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Title 19Chapter IPart 4 → Subject Group


Title 19: Customs Duties
PART 4—VESSELS IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC TRADES


General

§4.94   Yacht privileges and obligations.

(a) Any documented vessel with a pleasure license endorsement, as well as any undocumented American pleasure vessel, shall be used exclusively for pleasure and shall not transport merchandise nor carry passengers for pay. Such a vessel which is not engaged in any trade nor in any way violating the Customs or navigation laws of the U.S. may proceed from port to port in the U.S. or to foreign ports without clearing and is not subject to entry upon its arrival in a port of the U.S., provided it has not visited a hovering vessel, received merchandise while in the customs waters beyond the territorial sea, or received merchandise while on the high seas. Such a vessel shall immediately report arrival to Customs when arriving in any port or place within the U.S., including the U.S. Virgin Islands, from a foreign port or place.

(b) A cruising license may be issued to a yacht of a foreign country only if it has been made to appear to the satisfaction of the Secretary of the Treasury that yachts of the United States are allowed to arrive at and depart from ports in such foreign country and to cruise in the waters of such ports without entering or clearing at the customhouse thereof and without the payment of any charges for entering or clearing, dues, duty per ton, tonnage, taxes, or charges for cruising licenses. It has been made to appear to the satisfaction of the Secretary of the Treasury that yachts of the United States are granted such privileges in the following countries:

Argentina   Italy
Australia   Jamaica
Austria   Liberia
Bahama Islands   Marshall Islands
Belgium   Netherlands
Bermuda   New Zealand
Canada   Norway
Denmark   Saint Kitts and Nevis
Finland   Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
France   Sweden
Germany, Federal Republic of   Switzerland
Greece   Turkey
Honduras   United Kingdom and the Dependencies: the Anguilla Islands, the Isle of Man, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, and the Turks and Caicos Islands
Ireland 

(c) In order to obtain a cruising license for a yacht of any country listed in paragraph (b) of this section, there shall be filed with the port director an application therefor executed by either the yacht owner or the master which shall set forth the owner's name and address and identify the vessel by flag, rig, name, and such other matters as are usually descriptive of a vessel. The application shall also include a description of the waters in which the yacht will cruise, and a statement of the probable time it will remain in such waters. Upon approval of the application, the port director will issue a cruising license in the form prescribed by paragraph (d) of this section permitting the yacht, for a stated period not to exceed one year, to arrive and depart from the United States and to cruise in specified waters of the United States without entering and clearing, without filing manifests and obtaining or delivering permits to proceed, and without the payment of entrance and clearance fees, or fees for receiving manifests and granting permits to proceed, duty on tonnage, tonnage tax, or light money. The license shall be granted subject to the condition that the vessel shall not engage in trade or violate the laws of the United States in any respect. Upon the vessel's arrival at any port or place within the U.S. or the U.S. Virgin Islands, the master shall comply with 19 U.S.C. 1433 by immediately reporting arrival at the nearest Customs facility or other place designated by the port director. Individuals shall remain on board until directed otherwise by the appropriate Customs officer, as provided in 19 U.S.C. 1459.

(d) Cruising licenses shall be in the following form:

License To Cruise in the Waters of the United States

To Port Directors:

For a period of ____ from ____(Date) the ____(Flag) ____ (Rig) yacht ____(Name) belonging to ________ of (Owner's name) ________(Address) shall be permitted to arrive at and depart from the United States and to cruise in the waters of the Customs port of

 

      (Name of port or ports)

without entering and clearing, without filing manifests and obtaining or delivering permits to proceed, and without the payment of entry and clearance fees, or fees for receiving manifests and granting permits to proceed, duty on tonnage, tonnage tax, or light money.

This license is granted subject to the condition that the yacht named herein shall not engage in trade or violate the laws of the United States in any respect. Upon arrival at each port or place in the United States, the master shall report the fact of arrival to the Customs officer at the nearest customhouse. Such report shall be immediately made.

