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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR data is current as of February 18, 2020

Title 31Subtitle BChapter IISubchapter APart 205 → Subpart A


Title 31: Money and Finance: Treasury
PART 205—RULES AND PROCEDURES FOR EFFICIENT FEDERAL-STATE FUNDS TRANSFERS


Subpart A—Rules Applicable to Federal Assistance Programs Included in a Treasury-State Agreement


Contents
§205.3   What Federal assistance programs are subject to this subpart A?
§205.4   Are there any circumstances where a Federal assistance program that meets the criteria of §205.3 would not be subject to this subpart A?
§205.5   What are the thresholds for major Federal assistance programs?
§205.6   What is a Treasury-State agreement?
§205.7   Can a Treasury-State agreement be amended?
§205.8   What if there is no Treasury-State agreement in effect?
§205.9   What is included in a Treasury-State agreement?
§205.10   How do you document funding techniques?
§205.11   What requirements apply to funding techniques?
§205.12   What funding techniques may be used?
§205.13   How do you determine when State or Federal interest liability accrues?
§205.14   When does Federal interest liability accrue?
§205.15   When does State interest liability accrue?
§205.16   What special rules apply to Federal assistance programs and projects funded by the Federal Highway Trust Fund?
§205.17   Are funds transfers delayed by automated payment systems restrictions based on the size and timing of the drawdown request subject to this part?
§205.18   Are administrative costs subject to this part?
§205.19   How is interest calculated?
§205.20   What is a clearance pattern?
§205.21   When may clearance patterns be used?
§205.22   How are accurate clearance patterns maintained?
§205.23   What requirements apply to estimates?
§205.24   How are accurate estimates maintained?
§205.25   How does this part apply to certain Federal assistance programs or funds?
§205.26   What are the requirements for preparing Annual Reports?
§205.27   How are Interest Calculation Costs calculated?
§205.28   How are interest payments exchanged?
§205.29   What are the State oversight and compliance responsibilities?
§205.30   What are the Federal oversight and compliance responsibilities?
§205.31   How does a State or Federal Program Agency appeal a determination made by us and resolve disputes?

§205.3   What Federal assistance programs are subject to this subpart A?

(a) Generally, this subpart prescribes the rules that apply to Federal assistance programs which:

(1) Are listed in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance;

(2) Meet the funding threshold for a major Federal assistance program; and

(3) Are included in a Treasury-State agreement or default procedures.

(b) Upon a State's request, we will make additional Federal assistance programs subject to subpart A by lowering the funding threshold in the Treasury-State agreement. All of a State's programs that meet this lower threshold would be subject to this subpart A.

(c) We may make additional Federal assistance programs subject to subpart A if a State or Federal Program Agency fails to comply with subpart B of this part.

§205.4   Are there any circumstances where a Federal assistance program that meets the criteria of §205.3 would not be subject to this subpart A?

(a) A Federal assistance program that meets or exceeds the threshold for major Federal assistance programs in a State is not subject to this subpart A until it is included in a Treasury-State agreement or in default procedures.

(b) We and a State may agree to exclude components of a major Federal assistance program from interest calculations if the State administers the program through several State agencies and meets the following requirements:

(1) The dollar amount of the exempted cash flow does not exceed 5% of the State's major Federal assistance program threshold and the total amount excluded under a single program by all State agencies administering the program does not exceed 10% of that Federal assistance program's total expenditures;

(2) If less than the total amount of Federal assistance program funding is subject to interest calculation procedures, the interest liabilities should be pro-rated to 100% of the Federal assistance program funding;

(3) A State may not use this exclusion if a Federal assistance program is administered by only one State agency; and

(4) We may request Federal assistance program specific data on funding levels to determine exemptions.

(c) We and a State may exclude a Federal assistance program from this subpart A if the Federal assistance program has been discontinued since the most recent Single Audit and the remaining funding is below the threshold, or if the Federal assistance program is funded by an award not limited to one fiscal year and the remaining Federal assistance program funding is below the State's threshold.

§205.5   What are the thresholds for major Federal assistance programs?

(a) Table A of this section defines major Federal assistance programs based on the dollar amount of an individual Federal assistance program and the dollar amount of all Federal assistance being received by a State for all Federal assistance programs including non-cash programs. A State must locate the appropriate row in Column A based upon the total amount of Federal assistance received. In that same row, a State must apply the percentage from Column B to the dollar value of all its Federal assistance programs to determine the State's threshold for major Federal assistance programs. For example, if the total amount received by a State for all Federal assistance programs is $50 million, then that State's threshold for major Federal assistance programs is 6% of $50 million or $3 million. A State which receives more than $10 billion under Federal assistance programs will have a minimum default threshold of $60 million.

