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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR data is current as of February 20, 2020

Title 50Chapter IISubchapter CPart 226 → §226.222


Title 50: Wildlife and Fisheries
PART 226—DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT


§226.222   Critical habitat for the southern Distinct Population Segment of eulachon (Thaleichthys pacificus).

Critical habitat is designated for the southern Distinct Population Segment of eulachon (southern DPS) as described in this section. The textual descriptions of critical habitat in this section are the definitive source for determining the critical habitat boundaries. The overview maps are provided for general guidance only and not as a definitive source for determining critical habitat boundaries. In freshwater areas, critical habitat includes the stream channel and a lateral extent as defined by the ordinary high-water line (33 CFR 329.11). In areas where the ordinary high-water line has not been defined, the lateral extent will be defined by the bankfull elevation. Bankfull elevation is the level at which water begins to leave the channel and move into the floodplain and is reached at a discharge which generally has a recurrence interval of 1 to 2 years on the annual flood series. In estuarine areas, critical habitat includes tidally influenced areas as defined by the elevation of mean higher high water.

(a) Critical habitat boundaries. Critical habitat is designated to include the following areas in California, Oregon, and Washington:

(1) Mad River, California. From the mouth of the Mad River (40°5737 N./124°736 W.) upstream to the confluence with the North Fork Mad River (40°5232 N./123°5930 W.).

(2) Redwood Creek, California. From the mouth of Redwood Creek (41°1735 N./124°530 W.) upstream to the confluence with Tom McDonald Creek (41°1225 N./124°039 W.).

(3) Klamath River, California. From the mouth of the Klamath River (41°3252 N./124°458 W.) upstream to the confluence with Omogar Creek (41°2913 N./123°5739 W.)

(4) Umpqua River, Oregon. From the mouth of the Umpqua River (43°407 N./124°136 W.) upstream to the confluence with Mill Creek (43°3920 N./123°5235 W.).

(5) Tenmile Creek, Oregon. From the mouth of Tenmile Creek (44°1334 N./124°645 W.) upstream to the Highway 101 bridge crossing (44°1327 N./124°635 W.).

(6) Sandy River, Oregon. From the confluence with the Columbia River upstream to the confluence with Gordon Creek (45°2945 N./122°1641 W.).

(7) Columbia River, Oregon and Washington. From the mouth of the Columbia River (46°1448 N./124°433 W.) upstream to Bonneville Dam (45°3840 N./121°5628 W.).

(8) Grays River, Washington. From the confluence with the Columbia River upstream to Covered Bridge Road (46°2118 N./123°3452 W.).

(9) Skamokawa Creek, Washington. From the confluence with the Columbia River upstream to Peterson Road Bridge (46°1852 N./123°2710 W.).

(10) Elochoman River, Washington. From the confluence with the Columbia River upstream to Monroe Road bridge crossing (46°1333 N./123°2134 W.).

(11) Cowlitz River, Washington. From the confluence with the Columbia River upstream to the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery barrier dam (46°3045 N./122°380 W.).

(12) Toutle River, Washington. From the confluence with the Cowlitz River upstream to Tower Road Bridge (46°204 N./122°5026 W.).

(13) Kalama River, Washington. From the confluence with the Columbia River upstream to the confluence with Indian Creek (46°222 N./122°467 W.).

(14) Lewis River, Washington. Lewis River mainstem, from the confluence with the Columbia River upstream to Merwin Dam (45°5724 N./122°3322 W.); East Fork of the Lewis River, from the confluence with the mainstem of the Lewis River upstream to the confluence with Mason Creek (45°5013 N./122°3837 W.).

(15) Quinault River, Washington. From the mouth of the Quinault River (47°2058 N./124°182 W.) upstream to 47°1958 N./124°151 W.

(16) Elwha River, Washington. From the mouth of the Elwha River (48°851 N./123°341 W.) upstream to Elwha Dam (48°542 N./123°3322 W.).

(b) Physical or biological features essential for conservation. The physical or biological features essential for conservation of the southern DPS of eulachon are:

(1) Freshwater spawning and incubation sites with water flow, quality and temperature conditions and substrate supporting spawning and incubation.

(2) Freshwater and estuarine migration corridors free of obstruction and with water flow, quality and temperature conditions supporting larval and adult mobility, and with abundant prey items supporting larval feeding after the yolk sac is depleted.

(3) Nearshore and offshore marine foraging habitat with water quality and available prey, supporting juveniles and adult survival.

(c) Indian lands. Critical habitat does not include any Indian lands of the following Federally-recognized Tribes in the States of California, Oregon, and Washington:

(1) Lower Elwha Tribe, Washington;

(2) Quinault Tribe, Washington;

(3) Yurok Tribe, California; and

(4) Resighini Rancheria, California.

(d) Maps of critical habitat for the southern DPS of eulachon follow:

eCFR graphic er20oc11.000.gif

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eCFR graphic er20oc11.001.gif

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[76 FR 65349, Oct. 20, 2011]

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