarterly usage of carbon.

(iii) Reasons for not meeting the required quarterly usage of carbon.

(iv) The corrective actions you have taken to meet the required quarterly usage of carbon.

(v) The calendar date.

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§62.15360   Can reporting dates be changed?

(a) If the Administrator agrees, you may change the semiannual or annual reporting dates.

(b) See §60.19(c) in subpart A of 40 CFR part 60 for procedures to seek approval to change your reporting date.

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Air Curtain Incinerators that Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste

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§62.15365   What is an air curtain incinerator?

An air curtain incinerator operates by forcefully projecting a curtain of air across an open chamber or open pit in which combustion occurs. Incinerators of this type can be constructed above or below ground and with or without refractory walls and floor.

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§62.15370   What is yard waste?

Yard waste is grass, grass clippings, bushes, shrubs, and clippings from bushes and shrubs. They come from residential, commercial/retail, institutional, or industrial sources as part of maintaining yards or other private or public lands. Yard waste does not include two items:

(a) Construction, renovation, and demolition wastes that are exempt from the definition of “municipal solid waste” in §62.15410.

(b) Clean wood that is exempt from the definition of “municipal solid waste” in §62.15410 of this subpart.

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§62.15375   What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

If your air curtain incinerator combusts 100 percent yard waste, you must meet only the emission limits in this section.

(a) Within 180 days after your final compliance date, you must meet two limits:

(1) The opacity limit is 10 percent (6-minute average) for air curtain incinerators that can combust at least 35 tons per day of yard waste and no more than 250 tons per day of yard waste.

(2) The opacity limit is 35 percent (6-minute average) during the startup period that is within the first 30 minutes of operation.

(b) Except during malfunctions, the requirements of this subpart apply at all times. Each malfunction must not exceed 3 hours.

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§62.15380   How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

(a) Use EPA Reference Method 9 in appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 to determine compliance with the opacity limit.

(b) Conduct an initial test for opacity as specified in §60.8 of subpart A of 40 CFR part 60.

(c) After the initial test for opacity, conduct annual tests no more than 13 calendar months following the date of your previous test.

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§62.15385   What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

(a) Provide a notice of construction that includes four items:

(1) Your intent to construct the air curtain incinerator.

(2) Your planned initial startup date.

(3) Types of fuels you plan to combust in your air curtain incinerator.

(4) The capacity of your incinerator, including supporting capacity calculations, as specified in §62.15390 (d) and (e).

(b) Keep records of results of all opacity tests onsite in either paper copy or electronic format unless the Administrator approves another format.

(c) Keep all records for each incinerator for at least 5 years.

(d) Make all records available for submittal to the Administrator or for onsite review by an inspector.

(e) Submit the results (each 6-minute average) of the opacity tests by February 1 of the year following the year of the opacity emission test.

(f) Submit reports as a paper copy on or before the applicable submittal date. If the Administrator agrees, you may submit reports on electronic media.

(g) If the Administrator agrees, you may change the annual reporting dates (see §60.19(c) in subpart A of 40 CFR part 60).

(h) Keep a copy of all reports onsite for a period of 5 years.

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Equations

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§62.15390   What equations must I use?

(a) Concentration correction to 7 percent oxygen. Correct any pollutant concentration to 7 percent oxygen using equation 1 of this section:

eCFR graphic er31ja03.000.gif

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Where:

C7% = concentration corrected to 7 percent oxygen.

Cunc = uncorrected pollutant concentration.

CO2 = concentration of oxygen (%).

(b) Percent reduction in potential mercury emissions. Calculate the percent reduction in potential mercury emissions (%PHg) using equation 2 of this section:

eCFR graphic er31ja03.001.gif

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Where:

%PHg = percent reduction of potential mercury emissions

Ei = mercury emission concentration as measured at the air pollution control device inlet, corrected to 7 percent oxygen, dry basis

Eo = mercury emission concentration as measured at the air pollution control device outlet, corrected to 7 percent oxygen, dry basis

(c) Percent reduction in potential hydrogen chloride emissions. Calculate the percent reduction in potential hydrogen chloride emissions (%PHCl) using equation 3 of this section:

eCFR graphic er31ja03.002.gif

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Where:

%PHCl = percent reduction of the potential hydrogen chloride emissions

Ei = hydrogen chloride emission concentration as measured at the air pollution control device inlet, corrected to 7 percent oxygen, dry basis

