Home
gpo.gov
govinfo.gov

e-CFR Navigation Aids

Browse

Simple Search

Advanced Search

 — Boolean

 — Proximity

 

Search History

Search Tips

Corrections

Latest Updates

User Info

FAQs

Agency List

Incorporation By Reference

eCFR logo

Related Resources

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

We invite you to try out our new beta eCFR site at https://ecfr.federalregister.gov. We have made big changes to make the eCFR easier to use. Be sure to leave feedback using the Help button on the bottom right of each page!

e-CFR data is current as of October 23, 2020

Title 24Subtitle APart 93Subpart G → §93.301


Title 24: Housing and Urban Development
PART 93—HOUSING TRUST FUND
Subpart G—Project Requirements


§93.301   Property standards.

(a) New construction projects. (1) State and local codes, ordinances, and zoning requirements. Housing that is newly constructed with HTF funds must meet all applicable State and local codes, ordinances, and zoning requirements. HTF-assisted new construction projects must meet State or local residential and building codes, as applicable or, in the absence of a State or local building code, the International Residential Code or International Building Code (as applicable to the type of housing) of the International Code Council. The housing must meet the applicable requirements upon project completion.

(2) HUD requirements. All new construction projects must also meet the requirements described in this paragraph:

(i) Accessibility. The housing must meet the accessibility requirements of 24 CFR part 8, which implements section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794), and Titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (42 U.S.C. 12131-12189) implemented at 28 CFR parts 35 and 36, as applicable. “Covered multifamily dwellings,” as defined at 24 CFR 100.201, must also meet the design and construction requirements at 24 CFR 100.205, which implements the Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 3601-3619).

(ii) Energy efficiency. The housing must meet the energy efficiency standards established pursuant to section 109 of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 12709).

(iii) Disaster mitigation. Where relevant, the housing must be constructed to mitigate the impact of potential disasters (e.g., earthquakes, hurricanes, flooding, and wildfires), in accordance with State and local codes, ordinances, or other State and local requirements, or such other requirements as HUD may establish.

(iv) Written cost estimates, construction contracts, and construction documents. The grantee must ensure the construction contract(s) and construction documents describe the work to be undertaken in adequate detail so that inspections can be conducted. The grantee must review and approve written cost estimates for construction and determine that costs are reasonable.

(v) Construction progress inspections. The grantee must conduct progress and final inspections of construction to ensure that work is done in accordance with the applicable codes, the construction contract, and construction documents.

(vi) Broadband infrastructure. For new commitments made after January 19, 2017 for a new construction housing project of a building with more than 4 rental units, the construction must include installation of broadband infrastructure, as this term is defined in 24 CFR 5.100, except where the grantee determines and, in accordance with §93.407(a)(2)(iv), documents the determination that:

(A) The location of the new construction makes installation of broadband infrastructure infeasible; or

(B) The cost of installing broadband infrastructure would result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of its program or activity or in an undue financial burden.

(b) Rehabilitation projects. All rehabilitation that is performed using HTF funds must meet the requirements of this paragraph (b).

(1) Rehabilitation standards. The grantee must establish rehabilitation standards for all HTF-assisted housing rehabilitation activities that set forth the requirements that the housing must meet upon project completion. The grantee's description of its standards must be in sufficient detail to determine the required rehabilitation work including methods and materials. The standards may refer to applicable codes or they may establish requirements that exceed the minimum requirements of the codes. The rehabilitation standards must address each of the following:

(i) Health and safety. The grantee's standards must identify life-threatening deficiencies that must be addressed immediately if the housing is occupied.

(ii) Major systems. Major systems are: structural support; roofing; cladding and weatherproofing (e.g., windows, doors, siding, gutters); plumbing; electrical; and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. For rental housing, the grantee's standards must require the grantee to estimate (based on age and condition) the remaining useful life of these systems, upon project completion of each major system. For multifamily housing projects of 26 units or more, the grantee's standards must require the grantee to determine the useful life of major systems through a capital needs assessment of the project. For rental housing, if the remaining useful life of one or more major system is less than the applicable period of affordability, the grantee's standards must require the grantee to ensure that a replacement reserve is established and monthly payments are made to the reserve that are adequate to repair or replace the systems as needed. For homeownership housing, the grantee's standards must require, upon project completion, each of the major systems to have a remaining useful life for a minimum of 5 years or for such longer period specified by grantee, or the major systems must be rehabilitated or replaced as part of the rehabilitation work.