(b) To ensure adequate coverage of all State programs, a State must, on an annual basis, compare its program coverage using the percentage obtained from Table A to the program coverage which would result using a percentage which is half of the percentage obtained from Table A. For example, a State receiving $1 billion in Federal Assistance would use Table A to learn that its threshold level would be .60 percent of $1 billion. A State would compare program coverage at .60 percent of $1 billion to program coverage at .30 percent of $1 billion.

(c) If the comparison conducted under paragraph (b) of this section results in a reduction of program coverage that is greater than 10%, a State must lower its threshold, or add programs, until the difference is less than or equal to 10%.

(d) In accordance with §205.3(b), a State may lower its threshold to include additional programs. All of a State's programs that meet this lower threshold would be subject to this subpart A.

(e) Unless specified otherwise, major Federal assistance programs must be determined from the most recent Single Audit data available.

Table A to §205.5

Column A
Total amount of Federal Assistance for all programs per State:
Column B
Major Federal Assistance Program means any Federal assistance program that exceed these levels:
Between zero and $100 million inclusive6.00 percent of the total amount of Federal assistance.
Over $100 million but less than or equal to $10 billion0.60 percent of the total amount of Federal assistance.
Over $10 billionThe greater of 0.30 percent of the total Federal assistance of $60 million.

§205.6   What is a Treasury-State agreement?

(a) A Treasury-State agreement documents the accepted funding techniques and methods for calculating interest agreed upon by us and a State and identifies the Federal assistance programs governed by this subpart A. If anything in a Treasury-State agreement is inconsistent with this subpart A, that part of the Treasury-State agreement will not have any effect and this subpart A will govern.

(b) A Treasury-State agreement will be effective until terminated unless we and a State agree to a specific termination date. We or a State may terminate a Treasury-State agreement on 30 days written notice.

§205.7   Can a Treasury-State agreement be amended?

(a) We or a State may amend a Treasury-State agreement at any time if both we and the State agree in writing.

(b) The effective date of an amendment shall be the date both parties agree to the amendment in writing unless otherwise agreed to by both parties.

(c) We and a State must amend a Treasury-State agreement as needed to change or clarify its language when the terms of the existing agreement are either no longer correct or no longer applicable. A State must notify us in writing within 30 days of the time the State becomes aware of a change, describing the Federal assistance program change. The notification must include a proposed amendment for our review and a current list of all programs included in the Treasury-State agreement. Amendments may address, but are not limited to:

(1) Additions or deletions of Federal assistance programs subject to this subpart A;

(2) Changes in funding techniques; and

(3) Changes in clearance patterns.

(d) Additions or deletions to the list of Federal assistance programs subject to this subpart A take effect when a Treasury-State agreement is amended, unless otherwise agreed to by the parties.

(e) Federal assistance programs that are to be added to a Treasury-State agreement are not subject to this subpart A until the Treasury-State agreement is amended, except when a Federal assistance program subject to this subpart A is being replaced by a Federal assistance program governed by subpart B of this part, in which case the replacement program is immediately subject to this subpart A.

(f) Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, if no changes to the Treasury-State agreement are required, States must notify us annually.

§205.8   What if there is no Treasury-State agreement in effect?

When a State does not have a Treasury-State agreement in effect, we will prescribe default procedures to implement this subpart A. The default procedures will prescribe efficient funds transfer procedures consistent with State and Federal law and identify the covered Federal assistance programs and designated funding techniques. When we and a State reach agreement on some but not all Federal assistance programs administered by the State, we and the State may enter into a Treasury-State agreement for all programs on which we are in agreement and we may prescribe default procedures governing those programs on which we are unable to reach agreement.

§205.9   What is included in a Treasury-State agreement?

We will prescribe a uniform format for all Treasury-State agreements. A Treasury-State agreement must include, but is not limited to, the following:

(a) State agencies, instrumentalities, and fiscal agents that administer the Federal assistance programs subject to this subpart A.

(b) Federal assistance programs subject to this subpart A, consistent with §§205.3 and 205.4. A State must use its most recent Single Audit report as a basis for determining the funding thresholds for major Federal assistance programs, unless otherwise specified in the Treasury-State agreement. A State may use budget or appropriations data for a more recent period instead of Single Audit data, if specified in the Treasury-State agreement.

(c) Funding techniques to be applied to Federal assistance programs subject to this subpart A.

(d) Methods the State will use to develop and maintain clearance patterns and estimates, consistent with §205.11. The method must include, at a minimum, a clear indication of:

(1) The data used;

(2) The sources of the data;

(3) The development process;

(4) For estimates, when and how the State will update the estimate to reflect the most recent data available;

(5) For estimates, when and how the State will make adjustments, if any, to reconcile the difference between the estimate and the State's actual cash needs; and

(6) Any assumptions, standards, or conventions used in converting the data into the clearance pattern or estimate.