Eo = hydrogen chloride emission concentration as measured at the air pollution control device outlet, corrected to 7 percent oxygen, dry basis

(d) Capacity of a municipal waste combustion unit. For a municipal waste combustion unit that can operate continuously for 24-hour periods, calculate the capacity of the municipal waste combustion unit based on 24 hours of operation at the maximum charge rate. To determine the maximum charge rate, use one of two methods:

(1) For municipal waste combustion units with a design based on heat input capacity, calculate the maximum charging rate based on this maximum heat input capacity and one of two heating values:

(i) If your municipal waste combustion unit combusts refuse-derived fuel, use a heating value of 12,800 kilojoules per kilogram (5,500 British thermal units per pound).

(ii) If your municipal waste combustion unit combusts municipal solid waste, use a heating value of 10,500 kilojoules per kilogram (4,500 British thermal units per pound).

(2) For municipal waste combustion units with a design not based on heat input capacity, use the maximum designed charging rate.

(e) Capacity of a batch municipal waste combustion unit. Calculate the capacity of a batch municipal waste combustion unit as the maximum design amount of municipal solid waste they can charge per batch multiplied by the maximum number of batches they can process in 24 hours. Calculate this maximum number of batches by dividing 24 by the number of hours needed to process one batch. Retain fractional batches in the calculation. For example, if one batch requires 16 hours, the municipal waste combustion unit can combust 24/16, or 1.5 batches, in 24 hours.

(f) Quarterly carbon usage. If you use activated carbon to comply with the dioxins/furans or mercury limits, calculate the required quarterly usage of carbon using equation 4 or 5 of this section for plant basis or unit basis:

(1) Plant basis.

eCFR graphic er31ja03.003.gif

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Where:

C = required quarterly carbon usage for the plant in kilograms (or pounds).

fi = required carbon feed rate for the municipal waste combustion unit in kilograms (or pounds) per hour. This is the average carbon feed rate during the most recent mercury or dioxins/furans stack tests (whichever has a higher feed rate).

hi = number of hours the municipal waste combustion unit was in operation during the calendar quarter (hours).

n = number of municipal waste combustion units, i, located at your plant.

(2) Unit basis.

eCFR graphic er31ja03.004.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

C = required quarterly carbon usage for the unit in kilograms (or pounds).

f = required carbon feed rate for the municipal waste combustion unit in kilograms (or pounds) per hour. This is the average carbon feed rate during the most recent mercury or dioxins/furans stack tests (whichever has a higher feed rate).

h = number of hours the municipal waste combustion unit was in operation during the calendar quarter (hours).

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Title V Requirements

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§62.15395   Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act?

Yes. If you are subject to this subpart on the effective date of this subpart or any time thereafter, you are required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit.

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§62.15400   When must I submit a title V permit application for my existing small municipal waste combustion unit?

(a) You must submit a complete title V permit application within 12 months of when your source first becomes subject to a title V permitting program. See 40 CFR 70.3(a) and (b), 70.5(a)(1), 71.3(a) and (b), and 71.5(a)(1). As provided in section 503(c) of the Clean Air Act, permitting authorities may establish permit application deadlines earlier than the 12-month deadline.

(b) If your existing small MWC unit is not subject to an earlier permit application deadline, a complete title V permit application must be submitted not later than the date 36 months after promulgation of 40 CFR part 60, subpart BBBB (December 6, 2003), or by the effective date of the applicable State, tribal, or Federal operating permits program, whichever is later. For any existing small MWC unit not subject to an earlier application deadline, this final application deadline applies regardless of when this Federal plan is effective, or when the relevant State or Tribal section 111(d)/129 plan is approved by EPA and becomes effective. See sections 129(e), 503(c), 503(d), and 502(a) of the Clean Air Act.

(c) A “complete” title V permit application is one that has been determined or deemed complete by the relevant permitting authority under section 503(d) of the Clear Air Act and 40 CFR 70.5(a)(2) or 71.5(a)(2). You must submit a complete permit application by the relevant application deadline in order to operate after this date in compliance with Federal law. See sections 503(d) and 502(a); 40 CFR 70.7(b) and 71.7(b).

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Delegation of Authority

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§62.15405   What authorities are retained by the Administrator?