(iii) Lead-based paint. The grantee's standards must require the housing to meet the lead-based paint requirements at 24 CFR part 35.

(iv) Accessibility. The grantee's standards must require the housing to meet the accessibility requirements in 24 CFR part 8, which implements section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794), and Titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (42 U.S.C. 12131-12189) implemented at 28 CFR parts 35 and 36, as applicable. “Covered multifamily dwellings,” as defined at 24 CFR 100.201, must also meet the design and construction requirements at 24 CFR 100.205, which implements the Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 3601-3619). Rehabilitation may include improvements that are not required by regulation or statute that permit use by a person with disabilities.

(v) [Reserved].

(vi) Disaster mitigation. Where relevant, the grantee's standards must require the housing to be improved to mitigate the impact of potential disasters (e.g., earthquake, hurricanes, flooding, and wildfires) in accordance with State and local codes, ordinances, and requirements, or such other requirements as HUD may establish.

(vii) State and local codes, ordinances, and zoning requirements. The grantee's standards must require the housing to meet all applicable State and local codes, ordinances, and requirements or, in the absence of a State or local building code, the International Existing Building Code of the International Code Council.

(viii) Uniform Physical Condition Standards. The standards of the grantee must be such that, upon completion, the HTF-assisted project and units will be decent, safe, sanitary, and in good repair as described in 24 CFR 5.703. HUD will establish the minimum deficiencies that must be corrected under the grantee's rehabilitation standards based on inspectable items and inspected areas from HUD-prescribed physical inspection procedures (Uniform Physical Conditions Standards) pursuant to 24 CFR 5.705.

(ix) Capital Needs Assessments. For multifamily rental housing projects of 26 or more total units, the grantee must determine all work that will be performed in the rehabilitation of the housing and the long-term physical needs of the project through a capital needs assessment of the project.

(x) Broadband infrastructure. For new commitments made after January 19, 2017 for a substantial rehabilitation project of a building with more than 4 rental units, any substantial rehabilitation, as defined in 24 CFR 5.100, must provide for installation of broadband infrastructure, as this term is also defined in 24 CFR 5.100, except where the grantee determines and, in accordance with §93.407(a)(2)(iv), documents the determination that:

(A) The location of the substantial rehabilitation makes installation of broadband infrastructure infeasible;

(B) The cost of installing broadband infrastructure would result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of its program or activity or in an undue financial burden; or

(C) The structure of the housing to be substantially rehabilitated makes installation of broadband infrastructure infeasible.

(2) Construction documents and cost estimates. The grantee must ensure that the work to be undertaken will meet the grantee's rehabilitation standards. The construction documents (i.e., written scope of work to be performed) must be in sufficient detail to establish the basis for a uniform inspection of the housing to determine compliance with the grantee's standards. The grantee must review and approve a written cost estimate for rehabilitation after determining that costs are reasonable.

(3) Frequency of inspections. The grantee must conduct an initial property inspection to identify the deficiencies that must be addressed. The grantee must conduct progress and final inspections to determine that work was done in accordance with work write-ups.

(c) Acquisition of standard housing. (1) Existing housing that is acquired with HTF assistance for rental housing, and that was newly constructed or rehabilitated less than 12 months before the date of commitment of HTF funds, must meet the property standards of paragraph (a) or paragraph (b) of this section, as applicable, for new construction and rehabilitation projects. The grantee must document this compliance based upon a review of approved building plans and Certificates of Occupancy, and an inspection that is conducted no earlier than 90 calendar days before the date of commitment of HTF assistance.

