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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR data is current as of April 2, 2020

Title 27Chapter ISubchapter APart 19Subpart I → Subject Group


Title 27: Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms
PART 19—DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS
Subpart I—Distilled Spirits Taxes


Effective Tax Rates

§19.245   Tax credits under 26 U.S.C. 5010.

(a) The distilled spirits tax. Sections 5001 and 7652 of the IRC impose a tax on all distilled spirits produced in, or imported into, or brought into the United States at the rate prescribed in section 5001 of the IRC.

(b) Tax credits. Section 5010 of the IRC provides a credit for the wine and flavors content in distilled spirits products. These credits effectively reduce the rate of excise tax paid on distilled spirits products that contain eligible wines and eligible flavors. As a result, the alcohol derived from eligible wine is taxed at the rates specified for wine in 26 U.S.C. 5041, and the alcohol derived from eligible flavors is not taxed to the extent that it does not exceed 2.5 percent of the alcohol in the product. This results in an effective tax rate on the distilled spirits product that is lower than the rate prescribed in 26 U.S.C. 5001.

(c) Eligible wine and eligible flavor. The credit for the wine and flavor content of a distilled spirits product is allowable only if the wine or flavor contained in the product is an “eligible wine” or an “eligible flavor”. To determine whether a wine or flavor is eligible, refer to the definitions in §19.1 and 26 U.S.C. 5010.

(d) Application of effective tax rates. Section 19.246 describes how the proprietor should compute the effective tax rate for each distilled spirits product containing eligible wine or eligible flavor. Sections 19.247 through 19.250 set forth several different methods that the proprietor may use in applying the effective tax rates to taxable removals of products from the proprietor's bonded premises.

(26 U.S.C. 5010)

§19.246   Computing the effective tax rate for a product.

(a) How to compute effective tax rates. In order to determine the effective tax rate for a distilled spirits product containing eligible wine or eligible flavor, the proprietor must first determine the total excise taxes due on the product from all sources including distilled spirits, eligible wine, and alcohol from eligible flavors in excess of 2.5 percent of the total proof gallons in the product. Then, the proprietor must determine the total number of proof gallons of alcohol in the product regardless of the source. By dividing the total tax (numerator) by the total number of proof gallons (denominator) the proprietor will arrive at the effective tax rate for the product in dollars per proof gallon. The proprietor will compute the effective tax rate according to the following formula:

(1) Numerator. The numerator will be the sum of:

(i) The proof gallons of all distilled spirits used in the product (exclusive of distilled spirits derived from eligible flavors), multiplied by the tax rate prescribed by 26 U.S.C. 5001;

(ii) The wine gallons of each eligible wine used in the product, multiplied by the tax rate prescribed by 26 U.S.C. 5041(b)(1), (2), or (3), that would be imposed on the wine but for its removal to bonded premises. Three different tax classes of wine are eligible for the tax credit. The proprietor will have to repeat this step for each different tax class of eligible wine used; and

(iii) The proof gallons of all distilled spirits derived from eligible flavors used in the product, multiplied by the tax rate prescribed by 26 U.S.C. 5001, but only to the extent that such distilled spirits exceed 2.5 percent of the denominator prescribed in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.

(2) Denominator. The denominator will be the sum of:

(i) The proof gallons of all distilled spirits used in the product, including distilled spirits derived from eligible flavors; and

(ii) The wine gallons of each eligible wine used in the product, multiplied by twice the percentage of alcohol by volume of each, divided by 100.

(b) Rounding numbers—(1) Proof gallons. When determining the effective tax rate, the proprietor must express quantities of distilled spirits, eligible wine, and eligible flavors to the nearest tenth of a proof gallon.

(2) Tax rates. The proprietor may round the effective tax rate to as many decimal places as the proprietor deems appropriate, provided that the rate is expressed no less exactly than the rate rounded to the nearest whole cent. The proprietor must be consistent and round the effective tax rates for all products to the same number of decimal places. When rounding, if the number to the right of the last decimal place to be kept is less than five, it will be dropped, if it is five or over, a unit will be added.

(c) Example. The following is an example of the use of the formula.

1Proof gallons by which distilled spirits derived from eligible flavors exceed 2.5% of the total proof gallons in the batch (100.9 − (2.5% × 3,371.8) = 16.6).