These authorities are retained by the EPA Administrator and not transferred to the State upon delegation of authority to the State to implement and enforce this subpart.

(a) Approval of alternative non-opacity emission standard;

(b) Approval of alternative opacity standard;

(c) Approval of major alternatives to test methods;

(d) Approval of major alternatives to monitoring;

(e) Waiver of recordkeeping; and

(f) Approval of exemption to operating practice requirements in §62.15145(e)(5).

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Definitions

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§62.15410   What definitions must I know?

Terms used but not defined in this section are defined in the Clean Air Act and in subparts A and B of 40 CFR part 60.

Administrator means the Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or his/her authorized representative or the Administrator of a State Air Pollution Control Agency.

Air curtain incinerator means an incinerator that operates by forcefully projecting a curtain of air across an open chamber or pit in which combustion occurs. Incinerators of this type can be constructed above or below ground and with or without refractory walls and floor.

Batch municipal waste combustion unit means a municipal waste combustion unit designed so it cannot combust municipal solid waste continuously 24 hours per day because the design does not allow waste to be fed to the unit or ash to be removed during combustion.

Calendar quarter means three consecutive months (nonoverlapping) beginning on: January 1, April 1, July 1, or October 1.

Calendar year means 365 consecutive days (or 366 consecutive days in leap years) starting on January 1 and ending on December 31.

Chief facility operator means the person in direct charge and control of the operation of a municipal waste combustion unit. This person is responsible for daily onsite supervision, technical direction, management, and overall performance of the municipal waste combustion unit.

Class I units mean small municipal waste combustion units subject to this subpart that are located at municipal waste combustion plants with an aggregate plant combustion capacity greater than 250 tons per day of municipal solid waste. See the definition of “municipal waste combustion plant capacity” for specification of which units at a plant site are included in the aggregate capacity calculation.

Class II units mean small municipal combustion units subject to this subpart that are located at municipal waste combustion plants with aggregate plant combustion capacity less than or equal to 250 tons per day of municipal solid waste. See the definition of “municipal waste combustion plant capacity” for specification of which units at a plant site are included in the aggregate capacity calculation.

Clean wood means untreated wood or untreated wood products including clean untreated lumber, tree stumps (whole or chipped), and tree limbs (whole or chipped). Clean wood does not include two items:

(1) “Yard waste”, which is defined in this section.

(2) Construction, renovation, or demolition wastes (for example, railroad ties and telephone poles) that are exempt from the definition of municipal solid waste in this section.

Cofired combustion unit means a unit that combusts municipal solid waste with nonmunicipal solid waste fuel (for example, coal, industrial process waste). To be considered a cofired combustion unit, the unit must be subject to a federally enforceable permit that limits it to combusting a fuel feed stream which is 30 percent or less (by weight) municipal solid waste as measured each calendar quarter.

Continuous burning means the continuous, semicontinuous, or batch feeding of municipal solid waste to dispose of the waste, produce energy, or provide heat to the combustion system in preparation for waste disposal or energy production. Continuous burning does not mean the use of municipal solid waste solely to thermally protect the grate or hearth during the startup period when municipal solid waste is not fed to the grate or hearth.

Continuous emission monitoring system means a monitoring system that continuously measures the emissions of a pollutant from a municipal waste combustion unit.

Contract means a legally binding agreement or obligation that cannot be canceled or modified without substantial financial loss.

De-rate means to make a permanent physical change to the municipal waste combustor unit that reduces the maximum combustion capacity of the unit to less than or equal to 35 tons per day of municipal solid waste. A permit restriction or a change in the method of operation does not qualify as de-rating.

Dioxins/furans mean tetra- through octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans.

Effective date of State plan approval means the effective date that the EPA approves the State plan. The Federal Register specifies this date in the notice that announces EPA's approval of the State plan.

Eight-hour block average means the average of all hourly emission concentrations or parameter levels when the municipal waste combustion unit operates and combusts municipal solid waste measured over any of three 8-hour periods of time:

(1) 12 midnight to 8 a.m.

(2) 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

(3) 4 p.m. to 12 midnight.

EPA-approved State plan means a State plan that EPA has reviewed and approved based on the requirements in 40 CFR part 60 subpart B to implement and enforce 40 CFR part 60, subpart BBBB. An approved State plan becomes effective on the date specified in the notice published in the Federal Register announcing EPA's approval.

