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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR data is current as of March 27, 2020

Title 27Chapter ISubchapter APart 19Subpart F → Subject Group


Title 27: Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms
PART 19—DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS
Subpart F—Bonds and Consents of Surety


Bonding Requirements for a DSP

§19.151   General.

(a) Bond required. Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, any person who plans to establish and operate a distilled spirits plant must provide TTB with one or more bonds on form TTB F 5110.56, Distilled Spirits Bond. TTB will not approve a registration or allow a person to operate a distilled spirits plant until the applicant has provided the necessary bonds. If a proprietor fails to pay any liability covered by a bond, TTB may seek payment from the proprietor, from the surety (see §19.153) or from both the proprietor and the surety. The types and penal sums of bonds required will depend upon the type and size of the operations that the proprietor will conduct.

(b) Bond terms and conditions. The terms and conditions of a distilled spirits bond require that the proprietor comply with all provisions of law and regulations relating to activities covered by the bond, and to pay all taxes imposed by 26 U.S.C. chapter 51, including taxes on unexplained shortages of bottled distilled spirits. The bond will further specify that the proprietor will pay all penalties incurred, or fines imposed, for violations of law and regulations relating to activities covered by the bond. The specific terms of the required bond(s) are stated on TTB F 5110.56.

(c) Corporations and controlled subsidiaries. For purposes of this subpart, the term “corporation” includes a Limited Liability Company (LLC) or Limited Liability Partnership (LLP) in any jurisdiction where the law authorizes such a business organization to operate. Whenever used in this subpart, the term “controlled subsidiary” means a corporation (or LLC or LLP) in which more than 50 percent of the voting power is controlled by a parent corporation.

(d) Bonds covering distilled spirits for nonindustrial use and industrial use—(1) Nonindustrial use. A proprietor who pays tax on a deferred basis under §19.235 is not required to provide a bond or bonds to cover operations and withdrawals of distilled spirits for nonindustrial use during any portion of a calendar year for which the proprietor is eligible to use an annual or quarterly return period under §19.235(b) or (c). For purposes of the preceding sentence, a proprietor is considered to be paying tax on a deferred basis even if the proprietor does not pay tax during every return period as long as the proprietor intends to pay tax in a future period. See §§19.73 and 19.136 for rules governing applying for this bond exemption. See §19.168(b) for rules governing when an existing proprietor who has not provided a bond under this paragraph must obtain bond coverage.

(2) Industrial use. A proprietor is required to provide one or more bonds to cover operations and withdrawals of distilled spirits for industrial use even if the proprietor pays tax on a deferred basis under §19.235 and is eligible to use an annual or quarterly return period under §19.235(b) or (c). In the case of a proprietor whose operations involve distilled spirits for both nonindustrial and industrial use, distilled spirits are considered to be for industrial use for purposes of this paragraph unless the proprietor designates the spirits as being solely for nonindustrial use either upon taking the production gauge (see §19.304) or upon receiving the spirits and, in either case, does not thereafter mix the spirits with any spirits for industrial use.

(3) Nonindustrial use and industrial use defined. See §19.472 for the provisions defining the nonindustrial and industrial uses of distilled spirits.

(26 U.S.C. 5173, 5551)

[T.D. TTB-92, 76 FR 9090, Feb. 16, 2011, as amended by T.D. TTB-146, 82 FR 1120, Jan. 4, 2017]

§19.152   Types of bonds.

(a) Basic Bonds. There are two basic types of bonds: the operations bond, and the withdrawal bond.

(1) Operations bond. An operations bond covers the tax liability for a variety of operations at a distilled spirits plant, along with any penalties incurred and fines imposed for violation of the law and regulations relating to activities covered by the bond.

(2) Withdrawal bond. A withdrawal bond covers the tax liability for tax determined distilled spirits withdrawn from the bonded premises on a tax deferred basis.

(b) Other bonds. In addition to the basic operations and withdrawal bonds, several variations of these bonds are available:

(1) An adjacent wine cellar bond covers operations at a distilled spirits plant and an adjacent bonded wine cellar;

(2) An area bond covers operations at two or more distilled spirits plant and any adjacent bonded wine cellars; and

(3) A unit bond covers both operations and withdrawals at one or more distilled spirits plants and operations at any adjacent bonded wine cellars.

(26 U.S.C. 5173)

§19.153   Bond guaranteed by a corporate surety.

(a) Corporate surety. A company that issues bonds is called a “corporate surety.” Proprietors must obtain the surety bonds required by this subpart from a corporate surety approved by the Secretary of the Treasury.