Issued this _____ day of _______, 19__

 

(Port Director of Customs)         

Warning: This vessel is dutiable:

(1) If owned by a resident of the United States (including Puerto Rico), or brought into the United States (including Puerto Rico), for sale or charter to a resident thereof, or

(2) If brought into the United States (including Puerto Rico) by a nonresident free of duty as part of personal effects and sold or chartered within one year from date of entry.

Any offer to sell or charter (for example, a listing with yacht brokers or agents) is considered evidence that the vessel was brought in for sale or charter to a resident or, if made within one year of entry of a vessel brought in free of duty as personal effects, that the vessel no longer is for the personal use of the non-resident.

If the vessel is sold or chartered, or offered for sale or charter, in the circumstances described, without the owner first having filed a consumption entry and having paid duty, the vessel may be subject to seizure or to a monetary claim equal to the value of the vessel. See Chapter 89, Additional U.S. Note 1, HTSUS, and subheadings 8903.10, 8903.91, 8903.92, 8903.99.10, 8903.99.20, and 8903.99.90, HTSUS.

(e) A foreign-flag yacht which is not in possession of a cruising license shall be required to comply with the laws applicable to foreign vessels arriving at, departing from, and proceeding between ports of the United States.

[T.D. 69-266, 34 FR 20423, Dec. 31, 1969]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §4.94, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

§4.94a   Large yachts imported for sale.

(a) General. An otherwise dutiable vessel used primarily for recreation or pleasure and exceeding 79 feet in length that has been previously sold by a manufacturer or dealer to a retail consumer and that is imported with the intention to offer for sale at a boat show in the United States may qualify at the time of importation for a deferral of entry completion and deposit of duty. The following requirements and conditions will apply in connection with a deferral of entry completion and duty deposit under this section:

(1) The importer of record must certify to Customs in writing that the vessel is being imported pursuant to 19 U.S.C. 1484b for sale at a boat show in the United States;

(2) The certification referred to in paragraph (a)(1) of this section must be accompanied by the posting of a single entry bond containing the terms and conditions set forth in appendix C of part 113 of this chapter. The bond will have a duration of 6 months after the date of importation of the vessel, and no extensions of the bond period will be allowed;

(3) The filing of the certification and the posting of the bond in accordance with this section will permit Customs to determine whether the vessel may be released;

(4) All subsequent transactions with Customs involving the vessel in question, including any transaction referred to in paragraphs (b) through (d) of this section, must be carried out in the same port of entry in which the certification was filed and the bond was posted under this section; and

(5) The vessel in question will not be eligible for issuance of a cruising license under §4.94 and must comply with the laws respecting vessel entry and clearance when moving between ports of entry during the 6-month bond period prescribed under this section.

(b) Exportation within 6-month period. If a vessel for which entry completion and duty payment are deferred under paragraph (a) of this section is not sold but is exported within the 6-month bond period specified in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, the importer of record must inform Customs in writing of that fact within 30 calendar days after the date of exportation. The bond posted with Customs will be returned to the importer of record and no entry completion and duty payment will be required. The exported vessel will be precluded from reentry under the terms of paragraph (a) of this section for a period of 3 months after the date of exportation.

(c) Sale within 6-month period. If the sale of a vessel for which entry completion and duty payment are deferred under paragraph (a) of this section is completed within the 6-month bond period specified in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, the importer of record within 15 calendar days after completion of the sale must complete the entry by filing an Entry Summary (Customs Form 7501, or its electronic equivalent) and must deposit the appropriate duty (calculated at the applicable rates provided for under subheading 8903.91.00 or 8903.92.00 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States and based upon the value of the vessel at the time of importation). Upon entry completion and deposit of duty under this paragraph, the bond posted with Customs will be returned to the importer of record.

(d) Expiration of bond period. If the 6-month bond period specified in paragraph (a)(2) of this section expires without either the completed sale or the exportation of a vessel for which entry completion and duty payment are deferred under paragraph (a) of this section, the importer of record within 15 calendar days after expiration of that 6-month period must complete the entry by filing an Entry Summary (Customs Form 7501, or its electronic equivalent) and must deposit the appropriate duty (calculated at the applicable rates provided for under subheading 8903.91.00 or 8903.92.00 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States and based upon the value of the vessel at the time of importation). Upon entry completion and deposit of duty under this paragraph, the bond posted with Customs will be returned to the importer of record, and a new bond on Customs Form 301, containing the bond conditions set forth in §113.62 of this chapter, may be required by the Center director.

