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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR data is current as of December 12, 2019

Title 21Chapter ISubchapter EPart 500 → Subpart C


Title 21: Food and Drugs
PART 500—GENERAL


Subpart C—Animal Drug Labeling Requirements


Contents
§500.51   Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding.
§500.52   Use of terms such as “tonic”, “tone”, “toner”, or “conditioner” in the labeling of preparations intended for use in or on animals.
§500.55   Exemption from certain drug-labeling requirements.

§500.51   Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding.

(a) Among the representations on the label or labeling of an animal drug which will render the drug misbranded are any broad statements suggesting or implying that the drug is not safe and effective for use when used in accordance with labeling direction, or suggesting or implying that the labeling does not contain adequate warnings or adequate directions for use. Such statements include, but are not limited to:

(1) Any statement that disclaims liability when the drug is used in accordance with directions for use contained on the label or labeling.

(2) Any statement that disclaims liability when the drug is used under “abnormal” or “unforeseeable” conditions.

(3) Any statement limiting the warranty for the products to a warranty that the drug in the package contains the ingredients listed on the label.

(b) This regulation is not intended to prohibit any liability disclaimer that purports to limit the amount of damages or that sets forth the legal theory under which damages are to be recovered.

(c) Any person wishing to obtain an evaluation of an animal drug liability disclaimer under this regulation may submit it to Division of Compliance, (HFV-230), Center for Veterinary Medicine, Food and Drug Administration, 7500 Standish Pl., Rockville, MD 20855. A supplemental NADA providing appropriately revised labeling shall be submitted for any approved new animal drug the labeling of which is not in compliance with this regulation.

[41 FR 8473, Feb. 27, 1976, as amended at 54 FR 18279, Apr. 28, 1989; 57 FR 6475, Feb. 25, 1992]

§500.52   Use of terms such as “tonic”, “tone”, “toner”, or “conditioner” in the labeling of preparations intended for use in or on animals.

(a) The use of terms such as tonic, tone, toner, and similar terms in the labeling of a product intended for use in or on animals implies that such product is capable of a therapeutic effect(s) and causes such a product to be a drug within the meaning of section 201(g) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The unqualified use of such terms in a product's labeling fails to provide adequate directions and indications for use of such product and causes it to be misbranded within the meaning of section 502(a) and (f)(1) of the act. The terms tonic, tone, toner, and similar terms may be used in labeling only when appropriately qualified so as to fully inform the user regarding the intended use(s) of the product.

(b) The unqualified use of the term conditioner and similar terms in the labeling of a product intended for use in or on animals implies that such product is capable of a therapeutic effect(s) and causes such a product to be a drug within the meaning of section 201(g) of the act. The unqualified use of such terms in a product's labeling fails to provide adequate directions and indications for use of such product and causes it to be misbranded within the meaning of section 502(a) and (f)(1) of the act. The term conditioner and similar terms may be used in labeling only when appropriately qualified so as to fully inform the user regarding the intended use(s) of the product. A product labeled as a “conditioner” or with a similar term can be either a food or drug depending upon the manner in which the term is qualified in the labeling to reflect the product's intended use.

(c) An article so qualified as to be represented as a drug must be the subject of an approved new animal drug application unless the use of the article under the conditions set forth in its labeling is generally recognized as safe and effective among experts qualified by scientific training and experience to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of animal drugs.

§500.55   Exemption from certain drug-labeling requirements.

(a) Section 201.105(c) of this chapter provides that in the case of certain drugs for which directions, hazards, warnings, and use information are commonly known to practitioners licensed by law, such information may be omitted from the dispensing package. Under this proviso, the Commissioner of Food and Drugs will offer an opinion, upon written request, stating reasonable grounds therefore on a proposal to omit such information from the dispensing package.

(b) The Commissioner of Food and Drugs has considered submitted material covering a number of drug products and has offered the opinion that the following drugs when intended for those veterinary uses for which they are now generally employed by the veterinary medical profession, should be exempt from the requirements of §201.105(c) of this chapter, provided that they meet the conditions prescribed in this paragraph. Preparations that are not in dosage unit form (for example, solutions) will be regarded as meeting the conditions with respect to the maximum quantity of drug per dosage unit if they are prepared in a manner that enables accurate and ready administration of a quantity of drug not in excess of the stated maximum per dosage unit:

Atropine sulfate. As an injectable for cattle, goats, horses, pigs, and sheep, not in excess of 15 milligrams per dosage unit; as an injectable for cats and dogs, not in excess of 0.6 milligram per dosage unit.

Barbital sodium. For oral use in cats and dogs, not in excess of 300 milligrams per dosage unit.

Epinephrine injection. 1:1,000. For cats, dogs, cattle, goats, horses, pigs, and sheep (except as provided in §500.65).

Morphine sulfate. As an injectable for dogs, not in excess of 15 milligrams per dosage unit.

Pentobarbital sodium. For oral use in cats and dogs, not in excess of 100 milligrams per dosage unit.

Phenobarbital sodium. For oral use in cats and dogs, not in excess of 100 milligrams per dosage unit.

Procaine hydrochloride injection. Containing not in excess of 2 percent procaine hydrochloride, with or without epinephrine up to a concentration of 1:50,000. For use in cats, dogs, cattle, goats, horses, pigs, and sheep.

Thyroid. For oral use in dogs, not in excess of 60 milligrams per dosage unit.

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