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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR data is current as of December 5, 2019

Title 9Chapter ISubchapter D → Part 93


Title 9: Animals and Animal Products


PART 93—IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS


Contents

Subpart A—Birds

§93.100   Definitions.
§93.101   General prohibitions; exceptions.
§93.102   Ports designated for the importation of birds.
§93.103   Import permits for birds; and reservation fees for space at quarantine facilities maintained by APHIS.
§93.104   Certificate for pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds.
§93.105   Inspection at the port of entry.
§93.106   Quarantine requirements.

Canada

§93.107   Special provisions.

Subpart B—Poultry

§93.200   Definitions.
§93.201   General prohibitions; exceptions.
§93.202   Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon; unloading, cleaning, and disinfection requirements.
§93.203   Ports designated for the importation of poultry.
§93.204   Import permits for poultry and for poultry test specimens for diagnostic purposes; and reservation fees for space at quarantine facilities maintained by APHIS.
§93.205   Certificate for live poultry and hatching eggs.
§93.206   Declaration and other documents for poultry.
§93.207   Inspection at the port of entry.
§93.208   Articles accompanying poultry.
§93.209   Quarantine requirements.
§93.210   Poultry quarantine facilities.
§93.211   Quarantine stations, visiting restricted; sales prohibited.
§93.212   Manure from quarantined poultry.
§93.213   Appearance of disease among poultry in quarantine.

Canada

§93.214   Import permit and declaration for poultry.
§93.215   Special provisions.
§93.216   Poultry from Canada.

Central America and the West Indies

§93.217   Import permit and declaration for poultry.

Mexico

§93.218   Import permits and applications for inspection for poultry.
§93.219   Declaration for poultry.
§93.220   Inspection at port of entry.

Subpart C—Horses

§93.300   Definitions.
§93.301   General prohibitions; exceptions.
§93.302   Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon; unloading, cleaning, and disinfection requirements.
§93.303   Ports designated for the importation of horses.
§93.304   Import permits for horses from regions affected with CEM and for horse specimens for diagnostic purposes; reservation fees for space at quarantine facilities maintained by APHIS.
§93.305   Declaration and other documents for horses.
§93.306   Inspection at the port of entry.
§93.307   Articles accompanying horses.
§93.308   Quarantine requirements.
§93.309   Horse quarantine facilities; payment information.
§93.310   Quarantine stations, visiting restricted; sales prohibited.
§93.311   Milk from quarantined horses.
§93.312   Manure from quarantined horses.
§93.313   Appearance of disease among horses in quarantine.
§93.314   Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment.

Canada

§93.315   Import permit and declaration for horses.
§93.316   Horses from Canada for immediate slaughter.
§93.317   Horses from Canada.
§93.318   Special provisions.

Central America and the West Indies

§93.319   Import permit and declaration for horses.
§93.320   Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

Mexico

§93.321   Import permits and applications for inspection for horses.
§93.322   Declaration for horses.
§93.323   Inspection.
§93.324   Detention for quarantine.
§93.325   Horses from Mexico.
§93.326   Horses for immediate slaughter.

Subpart D—Ruminants

§93.400   Definitions.
§93.401   General prohibitions; exceptions.
§93.402   Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon; unloading, cleaning, and disinfection requirements.
§93.403   Ports designated for the importation of ruminants.
§93.404   Import permits for ruminants and for ruminant test specimens for diagnostic purposes; and reservation fees for space at quarantine facilities maintained by APHIS.
§93.405   Health certificate for ruminants.
§93.406   Diagnostic tests.
§93.407   Declaration and other documents for ruminants.
§93.408   Inspection at the port of entry.
§93.409   Articles accompanying ruminants.
§93.410   Movement from conveyances to quarantine station.
§93.411   Quarantine requirements.
§93.412   Ruminant quarantine facilities.
§93.413   Quarantine stations, visiting restricted; sales prohibited.
§93.414   Milk from quarantined ruminants.
§93.415   Manure from quarantined ruminants.
§93.416   Appearance of disease among ruminants in quarantine.

Canada

§93.417   Import permit and declaration for ruminants.
§93.418   Cattle and other bovines from Canada.
§93.419   Sheep and goats from Canada.
§93.420   Ruminants from Canada for immediate slaughter other than sheep and goats.
§93.421   Special provisions.

Central America and West Indies

§93.422   Import permit and declaration for ruminants.
§93.423   Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

Mexico

§93.424   Import permits and applications for inspection of ruminants.
§93.425   Declaration for ruminants.
§93.426   Inspection at port of entry.
§93.427   Cattle and other bovines from Mexico.
§93.428   Sheep and goats and wild ruminants from Mexico.
§93.429   Ruminants for immediate slaughter.

Additional General Provisions

§§93.430-93.431   [Reserved]
§93.432   Cattle and other bovines from the Republic of Ireland.
§§93.433-93.434   [Reserved]
§93.435   Sheep and goats.
§93.436   Bovines from regions of negligible risk, controlled risk, and undetermined risk for BSE.

Subpart E—Swine

§93.500   Definitions.
§93.501   General prohibitions; exceptions.
§93.502   Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon; unloading, cleaning, and disinfection requirements.
§93.503   Ports designated for the importation of swine.
§93.504   Import permits for swine and for swine specimens for diagnostic purposes; and reservation fees for space at quarantine facilities maintained by APHIS.
§93.505   Certificate for swine.
§93.506   Declaration and other documents for swine.
§93.507   Inspection at the port of entry.
§93.508   Articles accompanying swine.
§93.509   Movement from conveyances to quarantine station.
§93.510   Quarantine requirements.
§93.511   Swine quarantine facilities.
§93.512   Quarantine stations, visiting restricted; sales prohibited.
§93.513   Milk from quarantined swine.
§93.514   Manure from quarantined swine.
§93.515   Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine.

Canada

§93.516   Import permit and declaration for swine.
§93.517   Swine from Canada.
§93.518   Swine from Canada for immediate slaughter.
§93.519   Special provisions.

Central America and West Indies

§93.520   Import permit and declaration for swine.

Mexico

§93.521   Declaration for swine.

Subpart F—Dogs

§93.600   Importation of dogs.

Subpart G—Miscellaneous Animals

§93.700   Definitions.
§93.701   Prohibitions.
§93.702   Restrictions.
§93.703   Ports designated for importation.
§93.704   Import permit.
§93.705   Health certificate.
§93.706   Notification of arrival.
§93.707   Inspection at the port of first arrival.

Subpart H—Elephants, Hippopotami, Rhinoceroses, and Tapirs

§93.800   Definitions.
§93.801   Prohibitions.
§93.802   Import permit.
§93.803   Health certificate.
§93.804   Declaration upon arrival.
§93.805   Ports of entry, inspection, and treatment.
§93.806   Animals refused entry.
§93.807   Other importations.

Subpart I—Aquatic Animal Species

§93.900   Definitions.
§93.901   General restrictions; exceptions.
§93.902   Ports designated for the importation of live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes.
§93.903   Import permits for live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes.
§93.904   Health certificate for live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes.
§93.905   Declaration and other documents for live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes.
§93.906   Inspection at the port of entry.

Authority: 7 U.S.C. 1622 and 8301-8317; 21 U.S.C. 136 and 136a; 31 U.S.C. 9701; 7 CFR 2.22, 2.80, and 371.4.

Source: 55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, unless otherwise noted. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997.

Subpart A—Birds

§93.100   Definitions.

Wherever in this subpart the following terms are used, unless the context otherwise requires, they shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

Administrator. The Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service or any other employee of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, to whom authority has been or may be delegated to act in the Administrator's stead.

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (APHIS or Service.)

Animals. Cattle, sheep, goats, other ruminants, swine, horses, asses, mules, zebras, dogs, and poultry.

APHIS representative. A veterinarian or other individual employed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, who is authorized to perform the services required by this part.

Birds. All members of the class aves (including eggs for hatching), other than poultry.

Commercial birds. Birds which are imported for resale, breeding, public display, or any other purpose, except pet birds, zoological birds, research birds, or performing or theatrical birds.

Communicable disease. Any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease of domestic livestock, poultry or other animals.

Department. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). Highly pathogenic avian influenza is defined as follows:

(1) Any influenza virus that kills at least 75 percent of eight 4- to 6-week-old susceptible chickens within 10 days following intravenous inoculation with 0.2 mL of a 1:10 dilution of a bacteria-free, infectious allantoic fluid or inoculation of 10 susceptible 4- to 8-week-old chickens resulting in an intravenous pathogenicity index (IVPI) of greater than 1.2;

(2) Any H5 or H7 virus that does not meet the criteria in paragraph (1) of this definition, but has an amino acid sequence at the haemagglutinin cleavage site that is compatible with highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses; or

(3) Any influenza virus that is not an H5 or H7 subtype and that kills one to five out of eight inoculated chickens and grows in cell culture in the absence of trypsin within 10 days.

Inspector. An employee of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service authorized to perform duties required under this subpart.

Licensed veterinarian. Any person licensed by any region or political subdivision thereof to practice veterinary medicine.

Pen-raised. Cared for in a fenced enclosure, such that the ratites are kept apart from wild ratites, poultry, and other animals; can be readily observed, and be restrained for inspection and treatment. A flock is not considered to be pen-raised if ratites captured in the wild have been added to it after March 8, 1994.

Performing or theatrical birds. Birds, except ratites, which are to be used in shows, theatrical acts or performances only.

Persons. Any individual, corporation, company, association, firm, partnership, society or joint stock company.

Pet birds. Birds, except ratites, which are imported for the personal pleasure of their individual owners and are not intended for resale.

Port Veterinarian. A veterinarian employed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to perform duties required under this part at a port of entry.

Poultry. Chickens, doves, ducks, geese, grouse, guinea fowl, partridges, pea fowl, pheasants, pigeons, quail, swans, and turkeys (including eggs for hatching).

Production season. That period of time, usually approximately 9 months each year, from the time ratites in a flock begin laying eggs until the ratites cease laying eggs.

Quarantine facility. A USDA facility, or a private facility approved by APHIS, for the secure housing of imported birds, poultry, or other animals for specified periods.

Ratites. Cassowaries, emus, kiwis, ostriches, and rheas.

Region. Any defined geographic land area identifiable by geological, political, or surveyed boundaries. A region may consist of any of the following:

(1) A national entity (country);

(2) Part of a national entity (zone, county, department, municipality, parish, Province, State, etc.);

(3) Parts of several national entities combined into an area; or

(4) A group of national entities (countries) combined into a single area.

Research birds. Birds which are to be used for research purposes only.

Smuggled birds. Any bird which has been brought into the United States contrary to any Federal law or regulation and which has been seized by any official of any Department of the United States Government or which has been abandoned to the United States.

United States. All of the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands of the United States, and all other Territories and Possessions of the United States.

Veterinary Services. The Veterinary Services unit of the Department.

Zoological birds. Birds intended for breeding or public display, for recreational or educational purposes, at a zoological park.

Zoological park. A professionally operated zoo, park, garden or other place, maintained under the constant surveillance of a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, for the exhibition of live animals, pigeons or birds, for the purpose of public recreation or education.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 56 FR 31865, July 12, 1991; 59 FR 10732, Mar. 8, 1994; 59 FR 47068, Sept. 14, 1994. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56013, Oct. 28, 1997; 79 FR 71004, Dec. 1, 2014]

§93.101   General prohibitions; exceptions.

(a) No product or bird subject to the provisions of this part shall be brought into the United States except in accordance with the regulations in this part and part 94 of this subchapter;1 nor shall any such product or bird be handled or moved after physical entry into the United States before final release from quarantine orany other form of governmental detention except in compliance with such regulations; Provided, That the Administrator may upon request in specific cases permit products or birds to be brought into or through the United States under such conditions as he or she may prescribe, when he or she determines in the specific case that such action will not endanger the livestock or poultry of the United States. Unless otherwise indicated in the regulations, no live birds, and no hatching eggs from birds, shall be imported into the United States if the birds have originated from a region referenced in §94.6(a) of this subchapter where highly pathogenic avian influenza or Newcastle disease is known to exist in commercial poultry populations, have transited highly pathogenic avian influenza- or Newcastle disease-affected regions, or have been vaccinated for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza.

1Importations of certain animals from various regions are absolutely prohibited under part 94 because of specified diseases.

(b)(1) Birds from Canada may be imported in accordance with this section or, except for ratites in accordance with the provisions applicable to importation of poultry from Canada as specified in §§93.205, 93.214, and 93.216 of this part.

(2) Ratites and hatching eggs of ratites may be imported into the United States only in accordance with the provisions in this part that apply to commercial and zoological birds, and, where specified, with the provisions that apply to ratites or hatching eggs of ratites.

(3) Except for ratites imported as zoological birds, and ratites and ratite hatching eggs imported from Canada in accordance with §93.107, ratites and hatching eggs of ratites may not be imported into the United States unless the following conditions are met:

(i) The ratites or hatching eggs are produced by a pen-raised flock, and, in the case of ratites, maintained in a pen-raised flock;

(ii) Each ratite produced in the flock is identified with an identification number by means of a microchip implanted at 1-day of age in the pipping muscle of ostriches and in the upper neck of other ratites, each ratite added from outside the flock is identified in like manner upon arrival in the flock, except that the microchip need not be implanted in the pipping muscle or the upper neck, and each ratite already in the flock as of March 8, 1994 is identified in like manner, prior to the next visit to the flock premises by an APHIS representative under §93.103(a)(2)(iv), except that the microchip need not be implanted in the pipping muscle or the upper neck;

(iii) On the date it is produced, each hatching egg produced in the flock is marked in indelible ink with the date of the production, and with identification, assigned by the national government of the region of export, of the premises and region from which the ratites or hatching eggs are intended for exportation;

(iv) The owner or manager of the premises from which the ratites or hatching eggs are intended for importation into the United States maintains on a daily basis a register listing the following:

(A) Number of live ratites hatched in the flock or added to the flock, and number of live ratites removed from the flock, and the microchip number for each of these ratites;

(B) Number of eggs produced in the flock and date of production, and number of eggs removed from the flock and date of production; and

(C) Number of eggs in incubator/hatcher and date of production;

(v) The owner or manager of the premises submits a copy of the registers to the National Veterinary Service of the region of export on a quarterly basis. The region of export in turn submits a copy of the registers to the Administrator upon his or her request;2

2Copies should be mailed to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231.

(vi) The region from which the ratites or hatching eggs are exported to the United States maintains a registry of premises that wish to export ratites or hatching eggs of ratites to the United States, that lists each ratite according to the microchip number required under paragraph (b)(3)(iv) of this section, and also maintains a count of hatching eggs of ratites produced on or added to the premises;

(vii) Before a premises is added to the registry, either a veterinary officer of the national government of the region of export, or an employee of that government responsible for the protection of fish and wildlife, visits the premises and determines that all ratites and hatching eggs of ratites are identified as required under paragraphs (b)(3)(ii) and (b)(3)(iii) of this section.