[68 FR 13625, Mar. 20, 2003, as amended by CBP Dec. 15-14, 80 FR 61283, Oct. 13, 2015; CBP Dec. 16-26, 81 FR 93009, Dec. 20, 2016]

§4.95   Records of entry and clearance of vessels.

Permanent records shall be prepared at each customhouse of all entries of vessels on Customs Form 1400 and of all clearances and permits to proceed on Customs Form 1401. Whenever a vessel is diverted, as provided for in §4.91 (a) or (b), Customs Form 1401 shall be amended to show the new destination. These records shall be open to public inspection.

[T.D. 82-224, 47 FR 53727, Nov. 29, 1982]

§4.96   Fisheries.

(a) As used in this section:

(1) The term “convention vessel” means a Canadian fishing vessel which, at the time of its arrival in the United States, is engaged only in the North Pacific halibut fishery and which is therefore entitled to the privileges provided for by the Halibut Fishing Vessels Convention between the United States and Canada signed at Ottawa, Canada, on March 24, 1950 (T.D. 52862);

(2) The term “nonconvention fishing vessel” means any vessel other than a convention vessel which is employed in whole or in part in fishing at the time of its arrival in the United States and

(i) Which is documented under the laws of a foreign county,

(ii) Which is undocumented, of 5 net tons or over, and owned in whole or in part by a person other than a citizen of the United States, or

(iii) Which is undocumented, of less than 5 net tons, and owned in whole or in part by a person who is neither a citizen nor a resident of the United States;

(3) The term “nonconvention cargo vessel” means any vessel which is not employed in fishing at the time of its arrival in the United States, but which is engaged in whole or in part in the transportation of fish or fish products131a and

131aExcept as otherwise provided by treaty or convention to which the United States is a party, no foreign-flag vessel shall, whether documented as a cargo vessel or otherwise, land in a port of the United States its catch of fish taken on board such vessels on the high seas or fish products processed therefrom, or any fish or fish products taken on board such vessel on the high seas from a vessel engaged in fishing operations or in the processing of fish or fish products.” (46 U.S.C. 251)

132[Reserved]

(i) Which is documented under the laws of a foreign country or

(ii) Which is undocumented and owned by a person other than a citizen of the United States;

(4) The term “treaty vessel” means a Canadian fishing vessel which at the time of its arrival in the United States is engaged in the albacore tuna fishery and which is therefore entitled to the privileges provided for by the treaty with Canada on Pacific Coast Albacore Tuna Vessels and Port Privileges, entered into force at Ottawa, Canada, on July 29, 1981 (T.D. 81-227); and

(5) The term “fishing” means the planting, cultivation, or taking of fish, shell fish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation, or the transportation of any of those marine products to the United States by the taking vessel or another vessel under the complete control and management of a common owner or bareboat charterer.

(b) Except as otherwise provided by treaty or convention to which the United States is a party (see paragraphs (d) and (g) of this section), no foreign-flag vessel shall, whether documented as a cargo vessel or otherwise, land in a port of the United States its catch of fish taken on board such vessel on the high seas or fish products processed therefrom, or any fish or fish products taken on board such vessel on the high seas from a vessel engaged in fishing operations or in the processing of fish or fish products. (46 U.S.C. 251). This prohibition applies regardless of the intended ultimate disposition of the fish or fish products (e.g., it applies to transshipments from the foreign vessel to another vessel in United States territorial waters; it applies to landing for transshipment in bond to Canada or Mexico; it applies to landing for exportation under bond; and it applies to landing in a Foreign Trade Zone). However, the prohibition is limited to fish, or fish products processed therefrom, taken on board the foreign vessel on the high seas.

(c) A vessel of the United States to be employed in the fisheries must have a Certificate of Documentation endorsed with a fishery license. “Fisheries” includes processing, storing, transporting (except in foreign commerce), planting, cultivating, catching, taking, or harvesting fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation in the navigable waters of the United States or the exclusive economic zone.