Federally enforceable means all limits and conditions the Administrator can enforce (including the requirements of 40 CFR parts 60, 61, and 63), requirements in a State's implementation plan, and any permit requirements established under 40 CFR 52.21 or under 40 CFR 51.18 and 40 CFR 51.24.

First calendar half means the period that starts on January 1 and ends on June 30 in any year.

Fluidized bed combustion unit means a unit where municipal waste is combusted in a fluidized bed of material. The fluidized bed material may remain in the primary combustion zone or may be carried out of the primary combustion zone and returned through a recirculation loop.

Four-hour block average or 4-hour block average means the average of all hourly emission concentrations or parameter levels when the municipal waste combustion unit operates and combusts municipal solid waste measured over any of six 4-hour periods:

(1) 12 midnight to 4 a.m.

(2) 4 a.m. to 8 a.m.

(3) 8 a.m. to 12 noon.

(4) 12 noon to 4 p.m.

(5) 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

(6) 8 p.m. to 12 midnight.

Mass burn refractory municipal waste combustion unit means a field-erected municipal waste combustion unit that combusts municipal solid waste in a refractory wall furnace. Unless otherwise specified, this includes municipal waste combustion units with a cylindrical rotary refractory wall furnace.

Mass burn rotary waterwall municipal waste combustion unit means a field-erected municipal waste combustion unit that combusts municipal solid waste in a cylindrical rotary waterwall furnace.

Mass burn waterwall municipal waste combustion unit means a field-erected municipal waste combustion unit that combusts municipal solid waste in a waterwall furnace.

Maximum demonstrated load of a municipal waste combustion unit means the highest 4-hour block arithmetic average municipal waste combustion unit load achieved during 4 consecutive hours in the course of the most recent dioxins/furans stack test that demonstrates compliance with the applicable emission limit for dioxins/furans specified in this subpart.

Maximum demonstrated temperature of the particulate matter control device means the highest 4-hour block arithmetic average flue gas temperature measured at the inlet of the particulate matter control device during 4 consecutive hours in the course of the most recent stack test for dioxins/furans emissions that demonstrates compliance with the limits specified in this subpart.

Medical/infectious waste means any waste meeting the definition of medical/infectious waste contained in 40 CFR 60.51c of subpart Ec.

Mixed fuel-fired (pulverized coal/refuse-derived fuel) combustion unit means a combustion unit that combusts coal and refuse-derived fuel simultaneously, in which pulverized coal is introduced into an air stream that carries the coal to the combustion chamber of the unit where it is combusted in suspension. This includes both conventional pulverized coal and micropulverized coal.

Modification or modified municipal waste combustion unit means a municipal waste combustion unit you have changed later than June 6, 2001, and that meets one of two criteria:

(1) The cumulative cost of the changes over the life of the unit exceeds 50 percent of the original cost of building and installing the unit (not including the cost of land) updated to current costs.

(2) Any physical change in the municipal waste combustion unit or change in the method of operating it that increases the emission level of any air pollutant for which standards have been established under section 129 or section 111 of the Clean Air Act. Increases in the emission level of any air pollutant are determined when the municipal waste combustion unit operates at 100 percent of its physical load capability and are measured downstream of all air pollution control devices. Load restrictions based on permits or other nonphysical operational restrictions cannot be considered in this determination.

Modular excess-air municipal waste combustion unit means a municipal waste combustion unit that combusts municipal solid waste, is not field-erected, and has multiple combustion chambers, all of which are designed to operate at conditions with combustion air amounts in excess of theoretical air requirements.

Modular starved-air municipal waste combustion unit means a municipal waste combustion unit that combusts municipal solid waste, is not field-erected, and has multiple combustion chambers in which the primary combustion chamber is designed to operate at substoichiometric conditions.

Municipal solid waste or municipal-type solid waste means household, commercial/retail, or institutional waste. Household waste includes material discarded by residential dwellings, hotels, motels, and other similar permanent or temporary housing. Commercial/retail waste includes material discarded by stores, offices, restaurants, warehouses, nonmanufacturing activities at industrial facilities, and other similar establishments or facilities. Institutional waste includes materials discarded by schools, by hospitals (nonmedical), by nonmanufacturing activities at prisons and government facilities, and other similar establishments or facilities. Household, commercial/retail, and institutional waste does include yard waste and refuse-derived fuel. Household, commercial/retail, and institutional waste does not include used oil; sewage sludge; wood pallets; construction, renovation, and demolition wastes (which include railroad ties and telephone poles); clean wood; industrial process or manufacturing wastes; medical waste; or motor vehicles (including motor vehicle parts or vehicle fluff).