(e) Federal Program Agency provisions requiring reconciliation of estimates to actual outlays may be included in a Treasury-State agreement. The supporting documentation must be retained by the State for three years.

(f) States must include the results of the clearance pattern process in the Treasury-State agreement for programs where the timing of drawdowns is based on clearance patterns. For programs where the timing of drawdowns is not based on clearance patterns, the results of the clearance pattern process may be provided with the annual report required under §205.26. The supporting documentation must be retained by the State for three years.

(g) Methods used by the State and Federal agencies to calculate interest liabilities pursuant to this subpart A. The method must include, but is not limited to, a clear indication of:

(1) The data used;

(2) The sources of the data;

(3) The calculation process; and

(4) Any assumptions, standards, or conventions used in converting the data into the interest liability amounts.

(h) Treasury-State agreements must include language describing how a State and Federal Program Agency will address a State request for supplemental funding. This language must include, but is not limited to, the following provisions:

(1) What constitutes a timely request for supplemental funds for Federal assistance program purposes by a State; and

(2) What constitutes a timely transfer of supplemental funds for Federal assistance program purposes from a Federal Program Agency to a State.

§205.10   How do you document funding techniques?

The Treasury-State agreement must include a concise description for each funding technique that a State will use. The description must include the following:

(a) What constitutes a timely request for funds;

(b) How the State determines the amount of funds to request;

(c) What procedures are used to project or reconcile estimates with actual and immediate cash needs;

(d) What constitutes the timely receipt of funds; and

(e) Whether a State or Federal interest liability accrues when the funding technique, including any associated procedure for projection or reconciliation, is properly applied.

§205.11   What requirements apply to funding techniques?

(a) A State and a Federal Program Agency must minimize the time elapsing between the transfer of funds from the United States Treasury and the State's payout of funds for Federal assistance program purposes, whether the transfer occurs before or after the payout of funds.

(b) A State and a Federal Program Agency must limit the amount of funds transferred to the minimum required to meet a State's actual and immediate cash needs.

(c) A State must not draw down funds from its account in the Unemployment Trust Fund (UTF) or from a Federal account in the UTF in advance of actual immediate cash needs for any purpose including maintaining a compensating balance.

(d) A Federal Program Agency must allow a State to submit requests for funds daily. This requirement should not be construed as a change to Federal Program Agency guidelines defining a properly completed request for funds.

(e) In accordance with the electronic funds transfer provisions of the Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 (31 U.S.C. 3332), a Federal Program Agency must use electronic funds transfer methods to transfer funds to States unless a waiver is available.

§205.12   What funding techniques may be used?

(a) We and a State may negotiate the use of mutually agreed upon funding techniques. We may deny interest liability if a State does not use a mutually agreed upon funding technique. Funding techniques should be efficient and minimize the exchange of interest between States and Federal agencies.

(b) We and a State may base our agreement on the sample funding techniques listed in paragraphs (b)(1) through (b)(5) of this section, or any other technique upon which both parties agree.

(1) Zero balance accounting means that a Federal Program Agency transfers the actual amount of Federal funds to a State that are paid out by the State each day.

(2) Projected clearance means that a Federal Program Agency transfers to a State the projected amount of funds that the State pays out each day. The projected amount paid out each day is determined by applying a clearance pattern to the total amount the State will disburse.

(3) Average clearance means that a Federal Program Agency, on the dollar-weighted average day of clearance of a disbursement, transfers to a State a lump sum equal to the actual amount of funds that the State is paying out. The dollar-weighted average day of clearance is the day when, on a cumulative basis, 50 percent of the funds have been paid out. The dollar-weighted average day of clearance is calculated from a clearance pattern, consistent with §205.20.

(4) Cash advance (pre-issuance or post-issuance) funding means that a Federal Program Agency transfers the actual amount of Federal funds to a State that will be paid out by the State, in a lump sum, not more than three business days prior to the day the State issues checks or initiates EFT payments.

(5) Reimbursable funding means that a Federal Program Agency transfers Federal funds to a State after that State has already paid out the funds for Federal assistance program purposes.

§205.13   How do you determine when State or Federal interest liability accrues?

(a) State or Federal interest liability may or may not accrue when mutually agreed to funding techniques are applied, depending on the terms of the Treasury-State agreement.

(b) We and a State may agree in a Treasury-State agreement that no State or Federal interest liability will accrue for indirect costs or indirect allocated costs based on an indirect cost rate. This indirect cost must be consistent with OMB Circular A-87 (For availability, see 5 CFR 1310.3.) and be in accordance with this subpart A. The indirect cost rate may be a Statewide indirect cost rate or a public assistance cost rate, where appropriate.

§205.14   When does Federal interest liability accrue?

