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e-CFR data is current as of September 22, 2020

Title 33Chapter ISubchapter OPart 155 → Subpart I


Title 33: Navigation and Navigable Waters
PART 155—OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS


Subpart I—Salvage and Marine Firefighting


Contents
§155.4010   Purpose of this subpart.
§155.4015   Vessel owners and operators who must follow this subpart.
§155.4020   Complying with this subpart.
§155.4025   Definitions.
§155.4030   Required salvage and marine firefighting services to list in response plans.
§155.4032   Other resource provider considerations.
§155.4035   Required pre-incident information and arrangements for the salvage and marine firefighting resource providers listed in response plans.
§155.4040   Response times for each salvage and marine firefighting service.
§155.4045   Required agreements or contracts with the salvage and marine firefighting resource providers.
§155.4050   Ensuring that the salvors and marine firefighters are adequate.
§155.4052   Drills and exercises.
§155.4055   Temporary waivers from meeting one or more of the specified response times.

Source: USCG-1998-3417, 73 FR 80649, Dec. 31, 2008, unless otherwise noted.

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§155.4010   Purpose of this subpart.

(a) The purpose of this subpart is to establish vessel response plan salvage and marine firefighting requirements for vessels, that are carrying group I-IV oils, and that are required by §§155.1015 and 155.5015 to have a vessel response plan.

(b) Salvage and marine firefighting actions can save lives and property, and prevent the escalation of potential oil spills to worst case discharge scenarios.

(c) A planholder must ensure by contract or other approved means that response resources are available to respond. However, the response criteria specified in the regulations (e.g., quantities of response resources and their arrival times) are planning criteria, not performance standards, and are based on assumptions that may not exist during an actual incident, as stated in 33 CFR 155.1010. Compliance with the regulations is based upon whether a covered response plan ensures that adequate response resources are available, not on whether the actual performance of those response resources after an incident meets specified arrival times or other planning criteria. Failure to meet specified criteria during an actual spill response does not necessarily mean that the planning requirements of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA) (33 U.S.C. 1251-1376) and regulations were not met. The Coast Guard will exercise its enforcement discretion in light of all facts and circumstances.

[USCG-1998-3417, 73 FR 80649, Dec. 31, 2008, as amended by USCG-2008-1070, 78 FR 60123, Sept. 30, 2013]

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§155.4015   Vessel owners and operators who must follow this subpart.

You must follow this subpart if your vessel carries group I-IV oils, and is required by §155.1015 or §155.5015 to have a vessel response plan.

[USCG-1998-3417, 73 FR 80649, Dec. 31, 2008, as amended by USCG-2008-1070, 78 FR 60123, Sept. 30, 2013]

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§155.4020   Complying with this subpart.

(a)(1) If you have an existing approved vessel response plan required by §155.1015, you must have your vessel response plan updated and submitted to the Coast Guard by February 22, 2011.

(2) All new or existing vessels operating on the navigable waters of the United States or transferring oil in a port or place subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, that meet the applicability requirements of §155.1015, that do not have an approved vessel response plan, must comply with §155.1065.

(3) Your vessel may not conduct oil transport or transfer operations if—

(i) You have not submitted a plan to the Coast Guard in accordance with §155.1065 prior to February 22, 2011;

(ii) The Coast Guard determines that the response resources referenced in your plan do not meet the requirements of this subpart;

(iii) The contracts or agreements cited in your plan have lapsed or are otherwise no longer valid;

(iv) You are not operating in accordance with your plan; or

(v) The plan's approval has expired.

(b) If §155.5015 requires that you have a vessel response plan, you must have your vessel response plan submitted to the Coast Guard by January 30, 2014.

[USCG-1998-3417, 73 FR 80649, Dec. 31, 2008, as amended by USCG-2001-8661, 74 FR 45029, Aug. 31, 2009; USCG-2008-1070, 78 FR 60123, Sept. 30, 2013]

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§155.4025   Definitions.

For the purposes of this subpart, the following definitions apply:

Assessment of structural stability means completion of a vessel's stability and structural integrity assessment through the use of a salvage software program. The data used for the calculations would include information collected by the on-scene salvage professional. The assessment is intended to allow sound decisions to be made for subsequent salvage efforts. In addition, the assessment must be consistent with the conditions set forth in 33 CFR 155.240 and 155.245, as applicable.