(b) How to find an approved surety. The Department of the Treasury publishes a list of approved corporate surety companies in Treasury Department Circular 570, Companies Holding Certificates of Authority as Acceptable Sureties on Federal Bonds and as Acceptable Reinsuring Companies. Treasury Department Circular 570 is published in the Federal Register annually on the first business day in July, and supplemental changes are published periodically thereafter. The most recent circular and any supplemental changes to it may be viewed on the Bureau of the Fiscal Service Web site at https://www.fiscal.treasury.gov/fsreports/ref/suretyBnd/c570.htm.

(31 U.S.C. 9304, 9306)

[T.D. TTB-92, 76 FR 9090, Feb. 16, 2011, as amended by T.D. TTB-146, 82 FR 1120, Jan. 4, 2017]

§19.154   Bond guaranteed by deposit of securities or cash (including cash equivalents).

(a) Bond guaranteed by deposit of securities—(1) General. As an alternative to the corporate surety bond under §19.153, a person can file a bond that guarantees payment of the liability by pledging one or more acceptable negotiable securities. These securities must have a par value (face amount) equal to or greater than the penal sums of the required bonds. The pledged securities are held in the Federal Reserve Bank in a safekeeping account with TTB as the pledgee. Should the proprietor fail to pay one or more of the guaranteed liabilities, TTB can take action to sell the deposited securities to satisfy the debt. Pledged securities will be released if there are no outstanding liabilities when the bond is terminated. (See §19.170.)

(2) Acceptable securities. Only public debt obligations of the United States, the principal and interest of which are unconditionally guaranteed by the United States Government, are acceptable for the purpose described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section. The Department of the Treasury and certain other United States Government agencies issue debt instruments that are acceptable as collateral, such as Treasury notes and Treasury bills. Savings bonds, certificates of deposit and letters of credit are not acceptable. A list of securities acceptable as collateral in lieu of surety bonds is available from the Bureau of the Fiscal Service. Current information and guidance from the Bureau of the Fiscal Service Web site may be found at https://www.fiscal.treasury.gov.

(b) Bond guaranteed by deposit of cash or cash equivalent. As an alternative to the corporate surety bond under §19.153, a person can file a bond that guarantees payment of the liability by submitting cash or its equivalent (including a money order, cashier's check, or personal check). Cash or its equivalent must be no less than the penal sums of the required bond. Cash equivalents must be payable to the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau. A bond described in this paragraph will be released if there are no outstanding liabilities when the bond is terminated. (See §19.170.)

(31 U.S.C. 9301, 9303; 31 CFR part 380)

[T.D. TTB-146, 82 FR 1120, Jan. 4, 2017]

§19.155   Change of surety bond terms—consent of surety.

In order to change the terms of an approved bond, both the principal and the surety company that guaranteed the bond must agree to the change. TTB must also approve the change. All changes to the terms of a bond must be executed on form TTB F 5000.18, Change of Bond (Consent of Surety) by both the principal and the surety with the same formality and proof of authority as required for the original bond. The completed, executed TTB F 5000.18 must be submitted to the National Revenue Center.

(26 U.S.C. 5173)

§19.156   Power of attorney for surety.

(a) Requirement for power of attorney. Every bond and every consent of surety filed with TTB in which an agent or officer executed the bond or consent on behalf of the surety must be supported by a power of attorney authorizing the agent or officer to execute the bond or consent of surety. The power of attorney assures TTB that the person who signed the bond on behalf of the surety has the legal authority to obligate the surety.

(b) Form of power of attorney and endorsement. A power of attorney will be prepared on the surety's own form, and must be executed under the surety's corporate seal. If the power of attorney submitted is other than a manually signed original, it must be accompanied by a certification from the surety that the power of attorney is valid.

(c) Additional documentation. The appropriate TTB officer authorized to approve and accept the bond may require additional evidence of the authenticity of signatures and the authority of persons signing on behalf of the surety to execute the bond or consent.

(31 U.S.C. 9304, 9306)

§19.157   Disapproval of bonds and consents of surety.

(a) Grounds for disapproval. The appropriate TTB officer may disapprove any bond or consent of surety required by this part if the principal or any person having ownership, control or responsibility for actively managing the business of the surety has been previously convicted, in a court of competent jurisdiction of:

(1) Any fraudulent noncompliance with any provision of any law of the United States relating to internal revenue or customs taxation of spirits, wines, or beer, or if the offense was compromised by payment of penalties or otherwise, or

(2) Any felony under a law of any State or the District of Columbia, or the United States, prohibiting the manufacture, sale, importation, or transportation of spirits, wine, beer, or other intoxicating liquor.

(b) Appeal. If the appropriate TTB officer disapproves a bond or consent of surety, the person giving the bond may appeal the disapproval to the Administrator, who will hear the appeal. The decision of the Administrator will be final.

(26 U.S.C. 5551)

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