(a) Federal interest liabilities may accrue in accordance with the following provisions:

(1) The Federal Program Agency incurs interest liability if a State pays out its own funds for Federal assistance program purposes with valid obligational authority under Federal law, Federal regulation, or Federal-State agreement. A Federal interest liability will accrue from the day a State pays out its own funds for Federal assistance program purposes to the day Federal funds are credited to a State bank account.

(2) If a State pays out its own funds for Federal assistance program purposes without obligational authority, the Federal Program Agency will incur an interest liability if obligational authority subsequently is established. However, if the lack of obligational authority is the result of the failure of the State to comply with a Federal Program Agency requirement established by statute, regulation, or agreement, interest liability may be denied. A Federal interest liability will accrue from the day a State pays out its own funds for Federal assistance program purposes to the day Federal funds are credited to a State bank account.

(3) If a State pays out its own funds prior to the day a Federal Program Agency officially notifies the State in writing that a discretionary grant project is approved, the Federal Program Agency does not incur an interest liability, notwithstanding any other provision of this section.

(4) If a State pays out its own funds prior to the availability of Federal funds authorized or appropriated for a future Federal fiscal year, the Federal Program Agency does not incur an interest liability, notwithstanding any other provision of this section.

(5) If a State fails to request funds timely as set forth in §205.29, or otherwise fails to apply a funding technique properly, we may deny any resulting Federal interest liability, notwithstanding any other provision of this section.

(b) Federal Program Agency programs that have specific payment dates set by the Federal Program Agency that create interest liabilities are subject to this part.

(c) States must adhere to Federal Program Agency disbursement schedules when requesting funds. Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, we may deny a State's claim for Federal interest liability for the period prior to a late drawdown request. States must time their funds drawdown so that it does not create Federal interest liability. The drawdown request must allow the Federal Program Agency sufficient time to meet its disbursement schedule. If the Federal Program Agency does not make a timely payout in accordance with the terms of the Treasury-State agreement, a State may submit a claim for interest liability.

§205.15   When does State interest liability accrue?

(a) General rule. State interest liability may accrue if Federal funds are received by a State prior to the day the State pays out the funds for Federal assistance program purposes. State interest liability accrues from the day Federal funds are credited to a State account to the day the State pays out the Federal funds for Federal assistance program purposes.

(b) Refunds. (1) A State incurs interest liability on refunds of Federal funds from the day the refund is credited to a State account to the day the refund is either paid out for Federal assistance program purposes or credited to the Federal government.

(2) We and a State may agree, in a Treasury-State agreement, that a State does not incur an interest liability on refunds in refund transactions under $50,000.

(c) Exception to the general rule. A State does not incur an interest liability to the Federal government if a Federal statute requires the State to retain or use for Federal assistance program purposes the interest earned on Federal funds, notwithstanding any other provision in this section.

(d) Mandatory matching of Federal funds. In programs utilizing mandatory matching of Federal funds with State funds, a State must not arbitrarily assign its earliest costs to the Federal government. A State incurs interest liabilities if it draws Federal funds in advance and/or in excess of the required proportion of agreed upon levels of State contributions in programs utilizing mandatory matching of Federal funds with State funds.

§205.16   What special rules apply to Federal assistance programs and projects funded by the Federal Highway Trust Fund?

The following applies to Federal assistance programs and projects funded out of the Federal Highway Trust Fund, notwithstanding any other provision of this part:

(a) A State must request funds at least weekly for current project costs, or Federal interest liability will not accrue prior to the day a State submits a request for funds.

(b) If a State pays out its own funds in the absence of a project agreement or in excess of the Federal obligation in a project agreement, the Federal Program Agency will not incur an interest liability.

§205.17   Are funds transfers delayed by automated payment systems restrictions based on the size and timing of the drawdown request subject to this part?

Funds transfers delayed due to payment processes that automatically reject drawdown requests that fall outside a pre-determined set of parameters are subject to this part.

§205.18   Are administrative costs subject to this part?

(a) A State and Fiscal Service may agree, in a Treasury-State agreement, to the following funding conventions for indirect costs and administrative costs:

(1) The State will draw down a prorated amount of administrative costs on the date of the State payday. For example, the State would draw one-third of its quarterly administrative costs if payroll is monthly, or one-sixth of its quarterly administrative costs if payroll is semi-monthly.

(2) If an indirect cost rate is applied to a program, the State will include a proportionate share of the indirect cost allowance on each drawdown by applying the indirect cost rate to the appropriate direct costs on each drawdown.

(3) If costs must be allocated to various programs pursuant to a labor distribution or other system under an approved cost allocation plan, the State will draw down funds to meet cash outlay requirements based on the most recent, certified cost allocations, with subsequent adjustments made pursuant to the actual allocation of costs.

(b) Notwithstanding any other provision of this part, no interest liabilities will be incurred or calculated for indirect costs and administrative costs, provided the funding conventions described in paragraph (a) of this section are properly applied.