Boundary lines are lines drawn following the general trend of the seaward, highwater shorelines and lines continuing the general trend of the seaward, highwater shorelines across entrances to small bays, inlets and rivers as defined in 46 CFR 7.5(c).

Captain of the Port (COTP) city means the city which is the geographical location of the COTP office. COTP city locations are listed in 33 CFR part 3.

Continental United States (CONUS) means the contiguous 48 States and the District of Columbia.

Contract or other approved means is any one of the following:

(1)(i) A written contractual agreement between a vessel owner or operator and resource provider. This agreement must expressly provide that the resource provider is capable of, and intends to commit to, meeting the plan requirements.

(ii) A written certification that the personnel, equipment, and capabilities required by this subpart are available and under the vessel owner or operator's direct control. If the planholder has personnel, equipment and capabilities under their direct control, they need not contract those items with a resource provider.

(iii) An alternative approved by the Coast Guard (Assistant Commandant for Response Policy (CG-5R)) and submitted in accordance with 33 CFR 155.1065(f) and 155.5067(a).

(2) As part of the contract or other approved means you must develop and sign, with your resource provider, a written funding agreement. This funding agreement is to ensure that salvage and marine firefighting responses are not delayed due to funding negotiations. The funding agreement must include a statement of how long the agreement remains in effect, and must be provided to the Coast Guard for VRP approval. In addition any written agreement with a public resource provider must be included in the planholder's Vessel Response Plan (VRP).

Diving services support means divers and their equipment to support salvage operations. This support may include, but not be limited to, underwater repairs, welding, placing lifting slings, or performing damage assessments.

Emergency lightering is the process of transferring oil between two ships or other floating or land-based receptacles in an emergency situation and may require pumping equipment, transfer hoses, fenders, portable barges, shore based portable tanks, or other equipment that circumstances may dictate.

Emergency towing, also referred to as rescue towing, means the use of towing vessels that can pull, push or make-up alongside a vessel. This is to ensure that a vessel can be stabilized, controlled or removed from a grounded position. Towing vessels must have the proper horsepower or bollard pull compatible with the size and tonnage of the vessel to be assisted.

External emergency transfer operations means the use of external pumping equipment placed on board a vessel to move oil from one tank to another, when the vessel's own transfer equipment is not working.

External firefighting teams means trained firefighting personnel, aside from the crew, with the capability of boarding and combating a fire on a vessel.

External vessel firefighting systems mean firefighting resources (personnel and equipment) that are capable of combating a fire from other than on board the vessel. These resources include, but are not limited to, fire tugs, portable fire pumps, airplanes, helicopters, or shore side fire trucks.

Funding agreement is a written agreement between a resource provider and a planholder that identifies agreed upon rates for specific equipment and services to be made available by the resource provider under the agreement. The funding agreement is to ensure that salvage and marine firefighting responses are not delayed due to funding negotiations. This agreement must be part of the contract or other approved means and must be submitted for review along with the VRP.

Great Lakes means Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario, their connecting and tributary waters, the Saint Lawrence River as far as Saint Regis, and adjacent port areas.

Heavy lift means the use of a salvage crane, A-frames, hydraulic jacks, winches, or other equipment for lifting, righting, or stabilizing a vessel.

Inland area means the area shoreward of the boundary lines defined in 46 CFR part 7, except that in the Gulf of Mexico, it means the area shoreward of the lines of demarcation (COLREG lines) as defined in §§80.740 through 80.850 of this chapter. The inland area does not include the Great Lakes.

Making temporary repairs means action to temporarily repair a vessel to enable it to safely move to a shipyard or other location for permanent repairs. These services include, but are not limited to, shoring, patching, drill stopping, or structural reinforcement.

Marine firefighting means any firefighting related act undertaken to assist a vessel with a potential or actual fire, to prevent loss of life, damage or destruction of the vessel, or damage to the marine environment.

Marine firefighting pre-fire plan means a plan that outlines the responsibilities and actions during a marine fire incident. The principle purpose is to explain the resource provider's role, and the support which can be provided, during marine firefighting incidents. Policies, responsibilities and procedures for coordination of on-scene forces are provided in the plan. It should be designed for use in conjunction with other state, regional and local contingency and resource mobilization plans.