(d) A convention vessel may come into a port of entry on the Pacific coast of the United States, including Alaska, to land its catch of halibut and incidentally-caught sable fish, or to secure supplies, equipment, or repairs. Such a vessel may come into any other port of entry or, if properly authorized to do so under §101.4(b) of this chapter, into any place other than a port of entry, for the purpose of securing supplies, equipment, or repairs only, but shall not land its catch. A convention vessel which comes into the United States as provided for in this paragraph shall comply with the usual requirements applicable to foreign vessels arriving at and departing from ports of the United States.

(e) A nonconvention fishing vessel, other than a treaty vessel, may come into a port of entry in the United States or, if granted permission under §101.4(b) of this chapter, into a place other than a port of entry for the purpose of securing supplies, equipment, or repairs, but shall not land its catch. A nonconvention fishing vessel which comes into the United States as provided for in this paragraph shall comply with the usual requirements applicable to foreign vessels arriving at and departing from ports of the United States.

(f) A nonconvention cargo vessel, although not prohibited by law from coming into the United States, shall not be permitted to land in the United States its catch of fish taken on the high seas or any fish or fish products taken on board on the high seas from a vessel employed in fishing or in the processing of fish or fish products, but may land fish taken on board at any place other than the high seas upon compliance with the usual requirements. Before any such fish may be landed the master shall satisfy the port director that the fish were not taken on board on the high seas by presenting declarations of the master and two or more officers or members of the crew of the vessel, of whom the person next in authority to the master shall be one, or other evidence acceptable to the port director which establishes the place of lading to his satisfaction.

(g) A treaty vessel may come into a port or place of the United States named in Annex B of the Treaty with Canada on Pacific Coast Albacore Tuna Vessels and Port Privileges to land its catch of albacore tuna, or to secure fuel, supplies, equipment and repairs. Such a vessel may come into any other port of entry or, if properly authorized to do so under §101.4(b) of this chapter, into any place other than a port of entry, for the purpose of securing supplies, equipment, or repairs only, but shall not land its catch. A treaty vessel which comes into the United States as provided for in this paragraph shall comply with the usual requirements applicable to foreign vessels arriving at and departing from ports of the United States.

(h) A convention vessel, a nonconvention fishing vessel, a nonconvention cargo vessel, or a treaty vessel, which arrives in the United States in distress shall be subject to the usual requirements applicable to foreign vessels arriving in distress. While in the United States, supplies, equipment, or repairs may be secured, but, except as specified in the next sentence, fish shall not be landed unless the vessel's master, or other authorized representative of the owner, shows to the satisfaction of the port director that it will not be possible, by the exercise of due diligence, for the vessel to transport its catch to a foreign port without spoilage, in which event the port director may allow the vessel upon compliance with all applicable requirements, to land, transship, or otherwise dispose of its catch. Nothing herein shall prevent, upon compliance with normal Customs procedures, a convention vessel arriving in distress from landing its catch of halibut and incidentally-caught sable fish at a port of entry on the Pacific coast, including Alaska; a foreign cargo vessel arriving in distress from landing its cargo of fish taken on board at any place not on the high seas; or a treaty vessel arriving in distress from landing its catch of albacore tuna at a port of entry on the Pacific coast, including Alaska.

[T.D. 82-144, 47 FR 35182, Aug. 13, 1982, as amended by T.D. 83-214, 48 FR 46513, Oct. 13, 1983; T.D. 83-214, 48 FR 50075, Oct. 31, 1983; T.D. 93-12, 58 FR 13197, Mar. 10, 1993]

§4.97   Salvage vessels.