Municipal waste combustion plant means one or more municipal waste combustion units at the same location as specified under “Applicability of State Plans” (§62.15010(a)).

Municipal waste combustion plant capacity means the aggregate municipal waste combustion capacity of all municipal waste combustion units at the plant that are not subject to subparts Ea, Eb, or AAAA of 40 CFR part 60.

Municipal waste combustion unit means any setting or equipment that combusts solid, liquid, or gasified municipal solid waste including, but not limited to, field-erected combustion units (with or without heat recovery), modular combustion units (starved-air or excess-air), boilers (for example, steam generating units), furnaces (whether suspension-fired, grate-fired, mass-fired, air curtain incinerators, or fluidized bed-fired), and pyrolysis/combustion units. Two criteria further define these municipal waste combustion units:

(1) Municipal waste combustion units do not include pyrolysis or combustion units located at a plastics or rubber recycling unit as specified under §62.15020(h) and (i). Municipal waste combustion units do not include cement kilns that combust municipal solid waste as specified under §62.15020(j). Municipal waste combustion units also do not include internal combustion engines, gas turbines, or other combustion devices that combust landfill gases collected by landfill gas collection systems.

(2) The boundaries of a municipal waste combustion unit are defined as follows. The municipal waste combustion unit includes, but is not limited to, the municipal solid waste fuel feed system, grate system, flue gas system, bottom ash system, and the combustion unit water system. The municipal waste combustion unit does not include air pollution control equipment, the stack, water treatment equipment, or the turbine-generator set. The municipal waste combustion unit boundary starts at the municipal solid waste pit or hopper and extends through three areas:

(i) The combustion unit flue gas system, which ends immediately after the heat recovery equipment or, if there is no heat recovery equipment, immediately after the combustion chamber.

(ii) The combustion unit bottom ash system, which ends at the truck loading station or similar equipment that transfers the ash to final disposal. It includes all ash handling systems connected to the bottom ash handling system.

(iii) The combustion unit water system, which starts at the feed water pump and ends at the piping that exits the steam drum or superheater.

Particulate matter means total particulate matter emitted from municipal waste combustion units as measured by EPA Reference Method 5 in appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 and the procedures specified in §62.15245.

Plastics or rubber recycling unit means an integrated processing unit for which plastics, rubber, or rubber tires are the only feed materials (incidental contaminants may be in the feed materials). These materials are processed and marketed to become input feed stock for chemical plants or petroleum refineries. The following three criteria further define a plastics or rubber recycling unit:

(1) Each calendar quarter, the combined weight of the feed stock that a plastics or rubber recycling unit produces must be more than 70 percent of the combined weight of the plastics, rubber, and rubber tires that recycling unit processes.

(2) The plastics, rubber, or rubber tires fed to the recycling unit may originate from separating or diverting plastics, rubber, or rubber tires from municipal or industrial solid waste. These feed materials may include manufacturing scraps, trimmings, and off-specification plastics, rubber, and rubber tire discards.

(3) The plastics, rubber, and rubber tires fed to the recycling unit may contain incidental contaminants (for example, paper labels on plastic bottles or metal rings on plastic bottle caps).

Potential hydrogen chloride emissions means the level of emissions from a municipal waste combustion unit that would occur from combusting municipal solid waste without emission controls for acid gases.

Potential mercury emissions means the level of emissions from a municipal waste combustion unit that would occur from combusting municipal solid waste without controls for mercury emissions.

Potential sulfur dioxide emissions means the level of emissions from a municipal waste combustion unit that would occur from combusting municipal solid waste without emission controls for acid gases.

Protectorate means American Samoa, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the Virgin Islands.

Pyrolysis/combustion unit means a unit that produces gases, liquids, or solids by heating municipal solid waste. The gases, liquids, or solids produced are combusted and the emissions vented to the atmosphere.

Reconstruction means rebuilding a municipal waste combustion unit and meeting two criteria:

(1) The reconstruction begins on or after June 6, 2001.