§205.19   How is interest calculated?

(a) A State must calculate Federal interest liabilities and State interest liabilities for each Federal assistance program subject to this subpart A.

(b) The interest rate for all interest liabilities for each Federal assistance program subject to this subpart A is the annualized rate equal to the average equivalent yields of 13-week Treasury Bills auctioned during a State's fiscal year. We provide this rate to each State.

(c) A State must calculate and report interest liabilities on the basis of its fiscal year. A State must ensure that its interest calculations are auditable and retain a record of the calculations.

(d) As set forth in §205.9, a Treasury-State agreement must include the method a State uses to calculate and document interest liabilities.

(e) A State may use actual data, a clearance pattern, or statistical sampling to calculate interest. A clearance pattern used to calculate interest must meet the standards of §205.20. If a State uses statistical sampling to calculate interest, the State must sample transactions separately for each Federal assistance program subject to this subpart A. Each sample must be representative of the pool of transactions and be of sufficient size to accurately represent the flow of Federal funds under the Federal assistance program, including seasonal or other periodic variations.

(f) For the first year in which a Federal assistance program is covered in a Treasury-State agreement, funds transfers that occur prior to the first day of the State's fiscal year must not be included in interest calculations and are not subject to the interest liability provisions of this part.

§205.20   What is a clearance pattern?

States use clearance patterns to project when funds are paid out, given a known dollar amount and a known date of disbursement. A State must ensure that clearance patterns meet the following standards:

(a) A clearance pattern must be auditable.

(b) A clearance pattern must accurately represent the flow of Federal funds under the Federal assistance programs to which it is applied.

(c) A clearance pattern must include seasonal or other periodic variations in clearance activity.

(d) A clearance pattern must be based on at least three consecutive months of disbursement data, unless additional data is required to accurately represent the flow of Federal funds.

(e) If a State uses statistical sampling to develop a clearance pattern, the sample size must be sufficient to ensure a 96 percent confidence interval no more than plus or minus 0.25 weighted days above or below the estimated mean.

(f) A clearance pattern must extend, at a minimum, until 99 percent of the dollars in a disbursement have been paid out for Federal assistance program purposes.

(g) We and a State may agree to other procedures, such as estimates to project when funds are paid out when the dollar amount and/or the timing of disbursements are not known.

§205.21   When may clearance patterns be used?

(a) A State may develop a clearance pattern for:

(1) An individual Federal assistance program;

(2) A logical group of Federal assistance programs that have the same disbursement method and type of payee;

(3) A bank account;

(4) A specific type of payment, such as payroll or vendor payments; or

(5) Anything that is agreed upon by us and a State. If a clearance pattern is used for multiple Federal assistance programs, a State must apply the clearance pattern separately to each Federal assistance program when scheduling funds transfers or calculating interest.

(b) As set forth in §205.9, a Treasury-State agreement must include the method a State uses to develop and maintain clearance patterns.

§205.22   How are accurate clearance patterns maintained?

(a) If a State has knowledge, at any time, that a clearance pattern no longer reflects a Federal assistance program's actual clearance activity, or if a Federal assistance program undergoes operational changes that may affect clearance activity, the State must notify us, develop a new clearance pattern, and certify that the new pattern corresponds to the Federal assistance program's clearance activity. Clearance patterns will remain in effect until a new clearance pattern is certified.

(b) An authorized State official must certify that a clearance pattern corresponds to the clearance activity of the Federal assistance program to which it is applied. An authorized State official must re-certify the accuracy of a clearance pattern at least every five years. If a State develops a clearance pattern for a bank account or a specific type of payment, or on another basis, as set forth in §205.21, we may prescribe other requirements for re-certifying the accuracy of the clearance pattern. A State can begin to use a new clearance pattern on the date the new clearance pattern is certified.

§205.23   What requirements apply to estimates?

The following requirements apply when we and a State negotiate a mutually agreed upon funds transfer procedure based on an estimate of the State's immediate cash needs:

(a) The State must ensure that the estimate reasonably represents the flow of Federal funds under the Federal assistance program or program component to which the estimate applies. The estimate must take into account seasonal or other periodic variations in activity throughout the period for which the Federal funds are available.

(b) As set forth in §§205.9 and 205.10, a Treasury-State agreement must include the method a State uses to develop, maintain, and document the estimate.

§205.24   How are accurate estimates maintained?

(a) If a State has knowledge that an estimate does not reasonably correspond to the State's cash needs for a Federal assistance program or program component, or if a Federal assistance program undergoes operational changes that may affect cash needs, the State must immediately notify us in writing. We and the State will amend the funding technique provisions in the Treasury-State agreement or take other mutually agreed upon corrective action.