Batch Record

Distilled spirits2249.1 proof gallons.
Eligible wine (14% alcohol by volume)2265.0 wine gallons.
Eligible wine (19% alcohol by volume)1020.0 wine gallons.
Eligible flavors100.9 proof gallons.
eCFR graphic er16fe11.000.gif

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(26 U.S.C. 5010)

§19.247   Use of effective (actual) tax rates.

(a) Select method of applying tax rate. The proprietor may choose to apply an effective tax rate to taxable removals of distilled spirits products in accordance with §19.248, §19.249, or §19.250. Any proprietor who does not elect one of these options must establish an effective tax rate for each batch of distilled spirits product on which a claim for tax credit for alcohol derived from eligible wine or eligible flavor will be made. The proprietor must compute the effective tax rates for these products in accordance with the instructions in §19.246.

(b) Record tax rates used. The proprietor must record the effective tax rate used on the dump or batch records for the products as required by §19.598. The proprietor must record the serial numbers of cases of product removed at each rate on the record of tax determination or other related record. The proprietor must keep these records available for inspection by TTB officers.

(26 U.S.C. 5010, 5207)

§19.248   Standard effective tax rate.

(a) Establishing a standard effective tax rate for a product. The proprietor may establish a permanent standard effective tax rate for any eligible distilled spirits product, rather than calculate a separate effective tax rate for each batch of product made. If the proprietor elects to use this option, the proprietor must determine the permanent standard effective tax rate based on the least quantity and the lowest alcohol content of eligible wine or eligible flavors used to manufacture the product. Thus, the permanent standard effective tax rate is the highest tax rate that would apply to the product because it is based on a batch with the least amount of alcohol from eligible wine and flavors that qualify for the credit under 26 U.S.C. 5010. By using this method the proprietor forgoes the possible use of a lower tax rate in exchange for the convenience of using a permanent standard effective tax rate that does not have to be recomputed for each batch of product made. The proprietor must keep a permanent record of the standard effective tax rates established for each product, in accordance with §19.615.

(b) Batches subject to a higher tax rate. Whenever the proprietor manufactures a batch of the product with a lesser quantity or lower alcohol content of eligible wine or eligible flavor, this will result in a higher tax rate on the product since the product will have less alcohol qualifying for the credit under 26 U.S.C. 5010 and a higher percentage of alcohol taxable at the rate published in 26 U.S.C. 5001. In such instances, the proprietor must keep the cased goods segregated from other completed cases of the same product subject to the permanent standard effective tax rate for that product. The proprietor must determine the tax rate for the nonstandard batch in accordance with §19.247.

(c) TTB review of standard tax rates. If the appropriate TTB officer finds that the use of this procedure jeopardizes the revenue, or causes administrative difficulty, the proprietor upon notification from TTB must discontinue use of this procedure.

(26 U.S.C. 5010, 5207)

§19.249   Average effective tax rate.

(a) Establishing an average tax rate. The proprietor may establish an average effective tax rate for any eligible distilled spirits product based on the total proof gallons in all batches of the same composition which have been produced during the preceding 6-month period and which have been or will be bottled or packaged, in whole or in part, for domestic consumption. At the beginning of each month, the proprietor must recompute the average effective tax rate so as to include only the immediately preceding 6-month period. The proprietor must show the average tax rate established for a product in the record of average effective tax rates as prescribed in §19.613.

(b) TTB review of average effective tax rates. If the appropriate TTB officer finds that the use of this procedure jeopardizes the revenue, or causes administrative difficulty, the proprietor upon notification from TTB must discontinue use of this procedure.

(26 U.S.C. 5010, 5207)

§19.250   Inventory reserve account.

(a) The proprietor may establish an inventory reserve account for any eligible distilled spirits product by maintaining an inventory reserve record as prescribed by §19.614. The effective tax rate applied to each removal or other disposition will be the effective tax rate recorded on the inventory reserve record from which the removal or other disposition is depleted. With an inventory reserve account, the proprietor will tax pay removals on a first-in first-out basis regardless of which lot of product is actually removed.

(b) If the appropriate TTB officer finds that the use of this procedure jeopardizes the revenue, or causes administrative difficulty, the proprietor upon notification from TTB must discontinue use of this procedure.

(26 U.S.C. 5010, 5207)

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