Nearshore area means the area extending seaward 12 miles from the boundary lines defined in 46 CFR part 7, except in the Gulf of Mexico. In the Gulf of Mexico, a nearshore area is one extending seaward 12 miles from the line of demarcation (COLREG lines) as defined in §§80.740 through 80.850 of this chapter.

Offshore area means the area up to 38 nautical miles seaward of the outer boundary of the nearshore area.

On-site fire assessment means that a marine firefighting professional is on scene, at a safe distance from the vessel or on the vessel, who can determine the steps needed to control and extinguish a marine fire in accordance with a vessel's stability and structural integrity assessment if necessary.

On-site salvage assessment means that a salvage professional is on scene, at a safe distance from the vessel or on the vessel, who has the ability to assess the vessel's stability and structural integrity. The data collected during this assessment will be used in the salvage software calculations and to determine necessary steps to salve the vessel.

Other refloating methods means those techniques for refloating a vessel aside from using pumps. These services include, but are not limited to, the use of pontoons, air bags or compressed air.

Outside continental United States (OCONUS) means Alaska, Hawaii, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas, and any other territory or possession of the United States.

Primary resource provider means a resource provider listed in the vessel response plan as the principal entity contracted for providing specific salvage and/or marine firefighting services and resources, when multiple resource providers are listed for that service, for each of the COTP zones in which a vessel operates. The primary resource provider will be the point of contact for the planholder, the Federal On Scene Coordinator (FOSC) and the Unified Command, in matters related to specific resources and services, as required in §155.4030(a).

Remote assessment and consultation means contacting the salvage and/or marine firefighting resource providers, by phone or other means of communications to discuss and assess the situation. The person contacted must be competent to consult on a determination of the appropriate course of action and initiation of a response plan.

Resource provider means an entity that provides personnel, equipment, supplies, and other capabilities necessary to perform salvage and/or marine firefighting services identified in the response plan, and has been arranged by contract or other approved means. The resource provider must be selected in accordance with §155.4050. For marine firefighting services, resource providers can include public firefighting resources as long as they are able, in accordance with the requirements of §155.4045(d), and willing to provide the services needed.

Salvage means any act undertaken to assist a vessel in potential or actual danger, to prevent loss of life, damage or destruction of the vessel and release of its contents into the marine environment.

Salvage plan means a plan developed to guide salvage operations except those identified as specialized salvage operations.

Special salvage operations plan means a salvage plan developed to carry out a specialized salvage operation, including heavy lift and/or subsurface product removal.

Subsurface product removal means the safe removal of oil from a vessel that has sunk or is partially submerged underwater. These actions can include pumping or other means to transfer the oil to a storage device.

Underwater vessel and bottom survey means having salvage resources on scene that can perform examination and analysis of the vessel's hull and equipment below the water surface. These resources also include the ability to determine the bottom configuration and type for the body of water. This service can be accomplished through the use of equipment such as sonar, magnetometers, remotely operated vehicles or divers. When divers are used to perform these services, the time requirements for this service apply and not those of diving services support.

[USCG-1998-3417, 73 FR 80649, Dec. 31, 2008, as amended by USCG-2008-1070, 78 FR 60124, Sept. 30, 2013; USCG-2016-0498, 82 FR 35082, July 28, 2017]

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§155.4030   Required salvage and marine firefighting services to list in response plans.

(a) You must identify, in the geographical-specific appendices of your VRP, the salvage and marine firefighting services listed in Table 155.4030(b)—Salvage and Marine Firefighting Services and Response Timeframes. Additionally, you must list those resource providers that you have contracted to provide these services. You may list multiple resource providers for each service, but you must identify which one is your primary resource provider for each Captain of the Port (COTP) zone in which you operate. A method of contact, consistent with the requirements in §§155.1035(e)(6)(ii), 155.1040(e)(5)(ii), and 155.5035(e)(6)(ii) must also be listed, in the geographical-specific appendices of your VRP, adjacent to the name of the resource provider.

(b) Table 155.4030(b) lists the required salvage and marine firefighting services and response timeframes.

