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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR data is current as of December 5, 2019

Title 46Chapter ISubchapter OPart 151Subpart 151.15 → §151.15-3


Title 46: Shipping
PART 151—BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES
Subpart 151.15—Tanks


§151.15-3   Construction.

This section lists the requirements for construction of the types of cargo tanks defined in §151.15-1.

(a) Gravity type tanks. Gravity type cargo tanks vented at a pressure of 4 pounds per square inch gauge or less shall be constructed and tested as required by standards established by the American Bureau of Shipping or other recognized classification society. Gravity type tanks vented at a pressure exceeding 4 but not exceeding 10 pounds per square inch gauge will be given special consideration by the Commandant.

(b) Pressure vessel type tanks. Pressure vessel type tanks shall be designed and tested in accordance with the requirements of Part 54 of this chapter.

(1) Uninsulated cargo tanks, where the cargo is transported, at or near ambient temperatures, shall be designed for a pressure not less than the vapor pressure of the cargo at 115 °F. The design shall also be based on the minimum internal pressure (maximum vacuum), plus the maximum external static head to which the tank may be subjected.

(2) When cargo tanks, in which the cargo is transported at or near ambient temperature, are insulated with an insulation material of a thickness to provide a thermal conductance of not more than 0.075 B.t.u. per square foot per degree Fahrenheit differential in temperature per hour, the tanks shall be designed for a pressure of not less than the vapor pressure of the cargo at 105 °F. The insulation shall also meet the requirements of paragraph (f) of this section.

(3) Cargo tanks in which the temperature is maintained below the normal atmospheric temperature by refrigeration or other acceptable means shall be designed for a pressure of not less than 110 percent of the vapor pressure corresponding to the temperature of the liquid at which the system is maintained, or the pressure corresponding to the greatest dynamic and static loads expected to be encountered in service. For mechanically stressed relieved cargo tanks, additional factors relating design pressure and maximum allowable pressure shall be as specified by the Commandant. The material of the tank shall meet the material requirements specified in part 54 of this chapter for the service temperature, and this temperature shall be permanently marked on the tank as prescribed in §54.10-20 of this chapter.

(4) The maximum allowable temperature of the cargo is defined as the boiling temperature of the liquid at a pressure equal to the setting of the relief valve.

(5) The service temperature is the minimum temperature of a product at which it may be contained, loaded and/or transported. However, the service temperature shall in no case be taken higher than given by the following formula.

tz=tw−0.25(tw−tB)

where:

tz = Service temperature.

tw = Boiling temperature of gas at normal working pressure of container but not higher than + 32 °F.

tB = Boiling temperature of gas at atmospheric pressure.

Under normal circumstances, only temperatures due to refrigerated service will be considered in determining the service temperature. Refrigerated service for purposes of this paragraph is defined as service where the temperature is controlled in the process rather than being caused by atmospheric conditions.

(6) Heat transmission studies, where required, shall assume the minimum ambient temperatures of 0 °F still air and 32 °F still water, and maximum ambient temperatures of 115 °F still air and 90 °F still water.

(7) Where applicable, the design of the cargo tanks shall investigate the thermal stresses induced in the tanks at the service temperature.

(8) Calculations showing the stress level in the tanks under dynamic loading conditions for ocean service barges (see §151.10-20(b)(4)) and grounding conditions for inland service barges (see §151.10-20-(b)(2)) shall be submitted to the Commandant for approval. These calculations shall take into account the local stresses due to the interaction between the barge hull and the tanks.

(c) High density cargo. Cargoes with a specific gravity greater than that for which the scantlings of the tank are designed may be carried provided that:

(1) The maximum cargo weight (tons) in a specific tank does not exceed the maximum cargo weight (tons) endorsed on the certificate of inspection.

(2) The scantlings of the tank are sufficient to prevent rupture under a full head of the higher density cargo. Scantlings meeting ordinary bulkhead requirements for the full head will satisfy this requirement.

(d) Arrangements—(1) Collision protection. (i) Tanks containing cargoes which are required to be carried in Type I hulls by Table 151.05 shall be located a minimum of 4 feet inboard from the side shell and box end of the vessel. Tanks containing cargoes which are required to be carried in Type II hulls by Table 151.05 shall be located a minimum of 3 feet inboard from the side shell and box end of the vessel.

(ii) All independent cargo tanks installed on Type I or Type II barge hulls shall be protected with suitable collision chocks or collision straps. A longitudinal collision load of one and one half times the combined weight of the tank and the cargo shall be assumed. All other independent cargo tanks shall be provided with suitable collision chocks or collision straps assuming a longitudinal collision load equal to the combined weight of the tank and the cargo. The design bearing stress shall not exceed 2 times the yield strength or 1.5 times the minimum ultimate strength, whichever is less.

(iii) Tanks containing cargoes, which are required to be carried in Type I or Type II hulls by Table 151.05, shall be located a minimum of 25 feet from the head log at the bow. Box barges and trail barges need not comply with this requirement.

(2) Inspection clearances. The distance between tanks or between a tank and the vessel's structure shall be such as to provide adequate access for inspection and maintenance of all tank surfaces and hull structure; but shall not normally be less than 15 inches except in way of web frames or similar major structural members where the minimum clearance shall be equal to the flange or faceplate width.

(3) Access openings. Each tank shall be provided with at least a 15 × 18 diameter manhole, fitted with a cover located above the maximum liquid level as close as possible to the top of the tank. Where access trunks are fitted to tanks, the diameter of the trunks shall be at least 30 inches.