(2) All other existing housing that is acquired with HTF assistance for rental housing must meet the rehabilitation property standards requirements of paragraph (b) of this section. The grantee must document this compliance based upon an inspection that is conducted no earlier than 90 calendar days before the date of commitment of HTF assistance. If the property does not meet these standards, HTF funds cannot be used to acquire the property unless it is rehabilitated to meet the standards of paragraph (b) of this section.

(3) Existing housing that is acquired for homeownership (e.g., downpayment assistance) must be decent, safe, sanitary, and in good repair. The grantee must establish standards to determine that the housing is decent, safe, sanitary, and in good repair. At minimum, the standards must provide that the housing meets all applicable State and local standards and code requirements and the housing does not contain the specific deficiencies proscribed by HUD based on the applicable inspectable items and inspected areas in HUD-prescribed physical inspection procedures (Uniform Physical Condition Standards) issued pursuant to 24 CFR 5.705. The grantee must inspect the housing and document this compliance based upon an inspection that is conducted no earlier than 90 calendar days before the date of commitment of HTF assistance. If the housing does not meet these standards, the housing must be rehabilitated to meet the standards of this paragraph (c)(3) or it cannot be assisted with HTF funds.

(d) Manufactured housing. Construction of all manufactured housing (including manufactured housing that replaces an existing substandard unit under the definition of “reconstruction”) must meet the Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards codified at 24 CFR part 3280. These standards preempt State and local codes which are not identical to the Federal standards for the new construction of manufactured housing. The grantees providing HTF funds to assist manufactured housing units must comply with applicable State and local laws or codes. In the absence of such laws or codes, the installation must comply with the manufacturer's written instructions for installation of manufactured housing units. All new manufactured housing and all manufactured housing that replaces an existing substandard unit under the definition of “reconstruction” must be on a permanent foundation that meets the requirements for foundation systems as set forth in 24 CFR 203.43f(c)(i). All new manufactured housing (and all manufactured housing that replaces an existing substandard unit under the definition of “reconstruction”) must, at the time of project completion, be connected to permanent utility hook-ups and be located on land that is owned by the manufactured housing unit owner or land for which the manufactured housing owner has a lease for a period at least equal to the applicable period of affordability. In HTF-funded rehabilitation of existing manufactured housing the foundation and anchoring must meet all applicable State and local codes, ordinances, and requirements or in the absence of local or State codes, the Model Manufactured Home Installation Standards at 24 CFR part 3285. Manufactured housing that is rehabilitated using HTF funds must meet the property standards requirements in paragraph (b) of this section, as applicable. The grantee must document this compliance in accordance with inspection procedures that the grantee has established pursuant to §92.301, as applicable.

(e) Ongoing property condition standards: Rental housing—(1) Ongoing property standards. The grantee must establish property standards for rental housing (including manufactured housing) that apply throughout the affordability period. The standards must ensure that owners maintain the housing as decent, safe, and sanitary housing in good repair. The grantee's description of its property standards must be in sufficient detail to establish the basis for a uniform inspection of HTF rental projects. The grantee's ongoing property standards must address each of the following:

(i) At a minimum, the grantee's ongoing property standards must include all inspectable items and inspectable areas specified by HUD based on the HUD physical inspection procedures (Uniform Physical Condition Standards (UPCS)) prescribed by HUD pursuant to 24 CFR 5.705.

(ii) Health and safety. The grantee's standards must require the housing to be free of all health and safety defects. The standards must identify life-threatening deficiencies that the owner must immediately correct and the time frames for addressing these deficiencies.

(iii) Lead-based paint. The grantee's standards must require the housing to meet the lead-based paint requirements in 24 CFR part 35.

(2) Inspections. The grantee must undertake ongoing property inspections, in accordance with §93.404.

(3) Corrective and remedial actions. The grantee must have procedures for ensuring that timely corrective and remedial actions are taken by the project owner to address identified deficiencies.

(4) Inspection procedures. The grantee must establish written inspection procedures. The procedures must include detailed inspection checklists, description of how and by whom inspections will be carried out, and procedures for training and certifying qualified inspectors. The procedures must also describe how frequently the property will be inspected, consistent with section §93.404(d).