(b) When estimates are properly updated and applied, a State or Federal interest liability may or may not accrue, depending on the terms of the Treasury-State agreement.

(c) We may require a State to justify in writing that it is not feasible to use a more efficient basis for determining the amount of funds to be transferred under the Federal assistance program or program component to which an estimate is applied. We may prescribe requirements for certifying the reasonableness of an estimate.

§205.25   How does this part apply to certain Federal assistance programs or funds?

(a) Special rules apply to certain Federal assistance programs or funds described in this section. To the extent the provisions of this section are inconsistent with other provisions of this part, this section applies.

(b) A State's interest liability on funds withdrawn from its account in the UTF equals the actual interest earned on such funds less the related banking costs. Actual interest earned does not include non-cash bank earnings. If funds withdrawn from the State account in the UTF are commingled with other funds, a proportionate share of interest earnings and banking costs must be allocated to the funds withdrawn from the State account. Interest liabilities on funds withdrawn from a Federal account in the UTF, except the Federal Unemployment Account, are calculated in accordance with §205.19.

(c) Supplemental Security Income. (1) Except as provided in 42 U.S.C. 1382e(d), the Federal government incurs an interest liability from the day State funds are credited to the Federal government's account to the day a Federal Program Agency pays out the State funds for Federal assistance program purposes. A State incurs an interest liability from the day a Federal Program Agency pays out Federal funds for Federal assistance program purposes to the day State funds are credited to the Federal government's account.

(2) Interest liability must be calculated on the difference between a State's monthly Supplemental Security Income payment and the State's actual liability for the month.

(3) The Federal government will not incur interest liabilities on refunds of State funds under the Supplemental Security Income Program.

(4) Administrative fees charged by the Social Security Administration to States under the Supplemental Security Income program are not subject to this part.

(5) Supplemental State payments made in conjunction with Supplemental Security Income are not subject to this part.

(d) Funds collected under the Child Support Enforcement Program. (1) Funds collected by States from absent parents pursuant to Title IV-D of the Social Security Act are not subject to this part.

(2) Interest earned by States on undistributed collections must be treated as Federal assistance program income under 45 CFR 304.50(b) and is not subject to this part.

(3) Late payment fees collected by States from absent parents are not subject to interest liabilities under this part and are not subject to this part. However, such fees must be treated as Federal assistance program income in accordance with 45 CFR 302.75(b)(6).

(e) A State that earns interest on Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children rebates is not subject to interest liability if the funds earned are used for Federal assistance program purposes.

(f) Revolving Loan Funds. (1) This part applies to any transfer of funds from the Federal Program Agency to the State for the Revolving Loan Fund.

(2) This part does not apply to interest a State earns on Revolving Loan Funds when Federal Program Agency regulations require that all interest earned on invested funds be used for Federal assistance program purposes.

§205.26   What are the requirements for preparing Annual Reports?

(a) A State must submit to us an Annual Report accounting for State and Federal interest liabilities of the State's most recently completed fiscal year. Adjustments to the Annual Report must be limited to the two State fiscal years prior to the State fiscal year covered by the report. The authorized State official must certify the accuracy of a State's Annual Report. A signed original of the Annual Report must be received by December 31 of the year in which the State's fiscal year ends. We will provide copies of Annual Reports to Federal agencies. We will prescribe the format of the Annual Report, and may prescribe that the Annual Report be submitted by electronic means.

(b) A State must submit a description and supporting documentation for liability claims greater than $5,000. This information must include the following:

(1) The amount of funds requested;

(2) The date the funds were requested;

(3) The date the funds were paid out for Federal assistance program purposes;

(4) The date the funds were received by the State; and

(5) The date of award.

(c) A State claiming reimbursement of Interest Calculation Costs must submit its claim with its Annual Report in accordance with §205.27. An authorized State official must certify the accuracy of a State's claim for Interest Calculation Costs.

§205.27   How are Interest Calculation Costs calculated?

(a) We will compensate a State annually for the costs of calculating interest, including the cost of developing and maintaining clearance patterns in support of interest calculations, pursuant to this subpart A, subject to the conditions and limitations of this section.

(b) We may deny an interest calculation cost claim if a State does not:

(1) Have a Treasury-State agreement with us, as set forth in §§205.6 through 205.9;

(2) Submit timely a Treasury-State agreement, as set forth in §§205.6 through 205.9;

(3) Submit timely an updated list of Federal assistance programs subject to this subpart A, as set forth in §§205.6 through 205.9;

(4) Submit timely a claim for Interest Calculation Costs with its Annual Report, as set forth in §205.26; or

(5) Submit timely its Annual Report, as set forth in §205.26.

(c) A State must maintain documentation to substantiate its claim for Interest Calculation Costs. We may require a State to provide documentation to support its interest calculation cost claims. We will review all interest calculation cost claims for reasonableness. If we determine that a cost claim is unreasonable, we will not reimburse a State for that cost, notwithstanding any other provision of this section.