(a) Only a vessel of the United States, a numbered motorboat owned by a citizen, or a vessel operating within the purview of paragraph (d) or (e) of this section, shall engage in any salvage operation in territorial waters of the United States unless an application addressed to the Commissioner of Customs to use another specified vessel in a completely described operation has been granted.133

133“No foreign vessel shall, under penalty of forfeiture, engage in salvaging operations on the Atlantic or Pacific coast of the United States, in any portion of the Great Lakes or their connecting or tributary waters, including any portion of the Saint Lawrence River through which the international boundary line extends, or in territorial waters of the United States on the Gulf of Mexico, except when authorized by a treaty or in accordance with the provisions of section 725 of this title: Provided, however, That if, on investigation, the Secretary of the Treasury is satisfied that no suitable vessel wholly owned by a person who is a citizen of the United States and documented under the laws of the United States or numbered pursuant to section 288 of this title, is available in any particular locality he may authorize the use of a foreign vessel or vessels in salvaging operations in that locality and no penalty shall be incurred for such authorized use.” (46 U.S.C. 316(d))

“Nothing in this section shall be held or construed to prohibit or restrict any assistance to vessels or salvage operations authorized by Article II of the treaty between the United States and Great Britain ‘concerning reciprocal rights for United States and Canada in the conveyance of prisoners and wrecking and salvage’ signed at Washington, May 18, 1908 (35 Stat. 2036), or by the treaty between the United States and Mexico ‘to facilitate assistance to and salvage of vessels in territorial waters,’ signed at Mexico City, June 13, 1935 (49 Stat. 3359).” (46 U.S.C. 316(e))

(b) Upon receipt of such an application, the Commissioner of Customs will cause an investigation to be made immediately to determine whether a suitable vessel of the United States or a suitable numbered motorboat owned by a citizen is available for the operation. If he finds that no such vessel is available and that the facts otherwise warrant favorable action, he will grant the application.

(c) If the application is granted, the applicant shall make a full report of the operation as soon as possible to the director of the port nearest the place where the operation was conducted.

(d) A Canadian vessel may engage in salvage operations on any vessel in any territorial waters of the United States in which Canadian vessels are permitted to conduct such operations by article II of the treaty between the United States and Great Britain signed on May 18, 1908,134 or by section 725, title 46, United States Code.135 If any such vessel engages in a salvage operation in territorial waters of the United States, the owner or master of the vessel shall make a full report of the operation as soon as possible to the director of the port nearest the place where the operation was conducted.

134“The High Contracting Parties agree that vessels and wrecking appliances, either from the United States or from the Dominion of Canada, may salve any property wrecked and may render aid and assistance to any vessels wrecked, disabled or in distress in the waters or on the shores of the other country in that portion of the St. Lawrence River through which the International Boundary line extends, and, in Lake Ontario, Lake Erie, Lake St. Clair, Lake Huron, and Lake Superior, and in the Rivers Niagara, Detroit, St. Clair, and Ste. Marie, and the Canals at Sault Ste. Marie, and on the shores and in the waters of the other country along the Atlantic and Pacific Coasts within a distance of thirty miles from the International Boundary on such Coasts.

“It is further agreed that such reciprocal wrecking and salvage privileges shall include all necessary towing incident thereto, and that nothing in the Customs, Coasting or other laws or regulations of either country shall restrict in any manner the salving operations of such vessels or wrecking appliances.

“Vessels from either country employed in salving in the waters of the other shall, as soon as practicable afterwards, make full report at the nearest custom house of the country in whose waters such salving takes place.” (35 Stat. 2036)

135“Canadian vessels and wrecking appurtenance may render aid and assistance to Canadian or other vessels and property wrecked, disabled, or in distress in the waters of the United States contiguous to the Dominion of Canada.

“This section shall be construed to apply to the canal and improvement of the waters between Lake Erie and Lake Huron, and to the waters of the Saint Mary's River and Canal: *  *  *.” (46 U.S.C. 725)

The waters of Lake Michigan are not contiguous to the Dominion of Canada within the meaning of this statute.

(e) A Mexican vessel may engage in a salvage operation on a Mexican vessel in any territorial waters of the United States in which Mexican vessels are permitted to conduct such operations by the treaty between the United States and Mexico signed on June 13, 1935.136

136“The High Contracting Parties agree that vessels and rescue apparatus, public or private, of either country, may aid or assist vessels of their own nationality, including the passengers and crews thereof, which may be disabled or in distress on the shores or within the territorial waters of the other country within a radius of seven hundred and twenty nautical miles of the intersection of the International Boundary Line and the coast of the Pacific Ocean, or within a radius of two hundred nautical miles of the intersection of the International Boundary Line and the coast of the Gulf of Mexico.” (49 Stat. 3360)

[28 FR 14596, Dec. 31, 1963, as amended by T.D. 69-266, 34 FR 20423, Dec. 31, 1969]

§4.98   Navigation fees.