(viii) The region from which the ratites or hatching eggs of ratites are exported to the United States requires each premises from which ratites or hatching eggs of ratites are exported to the United States to receive approval from the National Veterinary Service of that region before ratites are added to the premises from outside the premises, and also prohibits the addition of ratites to a flock during production seasons;

(ix) The region from which ratites or hatching eggs of ratites are exported to the United States establishes a maximum number of hatching eggs of ratites that may be produced on each premises over a set production season. The ceiling for each premises is calculated jointly by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the region of export and the APHIS representative who conducts the site visit required under §93.103(a)(2)(iv), and is adjusted jointly by an APHIS representative and a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the region of export according to changes in the number of laying hens in the flock;

(x) The region of export conducts random inspections of each premises intending to export ratites or hatching eggs of ratites to the United States, at least twice during each production season, to ensure that all ratites and hatching eggs of ratites on the premises are identified as required under paragraphs (b)(3)(ii) and (b)(3)(iii) of this section. These inspections must be conducted by either a veterinary officer of the national government of the region of export or an employee of that government responsible for the protection of fish and wildlife. If any ratites or hatching eggs are not identified as required, the region of export must not issue the export certificate required under §93.104(a). The region of export must record, on the copy of the report required to be sent to the Administrator under paragraph (b)(3)(v) of this section, whether all ratites and hatching eggs are identified as required;

(xi) The region of export requires each premises on which ratites or hatching eggs of ratites intended for export to the United States are kept to submit to the National Veterinary Service of that region a copy of the certificate required under §93.104(a);

(xii) The person intending to import ratites into the United States provides the APHIS veterinary inspector at the intended port of entry with a reader capable of reading the microchip implanted in each of the ratites.

(4) Ratites and hatching eggs of ratites may not be imported into the United States in any container that holds hay, straw, grasses, wood chips, sawdust, or other materials likely to harbor ectoparasites. Ratites and hatching eggs of ratites that are imported into the United States in containers holding such materials will be refused entry.

(c)(1) Pet birds offered for entry from Canada and which are not known to be affected with or exposed to any communicable disease of poultry, which are caged (prior to release from the port of entry) and which are personal pets, may be imported by the owner thereof at any port of entry designated in §§93.103 or 93.203: Provided, That, such birds are found upon port of entry veterinary inspection under §93.105 to be free of poultry diseases and at the time of entry the owner signs and furnishes to the Administrator, a statement stating that the bird or birds have been in his or her possession for a minimum of 90 days preceding the date of importation and that during such time such birds have not been in contact with poultry or other birds (for example, association with other avian species at exhibitions or in aviaries.)

(2)(i) Except for pet birds that have been in any region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists, which are subject to the provisions of paragraph (c)(3) of this section, pet birds of United States origin that have not been outside the country for more than 60 days may be offered for entry under the provisions of paragraph (c)(1) of this section if:

(A) The pet birds are accompanied by an import permit issued by APHIS: Provided, that an import permit will not be required for pet birds returning from Canada or Mexico through a land border port; and

(B) The birds are also accompanied by a United States veterinary health certificate issued prior to the departure of the birds from the United States and the certificate shows the number from the leg band, tattoo, or microchip affixed to the birds prior to departure; and

(C) During port of entry veterinary inspection it is determined that the number from the leg band, tattoo, or microchip on the bird is the same as the one listed on the health certificate.

(ii) Except for pet birds that have been in any region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists, which are subject to the provisions of paragraph (c)(3) of this section, pet birds of United States origin that have been outside the country for more than 60 days may be imported by their owner if:

(A) The pet birds are accompanied by an import permit issued by APHIS: Provided, that an import permit will not be required for pet birds returning from Canada or Mexico through a land border port; and

(B) The pet birds are found upon port of entry veterinary inspection to be free of poultry diseases; and

(C) The pet birds are accompanied by a United States veterinary health certificate issued prior to the departure of the birds from the United States and the certificate shows the number from the leg band, tattoo, or microchip affixed to the birds prior to departure; and

(D) During port of entry veterinary inspection it is determined that the number from the leg band, tattoo, or microchip on the bird is the same as the one listed on the health certificate; and

(E) The owner importing the pet birds signs and furnishes to the Administrator the following:

(1) A notarized declaration under oath or affirmation (or a statement signed by the owner and witnessed by a Department inspector) stating that the bird or birds have not been in contact with poultry or other birds while out of the region (for example, association with other avian species at exhibitions or at aviaries); and

(2) An agreement on VS Form 17-8, obtainable from a Federal inspector at the port of entry, stating:

(i) That the birds will be maintained in confinement in his or her personal possession separate and apart from all poultry and other birds for a minimum of 30 days following importation at the address where the birds are to be held and made available for health inspection and testing by Department inspectors upon request until released at the end of such period by such an inspector; and

(ii) That appropriate Federal officials in the State of destination will be immediately notified if any signs of disease are noted in any of the birds or any bird dies during that period. The owner importing such birds must comply with the provisions of the aforementioned agreement before the birds may be released from confinement. Except for pet birds that have been in any region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists, lots of pet birds of United States origin which do not otherwise meet the requirements of paragraphs (c)(1) or (2) of this section may be offered for entry under the provisions of paragraph (c)(4) of this section.

(3) Any pet birds of United States origin that have been in any region identified in accordance with §94.6(a)(2) of this subchapter as a region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists, regardless of the length of time such birds have been outside of the United States, may only be imported through the port of Los Angeles, CA, Miami, FL, or New York, NY, and only under the following conditions:

(i) The birds meet the requirements of paragraphs (c)(2)(ii)(A) through (D) of this section; and

(ii) The birds are quarantined for a minimum of 30 days, and for such longer period as may be required by the Administrator in any specific case, at a USDA quarantine facility in accordance with §93.106.

(4) Pet birds which are not known to be affected with or exposed to communicable diseases of poultry may be offered for entry at one of the ports of entry designated in §93.102(a) under the following conditions:

(i) The pet birds shall be accompanied by a veterinary health certificate issued by a national government veterinary officer of the region of export stating that he or she personally inspected the birds listed on the health certificate and found them to be free of evidence of highly pathogenic avian influenza, Newcastle disease, chlamydiosis, and other communicable diseases of poultry, and that the birds were being exported in compliance with the laws and regulations of the region of export, or if exported from Mexico, shall be accompanied either by such a certificate or by a certificate issued by a veterinarian accredited by the National Government of Mexico and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the National Government of Mexico, thereby representing that the veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so. Certificates in a foreign language must be translated into English at the expense of the importer.

(ii) An advanced reservation fee as required by §93.103(a)(3) and a request for space which has been confirmed in writing, at a USDA-operated quarantine facility shall be made with the port veterinarian3 at the port where the birds are to be held for a minimum 30-day isolation in a biologically secure unit separate and apart from all other avian species, except, that birds arriving without an advanced reservation may be handled if an isolation unit is available, provided the reservation fee as required in §93.103(a)(3) is paid. Pet birds offered for entry at a port of entry that has not been designated in §93.102(a), or pet birds arriving without an advanced reservation at a port of entry designated in §93.102(a) but at which isolation units are not available, shall be refused entry at such port. However, such pet birds may be transported at the owner's expense to another port of entry designated in §93.102(a) if available quarantine space exists, if the reservation fee is paid and the birds are shipped to such other port under conditions deemed sufficient by the Administrator to prevent the spread of communicable diseases of poultry: Provided, That pet birds arriving with or without an advance reservation at the port of Hidalgo, Texas, will be transported at Department expense to the quarantine facility at Mission, Texas, if available quarantine space exists at that facility, until quarantine facilities are available at Hidalgo, Texas; and pet birds arriving with or without an approved reservation entered at the port of New York, New York, will be transported at Department expense to the quarantine facility at Newburgh, New York, if available quarantine space exists at the facility, until quarantine facilities are available at New York, New York. Following the isolation period, if such birds are found to be free from communicable diseases of poultry, the birds shall be returned at Department expense to the respective ports of Hidalgo, Texas, or New York, New York, as appropriate, for Agriculture release for entry through U.S. Customs.

3The names and addresses of the port veterinarians, as well as a fee schedule for quarantine charges, are available from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, Operational Support, 4700 River Road Unit 33, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231.

(iii) During the isolation period, the birds shall be subjected to such tests and procedures as required by the Administrator to determine whether the birds are free from communicable diseases of poultry.

(iv) Following the isolation period, if the birds are found to be free of communicable disease of poultry, the port veterinarian shall issue an agriculture release for entry through U.S. Customs. If the birds are found during port of entry inspection or during quarantine to be infected with or exposed to a communicable disease of poultry, such birds shall be refused entry and handled in accordance with §93.106(a) of this part.

(v) The owner of the birds is responsible for all costs which result from these procedures and shall reimburse APHIS for governmental expenses in accordance with §93.210 (b) and (c) of this part.

(d) The provisions in this subpart relating to birds shall not apply to healthy birds, except ratites, not known to be infected with or exposed, within the 90 days preceding the date of export from the region of origin, to communicable diseases of poultry, if an import permit4 has been obtained under §93.103 of this chapter and all conditions therein are observed; and if such birds are handled as follows:

4Such permit may be obtained from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, Operational Support, 4700 River Road Unit 33, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231 or by visiting http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal__health/permits/”. Requests for approval of such facilities should also be made to the Deputy Administrator.

(1)(i) They are maintained under continuous confinement in transit through the United States aboard an aircraft, ocean vessel, or other means of conveyance; or

(ii) Except for birds in transit through Anchorage, Alaska, under §93.103(c) of this part, which are not allowed to be unloaded, they are unloaded, in the course of such transit, into a bird holding facility which is provided by the carrier or its agent and has been approved5 in advance by the Administrator in accordance with paragraph (d)(3) of this section as adequate to prevent the spread within the United States of any livestock or poultry disease, and they are maintained there under continuous confinement until loaded aboard a means of conveyance for transportation from the United States and are maintained under continuous confinement aboard such means of conveyance until it leaves the United States; the import permit will specify any additional conditions necessary to assure that the transit of the poultry or birds through the United States can be made without endangering the livestock or poultry of the United States, and that Department inspectors may inspect the poultry or birds on board such means of conveyance or in such holding facility to ascertain whether the requirements of this paragraph are met, and dispose of them in accordance with the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.) if such conditions are not met; and

5See footnote 4 in subpart A.

(2) The carrier or its agent executes and furnishes to the collector of Customs at the first port of arrival a declaration stating that the poultry or birds will be retained aboard such means of conveyance or in an approved holding facility during transhipment as required by this paragraph.

(3) Provisions for the approval of facilities required in this paragraph are:

(i) They must be sufficiently isolated to prevent direct or indirect contact with all other animals and birds while in the United States.

(ii) They must be so constructed that they provide adequate protection against environmental conditions and can be adequately cleaned, washed and disinfected.

(iii) They must provide for disposal of animal and bird carcasses, manure, bedding, waste and any related shipping materials in a manner that will prevent dissemination of disease.

(iv) They must have provisions for adequate sources of feed and water and for attendants for the care and feeding of birds in the facility.

(v) They must comply with additional requirements as may be imposed by the Administrator if deemed applicable for a particular shipment.

(vi) They must also comply with all applicable local, State and Federal requirements for environmental quality and with the provisions of the Animal Welfare Regulations in chapter I of this title, as applicable.

(e) Commercial birds, zoological birds, research birds, or pet birds may be imported into the United States if they meet the requirements of §§93.102(a), 93.103, 93.104, 93.105(a), and 93.106(a) which specifically apply to such birds and the requirements of all other sections in this part that are applicable to poultry generally.

(f) Performing or theatrical birds returning to the United States. (1) Performing or theatrical birds of United States origin that are returning to the United States from Canada or Mexico may be imported if:

(i) The birds are found upon port of entry veterinary inspection to be free of avian diseases; and

(ii) The birds are accompanied by a United States veterinary health certificate issued prior to the departure of the birds from the United States and the certificate shows the number from the leg band, tattoo, or microchip affixed to the birds prior to departure; and

(iii) During port of entry veterinary inspection it is determined that the number from the leg band, tattoo, or microchip on the birds is the same as the one listed on the health certificate.

(2) Except for performing or theatrical birds that have been in any region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists, which are subject to the provisions of paragraph (f)(3) of this section, performing or theatrical poultry of United States origin that have been outside the United States in a region other than Canada or Mexico may be imported if:

(i) The birds meet the requirements of paragraphs (f)(1)(i) through (iii) of this section; and

(ii) The birds are accompanied by an import permit issued by APHIS; and

(iii) The owner importing the birds signs and furnishes to the Administrator the following:

(A) A notarized declaration under oath or affirmation (or a statement signed by the owner and witnessed by a Department inspector) stating that the birds have not been in contact with other birds while out of the region (for example, association with other avian species at exhibitions or at aviaries); and

(B) An agreement on VS Form 17-8, available electronically or through other authorized method, obtainable from a Federal inspector at the port of entry, stating:

(1) That the birds will be maintained in confinement in his or her personal possession separate and apart from all birds and other birds for a minimum of 30 days following importation at the address where the birds are to be held and made available for health inspection and testing by Department inspectors upon request until released at the end of such period by such an inspector; and

(2) That appropriate Federal officials in the State of destination will be immediately notified if any signs of disease are noted in any of the birds or any birds die during that period. The owner importing such poultry must comply with the provisions of the aforementioned agreement before the birds may be released from confinement. Except for performing or theatrical birds that have been in any region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists, performing or theatrical birds of United States origin which do not otherwise meet the requirements of paragraphs (f)(1) or (2) of this section may be offered for entry under the provisions of §93.101(c).

(3) Any performing or theatrical birds of United States origin that have been in any region identified in accordance with §94.6(a)(2) of this subchapter as a region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists may only be imported through the port of Los Angeles, CA, Miami, FL, or New York, NY, and only under the following conditions:

(i) The birds meet the requirements of paragraphs (f)(1)(i) through (iii) of this section; and

(ii) The birds are accompanied by an import permit issued by APHIS; and

(iii) The birds are quarantined for a minimum of 30 days, and for such longer period as may be required by the Administrator in any specific case, at a quarantine facility maintained by APHIS in accordance with paragraphs (c)(3)(ii) through (c)(3)(iv) of this section.

(g) Any smuggled bird shall:

(1) Be refused entry into the United States and be removed from the United States,6 or

6Birds that would require handfeeding will be refused entry.

(2) Be quarantined in a USDA-operated quarantine facility pending negative results to two consecutive tests for highly pathogenic avian influenza and Newcastle disease7 administered not less than 30 days apart, with the first test administered within seven days after the bird enters the facility.

7Such tests are conducted according to protocols for highly pathogenic avian influenza and Newcastle disease which are available upon request from the Administrator.