Table 155.4030(b)—Salvage and Marine Firefighting Services and Response Timeframes

ServiceLocation of incident response activity timeframe
(1) SalvageCONUS: nearshore area; inland waters; Great Lakes; and OCONUS: <or = 12 miles from COTP city (hours)CONUS: offshore area; and OCONUS: <or = 50 miles from COTP city (hours)
(i) Assessment & Survey:
(A) Remote assessment and consultation  1  1
(B) Begin assessment of structural stability  3  3
(C) On-site salvage assessment  612
(D) Assessment of structural stability1218
(E) Hull and bottom survey1218
(ii) Stabilization:
(A) Emergency towing1218
(B) Salvage plan1622
(C) External emergency transfer operations1824
(D) Emergency lightering1824
(E) Other refloating methods1824
(F) Making temporary repairs1824
(G) Diving services support1824
(iii) Specialized Salvage Operations:
(A) Special salvage operations plan1824
(B) Subsurface product removal7284
(C) Heavy lift1  Estimated  Estimated
(2) Marine firefightingAt pier (hours)CONUS: Nearshore area; inland waters; Great Lakes; and OCONUS: <or = 12 miles from COTP city (hours)CONUS: Offshore area; and OCONUS: <or = 50 miles from COTP city (hours)
(i) Assessment & Planning:
(A) Remote assessment and consultation  1  1  1
(B) On-site fire assessment  2  612
(ii) Fire Suppression:
(A) External firefighting teams  4  812
(B) External vessel firefighting systems  41218

1Heavy lift services are not required to have definite hours for a response time. The planholder must still contract for heavy lift services, provide a description of the heavy lift response and an estimated response time when these services are required, however, none of the timeframes listed in the table in §155.4030(b) will apply to these services.

(c) Integration into the response organization. You must ensure that all salvage and marine firefighting resource providers are integrated into the response organizations listed in your plans. The response organization must be consistent with the requirements set forth in §§155.1035(d), 155.1040(d), 155.1045(d), and 155.5035(d).

(d) Coordination with other response resource providers, response organizations and OSROs. Your plan must include provisions on how the salvage and marine firefighting resource providers will coordinate with other response resources, response organizations, and OSROs. For example, you will need to identify how salvage and marine firefighting assessment personnel will coordinate response activity with oil spill removal organizations. For services that, by law, require public assistance, there must be clear guidelines on how service providers will interact with those organizations. The information contained in the response plan must be consistent with applicable Area Contingency Plans (ACPs) and the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan as found in §§155.1030(h) and 155.5030(f).

(e) Ensuring the proper emergency towing vessels are listed in your VRP. Your VRP must identify towing vessels with the proper characteristics, horsepower, and bollard pull to tow your vessel(s). These towing vessels must be capable of operating in environments where the winds are up to 40 knots.

(f) Ensuring the proper type and amount of transfer equipment is listed in your VRP. Your salvage resource provider must be able to bring on scene a pumping capability that can offload the vessel's largest cargo or fuel tank, whichever is greater, in 24 hours of continuous operation. This is required for both emergency transfer and lightering operations.

(g) Ensuring firefighting equipment is compatible with your vessel. Your plan must list the proper type and amount of extinguishing agent needed to combat an oil fire involving your vessel's cargo fuel, other contents, and superstructure. If your primary extinguishing agent is foam or water, you must identify resources in your plan that are able to pump, for a minimum of 20 minutes, at least 0.016 gallons per minute per square foot of the deck area of your vessel, or an appropriate rate for spaces that this rate is not suitable for and if needed, an adequate source of foam. These resources described are to be supplied by the resource provider, external to the vessel's own firefighting system.

(h) Ensuring the proper subsurface product removal. You must have subsurface product removal capability if your vessel(s) operates in waters of 40 feet or more. Your resource provider must have the capability of removing bulk liquid cargo and fuel from your sunken vessel to a depth equal to the maximum your vessel operates in up to 150 feet.

[USCG-1998-3417, 73 FR 80649, Dec. 31, 2008; 74 FR 7648, Feb. 19, 2009; USCG-2010-0351, 75 FR 36285, June 25, 2010; USCG-2008-1070, 78 FR 60124, Sept. 30, 2013]

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§155.4032   Other resource provider considerations.

(a) Use of resource providers not listed in the VRP. If another resource provider, not listed in the approved plan for the specific service required, is to be contracted for a specific response, justification for the selection of that resource provider needs to be provided to, and approved by, the FOSC. Only under exceptional circumstances will the FOSC authorize deviation from the resource provider listed in the approved vessel response plan in instances where that would best affect a more successful response.