(2) The cumulative cost of the construction over the life of the unit exceeds 50 percent of the original cost of building and installing the municipal waste combustion unit (not including land) updated to current costs (current dollars). To determine what systems are within the boundary of the municipal waste combustion unit used to calculate these costs, see the definition of “municipal waste combustion unit” in this section.

Refractory unit or refractory wall furnace means a municipal waste combustion unit that has no energy recovery (such as through a waterwall) in the furnace of the municipal waste combustion unit.

Refuse-derived fuel means a type of municipal solid waste produced by processing municipal solid waste through shredding and size classification. This includes all classes of refuse-derived fuel including two fuels:

(1) Low-density fluff refuse-derived fuel through densified refuse-derived fuel.

(2) Pelletized refuse-derived fuel.

Same location means the same or contiguous properties under common ownership or control, including those separated only by a street, road, highway, or other public right-of-way. Common ownership or control includes properties that are owned, leased, or operated by the same entity, parent entity, subsidiary, subdivision, or any combination thereof. Entities may include a municipality, other governmental unit, or any quasi-governmental authority (for example, a public utility district or regional authority for waste disposal).

Second calendar half means the period that starts on July 1 and ends on December 31 in any year.

Shift supervisor means the person who is in direct charge and control of operating a municipal waste combustion unit and who is responsible for onsite supervision, technical direction, management, and overall performance of the municipal waste combustion unit during an assigned shift.

Spreader stoker, mixed fuel-fired (coal/refuse-derived fuel) combustion unit means a municipal waste combustion unit that combusts coal and refuse-derived fuel simultaneously, in which coal is introduced to the combustion zone by a mechanism that throws the fuel onto a grate from above. Combustion takes place both in suspension and on the grate.

Standard conditions when referring to units of measure mean a temperature of 20 °C and a pressure of 101.3 kilopascals.

Startup period means the period when a municipal waste combustion unit begins the continuous combustion of municipal solid waste. It does not include any warmup period during which the municipal waste combustion unit combusts fossil fuel or other solid waste fuel but receives no municipal solid waste.

State means any of the 50 United States and the protectorates of the United States.

State plan means a plan submitted pursuant to section 111(d) and section 129(b)(2) of the Clean Air Act and 40 CFR part 60, subpart B, that implements and enforces 40 CFR part 60, subpart BBBB.

Stoker (refuse-derived fuel) combustion unit means a steam generating unit that combusts refuse-derived fuel in a semisuspension combusting mode, using air-fed distributors.

Total mass dioxins/furans or total mass means the total mass of tetra-through octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans as determined using EPA Reference Method 23 in appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 and the procedures specified in §62.15245.

Tribal plan means a plan submitted by a tribal authority pursuant to 40 CFR parts 9, 35, 49, 50, and 81 that implements and enforces 40 CFR part 60 subpart BBBB.

Twenty-four hour daily average or 24-hour daily average means either the arithmetic mean or geometric mean (as specified) of all hourly emission concentrations when the municipal waste combustion unit operates and combusts municipal solid waste measured during the 24 hours between 12:00 midnight and the following midnight.

Untreated lumber means wood or wood products that have been cut or shaped and include wet, air-dried, and kiln-dried wood products. Untreated lumber does not include wood products that have been painted, pigment-stained, or pressure-treated by compounds such as chromate copper arsenate, pentachlorophenol, and creosote.

Waterwall furnace means a municipal waste combustion unit that has energy (heat) recovery in the furnace (for example, radiant heat transfer section) of the combustion unit.

Yard waste means grass, grass clippings, bushes, shrubs, and clippings from bushes and shrubs. They come from residential, commercial/retail, institutional, or industrial sources as part of maintaining yards or other private or public lands. Yard waste does not include two items:

(1) Construction, renovation, and demolition wastes that are exempt from the definition of “municipal solid waste” in this section.

(2) Clean wood that is exempt from the definition of “municipal solid waste” in this section.

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Table 1 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Generic Compliance Schedules and Increments of Progress

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Table 2 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Class I Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Limits

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Table 3 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Class I Nitrogen Oxides Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Unitsa b c

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Table 4 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Class II Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Unitsa

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Table 5 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Carbon Monoxide Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units

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Table 6 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

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Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)a

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Table 8 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Requirements for Stack Tests

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Table 9 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Site-specific Compliance Schedules and Increments of Progress

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