(3) Tissue samples from any smuggled bird which has died prior to release from quarantine shall be submitted for highly pathogenic avian influenza and Newcastle disease isolation. Smuggled birds shall also be subject to such other tests and procedures to determine whether the birds are free from communicable diseases of poultry other than highly pathogenic avian influenza and Newcastle disease when the port veterinarian determine that the bird in question has shown physical symptoms of being affected with or exposed to communicable diseases of poultry. A lot of smuggled birds placed into the quarantine facility shall be handled on an “all-in, all-out” basis: Provided, That birds of endangered and threatened species, as determined by the Department of the Interior (16 U.S.C. 1533, as amended) shall be separated for quarantine and testing as separate lots. If highly pathogenic avian influenza or Newcastle disease or any other communicable disease of poultry is diagnosed in any smuggled bird at any point or if it is determined that any smuggled bird has been exposed to highly pathogenic avian influenza or Newcastle disease or any other such communicable disease, such birds shall not be released from quarantine and shall be disposed of in accordance with procedures established by the Administrator to prevent the entry of communicable diseases of livestock or poultry into the United States. However, if endangered or threatened species are determined to be exposed such birds shall be held in permanent quarantine in accordance with such conditions as the Deputy Administrator may prescribe to protect poultry of the United States. At the time any smuggled bird enters the quarantine facility, it shall be identified in a manner approved by the Administrator.

(4) If the laboratory tests for highly pathogenic avian influenza and Newcastle disease are negative and as determined by the port veterinarian the birds are free of clinical evidence of diseases of poultry at the end of the quarantine period, the port veterinarian shall issue an agricultural release for entry of the birds through the United States Customs Service at the termination of the quarantine period. Providing that the sale of the smuggled birds is not contrary to any Federal law or regulation, expenses incurred by the Department for the handling of the smuggled birds under this paragraph shall be reimbursed from funds derived from the sale or disposition of the smuggled birds after their release from quarantine. Any smuggled bird which by law may not be sold, or so disposed, shall be quarantined in accordance with such procedures as the Deputy Administrator may establish to prevent the introduction of communicable diseases of livestock or poultry into the United States, in accordance with the law.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control numbers 0579-0220 and 0579-0245)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §93.101, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

§93.102   Ports designated for the importation of birds.

(a) Special ports for pet birds. The following ports are designated as ports of entry for pet birds imported under the provisions of §93.101(c) and performing or theatrical birds imported under the provisions of §93.101(f): Los Angeles and San Ysidro, CA; Miami, FL; New York, NY; Baudette, MN; and Hidalgo, TX.

(b) Designation of other ports. The Secretary of the Treasury has approved the designation as quarantine stations of the ports specified in this section. In special cases other ports may be designated as quarantine stations under this section by the Administrator, with the concurrence of the Secretary of the Treasury.

(c) Notwithstanding any other provisions of this section, all commercial birds, zoological birds, or research birds shall be imported only at a port of entry specified in §93.105.

(d) Limited ports. The following ports are designated as ports of entry for pet birds imported under the provisions of §93.101(c)(1) or (2) and performing or theatrical birds imported under the provisions of §93.101(f): Anchorage and Fairbanks, AK; San Diego, CA; Jacksonville, Port Canaveral, St. Petersburg-Clearwater, and Tampa, FL; Atlanta, GA; Honolulu, HI; Chicago, IL; New Orleans, LA; Baltimore, MD; Portland, ME; Minneapolis, MN; Great Falls, MT; Covington, KY (Greater Cincinnati International Airport); Portland, OR; San Juan, PR; Galveston and Houston, TX; and Seattle, Spokane, and Tacoma, WA.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 59 FR 36026, July 15, 1994; 60 FR 16045, Mar. 29, 1995; 60 FR 25120, May 11, 1995; 61 FR 68125, Dec. 27, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56014, Oct. 28, 1997; 65 FR 38178, June 20, 2000; 67 FR 6370, Feb. 12, 2002]

§93.103   Import permits for birds; and reservation fees for space at quarantine facilities maintained by APHIS.

(a) Application for permit; reservation required. Before any permit application is submitted, all construction at the quarantine facility must be completed.

(1) For pet birds, commercial birds, research birds, zoological birds, and performing or theatrical birds, intended for importation into the United States, except as otherwise provided in §§93.101(b) and (c), 93.103(c), and 93.107(b), the importer shall first apply for and obtain an import permit. The importer (permit applicant) shall submit a completed VS form 17-128 for ratites or hatching eggs of ratites; or, for other birds, a completed VS form 17-20; or shall submit a document that states that it is an application for a permit to import ratites, hatching eggs of ratites, or birds other than ratites or hatching eggs of ratites. The application8 must include the following information:

8VS import permit application forms are available from local offices of Veterinary Services, which are listed in telephone directories, or from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231 or by visiting http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal__health/permits/. For other permit requirements for birds, the regulations issued by the U.S. Department of the Interior (title 50, Code of Federal Regulations, parts 14 and 17) should be consulted.

(i) The name, address, and telephone number of the importer;

(ii) The status of the importer, such as individual, partnership, or corporation (if incorporated, include State where incorporated and date of incorporation);

(iii) Name and address of the quarantine facility;

(iv) Date of intended quarantine;

(v) The purpose of the importation;

(vi) The region of origin;

(vii) The name and address of the exporter;

(viii) The port of embarkation in the foreign region;

(ix) The mode of transportation, route of travel, and port of entry in the United States;

(x) The name and location of the quarantine facility in the United States to which delivery will be made from the port of entry, in accordance with §93.106(c)(5);

(xi) A drawing of the floor plan for the facility showing the location of the bird holding area; equipment storage areas; office areas; clothes storage and change areas; feed storage areas; necropsy areas (showing entry and refrigeration); washing areas for equipment; shower areas; ventilation arrangements; and entries and exits; and, for a facility for hatching eggs of ratites in which the hatching eggs of one lot may be quarantined at the same time as the hatched chicks from a previously quarantined lot, the incubation/hatcher and bird (chick) holding areas; and

(xii) Date and certification, by signature of the importer (permit applicant), after the following language:

I certify that the information provided herein is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief, and agree to comply with the applicable regulations in title 9, Code of Federal Regulations, §§93.100 through 93.107;

(xiii) In addition, the application for a permit to import ratites or hatching eggs of ratites, except for ratites and hatching eggs of ratites imported from Canada in accordance with §93.107, shall specify the number of ratites or hatching eggs intended for importation, the size of the flock of origin, and the location of the premises where the flock of origin is kept; and shall state that, from the date of application through the date of export, APHIS representatives shall be granted access to the premises where the flock of origin is kept. (For ratites intended for importation as zoological birds, the flock of origin shall be the ratites intended for importation.)

(2)(i) An import permit will be issued only after an APHIS representative has inspected the quarantine facility identified on the permit application, and has determined that it meets the standards set forth in §93.106(c) of this part.

(ii) An application for a permit to import pet birds, commercial birds, research birds, zoological birds, and performing or theatrical birds, may be denied or withdrawn because of: Communicable disease conditions in the area or region of origin, or in a region where the shipment has been or will be held or through which the shipment has been or will be transported; deficiencies in the regulatory programs for the control or eradication of animal diseases and the unavailability of veterinary services in the above mentioned countries; the importer's failure to provide satisfactory evidence concerning the origin, history, and health status of the animals; the lack of satisfactory information necessary to determine that the importation will not be likely to transmit any communicable disease to livestock or poultry of the United States; the lack of APHIS personnel; any outstanding debts to APHIS the permit applicant has not paid when due; or any other circumstances which the Administrator believes require such denial or withdrawal to prevent the dissemination of any communicable disease of livestock or poultry into the United States, such as if:

(A) Any requirement of this subpart is not complied with;

(B) The importer (permit applicant) or any person responsibly connected with the importer's business, any person responsibly connected with the privately owned bird quarantine facility through which the importation is intended, or, in the case of the importation of ratites or ratite hatching eggs, the operator of the flock of origin or a person responsibly connected with the owner of the flock of origin, has been convicted of any crime under any law regarding the import or export of goods, regarding the quarantine of any animal or bird, or the illegal movement of goods within a region, or involving fraud, bribery, extortion, or of any other crime involving lack of the integrity needed for the conduct of operations affecting the importation of birds;

(C) The importer (permit applicant) or any person responsibly connected with the importer's business, any person responsibly connected with the privately owned bird quarantine facility intended for use for the importation, or, in the case of the importation of ratites or ratite hatching eggs, the operator of the flock of origin or a person responsibly connected with the owner of the flock of origin, threatens to forcibly assault or forcibly assaults, intimidates, or interferes with any APHIS representative or employee in or on account of the performance of his or her official duties, unless, promptly upon the incident being brought to the importer's attention by the authorized supervisor of the APHIS representative or employee, and to the satisfaction of that supervisor, the importer justifies the incident, takes effective steps to prevent a recurrence, or provides acceptable assurance that there will not be any recurrences; or

(D) For any violation of the regulations in this subpart.

(iii) In addition, a permit to import ratites or hatching eggs of ratites, except for ratites or hatching eggs of ratites imported from Canada in accordance with §93.107, will be denied or withdrawn unless APHIS representatives are granted access to the premises where the flock of origin is kept (or, in the case of zoological birds, to the premises where the birds are kept), from the date of the application for the permit through the date of export.

(iv) Except for ratites intended for importation as zoological birds and ratites and hatching eggs of ratites imported from Canada in accordance with §93.107, a permit to import ratites or hatching eggs of ratites will be denied or withdrawn unless an APHIS representative has visited the premises where the flock of origin is kept within the 12-month period before the intended importation and has determined that the flock is pen-raised and contains sufficient breeding pairs to produce the number of ratites or hatching eggs intended for importation.

(v) A permit to import ratites or hatching eggs of ratites will be denied or withdrawn if an inspection of the premises of the flock or origin, carried out by the national government of the region of export under §93.101(b)(3), indicates that the ratites and hatching eggs are not identified and marked as required under §93.101(b)(3).

(vi) For the purposes of this section, a person shall be deemed to be responsibly connected with an importer's business, a privately owned bird quarantine facility, or an owner of a flock of origin, if such person has an ownership, mortgage, or lease interest in the physical plant of the importer's business, the privately owned bird quarantine facility, or the farm of the flock of origin, or if such person is a partner, officer, director, holder or owner of 10 per centum or more of the voting stock of the importer's business, the privately owned bird quarantine facility, or the farm of the flock of origin, or is an employee of the importer's business, the privately owned bird quarantine facility, or the owner of the flock of origin.

(vii) A permit may be denied or withdrawn at any time by the Administrator, for any of the reasons provided in paragraphs (a)(2)(ii), (iii), (iv), or (v) of this section. Before such action is taken, the importer will be informed of the reasons for the proposed action and, upon request in case of a dispute of material facts, shall be afforded an opportunity for a hearing with respect to the merits or validity of such action, in accordance with rules of practice which shall be adopted for the proceeding. However, withdrawal of a permit shall become effective pending final determination in the proceeding, when the Administrator determines that such action is necessary to protect the public health, interest, or safety. Such withdrawal shall be effective upon oral or written notification, whichever is earlier, to the importer. In the event of oral notification, written confirmation shall be given to the importer as promptly as circumstances permit. This withdrawal shall continue in effect pending the completion of the proceeding and any judicial review thereof, unless otherwise ordered by the Administrator.

(viii) If APHIS receives more than one application for a permit to import birds through a specified port of entry at approximately the same time, such that APHIS personnel could provide services to only one importer (permit applicant) who requests them, APHIS will issue the permit to the first importer who meets the requirements of this subpart to deposit, with the Administrator, the completed cooperative and trust fund agreement, accompanied by the required deposit.

(3)(i) The importer or importer's agent shall pay or ensure payment of a reservation fee for each lot of birds to be quarantined in a facility maintained by USDA. For birds the reservation fee shall be 100 percent of the cost of providing care, feed, and handling during quarantine, as estimated by the quarantine facility's veterinarian in charge.

(ii) At the time the importer or the importer's agent requests a reservation of quarantine space, the importer or importer's agent shall pay the reservation fee by check or U.S. money order or ensure payment of the reservation fee by an irrevocable letter of credit from a commercial bank (the effective date on such letter of credit shall run to 30 days after the date the birds are scheduled to be released from quarantine); except that anyone who issues a check to the Department for a reservation fee which is returned because of insufficient funds shall be denied any further request for reservation of a quarantine space until the outstanding amount is paid.

(iii) Any reservation fee paid by check or U.S. money order shall be applied against the expenses incurred for services received by the importer or importer's agent in connection with the quarantine for which the reservation was made. Any part of the reservation fee which remains unused after being applied against the expenses incurred for services received by the importer or the importer's agent in connection with the quarantine for which the reservation was made, shall be returned to the individual who paid the reservation fee. If the reservation fee is ensured by a letter of credit, the Department will draw against the letter of credit unless payment for services received by the importer or importer's agent in connection with the quarantine is otherwise made at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(iv) Any reservation fee shall be forfeited if the importer or the importer's agent fails to present for entry, within 24 hours following the designated time of arrival, the lot of birds for which the reservation was made: Except that a reservation fee shall not be forfeited if:

(A) Written notice of cancellation from the importer or the importer's agent is received by the office of the veterinarian in charge of the quarantine facility9 during regular business hours (8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays) no later than 15 days for birds prior to the beginning of the time of importation as specified in the import permit or as arranged with the veterinarian in charge of the quarantine facility if no import permit is required (the 15 day period shall not include Saturdays, Sundays, or holidays), or

9The addresses of USDA quarantine facilities may be found in telephone directories listing the facilities or by contacting the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231.

(B) The Administrator determines that services, other than provided by carriers, necessary for the importation of the poultry or birds within the requested period are unavailable because of unforeseen circumstances as determined by the Administrator, (such as the closing of an airport due to inclement weather or the unavailability of the reserved space due to the extension of another quarantine.)

(v) If the reservation fee was ensured by a letter of credit and the fee is to be forfeited under paragraph (a)(3)(iv) of this section, the Department will draw against the letter of credit unless the reservation fee is otherwise paid at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(vi) When a reservation is cancelled in accordance with paragraph (a)(3)(iv)(A) of this section and the provisions of paragraph (a)(3)(iv)(B) of this section do not apply, a $40.00 cancellation fee shall be charged. If a reservation fee was paid, the cancellation fee shall be deducted from any reservation fee returned to the importer or the importer's agent. If the reservation fee was ensured by a letter of credit, the Department will draw the amount of the cancellation fee against the letter of credit unless the cancellation fee is otherwise paid at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(4) Permit applications for ratites. (i) If quarantine space for ratites is desired at either the New York Animal Import Center or the Miami Animal Import Center, permit applications must be submitted to the New York Animal Import Center, USDA, APHIS, Veterinary Services, 200 Drury Lane, Rock Tavern, NY, 12575, or to the port veterinarian in charge of the New York Animal Import Center.

(ii) Quarantine space for ratites will be offered in the order that permit applications are or have been received, beginning with those permit applications received on August 12, 1991. Reservations for quarantine space at the Miami Animal Import Center will be limited to a maximum of 100 ratites per permit application. There will be a single waiting list for quarantine space at the Miami Animal Import Center and the New York Animal Import Center. Importers who prefer one of these two facilities over the other may remain on the waiting list until space opens up at the facility of their choice.