(b) Worker health and safety. Your resource providers must have the capability to implement the necessary engineering, administrative, and personal protective equipment controls to safeguard their workers when providing salvage and marine firefighting services, as found in 33 CFR 155.1055(e) and 29 CFR 1910.120(q).

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§155.4035   Required pre-incident information and arrangements for the salvage and marine firefighting resource providers listed in response plans.

(a) You must provide the information listed in §§155.1035(c), 155.1040(c), and 155.5035(c) to your salvage and marine firefighting resource providers.

(b) Marine firefighting pre-fire plan. (1) You must prepare a vessel pre-fire plan in accordance with NFPA 1405, Guide for Land-Based Firefighters Who Respond to Marine Vessel Fires, Chapter 9 (Incorporation by reference, see §155.140). If the planholder's vessel pre-fire plan is one that meets another regulation, such as SOLAS Chapter II-2, Regulation 15, or international standard, a copy of that specific fire plan must also be given to the resource provider(s) instead of the NFPA 1405 pre-fire plan, and be attached to the VRP.

(2) The marine firefighting resource provider(s) you are required to identify in your plan must be given a copy of the plan. Additionally, they must certify in writing to you that they find the plan acceptable and agree to implement it to mitigate a potential or actual fire.

(3) If a marine firefighting resource provider subcontracts to other organizations, each subcontracted organization must also receive a copy of the vessel pre-fire plan.

[USCG-1998-3417, 73 FR 80649, Dec. 31, 2008, as amended by USCG-2010-0351, 75 FR 36285, June 25, 2010; USCG-2008-1070, 78 FR 60124, Sept. 30, 2013]

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§155.4040   Response times for each salvage and marine firefighting service.

(a) You must ensure, by contract or other approved means, that your resource provider(s) is capable of providing the services within the required timeframes.

(1) If your vessel is at the pier or transiting a COTP zone within the continental United States (CONUS), the timeframes in Table 155.4030(b) apply as listed.

(2) If your vessel is at the pier or transiting a COTP zone outside the continental United States (OCONUS), the timeframes in Table 155.4030(b) apply as follows:

(i) Inland waters and nearshore area timeframes apply from the COTP city out to and including the 12 mile point.

(ii) Offshore area timeframes apply from 12 to 50 miles outside the COTP city.

(3) If your vessel transits within an OCONUS COTP zone that is outside the areas described in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, but within the inland waters or the nearshore or offshore area, you must submit in writing, in your plan, the steps you will take to address salvage and marine firefighting needs in the event these services are required.

(b) The timeframe starts when anyone in your response organization receives notification of a potential or actual incident. It ends when the service reaches the ship, the outer limit of the nearshore area, the outer limit of the offshore area, the 12 or 50-mile point from the COTP city, or a point identified in your response plan for areas OCONUS.

(c) Table 155.4040(c) provides additional amplifying information for vessels transiting within the nearshore and offshore areas of CONUS or within 50 miles of an OCONUS COTP city.

Table 155.4040(c)—Response Timeframe End Points

ServiceResponse timeframe ends when
(1) Salvage:
(i) Remote assessment and consultationSalvor is in voice contact with Qualified Individual (QI)/Master/Operator.
(ii) Begin assessment of structural stabilityA structural assessment of the vessel has been initiated.
(iii) On-site salvage assessmentSalvor on board vessel.
(iv) Assessment of structural stabilityInitial analysis is completed. This is a continual process, but at the time specified an analysis needs to be completed.
(v) Hull and bottom surveySurvey completed.
(vi) Emergency towingTowing vessel on scene.
vii) Salvage planPlan completed and submitted to Incident Commander/Unified Command.
(viii) External emergency transfer operationsExternal pumps on board vessel.
(ix) Emergency lighteringLightering equipment on scene and alongside.
(x) Other refloating methodsSalvage plan approved & resources on vessel.
(xi) Making temporary repairsRepair equipment on board vessel.
(xii) Diving services supportRequired support equipment & personnel on scene.
(xiii) Special salvage operations planPlan completed and submitted to Incident Commander/Unified Command.
(xiv) Subsurface product removalResources on scene.
(xv) Heavy lift1Estimated.
(2) Marine Firefighting:
(i) Remote assessment and consultationFirefighter in voice contact with QI/Master/Operator.
(ii) On-site fire assessmentFirefighter representative on site.
(iii) External firefighting teamsTeam and equipment on scene.
(iv) External vessel firefighting systemsPersonnel and equipment on scene.