(f) Environmental provisions—(1) New construction projects environmental requirements—(i) Historic preservation—(A) Standards. The project activities (including demolition) must not be performed on properties that are either listed in or determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places, unless the project activities meet the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, either as certified through the Federal and/or State historic rehabilitation tax credit programs or as verified by someone that meets the relevant Secretary of the Interior's Professional Qualification Standards;

(B) Archaeological resources. If archaeological resources or human remains are discovered on the project site during construction, the grantee must consult with affected tribes and/or descendant communities and comply with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (25 U.S.C. 3001-3013), State law and/or local ordinance (e.g., State unmarked burial law).

(ii) Farmland. Project activities must not result in the conversion of unique, prime, or statewide or locally significant agricultural properties to urban uses.

(iii) Airport zones. Projects are not permitted within the runway protection zones of civilian airports, or the clear zones or accident potential zones of military airfields.

(iv) Coastal Barrier Resource System. No projects may be assisted in Coastal Barrier Resource System (CBRS) units. CBRS units are mapped and available from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

(v) Coastal zone management. Development must be consistent with the appropriate State coastal zone management plan. Plans are available from the local coastal zone management agency.

(vi) Floodplains. Except as modified below, definitions for terms used below can be found at 24 CFR part 55.

(A) Construction and other activities in the 100-year floodplain are to be avoided when practicable. If there are no practicable alternatives to new construction or substantial improvement in the 100-year floodplain, the structure must be elevated at least the base flood elevation (BFE) or floodproofed to one foot above the BFE. Elevated and floodproofed buildings must adhere to National Flood Insurance Program standards. The primary sources of floodplain data are Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs). When FEMA provides interim flood hazard data, such as Advisory Base Flood Elevations (ABFE) or preliminary maps or studies, the latest of these sources shall be used.

(B) No HTF assistance may be approved with respect to:

(1) Any action, other than a functionally dependent use, located in a floodway;

(2) Any new construction critical action located in a coastal high hazard area, 100- or 500-year floodplain; or

(3) Any non-critical new construction action in a coastal high hazard area, unless the action is reconstruction following destruction caused by a disaster and is designed for location in a coastal high hazard area consistent with the FEMA National Flood Insurance Program requirements for V-Zones.

(vii) Wetlands. (A) No draining, dredging, channelizing, filling, diking, impounding, or related grading activities are to be performed in wetlands. No activities, structures, or facilities funded under this program are to adversely impact a wetland.

(B) A wetland means those areas that are inundated by surface or ground water with a frequency sufficient to support, and under normal circumstances, does or would support a prevalence of vegetative or aquatic life that requires saturated or seasonally saturated soil conditions for growth and reproduction. Wetlands generally include swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas such as sloughs, potholes, wet meadows, river overflows, mud flats, and natural ponds. This definition includes those wetland areas separated from their natural supply of water as a result of activities, such as the construction of structural flood protection methods or solid-fill road beds, or mineral extraction and navigation improvements. This definition is independent of the definition of jurisdictional wetland used by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers under section 404 of the Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.).

(viii) Explosives and hazards. Projects must be in compliance with the standards for acceptable separation distance, as set forth at 24 CFR part 51, subpart C.

(ix) Contamination. All properties assisted with HTF funds must be free of hazardous materials, contamination, toxic chemicals and gases, and radioactive substances, where a hazard could affect the health and safety of occupants or conflict with the intended use of the property.

(A) All proposed multifamily (more than four housing units) HTF projects require a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA-ASTM). If the Phase I ESA identifies recognized environmental concerns (RECs), a Phase II (ESA-ASTM) will be required. ASTM reports shall be prepared in accordance with the most current ASTM standard. Single family housing does not require a Phase I ESA.

(B) HTF projects must avoid sites located within 0.25 miles of a Superfund or CERCLIS (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Information System) site or other contaminated site reported to Federal, State, or local authorities without a statement in writing from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or the appropriate State agency that there is no hazard that could affect the health and safety of the occupants or conflict with the intended use of the property.