(d) Eligibility and treatment of Interest Calculation Costs. (1) Interest Calculation Costs do not include expenses for normal disbursing services, such as processing checks or maintaining records for accounting and reconciliation of cash accounts, or expenses for upgrading or modernizing accounting systems.

(2) Interest Calculation Costs in excess of $50,000 in any year are not eligible for reimbursement, unless a State can justify to us that the State is unable to develop and maintain clearance patterns in support of interest calculations, or perform the actual calculation of interest, without incurring such costs. Supporting documentation must accompany State requests for reimbursement in excess of $50,000.

(3) Interest Calculation Costs that a State incurs in fiscal years prior to its most recently completed Annual Report are not eligible for reimbursement.

(4) A State must not include Interest Calculation Costs in its Statewide cost allocation plan, as defined and provided for in OMB Circular A-87. All costs incurred by a State to implement this subpart A, other than Interest Calculation Costs, are subject to the procedures and principles of OMB Circular A-87.

(e) The payments from the Federal government to individual States to offset Interest Calculation Costs incurred are funded from the aggregate interest payments States make to the Federal government. The following limitations apply:

(1) We will not reduce or adjust interest liabilities for Federal assistance programs funded out of trust funds for which the Secretary is trustee. These programs include, but are not limited to, Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund (CFDA 17.225); Highway & Planning Trust Fund (CFDA 20.205); Airport Improvement Trust Fund (CFDA 20.106); Federal Transit Capital Improvement Trust Fund (CFDA 20.500); Federal Transit Capital & Operating Assistance Trust Fund (CFDA 20.507); and Social Security—Disability Insurance Trust Fund (CFDA 96.001); and

(2) The aggregate payments from the Federal government to States to offset Interest Calculation Costs will not be greater than the aggregate interest payments States make to the Federal government.

§205.28   How are interest payments exchanged?

(a) We offset the adjusted total State interest liability and the adjusted total Federal interest liability for each State to determine the net interest payable to or from each specific State. The payment of net interest and any Interest Calculation Costs, as set forth in §205.27, for the most recently completed fiscal year must occur no later than March 31. We will notify a State of the final net interest liability. A State must submit a claim to receive payment.

(b) A State may appeal a decision by us on interest liabilities and interest calculation cost claims in accordance with §205.31.

(c) If a State appeals the amount of interest payable in accordance with the provisions of §205.31, payment must occur by March 31 for any portions not subject to the appeal.

(d) The Federal government will not be liable for interest on any payment of interest to a State.

§205.29   What are the State oversight and compliance responsibilities?

(a) A State must designate an official representative with the statutory or administrative authority to coordinate all interaction with the Federal government concerning this subpart A, and must notify us in writing of the representative's name and title. A State must notify us immediately of any change in the official representative.

(b) A State must maintain records supporting interest calculations, clearance patterns, Interest Calculation Costs, and other functions directly pertinent to the implementation and administration of this subpart A for audit purposes. A State must retain the records for each fiscal year for three years from the date the State submits its Annual Report, or until any pending dispute or action involving the records and documents is completed, whichever is later. We, the Comptroller General, and the Inspector General or other representative of a Federal Program Agency must have the right of access to, and may require submission of, all records for the purpose of verifying interest calculations, clearance patterns, interest calculation cost claims, and the State's accounting for Federal funds.

(c) A State's implementation of this subpart A is subject to audit in accordance with 31 U.S.C. Chapter 75, “Requirements for Single Audits.”

(d) If a State repeatedly or deliberately fails to request funds in accordance with the procedures established for its funding techniques, as set forth in §205.11, §205.12, or a Treasury-State agreement, we may deny the State payment or credit for the resulting Federal interest liability, notwithstanding any other provision of this part.

(e) If a State materially fails to comply with this subpart A, we may, in addition to the action described in paragraph (d) of this section, take one or more of the following actions, as appropriate under the circumstances:

(1) Deny the reimbursement of all or a part of the State's interest calculation cost claim;

(2) Send notification of the non-compliance to the affected Federal Program Agency for appropriate action, including, where appropriate, a determination regarding the impact of non-compliance on program funding;

(3) Request a Federal Program Agency or the General Accounting Office to conduct an audit of the State to determine interest owed to the Federal government, and to implement procedures to recover such interest;

(4) Initiate a debt collection process to recover claims owed to the United States; or

(5) Take other remedies legally available.

§205.30   What are the Federal oversight and compliance responsibilities?

(a) A Federal Program Agency must designate an official representative to coordinate all interaction with us and the States concerning this subpart A, and must notify us in writing of the representative's name and title. A Federal Program Agency must notify us immediately of any change in the official representative.