1 Heavy lift services are not required to have definite hours for a response time. The planholder must still contract for heavy lift services, provide a description of the heavy lift response and an estimated response time when these services are required, however, none of the timeframes listed in the table in §155.4030(b) will apply to these services.

(d) How to apply the timeframes to your particular situation. To apply the timeframes to your vessel's situation, follow these procedures:

(1) Identify if your vessel operates CONUS or OCONUS.

(2) If your vessel is calling at any CONUS pier or an OCONUS pier within 50 miles of a COTP city, you must list the pier location by facility name or city and ensure that the marine firefighting resource provider can reach the locations within the specified response times in Table 155.4030(b).

(3) If your vessel is transiting within CONUS inland waters, nearshore or offshore areas or the Great Lakes, you must ensure the listed salvage and marine firefighting services are capable of reaching your vessel within the appropriate response times listed in Table 155.4030(b).

(4) If your vessel is transiting within 12 miles or less from an OCONUS COTP city, you must ensure the listed salvage and marine firefighting services are capable of reaching a point 12 miles from the harbor of the COTP city within the nearshore area response times listed in Table 155.4030(b).

(5) If your vessel is transiting between 12 and 50 miles from an OCONUS COTP city, you must ensure the listed salvage and marine firefighting services are capable of reaching a point 50 miles from the harbor of the COTP city within the offshore area response times listed in Table 155.4030(b).

(6) If your vessel transits inland waters or the nearshore or offshore areas OCONUS, but is more than 50 miles from a COTP city, you must still contract for salvage and marine firefighting services and provide a description of how you intend to respond and an estimated response time when these services are required, however, none of the time limits listed in Table 155.4030(b) will apply to these services.

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§155.4045   Required agreements or contracts with the salvage and marine firefighting resource providers.

(a) You may only list resource providers in your plan that have been arranged by contract or other approved means.

(b) You must obtain written consent from the resource provider stating that they agree to be listed in your plan. This consent must state that the resource provider agrees to provide the services that are listed in §§155.4030(a) through 155.4030(h), and that these services are capable of arriving within the response times listed in Table 155.4030(b). This consent may be included in the contract with the resource provider or in a separate document.

(c) This written consent must be available to the Coast Guard for inspection. The response plan must identify the location of this written consent, which must be:

(1) On board the vessel; or

(2) With a qualified individual located in the United States.

(d) Public marine firefighters may only be listed out to the maximum extent of the public resource's jurisdiction, unless other agreements are in place. A public marine firefighting resource may agree to respond beyond their jurisdictional limits, but the Coast Guard considers it unreasonable to expect public marine firefighting resources to do this.

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§155.4050   Ensuring that the salvors and marine firefighters are adequate.

(a) You are responsible for determining the adequacy of the resource providers you intend to include in your plan.

(b) When determining adequacy of the resource provider, you must select a resource provider that meets the following selection criteria to the maximum extent possible:

(1) Resource provider is currently working in response service needed.

(2) Resource provider has documented history of participation in successful salvage and/or marine firefighting operations, including equipment deployment.

(3) Resource provider owns or has contracts for equipment needed to perform response services.

(4) Resource provider has personnel with documented training certification and degree experience (Naval Architecture, Fire Science, etc.).

(5) Resource provider has 24-hour availability of personnel and equipment, and history of response times compatible with the time requirements in the regulation.

(6) Resource provider has on-going continuous training program. For marine firefighting providers, they meet the training guidelines in NFPA 1001, 1005, 1021, 1405, and 1561 (Incorporation by reference, see §155.140), show equivalent training, or demonstrate qualification through experience.

(7) Resource provider has successful record of participation in drills and exercises.

(8) Resource provider has salvage or marine firefighting plans used and approved during real incidents.

(9) Resource provider has membership in relevant national and/or international organizations.

(10) Resource provider has insurance that covers the salvage and/or marine firefighting services which they intend to provide.

(11) Resource provider has sufficient up front capital to support an operation.

(12) Resource provider has equipment and experience to work in the specific regional geographic environment(s) that the vessel operates in (e.g., bottom type, water turbidity, water depth, sea state and temperature extremes).

(13) Resource provider has the logistical and transportation support capability required to sustain operations for extended periods of time in arduous sea states and conditions.