(x) Noise. (A) Internal noise levels: All activities will be developed to ensure an interior noise level of no more than 45 decibels (dB).

(B) External noise levels:

(1) Project sites exposed to less than or equal to 65 dB of environmental noise are acceptable.

(2) Sites between 65 dB and less than 75 dB are acceptable with mitigation (e.g., noise walls, careful site planning) that result in an interior standard of 45 dB.

(3) Locations with environmental noise levels of 75 dB or greater may not have noise sensitive outdoor uses (e.g., picnic areas, tot lots, balconies, or patios) and require sound attenuation in the building shell to achieve the 45 dB interior standard.

(xi) Endangered species. The grantee must avoid all actions which could jeopardize the continued existence of any endangered or threatened species, as designated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service or National Marine Fisheries Service, or would result in the destruction or adversely modify the designated critical habitat of such species.

(xii) Wild and scenic rivers. The grantee must avoid activities that are inconsistent with conservation easements, land-use protections, and restrictions adjacent to wild and scenic rivers, as designated/listed by the Departments of Agriculture or Interior. Maps for the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System are available at the governing departments.

(xiii) Safe drinking water. Projects with a potable water system must use only lead-free pipes, solder, and flux.

(xiv) Sole-source aquifers. Project activities should avoid sites and activities that have the potential to contaminate sole source aquifer areas (SSAs). EPA defines a sole or principal source aquifer as an aquifer that supplies at least 50 percent of the drinking water consumed in the area overlying the aquifer. If the project overlies an SSA, EPA must review the project. EPA review is designed to reduce the risk of ground water contamination that could pose a health hazard to those who use it.

(2) Rehabilitation projects environmental requirements—(i) Historic preservation. (A) The project activities (including demolition) must not be performed on properties that are either listed in or determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places, unless the project activities meet the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, either as certified through the Federal and/or State historic rehabilitation tax credit programs or as verified by someone that meets the relevant Secretary of the Interior's Professional Qualification Standards;

(B) Archaeological resources. If archaeological resources or human remains are discovered on the project site during construction or rehabilitation, the grantee must consult with affected tribes and/or descendant communities and comply with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (25 U.S.C. 3001-3013), State law, and/or local ordinance (e.g., State unmarked burial law).

(ii) Farmland. Project activities must not result in the conversion of unique, prime, or locally significant agricultural properties to urban uses.

(iii) Airport zones. Projects are not permitted within the runway protection zones of civilian airports, or the clear zones or accident potential zones of military airfields.

(iv) Coastal Barrier Resource System. No projects may be assisted in Coastal Barrier Resource System (CBRS) units. CBRS units are mapped and available from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

(v) Coastal zone management. Development must be consistent with the appropriate State coastal zone management plan. Plans are available from the local coastal zone management agency.

(vi) Floodplains. Except as modified below, definitions for terms used below can be found at 24 CFR part 55.

(A) Construction and other activities in the 100-year floodplain are to be avoided when practicable. If there are no practicable alternatives to new construction or substantial improvement in the 100-year floodplain, the structure must be elevated at least to the base flood elevation (BFE) or floodproofed to one foot above the BFE. Elevated and floodproofed buildings must adhere to National Flood Insurance Program standards. The primary sources of floodplain data are Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMS). When FEMA provides interim flood hazard data, such as Advisory Base Flood Elevations (ABFE) or preliminary maps or studies, the latest of these sources shall be used.

(B) No HTF assistance may be approved with respect to:

(1) Any action, other than functionally dependent uses, located in a floodway;

(2) Any critical action located in a coastal high hazard area, 100- or 500-year floodplain; or

(3) Any non-critical action located in a coastal high hazard area, unless the action is designed for location in a coastal high hazard area consistent with the FEMA National Flood Insurance Program requirements for V-Zones. “Any non-critical action in a coastal high hazard area, unless the action is reconstruction following destruction caused by a disaster and is designed for location in a coastal high hazard area consistent with the FEMA National Flood Insurance Program requirements for V-Zones.”