(b) Permit. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, when a permit is issued, the original and two copies will be sent to the importer. It shall be the responsibility of the importer to forward the original permit and one copy to the shipper in the region of origin, and it shall also be the responsibility of the importer to insure that the shipper presents the copy of the permit to the carrier and makes proper arrangements for the original permit to accompany the shipment to the specified U.S. port of entry for presentation to the collector of customs. The time prescribed in permits from the importation of pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, or research birds, shall not exceed 30 days, and for performing or theatrical birds shall not exceed 90 days. Birds for which a permit is required by these regulations will not be eligible for entry if a permit has not been issued; if unaccompanied by such a permit; if shipment is from any port other than the one designated in the permit; if arrival in the United States is at any port other than the one designated in the permit; if the birds offered for entry differ from those described in the permit.

(c) Notwithstanding any other provisions in this part, importers are not required to obtain an import permit and provide the shipper with an original import permit for each individual shipment of birds other than ratites transiting the port of Anchorage, Alaska, if the following conditions are met:

(1) The importer applies for and obtains an import permit for multiple shipments of birds transiting the port of Anchorage, Alaska, in accordance with the provisions of this section and related requirements concerning application for the permit. However, the following information is not required on the application:

(i) The species, breed, and number of birds to be imported;

(ii) The region of origin;

(iii) The name and address of the exporter;

(iv) The port of embarkation in the foreign region;

(v) The mode of transportation and the route of travel;

(vi) The proposed date of arrival of the birds; and

(vii) The name and address of the person to whom the birds or poultry will be delivered.

(2) The importer completes a copy of the import permit obtained under paragraph (c)(1) of this section for each separate shipment of birds intended to transit the port of Anchorage, Alaska, by inserting the following information on a copy of the permit:

(i) The species, breed, and number of birds to be imported;

(ii) The region of origin;

(iii) The name and address of the exporter;

(iv) The port of embarkation in the foreign region;

(v) The mode of transportation and the route of travel;

(vi) The proposed date of arrival of the birds; and

(vii) The name and address of the person to whom the birds will be delivered.

(3) The importer, not less than 2 weeks prior to the anticipated date of arrival of each separate intransit shipment of birds at the port of Anchorage, Alaska, provides the port veterinarian with a copy of the completed import permit;

(4) A copy of the completed import permit accompanies each separate intransit shipment of birds or poultry to the port of Anchorage, Alaska;

(5) Import permits issued for multiple shipments of birds transiting the port of Anchorage, Alaska, will be valid only during the calendar year in which they are issued.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0040)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 56 FR 31866, July 12, 1991; 57 FR 21725, May 22, 1992; 59 FR 10733, Mar. 8, 1994; 59 FR 47068, Sept. 14, 1994; 59 FR 47235, Sept. 15, 1994; 59 FR 67614, Dec. 30, 1994; 61 FR 68125, Dec. 27, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 56012, 56014, Oct. 28, 1997; 65 FR 38178, June 20, 2000; 81 FR 40151, June 21, 2016]

§93.104   Certificate for pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds.

(a) General. All pet birds, except as provided for in §93.101 (b) and (c) of this part; all research birds; and all commercial birds and zoological birds, including ratites and hatching eggs of ratites, offered for importation from any part of the world, shall be accompanied by a certificate issued by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the exporting region, or issued by a veterinarian authorized or accredited by the national government of the exporting region and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of that region.

(b) Birds other than ratites. The certificate for birds other than ratites must state:

(1) That all birds covered by the certificate have been inspected by the veterinarian issuing the certificate;

(2) That no evidence of Newcastle disease, highly pathogenic avian influenza, chlamydiosis, or other communicable disease of poultry was found among the birds;

(3) That insofar as has been possible to determine, the birds were not exposed to Newcastle disease, highly pathogenic avian influenza, chlamydiosis, or other communicable disease of poultry during the 90 days immediately preceding their exportation;

(4) That the birds have not been vaccinated with a vaccine for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza; however, zoological birds that have been vaccinated for avian influenza subtypes H5 or H7 as part of an official program, using vaccine products approved and used under supervision by the veterinary authorities of the exporting country, may be imported under specific conditions as determined by the Administrator and specified in an import permit. Such birds must be exported with permanent individual identification and meet the other requirements for entry under this part, and will be subject to official testing and quarantine on arrival to the United States.

(5) That highly pathogenic avian influenza or Newcastle disease did not occur anywhere on the premises from which the birds were to be exported or on adjacent premises during the 90 days immediately preceding the exportation of the birds;

(6) That neither the premises from which the birds were to be exported nor any adjacent premises were located in any area under quarantine for poultry diseases at any time during the 90 days immediately preceding the exportation of the birds, and that the birds have not originated from or been moved through a region identified in accordance with §94.6(a) of this subchapter as a region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists; and

(7) That the birds were placed into new or appropriately sanitized packaging materials at the premises from which the birds were to be exported.

(c) Ratites other than hatching eggs. The certificate for ratites other than hatching eggs must state:

(1) That, except as provided in paragraph (c)(13) of this section, all ratites covered by the certificate, and their flock of origin, have been inspected by the veterinarian issuing the certificate;

(2) That, except when the certificate is for zoological birds or ratites imported from Canada in accordance with §93.107, the flock of origin is pen- raised and the ratites covered by the certificate were produced and maintained in that flock;

(3) That no evidence of Newcastle disease, highly pathogenic avian influenza, chlamydiosis, or other communicable disease of poultry was found in the flock of origin;

(4) That insofar as has been possible to determine, the flock of origin was not exposed to Newcastle disease, highly pathogenic avian influenza, chlamydiosis, or other communicable disease of pountry during the 90 days immediately preceding the exportation;

(5) That none of the ratites intended for shipment to the United States have been vaccinated with Newcastle disease vaccine or with a vaccine for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza;

(6) That highly pathogenic avian influenza or Newcastle disease did not occur anywhere on the premises where the flock of origin was kept or on adjacent premises during the 90 days immediately preceding the exportation;

(7) That neither the premises where the flock of origin was kept nor any adjacent premises was located in any area under quarantine for poultry diseases at any time during the 90 days immediately preceding the exportation, and that the ratites have not originated from or been moved through a region identified in accordance with §94.6(a) of this subchapter as a region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists;

(8) That, except as provided in §93.107 for ratites imported from Canada for immediate slaughter, the ratites were treated at least 3 days but not more than 14 days before being loaded for shipment to the United States with a pesticide of a type and concentration sufficient to kill ectoparasites on the ratites;

(9) That the pesticide was applied to all body surfaces of the ratites under the supervision of the veterinarian issuing the certificate;

(10) That the ratites, after being treated for ectoparasites, did not have physical contact with, or share a pen or bedding materials with, any ratite not in the same shipment to the United States; and

(11) That the ratites were placed in new or appropriately sanitized packaging materials for shipment to the United States at the premises where the flock of origin was kept.

(12) The number of ratites contained in the shipment;

(13) That the number of ratites and hatching eggs of ratites exported from the flock of origin has not exceeded the ceiling required to be established under §93.101(b)(3)(ix);

(14) That all the ratites and hatching eggs of ratites in the flock from which the ratites come were identified in accordance with §93.101(b)(3);

(15) Except for ratites imported from Canada in accordance with §93.107, the number of ratite laying hens in the flock from which the ratites come;

(16) For ratites required to be treated prior to shipment with a pesticide for ectoparasites, the certificate must also state the name, concentration, and date of administration of the pesticide used to treat the ratites;

(17) When ratites intended for importation are zoological birds, only the ratites to be imported must be inspected, and the provisions in paragraphs (c)(3), (c)(4), (c)(5), (c)(6), (c)(7), and (c)(11) that apply to the flock of origin shall apply only to the ratites intended for importation.

(d) Hatching eggs of ratites. The certificate for hatching eggs of ratites must state:

(1) That the flock of origin of the hatching eggs has been inspected by the veterinarian issuing the certificate;

(2) That, except when the certificate is for hatching eggs of ratites imported from Canada in accordance with §93.107, the flock of origin is pen- raised, and the hatching eggs covered by the certificate were produced by that flock;

(3) That no evidence of Newcastle disease, highly pathogenic avian influenza, chlamydiosis, or other communicable disease of poultry was found in the flock of origin;

(4) That insofar as has been possible to determine, the flock of origin was not exposed to Newcastle disease, highly pathogenic avian influenza, chlamydiosis, or other communicable disease of poultry during the 90 days immediately preceding the exportation of the hatching eggs;

(5) That highly pathogenic avian influenza or Newcastle disease did not occur anywhere on the premises where the flock of origin was kept or on adjacent premises during the 90 days immediately preceding the exportation of the hatching eggs;

(6) That neither the premises where the flock of origin was kept nor any adjacent premises were located in any area under quarantine for poultry diseases at any time during the 90 days immediately preceding the exportation of the hatching eggs; and

(7) That the hatching eggs were placed into new or appropriately sanitized packaging materials for shipment to the United States at the premises where the flock of origin was kept.

(8) The number of hatching eggs contained in the shipment;

(9) That the number of ratites and hatching eggs of ratites exported from the flock of origin has not exceeded the ceiling required to be established under §93.101(b)(3)(ix);

(10) That all the ratites and hatching eggs of ratites in the flock from which the hatching eggs come were identified in accordance with §93.101(b)(3);

(11) Except for hatching eggs of ratites imported from Canada in accordance with §93.107, the number of ratite laying hens in the flock from which the hatching eggs come.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0040)

[56 FR 31866, July 12, 1991; 56 FR 41726, Aug. 22, 1991, as amended at 57 FR 28080, June 24, 1992; 59 FR 10733, Mar. 8, 1994; 59 FR 47235, Sept. 15, 1994; 61 FR 56891, Nov. 5, 1996; 61 FR 68126, Dec. 27, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56014, Oct. 28, 1997; 76 FR 4053, Jan. 24, 2011; 79 FR 71005, Dec. 1, 2014]

§93.105   Inspection at the port of entry.

(a) All commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds, including hatching eggs of ratites, but excluding other ratites, imported into the United States, must be inspected by the port veterinarian at the Customs port of entry, which may be any international airport, or any land-border port within 20 miles of an international airport, serviced by Customs, as well as, for Canadian-origin hatching eggs of ratites, ports listed in §93.107 (c). However, hatching eggs of ratites may be shipped, in bond, from the port of first arrival to the Customs port of entry at which they will be quarantined, for inspection, at that port.

(b) All pet birds imported from any part of the world, except pet birds from Canada and pet birds meeting the provisions of §93.101(c)(2), shall be subjected to inspection at the Customs port of entry by a veterinary inspector of APHIS and such birds shall be permitted entry only at the ports listed in §93.102(a). Pet birds of Canadian origin and those birds meeting the provisions of §93.101(c)(2) shall be subject to veterinary inspection at any of the ports of entry listed in §93.102 and 93.203.

(c) Ratites, other than hatching eggs of ratites, imported from any part of the world must be inspected at the Customs port of entry by a veterinary inspector of APHIS and, except as provided in §93.107(b) for ratites imported from Canada, shall be permitted entry only at one of the following ports of entry:

(1) Ostriches:

(i) Up to 36 inches in height (as measured from the top of the head to the base of the feet) or 30 pounds in weight: New York, NY; Stewart Airport, Newburgh, NY; and Miami, FL.

(ii) Exceeding 36 inches in height or 30 pounds in weight: New York, NY, and Stewart Airport, Newburgh, NY.

(2) Ratites other than ostriches: New York, NY; Stewart Airport, Newburgh, NY; and Miami, FL.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 56 FR 31867, July 12, 1991; 57 FR 21726, May 22, 1992; 59 FR 36026, July 15, 1994; 59 FR 47069, Sept. 14, 1994; 61 FR 68126, Dec. 27, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56014, Oct. 28, 1997; 65 FR 38178, June 20, 2000]

§93.106   Quarantine requirements.

(a) Birds other than ratites and hatching eggs of ratites. Each lot of pet birds, except as provided for in §93.101(c) of this part; research birds; and commercial birds and zoological birds, except ratites and hatching eggs of ratites, imported into the United States shall be quarantined for a minimum of 30 days, and for such longer period as may be required by the Administrator, in any specific case, on an “all-in, all-out” basis, at a Customs port of entry, at a USDA quarantine facility when arrangements have been made in advance by the importer and approval is granted in the permit described in §93.103, or in facilities that meet the requirements of paragraph (c) of this section. At a USDA quarantine facility each psittacine bird shall be individually identified by the Department within 7 days of the entry of the bird into the bird quarantine facility with a serially numbered legband which has been coded to the quarantine facility or by other suitable means of identification. The identification device must be approved by the Administrator, before it shall be used to identify birds under this section. Such means of identification shall be supplied by the Department at cost to the importer. The Department shall make an identification record at the time such bird is so identified containing the species of the bird, including the common and scientific name, and the number of the identification device placed on the bird. The daily log and the identification record shall be maintained for 12 months following the date of the release of the bird from quarantine. Prior to use of a privately owned quarantine facility, a Cooperative and Trust Fund Agreement as set forth in paragraph (c)(5) of this section shall be executed by the importer and the Department and appropriate funds shall be deposited with the Administrator pursuant to the Cooperative and Trust Fund Agreement. If the birds are found free of evidence of communicable diseases of poultry during quarantine, then the port veterinarian shall issue an agriculture release for entry through U.S. Customs. If the birds are found during port of entry inspection or during quarantine, to be infected with or exposed to a communicable disease of poultry, such birds shall be refused entry or shall be held for an additional period in quarantine until determined to be free of evidence of any communicable disease, or shall be otherwise disposed of as directed by the Administrator. See also paragraph (c)(3)(ii)(E) of this section.

(b) Ratites and hatching eggs of ratites. (1) Each lot of ratites imported from any part of the world except as provided in §93.107, shall be quarantined upon arrival for a minimum of 30 days, and for such longer period as may be required by the Administrator to determine the ratites' freedom from ectoparasites and communicable diseases. Quarantine shall be on an “all-in, all-out” basis, as described in paragraph (c)(3)(ii)(A) of this section, at the New York Animal Import Center at Newburgh, NY, when the port of entry is either New York, NY, or Stewart Airport, Newburgh, NY; or at the Miami Animal Import Center, Miami, FL, when the port of entry is Miami, FL. Reservations for space in these quarantine facilities must be made in advance of arrival and in accordance with §93.103 of this part.

(2) Each lot of hatching eggs of ratites imported from any part of the world except as provided in §93.107, shall be quarantined upon arrival, incubated for the full incubation period (approximately 42 days), and held in quarantine for a minimum of 30 days following the hatch of the last chick in the lot, and for such longer period as may be required by the Administrator to determine the ratites' freedom from communicable diseases. Quarantine shall be conducted at a facility that meets the requirements of paragraph (c) of this section, and in the manner prescribed by paragraph (c) of this section.

(3) During the quarantine period, the ratites, including chicks hatched in quarantine, shall be tested for viral diseases of poultry, including highly pathogenic avian influenza and Newcastle disease. If any of the ratites exhibit evidence of other communicable diseases, they will be subjected to such additional tests as may be required by the Administrator to determine their freedom from communicable diseases. Ratites other than those imported as hatching eggs also shall be treated for ectoparasites10 by an inspector until the inspector determines that the ratites are free of ectoparasites.

10APHIS will use an EPA registered dust formulation that contains 5 percent carbaryl as the only active ingredient. The dust formulation will be used in accordance with all applicable directions, restrictions, and precautions on the label. Treated birds may not be slaughtered for food purposes.