(b) A Federal Program Agency's implementation of this subpart A is subject to review pursuant to procedural instructions that we issue.

(c) We will consult with Federal agencies as necessary and appropriate before entering into or amending a Treasury-State agreement.

(d) We will distribute Annual Reports to Federal agencies, as set forth in §205.26. Upon our request, a Federal Program Agency must review a State's Annual Report for reasonableness and must report its findings to us within 30 days.

(e) A Federal Program Agency must notify us in writing if the program agency has knowledge, at any time, that:

(1) A State's clearance pattern does not correspond to a Federal assistance program's clearance activity; or

(2) Corrective action needs to be taken by a State, us, or another Federal Program Agency, with respect to the implementation of this subpart. We will notify the State or Federal Program Agency as appropriate in writing with a description of the Federal Program Agency's assertion.

(f) A Federal Program Agency must notify us in writing of new Federal assistance programs listed in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance.

(g) If a Federal Program Agency causes an interest liability by failing to comply with this subpart A, we may collect a charge from the Federal Program Agency. A Federal interest liability resulting from circumstances beyond the control of a Federal Program Agency does not constitute noncompliance. We will determine the charge using the following procedures:

(1) We will issue a Notice of Assessment to the Federal Program Agency, indicating the nature of the noncompliance, the amount of the charge, the manner in which it was calculated, and the right to file an appeal.

(2) To the maximum extent practicable, a Federal Program Agency must pay a charge for noncompliance out of appropriations available for the Federal Program Agency's operations and not from the Federal Program Agency's program funds.

(3) If a Federal Program Agency does not pay a charge for noncompliance within 45 days after receiving a Notice of Assessment, we will debit the appropriate Federal Program Agency account.

(4) In the event a Federal Program Agency appeals a charge imposed under the Notice of Assessment, we will defer the charge until we decide the appeal. If we deny the appeal, the effective date of the charge may be retroactive to the date indicated in the Notice of Assessment.

§205.31   How does a State or Federal Program Agency appeal a determination made by us and resolve disputes?

(a) This section documents the procedures for:

(1) A State to appeal the net interest charge that we have assessed;

(2) A State to appeal a determination we have made regarding the State's claim for Interest Calculation Costs in accordance with §205.27;

(3) A Federal Program Agency to appeal a charge for noncompliance that we have assessed in accordance with §205.30; or

(4) A State or a Federal Program Agency to resolve other disputes with us or between or among each other concerning the implementation of this subpart A.

(b) A State or Federal Program Agency must submit a written petition (Petition) to the Assistant Commissioner, Federal Finance, Bureau of the Fiscal Service, (Assistant Commissioner), within 90 days of the date of the notice of assessment or the event that initiated the appeal or dispute. The Petition must include a concise factual statement, not to exceed 15 pages, with supporting documentation in the appendices, of the conditions forming the basis of the Petition and the action requested of the Assistant Commissioner. In the case of a dispute, the party submitting the petition to us must concurrently provide a copy of the petition to the other concerned parties. The other concerned parties may submit to the Assistant Commissioner a rebuttal within 90 days of the date of the petition. The rebuttal must include a concise factual statement, not to exceed 15 pages, with supporting documentation in the appendices.

(c) The Assistant Commissioner will review the Petition, any rebuttal, and all supporting documentation. As part of the review process, the Assistant Commissioner may request to meet with any or all parties and may request additional information.

(d) The Assistant Commissioner will issue a written decision within the later of 120 days of the date of the Petition or the rebuttal, in case of a dispute, or 120 days from receipt of any additional information. The Assistant Commissioner's decision will be the final program agency action on our part for purposes of judicial review procedures under the Administrative Procedures Act, 5 U.S.C. 701-706 (APA), unless either the State or Federal Program Agency invokes the provisions of the Administrative Dispute Resolution Act of 1990 (ADRA), 5 U.S.C. 581-593.

(e) Either a State or Federal Program Agency may seek to invoke the provisions of the ADRA within 45 days after the date of the Assistant Commissioner's written decision.

(1) The party invoking the ADRA must notify the Assistant Commissioner and any other concerned parties in writing. If all parties, including the Assistant Commissioner, agree in writing, a neutral party appointed under the provisions of the ADRA may assist in resolving the dispute through the use of alternate means of dispute resolution as defined in the ADRA.

(2) If the party invoking the ADRA is unable to reach a satisfactory resolution, the Assistant Commissioner's decision will be the final agency action on our part for purposes of the judicial review procedures under the APA.

(f) Any amount due as a result of an appeal or dispute must be paid within 30 days of the date of the decision of the Assistant Commissioner or the date of the resolution under the ADRA. If a State fails to pay, the State will be subject to collection techniques under 31 U.S.C. 3701 et seq., including accrual of interest on outstanding balances and administrative offset.

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