(vii) Wetlands. No rehabilitation of existing properties that expands the footprint into a wetland is allowed. A wetland means those areas that are inundated by surface or ground water with a frequency sufficient to support, and under normal circumstances, does or would support a prevalence of vegetative or aquatic life that requires saturated or seasonally saturated soil conditions for growth and reproduction. Wetlands generally include swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas such as sloughs, potholes, wet meadows, river overflows, mud flats, and natural ponds. This definition includes those wetland areas separated from their natural supply of water as a result of activities such as the construction of structural flood protection methods or solid-fill road beds and activities such as mineral extraction and navigation improvements. This definition is independent of the definition of jurisdictional wetland used by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers under section 404 of the Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.).

(viii) Explosives and hazards. If the rehabilitation of the building increases the number of dwelling units, then the project must be in compliance with the standards for acceptable separation distance as set forth at 24 CFR part 51, subpart C.

(ix) Contamination. All properties assisted with HTF funds must be free of hazardous materials, contamination, toxic chemicals and gases, and radioactive substances, where a hazard could affect the health and safety of occupants or conflict with the intended use of the property:

(A) All proposed multifamily (more than four housing units) HTF project activities require a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA—ASTM). If the Phase I ESA identifies recognized environmental concerns (RECs), a Phase II (ESA-ASTM) will be required. ASTM reports shall be prepared in accordance with the most current ASTM standard. Single family housing does not require a Phase I ESA.

(B) HTF projects must avoid sites located within 0.25 miles of a Superfund or CERCLIS (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Information System) site or other contaminated site reported to Federal, State, or local authorities without a statement in writing from EPA or the appropriate State agency that there is no hazard that could affect the health and safety of the occupants or conflict with the intended utilization of the property.

(x) Noise—(A) Internal noise levels. All activities will be developed to ensure an interior noise level of no more than45 decibels (dB).

(B) [Reserved].

(xi) Endangered species. (A) The grantee must avoid all actions that could jeopardize the continued existence of any species designated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service or National Marine Fisheries Service as endangered or threatened.

(B) The grantee must avoid all actions that adversely modify the critical habitat of such species.

(xii) Wild and scenic rivers. The grantee must avoid activities that are inconsistent with conservation easements, land-use protections, and restrictions adjacent to wild and scenic rivers, as designated/listed by the Departments of Agriculture and Interior. Maps for the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System are available at the governing departments.

(xiii) Safe drinking water. Projects with a potable water system must use only lead-free pipes, solder, and flux.

(xiv) Sole-source aquifers. Project activities should avoid sites and activities that have the potential to contaminate sole source aquifer areas (SSAs). The EPA defines a sole or principal source aquifer as an aquifer that supplies at least 50 percent of the drinking water consumed in the area overlying the aquifer. If the project overlies an SSA, the EPA must review the project. The EPA review is designed to reduce the risk of ground water contamination, which could pose a health hazard to those who use it.

(3) Acquisition projects environmental requirements. (i)(A) Existing housing that is acquired with HTF funds, and has been newly constructed or rehabilitated less than 12 months before the commitment of HTF funds must meet the property standards at paragraph (f)(1) of this section.

(B) All other existing housing that is acquired with HTF assistance must meet the property standards requirements of paragraph (f)(2) of this section.

(ii) If under paragraph (f)(3)(i)(A) or paragraph (B) of this section, the property does not meet these standards, with the exception of the noise standards in paragraph (f)(2) of this section, HTF funds cannot be used to acquire the property.

(4) Manufactured housing environmental requirements. Manufactured housing is subject to the environmental standards in paragraph (f)(1) of this section for new construction or paragraph (f)(2) of this section for rehabilitation, as applicable. If an existing property does not meet these standards, HTF funds cannot be used to acquire the property unless it is rehabilitated to meet the standards in paragraph (f)(2), as applicable, with the exception of noise standards in paragraph (f)(2)(x).

[80 FR 5220, Jan. 30, 2015, as amended at 81 FR 92636, Dec. 20, 2016]

Need assistance?