(4) If the ratites, including chicks hatched during quarantine, are determined to be free of communicable diseases, the port veterinarian shall issue an agricultural release for entry through U.S. Customs. If the port veterinarian finds evidence of communicable disease, or exposure to communicable disease, during port of entry inspection or quarantine of the ratites, the ratites shall be refused entry, or shall be held in quarantine until they are determined to be free of communicable disease, or shall be otherwise disposed of as directed by the Administrator.

(c) Standards for privately owned bird quarantine facilities and handling procedures for importation of birds. Before the Administrator will issue an import permit for a lot of birds, the Administrator must determine that the privately owned bird quarantine facility to be used to quarantine birds imported into the United States (the facility) and its maintenance and operation meet the minimum requirements of paragraphs (c)(1) through (c)(5) of this section, that adequate APHIS personnel are available to provide services required by the facility, and that a Cooperative and Trust Fund Agreement between the importer and the Department has been executed, and the required funds have been deposited, in accordance with that agreement. The cost of the facility and all costs associated with its maintenance and operation must be borne by the importer, in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (e) of this section.

(1) Supervision of the facility. The facility shall be maintained under the supervision of the port veterinarian at the Customs port of entry.

(2) Physical plant requirements. The facility shall comply with the following requirements:

(i) Location. Each privately owned bird quarantine facility shall be located:

(A) Within the immediate metropolitan area of the port of entry to prevent the imported birds, while in transit to the quarantine facility, from introducing or disseminating disease to domestic poultry or livestock.

(B) At least one-half mile from any concentration of avian species, such as, but not limited to, poultry processing plants, poultry or bird farms, pigeon lofts, or other bird quarantine facilities. Factors such as prevailing winds, the efficiency of the air filtration system of the quarantine facility, possible exposure to poultry or birds moving in local traffic, etc., shall be taken into consideration.

(ii) Construction. Each quarantine facility shall consist of a single, self-contained building, which shall:

(A) Be constructed only with material that can withstand continued cleaning and disinfection. All solid walls, floors, and ceilings must be constructed of impervious material. All openings to the outside must be double-screened, with an interior screen of metal or nylon mesh that is impervious to biting insects such as gnats or mosquitos, and an exterior metal screen that is rodent-proof and is made of wire, such as rabbit wire, hardware cloth, or smooth welded wire, with mesh size no larger than 1 inch × 1.5 inches (2.54 cm × 3.81 cm). The interior and exterior screens must be separated by at least 3 inches (7.62 cm);

(B) Have a bird holding area of sufficient size to prevent overcrowding of the birds in quarantine. (All access into this holding area shall be from within the building and each entryway into such area shall be equipped with self-closing, double doors: Provided, That emergency exits to the outside may exist in the bird holding area if required by local fire ordinances. Such emergency exits shall be constructed so as to permit their opening from the inside of the facility only.);

(C) Have a ventilation capacity sufficient to control moisture and odor at levels that are not injurious to the health of the birds in quarantine;

(D) Have a vermin-proof feed storage area;

(E) Have office space for recordkeeping;

(F) Have a separate necropsy room which shall have refrigerated storage space for carcasses retained for laboratory examination and facilities adequate for specimen preparation and carcass disposal;

(G) Have a separate area for washing facility equipment;

(H) Have a shower at the entrance into the area comprised of the bird holding and necropsy rooms and a clothes storage and change area at each end of the shower area;

(I) Have a storage area for equipment necessary for quarantine operations;

(J) Have equipment necessary to maintain the facility in clean and sanitary condition, including insect and pest control equipment;

(K) Have a receptacle for soiled and contaminated clothing in the clothes change area located nearest the entrance to the bird holding area;

(L) All construction must be completed before any permit application is submitted in accordance with §93.103.

(M) An APHIS representative shall inspect the facility to determine whether the facility complies with the standards set forth in this section before any permit is issued in accordance with §93.103. Inspections shall take place at least once each year.

(N) In addition, a facility for hatching eggs of ratites, in which the hatching eggs of one lot may be quarantined at the same time as the hatched chicks from the previously quarantined lot, shall:

(1) Have a wall or a wall with a lockable door separating the incubator/hatcher area from the bird (chick) holding area, and this wall or wall-with-door shall provide an airtight seal between the two areas, shall be impervious to water, and shall be able to withstand continued cleaning and disinfection;

(2) Have a necropsy or sample collection area in both the incubator/hatcher area and the bird (chick) holding area; and

(3) Have separate entrances, showers, toilets, and dressing room facilities for the exclusive use of personnel working in the incubator/hatcher area and the bird (chick) holding area.

(O) The bird (chick) holding area in any facility for hatching eggs of ratites shall be of a size large enough to accommodate 75 percent of the incubator capacity, with a minimum of 10 square feet per egg.

(P) If a facility for hatching eggs of ratites has a sun room, the sun room shall be connected to the chick holding area by a wall with a lockable door. This wall; the other walls, if any; and the flooring, must be impervious to water and able to withstand continued cleaning and disinfection. All walls of the sun room must be at least 8 feet high.

(1) Any of the exterior walls may be replaced by a double-screened wall set in a concrete or concrete-block curb. The double screening shall be of wire mesh or wire mesh and nylon mesh, as provided in paragraph (c)(2)(ii)(A) of this section, with the interior and exterior screens of the sun room wall separated by at least 3 inches (7.62 cm); the concrete or concrete block curb must be at least 12 inches high, impermeable to water, and able to prevent the escape of water, manure, and debris.

(2) The sun room shall have a roof, such as a double-mesh-screened roof or a glass roof, that is both impervious to free-flying birds and biting insects (such as gnats or mosquitoes) and capable of preventing contact between chicks and free-flying birds.

(3) Be attended by personnel working in the bird (chick) holding area whenever chicks are in the sun room.

(iii) Sanitation and security. Arrangements shall exist for:

(A) A supply of water adequate to meet all watering and cleaning needs.

(B) Disposal of wastes by incineration or a public sewer system which meets all applicable environmental quality control standards;

(C) Control of surface drainage onto or from the facility to prevent any disease agent from entering or escaping;

(D) Protective clothing and footwear adequate to insure that workers at the facility have clean clothing and footwear at the start of each workday and at any time such articles become soiled or contaminated;

(E) Power cleaning and disinfecting equipment with adequate capacity to disinfect the facility and equipment;

(F) Sufficient stocks of a disinfectant authorized in §71.10(a)(5) of this chapter;

(G) A security system which prevents contact of birds in quarantine with persons not authorized entry to the facility and with other birds and animals. Such a system shall include a daily log to record the entry and exit of all persons entering the facility and controls at all doorways and other openings to the facility to prevent escape or accidental entry of birds.

(3) Operational procedures. The following procedures shall be observed at the facility at all times.

(i) Personnel. Access to the facility shall be granted only to persons working at the facility or to persons specifically granted such access by the port veterinarian.

(A) All personnel granted access to the bird holding area or the incubator/hatcher area shall:

(1) Wear clean protective clothing and footwear upon entering the bird holding area or the incubator/hatcher area;

(2) Change protective clothing and footwear when they become soiled or contaminated;

(3) Shower when entering and leaving any bird holding area, any incubator/hatcher area, and any necropsy area. Showering when moving between the incubator/hatcher area and the bird holding area is not required when the eggs in the hatching area and the chicks in the holding area are part of the same lot;

(4) Work exclusively with one lot of birds until the lot's release from quarantine, and have no contact with other birds or poultry until the release date.

(B) The importer shall handle soiled clothing worn within the quarantine unit in a manner approved by the port veterinarian as adequate to preclude transmission of a poultry disease agent from the facility.

(ii) Handling of the birds in quarantine. The birds shall be kept in the quarantine facility for a minimum of 30 days and while in quarantine shall be handled in compliance with the following requirements:

(A) Each lot of birds to be quarantined shall be placed in the facility on an “all-in, all-out” basis. No birds shall be taken out of the lot while it is in quarantine except for diagnostic purposes and if additional birds are added to a lot, the total quarantine period for that lot shall be extended so that all birds will have completed at least 30 consecutive days of quarantine before release for entry into the commerce of the United States. The quarantine period may be extended as provided in paragraph (a) of this section.

(1) Hatching eggs of ratites comprising a single lot may be added to the facility in stages, provided the entire lot has been placed in the facility no later than 15 days after the arrival of the first shipment.

(2) If hatching eggs of ratites begin to hatch in the incubator/hatcher area while ratite chicks from the previously quarantined lot remain in the bird (chick) holding area, then the separate lots assume the status of a single lot, and will be released from quarantine in accordance with paragraph (c)(3)(ii)(A) of this section.

(B) The birds may be vaccinated during quarantine only with a vaccine that has been approved by the Administrator, and is administered by a licensed veterinarian under the direct supervision of a veterinarian employed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. The Administrator will approve a vaccine if:

(1) The vaccine is licensed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service in accordance with §102.5 of this chapter; and

(2) The vaccine is not one that is used to prevent Newcastle disease, avian influenza, or any other hemagglutinating virus of poultry.11

11A list of approved vaccines is available from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231.

(C) Birds of the psittacine family shall receive a balanced, medicated feed ration treatment containing not less than 1% CTC with not more than 0.7% calcium for the entire quarantine period as a precautionary measure against chlamydiosis (psittacosis).

(D) The importer shall immediately collect all birds which die in quarantine and hold them under refrigeration, within the facility, shall account for all birds in the shipment, and shall not dispose of any carcass or parts thereof unless authorized to do so by a Veterinary Medical Officer of APHIS of the Department. Birds that die enroute to the United States or while in quarantine shall be made available at the port of entry for necropsy by a Department poultry disease diagnostician who may submit specimens from such birds for laboratory examination.

(E) During the period of quarantine, the birds shall be subjected to such tests and procedures as are required in specific cases by the port veterinarian, to determine whether the birds are free from communicable diseases of poultry and it shall be the responsibility of the importer to identify individually each psittacine bird within 7 days of the entry of the bird into the quarantine facility with a serially numbered legband which has been coded to the quarantine facility or by other suitable means of identification. Any identification device must be approved by the Administrator, upon written request to him, before it shall be used to identify birds under this section. Such means of identification shall be supplied by the importer, and the importer shall insure that each bird is so identified at the time the bird is released from the facility. If Newcastle disease or highly pathogenic avian influenza is found or detected among any birds in quarantine, all birds in the facility shall be destroyed or refused entry and the entire facility shall be thoroughly cleaned and then disinfected as directed under the supervision of an inspector.

(F) The quarantine facility from which a lot of birds has been released shall be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected with a disinfectant authorized in §71.10(a)(5) of this chapter, under supervision of an inspector before a new lot is placed in the facility.

(iii) Records. It shall be the responsibility of the importer to maintain a current daily log for each lot of birds, recording such information as the general condition of the birds each day, source of origin of the birds in the lot, total number of birds in the lot when imported, number of dead birds when lot arrived, date lot was placed into the facility, number of deaths each day in the lot during the quarantine period, necropsy results, and laboratory findings on birds that died during the quarantine date of prescribed tests and results, Department import permit numbers of each lot, date lot was removed from the facility, and any other observations pertinent to the general health of the birds in the lot. The importer shall also make an identification record, at the time each psittacine bird is identified, containing the species of the bird, including the common and scientific name and the number of the identification device placed on each psittacine bird. The daily log and the identification record shall be maintained for 12 months following the date of release of the bird from quarantine and shall be made available to APHIS personnel upon request.

(4) Additional requirements as to location, security, physical plant and facilities, sanitation, and other items may be imposed by the Administrator, in each specific case in order to assure that the quarantine of the birds in such facility will be adequate to enable determination of their health status, prevent spread of disease among birds in quarantine, and prevent escape of poultry disease agents from the facility.

(5) Cooperative and Trust Fund Agreement for services required by importer at a privately owned bird quarantine facility.

(i) When the Administrator determines that a privately owned bird quarantine facility meets the requirements set forth in paragraph (c) of this section, the Department and the importer shall execute a Cooperative and Trust Fund Agreement, as specified in paragraph (c)(5)(iii) of this section. In conjunction with the Cooperative and Trust Fund Agreement, the importer shall deposit with the Administrator a money order or cashier's check in an amount determined by the Administrator to cover all costs incurred by the Department in providing services in accordance with the provisions of the Cooperative and Trust Fund Agreement. Any unobligated funds will, upon request, be returned to the importer, after the birds' release from quarantine.

(ii) The Administrator may provide services required by the importer at a privately owned quarantine facility for the importation of birds on a first come, first served basis, if adequate APHIS personnel are available to provide those services, upon determining that the importer has executed a Cooperative and Trust Fund Agreement, and has deposited funds in an amount determined by the Administrator to be sufficient to cover all costs incurred by the Department in providing services in accordance with that agreement, as specified in paragraph (c)(5)(iii) of this section.

(iii) Cooperative and Trust Fund Agreement.

Cooperative And Trust Fund Agreement between ___ (name of importer) and the United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

This agreement is made and entered into by and between _____ (name of importer), hereinafter referred to as the Importer, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, hereinafter referred to as the Service, with respect to ______ (quarantine facility and address of facility). Whereas, the Service is authorized pursuant to the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.) to regulate the introduction of animals into the United States in order to prevent the introduction of animal and poultry diseases into the United States; and

Whereas, the Importer is interested in the importation of certain birds from regions presently under restrictions for such importation; and

Whereas, the Importer is equipped with a bird quarantine facility that meets the requirements of paragraph (c) of this section; and

Whereas, the Importer has requested the Service to conduct inspections, perform laboratory procedures, complete examinations, and supervise the isolation, quarantine, and care and handling of birds to insure that they meet the Department's quarantine requirements before release into the United States; and

Whereas, it is the intention of the parties hereto that such cooperation shall be for their mutual benefit and the benefit of the people of the United States;

Now therefore, for and in consideration of the promises and mutual covenants herein contained, the parties hereto do hereby mutually agree with each other as follows:

(A) The Importer Agrees:

(1) To operate the quarantine facility in accordance with all Federal Laws and regulations.

(2) To provide a current list of designated personnel employed by the Importer who will be used to handle and care for birds during the quarantine period. The list will include the legal names, current residential addresses, and social security numbers of the designated personnel. The list will be furnished to the port veterinarian at the time an application for an import permit to import birds into the quarantine facility is submitted to the Service. The list will be updated for any changes in or additions to the designated personnel in advance of such personnel working in the quarantine facility.

(3) To furnish to the Service a signed statement from each of the designated personnel employed by the Importer which provides that such personnel agree that for a period of 3 days from their most recent contact with birds in the quarantine facility, such personnel will refrain from having contact with other birds and poultry. This restriction ceases to apply on the date the birds are released from quarantine.

(4) To not permit any designated personnel which the Service determines to be unfit to be employed at a quarantine facility upon written notice from the Service. Such determination shall be based upon such employee's committing or aiding and abetting in the commission of any violation of title 9, Code of Federal Regulations, part 93. The Importer further agrees to suspend any designated employee from working at a quarantine facility when the Service has reason to believe that such employee has violated any provision of title 9, Code of Federal Regulations, part 93, and the Administrator has determined that the actions of such employee constitute a severe threat to introduce or disseminate a communicable disease of poultry into the United States. Such action shall be made upon receipt of notice from the Service requiring such action by the Importer.

