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e-CFR data is current as of September 17, 2020

Title 19Chapter IPart 102Subpart B → §102.22


Title 19: Customs Duties
PART 102—RULES OF ORIGIN
Subpart B—Rules of Origin


§102.22   Rules of origin for textile and apparel products of Israel.

(a) Applicability. The provisions of this section will control for purposes of determining whether a textile or apparel product, as defined in §102.21(b)(5), is considered a product of Israel for purposes of the customs laws and the administration of quantitative limitations. A textile or apparel product will be a product of Israel if it is wholly the growth, product, or manufacture of Israel. However, a textile or apparel product that consists of materials produced or derived from, or processed in, another country, or insular possession of the United States, in addition to Israel, will be a product of Israel if it last underwent a substantial transformation in Israel. A textile or apparel product will be considered to have undergone a substantial transformation if it has been transformed by means of substantial manufacturing or processing operations into a new and different article of commerce.

(b) Criteria for determining country of origin for products of Israel. The criteria in paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section will be considered in determining whether an imported textile or apparel product is a product of Israel. These criteria are not exhaustive. One or any combination of criteria may be determinative, and additional factors may be considered.

(1) A new and different article of commerce will usually result from a manufacturing or processing operation if there is a change in:

(i) Commercial designation or identity;

(ii) Fundamental character; or

(iii) Commercial use.

(2) In determining whether merchandise has been subjected to substantial manufacturing or processing operations, the following will be considered:

(i) The physical change in the material or article as a result of the manufacturing or processing operations in Israel or in Israel and a foreign territory or country or insular possession of the U.S.;

(ii) The time involved in the manufacturing or processing operations in Israel or in Israel and a foreign territory or country or insular possession of the U.S.;

(iii) The complexity of the manufacturing or processing operations in Israel or in Israel and a foreign territory or country or insular possession of the U.S.;

(iv) The level or degree of skill and/or technology required in the manufacturing or processing operations in Israel or in Israel and a foreign territory or country or insular possession of the U.S.; and

(v) The value added to the article or material in Israel or in Israel and a foreign territory or country or insular possession of the U.S., compared to its value when imported into the U.S.

(c) Manufacturing or processing operations. (1) An article or material usually will be a product of Israel when it has undergone in Israel prior to importation into the United States any of the following:

(i) Dyeing of fabric and printing when accompanied by two or more of the following finishing operations: bleaching, shrinking, fulling, napping, decating, permanent stiffening, weighting, permanent embossing, or moireing;

(ii) Spinning fibers into yarn;

(iii) Weaving, knitting or otherwise forming fabric;

(iv) Cutting of fabric into parts and the assembly of those parts into the completed article; or

(v) Substantial assembly by sewing and/or tailoring of all cut pieces of apparel articles which have been cut from fabric in another foreign territory or country, or insular possession of the U.S., into a completed garment (e.g., the complete assembly and tailoring of all cut pieces of suit-type jackets, suits, and shirts).

(2) An article or material usually will not be considered to be a product of Israel by virtue of merely having undergone any of the following:

(i) Simple combining operations, labeling, pressing, cleaning or dry cleaning, or packaging operations, or any combination thereof;

(ii) Cutting to length or width and hemming or overlocking fabrics which are readily identifiable as being intended for a particular commercial use;

(iii) Trimming and/or joining together by sewing, looping, linking, or other means of attaching otherwise completed knit-to-shape component parts produced in a single country, even when accompanied by other processes (e.g., washing, drying, and mending) normally incident to the assembly process;

(iv) One or more finishing operations on yarns, fabrics, or other textile articles, such as showerproofing, superwashing, bleaching, decating, fulling, shrinking, mercerizing, or similar operations; or

(v) Dyeing and/or printing of fabrics or yarns.

(d) Results of origin determination. If Israel is determined to be the country of origin of a textile or apparel product by application of the provisions in paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) of this section, the inquiry into the origin of the product ends. However, if Israel is determined not to be the country of origin of a textile or apparel product by application of the provisions in paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) of this section, the country of origin of the product will be determined under the rules of origin set forth in §102.21, although the application of those rules cannot result in Israel being the country of origin of the product.

[CBP Dec. 05-32, 70 FR 58013, Oct. 5, 2005]

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