(a)(1) The Customs Service shall publish a General Notice in the Federal Register and Customs Bulletin periodically, setting forth a revised schedule of navigation fees for the following services:

Fee No. and description of services

1   Entry of vessel, including American, from foreign port:

(a) Less than 100 net tons.

(b) 100 net tons and over.

2   Clearance of vessel, including American, to foreign port:

(a) Less than 100 net tons.

(b) 100 net tons or over.

3   Issuing permit to foreign vessel to proceed from port to port, and receiving manifest.

4   Receiving manifest of foreign vessel on arrival from another port, and granting a permit to unlade.

5   Receiving post entry.

6 [Reserved]

7   Certifying payment of tonnage tax for foreign vessels only.

8   Furnishing copy of official document, including certified outward foreign manifest, and others not elsewhere enumerated.

The published revised fee schedule shall remain in effect until changed.

(2) The fees shall be calculated in accordance with §24.17(d) Customs Regulations (19 CFR 24.17(d)), and be based upon the amount of time the average service requires of a Customs officer in the fifth step of GS-9.

(3) The party requesting a vessel service described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section for which reimbursable overtime compensation is payable under 19 U.S.C. 267 or 19 U.S.C. 1451 and §24.16 of this chapter shall pay only the applicable overtime charge, and not both the overtime charge and the fee specified in the fee schedule.

(4) The revised fee schedule shall be made available to the public in Customs offices.

(5) The respective fees shall be designated in correspondence and reports by the applicable fee number.

(b) Fee 1 shall be collected at the first port of entry only. It shall not be collected from a vessel entering directly from a port in noncontiguous territory of the United States nor from one entering at a port on a northern, northeastern, or northwestern frontier otherwise than by sea.

(c) Fee 2 shall be collected at the final port of departure from the United States. It shall be collected from a yacht or public vessel which obtains a clearance, but shall not be collected from a vessel clearing directly for a port in noncontiguous territory of the United States nor from one clearing from a port on the northern, northeastern, or northwestern frontier otherwise than by sea. It shall be collected only upon the first clearance each year of a vessel making regular daily trips between a port of the United States and a port in Canada wholly upon interior waters not navigable to the ocean.

(d) Fee 3 shall be collected for granting a permit to a foreign vessel to proceed to another Customs port. It shall be collected from a foreign vessel clearing directly for a port in noncontiguous territory of the United States outside its Customs territory. This fee shall not be collected in the case of a foreign vessel proceeding on a voyage by sea from one port in the United States to another port via a foreign port. Only one fee shall be collected in case of simultaneous vessel transactions.

(e) Fee 4 shall be collected for receiving the manifest of a foreign vessel arriving from another Customs port. It shall be collected from a foreign vessel entering directly from a port in noncontiguous territory of the United States outside its Customs territory. This fee shall not be collected in the case of a foreign vessel which arrives at one port in the United States from another port on a voyage by sea via a foreign port. Only one fee shall be collected in the case of simultaneous vessel transactions.

(e-1) Fee 5 shall be collected from a foreign or American vessel at each port where the vessel is required to file a post entry in accordance with the provisions of §4.12(a)(3). An original post entry may be supplemented by additional post entries in instances where items were omitted from the original post entry. A separate fee shall be collected for each supplemental post entry made to the original post entry.

(f) [Reserved]

(g) Fee 7 shall be collected from foreign vessels only.

(h) Fee 8 shall be collected for each copy of any official document, whether certified or not, furnished to any person other than a Government officer.

(i) Private and commercial vessels, and passengers aboard commercial vessels, may be subject to the payment of fees for services provided in connection with their arrival as set forth in §24.22 of this chapter.