(5) To allow the unannounced entry into the quarantine facility of Service personnel or other persons authorized by the Service for the purpose of inspecting birds in quarantine, the operations at the quarantine facility and to ascertain compliance with the Standards for quarantine facilities and handling procedures for importation of birds contained in title 9, Code of Federal Regulations, §93.106(c).

(6) To provide permanent restrooms in both the clean and the quarantine areas of the quarantine facility.

(7) To provide a T.V. monitoring system or a window or windows sufficient to provide a full view of the quarantine area excluding the clothes changing area.

(8) To install a communication system between the clean and quarantine areas of the quarantine facility. Such communication system shall not interfere with the maintenance of the biological security of the quarantine area.

(9) To secure all windows and any openings in the quarantine facility in a manner satisfactory to the Department which will insure the biological security of the quarantine facility and prevent the unauthorized removal of birds.

(10) To install tamperproof hasps and to install hinges on doors from which the pins cannot be removed.

(11) To install a hood with a viewing window over the necropsy table.

(12) To bag waste material in leakproof bags. Such material shall be handled in a manner that spoilage is kept to a minimum and control of pests is maintained. Such material shall be disposed of by incineration or by public sewer or other method authorized by the Administrator to prevent the spread of disease. The disposition of such material shall only be under the direction and supervision of the Service.

(13) To feed chlortetracycline to psittacine birds, upon their arrival in the facility as prescribed in §93.106(c)(3)(ii)(C).

(14) To install an electronic security system which is coordinated through or with the local police so that monitoring of the quarantine facility is maintained whenever Service personnel are not at the facility or, in lieu of such electronic monitoring system to arrange for continuous guarding of the facility with personnel from a bonded, security company. Provided, That, if highly pathogenic avian influenza or Newcastle disease is diagnosed in any of the birds in the quarantine facility, continuous guarding of the facility with personnel from a bonded security company shall be maintained by the Importer. The electronic security system if installed shall be of the “silent type” and shall be triggered to ring at the monitoring site and not at the facility. The electronic system shall be approved by Underwriter's Laboratories.

Written instructions shall be provided to the monitoring agency which shall require that upon activation of the alarm, the police and a representative of the Service designated by the Service shall be notified by the monitoring agency. Such instructions, as well as any changes in such instructions, shall be filed in writing with the Administrator. The Importer shall notify the Service whenever a break in security occurs or is suspected of occurring.

(15) To not have non-Service personnel in the quarantine area when birds are in the quarantine facility unless Service personnel are present.

(16) To have seals of the Service placed on all entrances and exits of the facility when determined necessary by the Service and to take all necessary steps to ensure that such seals are only broken in the presence of Service personnel.

(17) To decide what the disposition of a lot of birds will be within 48 hours following official notification that such a lot is infected with or exposed to highly pathogenic avian influenza or Newcastle disease. Final disposition of the infected or exposed lot is to be accomplished within 4 working days following official notification. Disposition of the birds will be under the supervision of the Service.

(18) To furnish a telephone number or numbers to the Service at which the Importer can be reached on a daily basis or furnish the same for an agent or representative that can act and make decisions on the Importer's behalf.

(19) To deposit with the Service, upon execution of this agreement, a money order or cashier's check, in an amount determined by the Administrator to be sufficient to defray all costs incurred by the Service in providing services required. If such costs exceed the deposited amount, the importer will pay for additional costs incurred, based on official accounting records, within 14 days of receipt of the bill showing the balance due.

(20) To provide for the maintenance and operation of the quarantine facility in accordance with standards for quarantine facilities and handling procedures for importation of birds contained in title 9, Code of Federal Regulations, §93.106(c).

(B) The Service agrees:

(1) To furnish the services of technical and/or professional personnel needed to conduct inspections, perform laboratory procedures, complete examinations, and supervise the isolation, quarantine, and care and handling of birds being imported to ensure that they meet the Department's quarantine requirements before release into the United States.

(2) To issue permits 3 working days following receipt of the permit application, depending upon the availability of personnel to provide the services required for quarantine and the results of an APHIS representative's inspection of the quarantine facility.

(3) To provide the Importer within 30 days following receipt of a written request from the Importer, with an accounting of funds expended in providing services under paragraph (B)(1) of this agreement. Any unobligated balance upon termination or expiration of this agreement shall be returned to the Importer.

(4) To inform the Importer when a diagnosis of highly pathogenic avian influenza or Newcastle disease has been made in any facility.

(5) To promptly inform the Embassy or Consulate of the foreign region to which lots of birds, refused entry into the United States due to a diagnosis of highly pathogenic avian influenza or Newcastle disease, are to be shipped.

(6) To notify in writing the Importer of any designated employee which the Service believes should be suspended from work at the quarantine facility and the basis for such action. Similar notice shall be afforded to the designated employee. Subsequent to such suspension, the designated employee shall have the right to request an immediate review of such action by the Administrator, including presenting his or her views to the Administrator in an informal conference. If the Administrator makes a final determination that grounds existed to suspend such employee, he or she shall notify the Importer and the suspended employee of his or her decision and such employee shall be discharged by the Importer.

(7) Prior to any final determination being made by the Service concerning the discharge of any designated personnel employed by the Importer, the Service will inform, in writing, the Importer and the designated personnel of the basis for such action. If such person contests such action he or she shall be permitted to present his or her views to the Administrator, provided such request is made within 30 days of the receipt of the aforementioned written notice. If a final determination is made by the Administrator that such personnel should be discharged, he or she shall notify such personnel and the Importer of such determination.

(C) It is mutually understood and agreed:

(1) That a maximum capacity will be established for each quarantine lot. This will be based upon the capacity of the quarantine facility to handle the birds. The number of birds on the permits will not exceed this capacity.

(2) If the seals referred to in paragraph (c)(5)(iii)(A)(16) of this section are broken by other than Service personnel, it will be considered a breach in security and an immediate accounting of all birds in the facility shall be made by the Service. If any birds are determined to be missing from the facility, the quarantine period will be extended for an additional 30-day period.

(3) During the performance of this cooperative work, the Importer agrees to be bound by the equal opportunity and nondiscrimination provisions as set forth in exhibit B and nonsegregation of facilities provisions as set forth in exhibit C,12 which are attached hereto and made a part thereof.

12Import-Export Animals Staff, Veterinary Services, APHIS, USDA, will furnish each importer with copies of exhibits B and C prior to their signing the Cooperative and Trust Fund Agreement.

(4) No member of or delegate to Congress or resident commissioner, shall be admitted to any share or part of this agreement or to any benefit to arise therefrom; but this provision shall not be construed to extend to this agreement if made with a corporation of its general benefit.

(5) This agreement shall become effective upon date of final signature and shall continue until the permitted lot of birds is released from quarantine. This agreement may be amended by agreement of the parties in writing. It may be terminated by either party upon 30 days written notice to the other party.

Date
 

Importer

Date
 

Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture

(d) Charges for services. The charges to be borne by the importer for services provided for quarantine facilities approved in accordance with paragraph (c) of this section shall be:

(1) The appropriate GS hourly rate (including appropriate premium pay in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 5541-5549) of the employee who actually performs the service, including his or her travel time and his or her travel expenses: Provided, however, Such time and travel expense shall not exceed the time and travel expense to and from his or her official duty station;

(2) All applicable user fees, as listed in part 130 of this chapter; and

(3) A surcharge for overhead based on the most current historical data available showing the percentage of APHIS funds expended for administrative support.

(e) Requirements of other Federal laws and regulations, such as the Department's Animal Welfare Regulations in subchapter A of this chapter shall also apply as applicable to the quarantine facilities.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §93.106, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

Canada13

13Importations from Canada shall be subject to §93.107, in addition to other sections in this part which are in terms applicable to such importations.

§93.107   Special provisions.

(a) In-bond shipments from Canada. Birds from Canada transported in-bond through the United States for immediate export shall be inspected at the border port of entry and, when accompanied by an import permit obtained under §93.103 of this part and all conditions therein are observed, shall be allowed entry into the United States and shall be otherwise handled as provided in paragraph (d) of §93.101.

(b) Ratites from Canada. Ratites that were hatched and raised in Canada or ratites that were legally imported into Canada and, upon arrival in Canada, were quarantined for a minimum of 28 days at a Canadian quarantine facility and remained in Canada for an additional 60 days following completion of quarantine may be imported into the United States:

(1) Without being quarantined upon arrival in the United States; and

(2) At any of the following ports of entry: Anchorage, AK; Fairbanks, AK; Los Angeles, CA; San Diego, CA; Denver, CO; Miami, FL; Tampa, FL; Atlanta, GA; Eastport, ID; Chicago, IL; New Orleans, LA; Boston, MA; Baltimore, MD; Houlton, ME; Jackman, ME; Detroit, MI; Port Huron, MI; Sault Ste. Marie, MI; Minneapolis, MN; Raymond, MT; Sweetgrass, MT; Buffalo, NY; Champlain, NY; New York, NY; Stewart Airport, Newburgh, NY; Dunseith, ND; Pembina, ND; Portal, ND; Portland, OR; San Juan, PR; Houston, TX; Highgate Springs, VT; Seattle, WA; and Sumas, WA; and

(3) If offered for entry at a Canadian land border port listed in §93.203(b), without an import permit; and

(4) If consigned directly to slaughter from the port of entry, without being treated for ectoparasites within 3 to 14 days before shipment to the United States, as otherwise required by §93.104(c)(8); and

(5) If in compliance with all of the applicable regulations of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service contained in Title 50, subchapter B, of the Code of Federal Regulations.

(c) Ratite eggs from Canada. Hatching eggs of ratites that were laid in Canada may be imported into the United States:

(1) Without being quarantined upon arrival in the United States; and

(2) At any of the ports of entry listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section or authorized by §93.105(a); and

(3) If offered for entry at a Canadian land border port listed in §93.203(b), without an import permit; and

(4) If in compliance with all of the applicable regulations of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service contained in Title 50, subchapter B, of the Code of Federal Regulations.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 61 FR 68126, Dec. 27, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 56012, 56015, Oct. 28, 1997; 65 FR 38178, June 20, 2000; 67 FR 68022, Nov. 8, 2002]

Subpart B—Poultry

§93.200   Definitions.

Wherever in this subpart the following terms are used, unless the context otherwise requires, they shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

Accredited veterinarian. A veterinarian approved by the Administrator in accordance with the provisions of part 161 of this title to perform functions specified in parts 1, 2, 3, and 11 of subchapter A, and subchapters B, C, and D of this chapter, and to perform functions required by cooperative state-federal disease control and eradication programs.

Administrator. The Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service or any other employee of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, to whom authority has been or may be delegated to act in the Administrator's stead.

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (APHIS or Service).

Animals. Cattle, sheep, goats, other ruminants, swine, horses, asses, mules, zebras, dogs, and poultry.

Commercial poultry. Chickens, doves, ducks, geese, grouse, guinea fowl, partridges, pea fowl, pheasants, pigeons, quail, swans, and turkeys (including eggs for hatching) which are imported for resale, breeding, public display, or any other commercial purpose.

Communicable disease. Any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease of domestic livestock, poultry or other animals.

Department. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Fever tick. Boophilus annulatus, including, but not limited to, the varieties Americana and Australia.

Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). Highly pathogenic avian influenza is defined as follows:

(1) Any influenza virus that kills at least 75 percent of eight 4- to 6-week-old susceptible chickens within 10 days following intravenous inoculation with 0.2 mL of a 1:10 dilution of a bacteria-free, infectious allantoic fluid or inoculation of 10 susceptible 4- to 8-week-old chickens resulting in an intravenous pathogenicity index (IVPI) of greater than 1.2;

(2) Any H5 or H7 virus that does not meet the criteria in paragraph (1) of this definition, but has an amino acid sequence at the haemagglutinin cleavage site that is compatible with highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses; or

(3) Any influenza virus that is not an H5 or H7 subtype and that kills one to five out of eight inoculated chickens and grows in cell culture in the absence of trypsin within 10 days.

Immediate slaughter. Consignment directly from the port of entry to a recognized slaughtering establishment1 and slaughter thereat within two weeks from the date of entry.

1The name of recognized slaughtering establishments approved under this part may be obtained from the Area Veterinarian in Charge, Veterinary Services, for the State of destination of the shipment.

Inspector. An employee of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service authorized to perform duties required under this subpart.

Operator. For the purpose of §93.209, any person operating an approved quarantine facility.

Performing or theatrical poultry. Poultry which are to be used in shows, theatrical acts or performances only.

Port veterinarian. A veterinarian employed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to perform duties required under this part at a port of entry.

Poultry. Chickens, doves, ducks, geese, grouse, guinea fowl, partridges, pea fowl, pheasants, pigeons, quail, swans, and turkeys (including eggs for hatching).

Quarantine facility. A USDA facility, or a private facility approved by APHIS, for the secure housing of imported birds, poultry, or other animals for specified periods.

Region. Any defined geographic land area identifiable by geological, political, or surveyed boundaries. A region may consist of any of the following:

(1) A national entity (country);

(2) Part of a national entity (zone, county, department, municipality, parish, Province, State, etc.)

(3) Parts of several national entities combined into an area; or

(4) A group of national entities (countries) combined into a single area.

Swine. The domestic hog and all varieties of wild hogs.

United States. All of the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands of the United States, and all other Territories and Possessions of the United States.

Veterinary services. The Veterinary Services unit of the Department.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56015, Oct. 28, 1997; 79 FR 71005, Dec. 1, 2014]

§93.201   General prohibitions; exceptions.

(a) No poultry or product subject to the provisions of this part shall be brought into the United States except in accordance with the regulations in this part and part 94 of this subchapter;2 nor shall any such poultry or product be handled or moved after physical entry into the United States before final release from quarantine or any other form of governmental detention except in compliance with such regulations; Provided, That, the Administrator may upon request in specific cases permit poultry or products to be brought into or through the United States under such conditions as he or she may prescribe, when he or she determines in the specific case that such action will not endanger the livestock or poultry of the United States. Unless otherwise indicated in the regulations, no live poultry, and no hatching eggs from poultry, shall be imported into the United States if the poultry have originated from a region referenced in §94.6(a) of this subchapter where highly pathogenic avian influenza or Newcastle disease is known to exist in commercial poultry populations, have transited highly pathogenic avian influenza- or Newcastle disease-affected regions, or have been vaccinated for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza.

2Importations of certain animals from various regions are absolutely prohibited under part 94 because of specific diseases.

(b) The provisions in this part 93 relating to poultry shall not apply to healthy poultry not known to be infected with or exposed, within the 90 days preceding the date of export from the region of origin, to communicable diseases of poultry, if an import permit3 has been obtained under §93.204 of this chapter and all conditions therein are observed; and if such poultry are handled as follows:

3Such permit may be obtained from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231. Requests for approval of such facilities should also be made to the Deputy Administrator.