(14) Resource provider has the capability to implement the necessary engineering, administrative, and personal protective equipment controls to safeguard the health and safety of their workers when providing salvage and marine firefighting services.

(15) Resource provider has familiarity with the salvage and marine firefighting protocol contained in the local ACPs for each COTP area for which they are contracted.

(c) A resource provider need not meet all of the selection criteria in order for you to choose them as a provider. They must, however, be selected on the basis of meeting the criteria to the maximum extent possible.

(d) You must certify in your plan that these factors were considered when you chose your resource provider.

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§155.4052   Drills and exercises.

(a) A vessel owner or operator required by §§155.1035, 155.1040, 155.5035 to have a response plan shall conduct exercises as necessary to ensure that the plan will function in an emergency. Both announced and unannounced exercises must be included.

(b) The following are the minimum exercise requirements for vessels covered by this subpart:

(1) Remote assessment and consultation exercises, which must be conducted quarterly;

(2) Emergency procedures exercises, which must be conducted quarterly;

(3) Shore-based salvage and shore-based marine firefighting management team tabletop exercises, which must be conducted annually;

(4) Response provider equipment deployment exercises, which must be conducted annually;

(5) An exercise of the entire response plan, which must be conducted every three years. The vessel owner or operator shall design the exercise program so that all components of the response plan are exercised at least once every three years. All of the components do not have to be exercised at one time; they may be exercised over the 3-year period through the required exercises or through an area exercise; and

(6) Annually, at least one of the exercises listed in §155.4052(b)(2) and (4) must be unannounced. An unannounced exercise is one in which the personnel participating in the exercise have not been advised in advance of the exact date, time, or scenario of the exercise.

(7) Compliance with the National Preparedness for Response Exercise Program (PREP) Guidelines will satisfy the vessel response plan exercise requirements. These guidelines are available on the Internet at https://Homeport.uscg.mil/exercises. Once on that Web site, select the link for “Preparedness for Response Exercise Program (PREP)” and then select “Preparedness for Response Exercise Program (PREP) Guidelines”. Compliance with an alternate program that meets the requirements of 33 CFR 155.1060(a) and 155.5061, and has been approved under 33 CFR 155.1065 and 155.5065 will also satisfy the vessel response plan exercise requirements.

[USCG-1998-3417, 73 FR 80649, Dec. 31, 2008, as amended by USCG-2008-1070, 78 FR 60124, Sept. 30, 2013]

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§155.4055   Temporary waivers from meeting one or more of the specified response times.

(a) You may submit a request for a temporary waiver of a specific response time requirement, if you are unable to identify a resource provider who can meet the response time.

(b) Your request must be specific as to the COTP zone, operating environment, salvage or marine firefighting service, and response time.

(c) Emergency lightering requirements set forth in §155.4030(b) will not be subject to the waiver provisions of this subpart.

(d) You must submit your request to the Assistant Commandant for Response Policy (CG-5R), via the local COTP for final approval. The local COTP will evaluate and comment on the waiver before forwarding the waiver request, via the District, to the Assistant Commandant (CG-5R) for final approval.

(e) Your request must include the reason why you are unable to meet the time requirements. It must also include how you intend to correct the shortfall, the time it will take to do so, and what arrangements have been made to provide the required response resources and their estimated response times.

(f) Assistant Commandant for Response Policy (CG-5R), will only approve waiver requests up to a specified time period, depending on the service addressed in the waiver request, the operating environment, and other relevant factors. These time periods are listed in Table 155.4055(g).

(g) Table 155.4055(g) lists the service waiver time periods.

Table 155.4055(g)—Service Waiver Time Periods

ServiceMaximum waiver time
period
(years)
(1) Remote salvage assessment & consultation0
(2) Remote firefighting assessment & consultation0
(3) On-site salvage & firefighting assessment1
(4) Hull and bottom survey2
(5) Salvage stabilization services3
(6) Fire suppression services4
(7) Specialized salvage operations5

(h) You must submit your waiver request 30 days prior to any plan submission deadlines identified in this or any other subpart of part 155 in order for your vessel to continue oil transport or transfer operations.

[USCG-1998-3417, 73 FR 80649, Dec. 31, 2008, as amended by USCG-2014-0410, 79 FR 38437, July 7, 2014; USCG-2016-0498, 82 FR 35082, July 28, 2017]

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