(j) The loading or unloading of merchandise or passengers from a commercial vessel at a U.S. port may cause the harbor maintenance fee set forth in §24.24 of this chapter to be assessed.

[T.D. 69-266, 34 FR 20423, Dec. 31, 1969, as amended by T.D. 74-194, 39 FR 26153, July 17, 1974; T.D. 80-25, 45 FR 3572, Jan. 18, 1980; T.D. 82-224, 47 FR 53727, Nov. 29, 1982; T.D. 84-149, 49 FR 28698, July 16, 1984; T.D. 86-109, 51 FR 21155, June 11, 1986; T.D. 87-44, 52 FR 10211, Mar. 30, 1987; T.D. 93-85, 58 FR 54282, Oct. 21, 1993]

§4.99   Forms; substitution.

(a) Customs Forms 1300, 1302, 1302-A, 1303, and 1304 printed by private parties or foreign governments shall be accepted provided the forms so printed:

(1) Conform to the official Customs forms in wording arrangement, style, size of type, and paper specifications;

(2) Conform to the official Customs forms in size, except that:

(i) Each form may be printed on metric A4 size paper, 210 by 297 millimeters (approximately 814 by 1123 inches).

(ii) The vertical format of Customs Forms 1300, 1302-A, 1303, and 1304 may be increased in size up to a maximum of 14 inches.

(iii) Customs Form 1302 may be reduced in size to not less than either 812 by 11 inches or 210 by 297 millimeters (metric A4 size). If Customs Form 1302 is reduced in size, the size of type used may be reduced proportionately.

(b) If instructions are printed on the reverse side of the official Customs form, the instructions may be omitted from the privately printed forms, but the instructions shall be followed.

(c) The port director, in his discretion, may accept a computer printout instead of Customs Form 1302 for use at a specific port. However, to ensure that computer printouts may be used at all ports, the private party or foreign government first must obtain specific approval from Headquarters, U.S. Customs Service.

(d) Forms which do not comply with the requirements of this section are not acceptable without the specific approval of the Commissioner of Customs.

[T.D. 79-255, 44 FR 57088, Oct. 4, 1979; T.D. 00-22, 65 FR 16517, Mar. 29, 2000]

§4.100   Licensing of vessels of less than 30 net tons.

(a) The application for a license to import merchandise in a vessel of less than 30 net tons in accordance with section 6, Anti-Smuggling Act of August 5, 1935, shall be addressed to the Secretary of the Treasury and delivered to the directors of the ports where foreign merchandise is to be imported in such vessel.

(b) The application shall contain the following information:

(1) Name of the vessel, rig, motive power, and home port.

(2) Name and address of the owner.

(3) Name and address of the master.

(4) Net tonnage of the vessel.

(5) Kind of merchandise to be imported.

(6) Country or countries of exportation.

(7) Ports of the United States where the merchandise will be imported.

(8) Whether the vessel will be used to transport and import merchandise from a hovering vessel.

(9) Kind of document under which the vessel is operating.

(c) If the port director finds that the applicant is a reputable person and that the revenue would not be jeopardized by the issuance of a license, he may issue the license for a period not to exceed 12 months, incorporating therein any special conditions he believes to be necessary or desirable, and deliver it to the licensee.

(d) The master or owner shall keep the license on board the vessel at all times and exhibit it upon demand of any duly authorized officer of the United States. This license is personal to the licensee and is not transferable.

(e) The Secretary of the Treasury or the port director at whose office the license was issued may revoke the license if any of its terms have been willfully or intentionally violated or for any other cause which may be considered prejudicial to the revenue or otherwise against the interest of the United States.

[T.D. 72-211, 37 FR 16486, Aug. 15, 1972]

§4.101   Prohibitions against Customs officers and employees.

No Customs officer or employee shall:

(a) Own, in whole or in part, any vessel except a yacht or other pleasure boat;

(b) Act as agent, attorney, or consignee for the owner or owners of any vessel, or of any cargo or lading on board the vessel; or

(c) Import or be concerned directly or indirectly in the importation of any merchandise for sale into the United States

[T.D. 78-394, 43 FR 49787, Oct. 25, 1978]

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