(1)(i) They are maintained under continuous confinement in transit through the United States aboard an aircraft, ocean vessel, or other means of conveyance; or

(ii) Except for poultry in transit through Anchorage, Alaska, under §93.204(c) of this part, which are not allowed to be unloaded, they are unloaded, in the course of such transit, into an animal or bird holding facility which is provided by the carrier or its agent and has been approved4 in advance by the Administrator in accordance with paragraph (b)(3) of this section as adequate to prevent the spread within the United States of any livestock or poultry disease, and they are maintained there under continuous confinement until loaded aboard a means of conveyance for transportation from the United States and are maintained under continuous confinement aboard such means of conveyance until it leaves the United States; the import permit will specify any additional conditions necessary to assure that the transit of the poultry through the United States can be made without endangering the livestock or poultry of the United States, and that Department inspectors may inspect the poultry on board such means of conveyance or in such holding facility to ascertain whether the requirements of this paragraph are met, and dispose of them in accordance with the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.) if such conditions are not met; and

4See footnote 3 in subpart B.

(2) The carrier or its agent executes and furnishes to the collector of Customs at the first port of arrival a declaration stating that the poultry will be retained aboard such means of conveyance or in an approved holding facility during transshipment as required by this paragraph.

(3) Provisions for the approval of facilities required in this paragraph are:

(i) They must be sufficiently isolated to prevent direct or indirect contact with all other animals and birds while in the United States.

(ii) They must be so constructed that they provide adequate protection against environmental conditions and can be adequately cleaned, washed and disinfected.

(iii) They must provide for disposal of animal and bird carcasses, manure, bedding, waste and any related shipping materials in a manner that will prevent dissemination of disease.

(iv) They must have provisions for adequate sources of feed and water and for attendants for the care and feeding of poultry in the facility.

(v) They must comply with additional requirements as may be imposed by the Administrator if deemed applicable for a particular shipment.

(vi) They must also comply with all applicable local, State and Federal requirements for environmental quality and with the provisions of the Animal Welfare Regulations in chapter I of this title, as applicable.

(c) Performing or theatrical poultry returning to the United States. (1) Performing or theatrical poultry of United States origin that are returning to the United States from Canada or Mexico may be imported if:

(i) The poultry are found upon port of entry veterinary inspection to be free of poultry diseases; and

(ii) The poultry are accompanied by a United States veterinary health certificate issued prior to the departure of the poultry from the United States and the certificate shows the number from the leg band, tattoo, or microchip affixed to the poultry prior to departure; and

(iii) During port of entry veterinary inspection it is determined that the number from the leg band, tattoo, or microchip on the poultry is the same as the one listed on the health certificate.

(2) Except for performing or theatrical poultry that have been in any region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists, which are subject to the provisions of paragraph (c)(3) of this section, performing or theatrical poultry of United States origin that have been outside the United States in a region other than Canada or Mexico may be imported if:

(i) The poultry meet the requirements of paragraphs (c)(1)(i) through (iii) of this section; and

(ii) The poultry are accompanied by an import permit issued by APHIS; and

(iii) The owner importing the poultry signs and furnishes to the Administrator the following:

(A) A notarized declaration under oath or affirmation (or a statement signed by the owner and witnessed by a Department inspector) stating that the poultry have not been in contact with poultry or other birds while out of the region (for example, association with other avian species at exhibitions or at aviaries); and

(B) An agreement on VS Form 17-8, obtainable from a Federal inspector at the port of entry, stating:

(1) That the poultry will be maintained in confinement in his or her personal possession separate and apart from all poultry and other birds for a minimum of 30 days following importation at the address where the poultry are to be held and made available for health inspection and testing by Department inspectors upon request until released at the end of such period by such an inspector; and

(2) That appropriate Federal officials in the State of destination will be immediately notified if any signs of disease are noted in any of the poultry or any poultry die during that period. The owner importing such poultry must comply with the provisions of the aforementioned agreement before the poultry may be released from confinement.

(3) Any performing or theatrical poultry of United States origin that have been in any region listed in §94.6(d) of this subchapter as a region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists may only be imported through the port of Los Angeles, CA, Miami, FL, or New York, NY, and only under the following conditions:

(i) The poultry meet the requirements of paragraphs (c)(1)(i) through (iii) of this section; and

(ii) The poultry are accompanied by an import permit issued by APHIS; and

(iii) The poultry are quarantined for a minimum of 30 days, and for such longer period as may be required by the Administrator in any specific case, at a quarantine facility maintained by APHIS in accordance with §§93.209 and 93.210.

(d) The provisions in this part relating to poultry shall not be applicable to performing or theatrical poultry.

(e) Pigeons, doves, and other Columbiform species that have originated from or transited regions where highly pathogenic avian influenza is considered to exist may be imported into the United States under permit and controlled conditions to approved establishments subject to all applicable requirements in this part.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0245)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 56012, 56015, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003; 69 FR 25825, May 10, 2004; 76 FR 4053, Jan. 24, 2011; 79 FR 71005, Dec. 1, 2014]

§93.202   Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon; unloading, cleaning, and disinfection requirements.

(a) Inspection: All aircraft and other means of conveyance (including shipping containers thereon) moving into the United States from any foreign region are subject to inspection without a warrant by properly identified and designated inspectors to determine whether they are carrying any animal, carcass, product or article regulated or subject to disposal under any law or regulation administered by the Secretary of Agriculture for prevention of the introduction or dissemination of any communicable animal disease.

(b) Unloading requirements: Whenever in the course of any such inspection at any port in the United States the inspector has reason to believe that the means of conveyance or container is contaminated with material of animal (including poultry) origin, such as, but not limited to, meat, organs, glands, extracts, secretions, fat, bones, blood, lymph, urine, or manure, so as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, the inspector may require the unloading of the means of conveyance and the emptying of the container if he or she deems it necessary to enable him or her to determine whether the means of conveyance or container is in fact so contaminated. The principal operator of the means of conveyance and his or her agent in charge of the means of conveyance shall comply with any such requirement under the immediate supervision of, and in the time and manner prescribed by, the inspector.

(c) Cleaning and disinfection: Whenever, upon inspection under this section, an inspector determines that a means of conveyance or shipping container is contaminated with material of animal origin so as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, he or she shall notify the principal operator of the means of conveyance or his or her agent in charge, of such determination and the requirements under this section. The person so notified shall cause the cleaning and disinfection of such means of conveyance and container under the immediate supervision of, and in the time and manner prescribed by, the inspector.

(d) For purposes of this section, the term “shipping container” means any container of a type specially adapted for use in transporting any article on the means of conveyance involved.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 59 FR 67614, Dec. 30, 1994. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56015, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003]

§93.203   Ports designated for the importation of poultry.

(a) Air and ocean ports. The following ports have APHIS inspection and quarantine facilities necessary for quarantine stations and all poultry shall be entered into the United States through these stations, except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), (d) and (e) of this section: Los Angeles, California; Miami, Florida; and Newburgh, New York.

(b) Canadian border ports. The following land border ports are designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of poultry from Canada: Eastport, Idaho; Houlton and Jackman, Maine; Detroit, Port Huron, and Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan; Baudette, Minnesota; Opheim, Raymond, and Sweetgrass, Montana; Alexandria Bay, Buffalo, and Champlain, New York; Dunseith, Pembina, and Portal, North Dakota; Derby Line and Highgate Springs, Vermont; Oroville and Sumas, Washington.

(c) Mexican border ports. The following land border ports are designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of poultry from Mexico: Brownsville, Hidalgo, Laredo, Eagle Pass, Del Rio, Presidio, and El Paso, Texas; Douglas, Naco, Nogales, Sasabe, and San Luis, Arizona; Calexico and San Ysidro, California; and Antelope Wells, and Columbus, New Mexico.

(d) Limited ports. The following ports are designated as having inspection facilities for the entry of poultry and poultry products such as poultry test specimens, or hatching eggs and day old chicks which do not appear to require restraint and holding inspection facilities: Anchorage and Fairbanks, Alaska; San Diego, California; Jacksonville, Port Canaveral, St. Petersburg-Clearwater, and Tampa, Florida; Atlanta, Georgia; Honolulu, Hawaii; Chicago, Illinois; New Orleans, Louisiana; Portland, Maine; Baltimore, Maryland; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Great Falls, Montana; Portland, Oregon; San Juan, Puerto Rico; Galveston and Houston, Texas; and Seattle, Spokane, and Tacoma, Washington.

(e) Designation of other ports. The Secretary of the Treasury has approved the designation as quarantine stations of the ports specified in this section. In special cases other ports may be designated as quarantine stations under this section by the Administrator, with the concurrence of the Secretary of the Treasury.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 58 FR 37642, July 13, 1993; 60 FR 16045, Mar. 29, 1995; 60 FR 25120, May 11, 1995. Redesignated at 56012, Oct. 28, 1997, as amended at 65 FR 38178, June 20, 2000; 67 FR 6370, Feb. 12, 2002; 67 FR 68022, Nov. 8, 2002]

§93.204   Import permits for poultry and for poultry test specimens for diagnostic purposes; and reservation fees for space at quarantine facilities maintained by APHIS.

(a) Application for permit; reservation required. (1) For poultry and poultry test specimens for diagnostic screening purposes, intended for importation from any part of the world, except as otherwise provided for in §§93.204(c), 93.214, 93.217, and 93.218, the importer shall first apply for and obtain from APHIS an import permit. The application shall specify the name and address of the importer; the species, breed, number or quantity of poultry or poultry test specimens to be imported; the purpose of the importation; the region of origin; the name and address of the exporter; the port of embarkation in the foreign region; the mode of transportation, route of travel, and the port of entry in the United States; the proposed date of arrival of the poultry or poultry test specimens to be imported; and the name of the person to whom the poultry or poultry test specimens will be delivered and the location of the place in the United States to which delivery will be made from the port of entry. Additional information may be required in the form of certificates concerning specific diseases to which the poultry are susceptible, as well as vaccinations or other precautionary treatments to which the poultry or poultry test specimens have been subjected. Notice of any such requirement will be given to the applicant in each case.

(2) An application for permit to import poultry may also be denied because of: Communicable disease conditions in the area or region of origin, or in a region where the shipment has been or will be held or through which the shipment has been or will be transported; deficiencies in the regulatory programs for the control or eradication of animal diseases and the unavailability of veterinary services in the above mentioned regions; the importer's failure to provide satisfactory evidence concerning the origin, history, and health status of the poultry; the lack of satisfactory information necessary to determine that the importation will not be likely to transmit any communicable disease to livestock or poultry of the United States; or any other circumstances which the Administrator believes require such denial to prevent the dissemination of any communicable disease of livestock or poultry into the United States.

(3)(i) The importer or importer's agent shall pay or ensure payment of a reservation fee for each lot of poultry to be quarantined in a facility maintained by USDA. For poultry, the reservation fee shall be 100 percent of the cost of providing care, feed, and handling during quarantine, as estimated by the quarantine facility's veterinarian in charge.

(ii) At the time the importer or the importer's agent requests a reservation of quarantine space, the importer or importer's agent shall pay the reservation fee by check or U.S. money order or ensure payment of the reservation fee by an irrevocable letter of credit from a commercial bank (the effective date on such letter of credit shall run to 30 days after the date the poultry are scheduled to be released from quarantine); except that anyone who issues a check to the Department for a reservation fee which is returned because of insufficient funds shall be denied any further request for reservation of a quarantine space until the outstanding amount is paid.

(iii) Any reservation fee paid by check or U.S. money order shall be applied against the expenses incurred for services received by the importer or importer's agent in connection with the quarantine for which the reservation was made. Any part of the reservation fee which remains unused after being applied against the expenses incurred for services received by the importer or the importer's agent in connection with the quarantine for which the reservation was made, shall be returned to the individual who paid the reservation fee. If the reservation fee is ensured by a letter of credit, the Department will draw against the letter of credit unless payment for services received by the importer or importer's agent in connection with the quarantine is otherwise made at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(iv) Any reservation fee shall be forfeited if the importer or the importer's agent fails to present for entry, within 24 hours following the designated time of arrival, the lot of poultry for which the reservation was made: Except that a reservation fee shall not be forfeited if:

(A) Written notice of cancellation from the importer or the importer's agent is received by the office of the veterinarian in charge of the quarantine facility5 during regular business hours (8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays) no later than 15 days prior to the beginning of the time of importation as specified in the import permit or as arranged with the veterinarian in charge of the quarantine facility if no import permit is required (the 15 day period shall not include Saturdays, Sundays, or holidays), or

5The addresses of USDA quarantine facilities may be found in telephone directories listing the facilities or by contacting the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231.

(B) The Administrator determines that services, other than provided by carriers, necessary for the importation of the poultry within the requested period are unavailable because of unforeseen circumstances as determined by the Administrator, (such as the closing of an airport due to inclement weather or the unavailability of the reserved space due to the extension of another quarantine).

(v) If the reservation fee was ensured by a letter of credit and the fee is to be forfeited under paragraph (a)(3)(iv) of this section, the Department will draw against the letter of credit unless the reservation fee is otherwise paid at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(vi) When a reservation is cancelled in accordance with paragraph (a)(3)(iv)(A) of this section and the provisions of paragraph (a)(3)(iv)(B) of this section do not apply, a $40.00 cancellation fee shall be charged. If a reservation fee was paid, the cancellation fee shall be deducted from any reservation fee returned to the importer or the importer's agent. If the reservation fee was ensured by a letter of credit, the Department will draw the amount of the cancellation fee against the letter of credit unless the cancellation fee is otherwise paid at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(b) Permit. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, when a permit is issued, the original and two copies will be sent to the importer. It shall be the responsibility of the importer to forward the original permit and one copy to the shipper in the region of origin, and it shall also be the responsibility of the importer to insure that the shipper presents the copy of the permit to the carrier and makes proper arrangements for the original permit to accompany the shipment to the specified U.S. port of entry for presentation to the collector of customs. Poultry and poultry test specimens for diagnostic screening purposes for poultry intended for importation into the United States for which a permit has been issued, will be received at the specified port of entry within the time prescribed in the permit which shall not exceed 14 days from the first day that the permit is effective for all permits, except that the time prescribed in permits from the importation of poultry shall not exceed 30 days, and for performing or theatrical poultry shall not exceed 90 days. Poultry and poultry test specimens for which a permit is required by these regulations will not be eligible for entry if a permit has not been issued; if unaccompanied by such a permit; if shipment is from any port other than the one designated in the permit; if arrival in the United States is at any port other than the one designated in the permit; if the poultry or poultry test specimens offered for entry differ from those described in the permit; or if the poultry or poultry test specimens are not handled as outlined in the application for the permit and as specified in the permit issued.

(c) Notwithstanding any other provisions in this part, importers are not required to obtain an import permit and provide the shipper with an original import permit for each individual shipment of poultry or pigeons transiting the port of Anchorage, Alaska, if the following conditions are met:

(1) The importer applies for and obtains an import permit for multiple shipments of poultry or pigeons transiting the port of Anchorage, Alaska, in accordance with the provisions of this section and related requirements concerning application for the permit. However, the following information is not required on the application:

(i) The species, breed, and number of poultry or pigeons to be imported;

(ii) The individual poultry identification;

(iii) The region of origin;

(iv) The name and address of the exporter;

(v) The port of embarkation in the foreign region;

(vi) The mode of transportation and the route of travel;

(vii) The proposed date of arrival of the poultry or pigeons; and

(viii) The name and address of the person to whom the poultry or pigeons will be delivered.