(4) Low temperature protection. (i) When low temperature cargoes are to be carried in gravity type tanks at a temperature lower than that for which the hull steel is adequate, a secondary barrier designed to contain leaked cargo temporarily shall be provided. The design of the cargo containment system shall be such that under normal service conditions, or upon failure of the primary tank, the hull structure shall not be cooled down to a temperature which is unsafe for the materials involved. The secondary barrier and structural components of the hull which may be exposed to low temperatures shall meet the material requirements (i.e., chemistry and physical properties) specified in part 54 of this chapter for the service temperature involved. Heat transmission studies and tests may be required to demonstrate that the structural material temperatures in the hull are acceptable.

(ii) The design shall take into consideration the thermal stresses induced in the cargo tank at the service temperature during loading.

(iii) Where necessary, devices for spray loading or other methods of precooling or cooling during loading shall be included in the design.

(iv) Pressure-vessel type tanks shall be radiographed in accordance with the requirements of part 54 of this chapter. For gravity type tanks, all weld intersections or crossings in joints of primary tank shells shall be radiographed for a distance of 10 thicknesses from the intersection. All other welding in the primary tank and in the secondary barrier, shall be spot radiographed in accordance with the requirements specified in part 54 of this chapter for Class II-L pressure vessels.

(v) For nonpressure vessel type containment systems, access shall be arranged to permit inspection one side each of the primary tank and secondary barrier, under normal shipyard conditions. Containment systems which, because of their peculiar design, cannot be visually inspected to this degree, may be specially considered provided an equivalent degree of safety is attained.

(e) Installation of cargo tanks. (1) Cargo tanks shall be supported on foundations of steel or other suitable material and securely anchored in place to prevent the tanks from shifting when subjected to external forces. Each tank shall be supported so as to prevent the concentration of excessive loads on the supporting portions of the shell or head.

(2) Foundations, and stays where required, shall be designed for support and constraint of the weight of the full tank, and the dynamic loads imposed thereon. Thermal movement shall also be considered.

(3) Foundations and stays shall be suitable for the temperatures they will experience at design conditions.

(4) Cargo tanks may be installed “on deck,” “under deck,” or with the tanks protruding through the deck. All tanks shall be installed with the manhole openings located in the open above the weather deck. Provided an equivalent degree of safety is attained, the Commandant may approve cargo tanks installed with manhole openings located below the weather deck. Where a portion of the tank extends above the weather deck, provision shall be made to maintain the weathertightness of the deck, except that the weathertightness of the upper deck need not be maintained on:

(i) Vessels operating on restricted routes which are sufficiently protected; or,

(ii) Open hopper type barges of acceptable design.

(5) No welding shall be performed on tanks which require and have been stress relieved unless authorized by the Commandant.

(f) Materials. (1) Materials used in the construction of cargo tanks shall be suitable for the intended application and shall be in accordance with the applicable requirements of part 54 of this chapter. For cargoes carried at low temperatures, the tank supports and foundations, and portions of the hull which may be exposed to low temperature, shall also meet the applicable requirements of that part.

(2) When required, cargo tanks shall be lined with rubber or other material acceptable to the Commandant. The interior surfaces of the cargo tanks shall be made smooth, welds chipped or ground smooth, and the surfaces thoroughly cleaned before the lining is applied. The lining material shall be resistive to attack by the cargo, not less elastic than the metal of the tank proper, and nonporous when tested after application. It shall be of substantially uniform thickness. The lining shall be directly bonded to the tank plating, or attached by other satisfactory means acceptable to the Commandant.

(g) Insulation. (1) Insulation, when provided, shall be compatible with the cargo and the tank materials.

(2) Insulation in a location exposed to possible high temperature or source of ignition shall be one of the following:

(i) Incombustible, complying with the requirements of Subpart 164.009 of Part 164 of this chapter; or

(ii) Fire retardant, having a flame spread rating of 50 or less as determined by ASTM Specification E 84 (incorporated by reference, see §151.01-2) (Tunnel Test); or,

(iii) Nonburning or “self-extinguishing” as determined by ASTM Specification D 4986, “Horizontal Burning Characteristics of Cellular Polymeric Materials” (incorporated by reference, see §151.01-2) and covered by a steel jacket having a minimum thickness of 18 gauge (0.0428 inches) (U.S. Standard Gauge) or an equivalent means of protection acceptable to the Commandant.

(3) Insulation in a location protected against high temperature or source of ignition need satisfy no requirement for combustibility.

(4) Insulation shall be impervious to water vapor, or have a vapor-proof coating of a fire-retardant material acceptable to the Commandant. Unless the vapor barrier is inherently weather resistant, tanks exposed to the weather shall be fitted with a removable sheet metal jacket of not less than 18 gauge over the vapor-proof coating and flashed around all openings so as to be weathertight. Insulation which is not exposed to the weather when installed on tanks carrying cargoes above ambient temperatures need not be impervious to water vapor nor be covered with a vapor-proof coating.

(5) Insulation shall be adequately protected in areas of possible mechanical damage.

(h) Fire exposure protection. Tanks which are provided with fire exposure protection of one of the following categories may be allowed a reduction in the size of relief valves.

(1) Approved incombustible insulation meeting the requirements of subpart 164.007 of part 164 of this chapter which is secured to the tank with steel bands.

(2) Located in a hold or protected by a self-supporting steel jacket or cover (such as a hopper cover) of at least 10 gauge (0.1345) for insulation.

(i) Tanks not protected against fire exposure as described in this paragraph shall not be permitted a reduction in size of relief valves.

[CGFR 70-10, 35 FR 3714, Feb. 25, 1970, as amended by CGD 88-100, 54 FR 40040, Sept. 29, 1989; USCG-1999-5151, 64 FR 67183, Dec. 1, 1999; USCG-2000-7790, 65 FR 58463, Sept. 29, 2000]

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