(2) The importer completes a copy of the import permit obtained under paragraph (c)(1) of this section for each separate shipment of poultry or pigeons intended to transit the port of Anchorage, Alaska, by inserting the following information on a copy of the permit:

(i) The species, breed, and number of poultry or pigeons to be imported;

(ii) The region of origin;

(iii) The name and address of the exporter;

(iv) The port of embarkation in the foreign region;

(v) The mode of transportation and the route of travel;

(vi) The proposed date of arrival of the poultry or pigeons; and

(vii) The name and address of the person to whom the poultry or pigeons will be delivered.

(3) The importer, not less than 2 weeks prior to the anticipated date of arrival of each separate intransit shipment of poultry or pigeons at the port of Anchorage, Alaska, provides the port veterinarian with a copy of the completed import permit;

(4) A copy of the completed import permit accompanies each separate intransit shipment of poultry or pigeons to the port of Anchorage, Alaska;

(5) Import permits issued for multiple shipments of poultry or pigeons transiting the port of Anchorage, Alaska, will be valid only during the calendar year in which they are issued.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 59 FR 67614, Dec. 30, 1994. Redesignated and amended at 56012, 56015, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.205   Certificate for live poultry and hatching eggs.

(a) Live poultry. (1) All live poultry, except eggs for hatching, offered for importation from any region of the world shall be accompanied by a certificate stating that such poultry and their flock or flocks of origin were inspected on the premises of origin immediately before the date of movement from such region and that they were then found to be free of evidence of communicable diseases of poultry. The certificate shall also state that, as far as it has been possible to determine, during the 90 days prior to movement, the poultry were not exposed to communicable diseases of poultry and the premises were not in any area under quarantine. The certificate shall also state that the poultry have not been vaccinated with a vaccine for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza. The certificate shall also state that the poultry have been kept in the region from which they are offered for importation since they were hatched, or for at least 90 days immediately preceding the date of movement, that the poultry have not originated from or have been moved through a region referenced in §94.6(a) of this subchapter as a region where any form of highly pathogenic influenza exists, and that, as far as it has been possible to determine, no case of highly pathogenic avian influenza or Newcastle disease occurred on the premises where such poultry were kept, or on adjoining premises, during that 90-day period. The certificate must also state that the birds were placed into new or appropriately sanitized packaging materials at the premises from which the birds were to be exported.

(2) Live poultry certificates accompanying pigeons, doves, and other Columbiform species that have originated from or been moved through regions where highly pathogenic avian influenza is considered to exist must additionally state that the Columbiform species have been moved and handled under conditions specified on the import permit ensuring that their movement and handling involved no direct or indirect exposure to other animals, birds, and poultry.

(b) Hatching eggs. All eggs for hatching offered for importation from any part of the world shall be accompanied by a certificate stating that the flock or flocks of origin were found upon inspection to be free from evidence of communicable diseases of poultry, the hatching eggs are from poultry that have not been vaccinated with a vaccine for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza, that during the 90 days prior to movement, the flock or flocks of origin were not exposed to communicable diseases of poultry and the premises were not in any area under quarantine, and that the hatching eggs and the flock or flocks of origin have not originated in or been moved through a region referenced in accordance with §94.6(a) of this subchapter as a region where any form of highly pathogenic avian influenza exists. The certificate must also state that the hatching eggs were placed into new or appropriately sanitized packaging materials at the premises from which the hatching eggs were to be exported.

(c) Nature of certificate. The certificate required by this section shall be issued by a salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the region of origin, or if the articles are exported from Mexico, may alternatively be issued by a veterinarian accredited by the National Government of Mexico and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the National Government of Mexico, thereby representing that the veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so.

[76 FR 4053, Jan. 24, 2011, as amended at 78 FR 19083, Mar. 29, 2013; 79 FR 71006, Dec. 1, 2014]

§93.206   Declaration and other documents for poultry.

(a) The certificates, declarations, and affidavits required by the regulations in this part shall be presented by the importer or his or her agent to the collector of customs at the port of entry, upon arrival of poultry at such port, for the use of the veterinary inspector at the port of entry.

(b) For all poultry offered for importation, the importer or his or her agent shall first present two copies of a declaration which shall list the port of entry, the name and address of the importer, the name and address of the broker, the origin of the poultry, the number, breed, species, and purpose of the importation, the name of the person to whom the poultry will be delivered, and the location of the place to which such delivery will be made.

(c) Any declaration, permit, or other document for poultry required under this subpart may be issued and presented using a U.S. Government electronic information exchange system or other authorized method.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 81 FR 40151, June 21, 2016]

§93.207   Inspection at the port of entry.

Inspection shall be made at the port of entry of all poultry imported from any part of the world except as provided in §§93.215 and 93.220. All poultry found to be free from communicable disease and not to have been exposed thereto within 90 days prior to their exportation to the United States shall be admitted subject to the other provisions in this part; all other poultry shall be refused entry. Poultry refused entry, unless exported within a time fixed in each case by the Administrator, and in accordance with other provisions he or she may require in each case for their handling shall be disposed of as the Administrator may direct. Such portions of the transporting vessel, and of its cargo, which have been exposed to any such poultry or their emanations shall be disinfected in such manner as may be considered necessary by the inspector in charge at the port of entry, to prevent the introduction or spread of livestock or poultry disease, before the cargo is allowed to land.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 56012, 56015, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003]

§93.208   Articles accompanying poultry.

No litter or manure, fodder or other aliment, nor any equipment such as boxes, buckets, ropes, chains, blankets, or other things used for or about poultry governed by the regulations this part, shall be landed from any conveyance except under such restrictions as the inspector in charge at the port of entry shall direct.

§93.209   Quarantine requirements.

(a) Poultry, other than eggs for hatching, imported, except as provided in §93.216 of this part, shall be quarantined for not less than 30 days, counting from the date of arrival at the port of entry. During their quarantine, such poultry shall be subject to any inspections, disinfections, and tests as may be required by the Administrator, to determine their freedom from communicable diseases of poultry, and their freedom from exposure to such diseases.

(b) Poultry eggs for hatching imported, except from regions designated in §94.6(a) of this subchapter as free of Newcastle disease and highly pathogenic avian influenza, shall be quarantined from time of arrival at the port of entry until hatched and the poultry from such eggs shall remain quarantined for not less than 30 days following hatch. During their quarantine, such eggs for hatching and poultry from such eggs shall be subject to any inspections, disinfections, and tests as may be required by the Administrator, to determine their freedom from communicable diseases of poultry.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 61 FR 56891, Nov. 5, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56015, Oct. 28, 1997; 76 FR 4054, Jan. 24, 2011; 78 FR 19083, Mar. 29, 2013]

§93.210   Poultry quarantine facilities.

(a) Privately operated quarantine facilities. The importer, or his or her agent, of poultry subject to quarantine under the regulations in this part shall arrange for acceptable transportation to the privately operated quarantine facility and for the care, feed, and handling of the poultry from the time of unloading at the quarantine port to the time of release from quarantine. Such arrangements shall be agreed to in advance by the Administrator. All expenses resulting therefrom or incident thereto shall be the responsibility of the importer; APHIS assumes no responsibility with respect thereto. The quarantine facility must be suitable for the quarantine of such poultry and must be approved by the Administrator prior to the issuance of any import permit. The facilities occupied by poultry should be kept clean and sanitary to the satisfaction of the inspector assigned to supervise the quarantine. If for any cause the care, feed, or handling of poultry, or the sanitation of the facilities, is neglected, in the opinion of the inspector assigned to supervise the quarantine, such services may be furnished by APHIS in the same manner as though arrangements had been made for such services as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, and/or the poultry may be disposed of as the Administrator, may direct, including sale in accordance with the procedure described in paragraph (b) of this section. The importer, or his or her agent, shall request in writing such inspection and other services as may be required, and shall waive all claim against the United States and APHIS or any employee of APHIS for damages which may arise from such services. The Administrator may prescribe reasonable rates for the services provided under this paragraph. When it is found necessary to extend the usual minimum quarantine period, the importer, or his or her agent, shall be so advised in writing and shall pay for such additional quarantine and other services required. Payment for all services received by the importer, or his or her agent, in connection with each separate lot of poultry shall be made by certified check or U.S. money order prior to release of the poultry. If such payment is not made, the poultry may be sold in accordance with the procedure described in paragraph (b) of this section, or otherwise disposed of as directed by the Administrator.

(b) Quarantine facilities maintained by APHIS. The importer, or his or her agent, of poultry subject to quarantine under the regulations in this part shall arrange for acceptable transportation to the quarantine facility, and for the care, feed, and handling of the poultry from the time they arrive at the quarantine port to the time of release from quarantine. Such arrangements shall be agreed to in advance by the Administrator. The importer or his or her agent shall request in writing such inspection and other services as may be required, and shall waive all claim against the United States and APHIS or any employee of APHIS, for damages which may arise from such services. All expenses resulting therefrom or incident thereto shall be the responsibility of the importer; APHIS assumes no responsibility with respect thereto. The Administrator may prescribe reasonable rates for the services provided under this paragraph. When it is found necessary to extend the usual minimum quarantine period, the importer, or his or her agent, shall be so advised in writing and shall pay for such additional quarantine and other services required. Payment for services received by the importer, or his or her agent, in connection with each separate lot of poultry shall be made by certified check or U.S. money order prior to release of the poultry. If such payment is not made, the poultry may be sold in accordance with the procedure described in this paragraph or otherwise disposed of as directed by the Administrator. When payment is not made and the poultry are to be sold to recover payment for services received, the importer, or his or her agent, will be notified by the inspector that if said charges are not immediately paid or satisfactory arrangements made for payment, the poultry will be sold at public sale to pay the expense of care, feed, and handling during that period. The sale will be held after the expiration of the quarantine period, at such time and place as may be designated by the General Services Administration or other designated selling agent. The proceeds of the sale, after deducting the charges for care, feed, and handling of the poultry and other expenses, including the expense of the sale, shall be held in a Special Deposit Account in the United States Treasury for 6 months from the date of sale. If not claimed by the importer, or his or her agent, within 6 months from the date of sale, the amount so held shall be transferred from the Special Deposit Account to the General Fund Account in the United States Treasury.

(c) Amounts collected from the importer, or his or her agent, for service rendered shall be deposited so as to be available for defraying the expenses involved in this service.

§93.211   Quarantine stations, visiting restricted; sales prohibited.

Visitors shall not be admitted to the quarantine enclosure during any time that poultry are in quarantine except that an importer (or his or her accredited agent or veterinarian) may be admitted to the yards and buildings containing his or her quarantined poultry at such intervals as may be deemed necessary, and under such conditions and restrictions as may be imposed, by the inspector in charge of the quarantine station. On the last day of the quarantine period, owners, officers or registry societies, and others having official business or whose services may be necessary in the removal of the poultry may be admitted upon written permission from the said inspector. No exhibition or sale shall be allowed within the quarantine grounds.

§93.212   Manure from quarantined poultry.

No manure shall be removed from the quarantine premises until the release of the poultry producing same.

§93.213   Appearance of disease among poultry in quarantine.

If any contagious disease appears among poultry during the quarantine period special precautions shall be taken to prevent spread of the infection to other poultry in the quarantine station or to those outside the grounds. The affected poultry shall be disposed of as the Administrator may direct, depending upon the nature of the disease.

Canada6

6Importations from Canada shall be subject to §§93.214 to 93.216, inclusive, in addition to other sections in this part which are in terms applicable to such importations.

§93.214   Import permit and declaration for poultry.

(a) For poultry intended for importation from Canada, the importer shall first apply for and obtain from APHIS an import permit as provided in §93.204: Provided, That an import permit is not required for poultry if offered for entry at a land border port designated in §93.203(b).

(b) For all poultry offered for importation from Canada, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of a declaration as provided in §93.206.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56015, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.215   Special provisions.

(a) In-bond shipments from Canada. (1) Poultry from Canada transported in-bond through the United States for immediate export shall be inspected at the border port of entry and, when accompanied by an import permit obtained under §93.204 of this part and all conditions therein are observed, shall be allowed entry into the United States and shall be otherwise handled as provided in paragraph (b) of §93.201. Poultry not accompanied by a permit shall meet the requirements of this part in the same manner as poultry destined for importation into the United States, except that the Administrator may permit their inspection at some other point when he or she finds that such action will not increase the risk that communicable disease of livestock and poultry will be disseminated to the livestock or poultry of the United States.

(2) In-transit shipments through Canada. Poultry originating in the United States and transported directly through Canada may re-enter the United States without Canadian health or test certificates when accompanied by copies of the United States export health certificates properly issued and endorsed in accordance with regulations in part 91 of this chapter: Provided, That, to qualify for entry, the date, time, port of entry, and signature of the Canadian Port Veterinarian that inspected the poultry for entry into Canada shall be recorded on the United States health certificate, or a document containing the information shall be included with the certificate that accompanies the poultry. In all cases it shall be determined by the veterinary inspector at the United States port of entry that the poultry are the identical poultry covered by said certificate.

(b) Exhibition poultry. Poultry from the United States which have been exhibited at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair at Toronto or other publicly recognized expositions in Canada, including racing, rodeo, circus, or stage exhibitions in Canada, and have not been in that region for more than 90 days are eligible for return to the United States without Canadian health or test certificates, if they are accompanied by copies of the United States health certificate, issued and endorsed in accordance with the export regulations contained in part 91 of this chapter for entry into Canada: Provided, That all poultry offered for re-entry upon examination by the veterinary inspector at the U.S. port of entry, are found by the inspector to be free of communicable diseases and exposure thereto and are determined to be the identical poultry covered by said certificates or that they otherwise qualified for entry into Canada under the Canadian regulations.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0020)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 59 FR 67133, Dec. 29, 1994. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56015, Oct. 28, 1997; 81 FR 40151, June 21, 2016]

§93.216   Poultry from Canada.

Poultry imported from Canada is not required to meet the requirements of §93.209 but shall meet all other requirements of this part applicable to poultry or to animals generally.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56015, Oct. 28, 1997]

Central America and the West Indies7

7Importations from regions of Central America and the West Indies shall be subject to §93.217, in addition to other sections in this part, which are in terms applicable to such importations.

§93.217   Import permit and declaration for poultry.

(a) For poultry intended for importation from regions of Central America or of the West Indies, the importer shall first apply for and obtain from APHIS an import permit as provided in §93.204: Provided, That the Administrator, when he or she finds that such action may be taken without endangering the livestock or poultry industry of the United States, may, upon request by any person, authorize the importation by such person, without such application or permit, from the British Virgin Islands into the Virgin Islands of the United States, of poultry consigned for immediate slaughter, and such authorization may be limited to a particular shipment or extend to all shipments under this paragraph by such person during a specified period of time.

(b) For all poultry offered for importation from regions of Central America or of the West Indies, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of a declaration as provided in §93.206.

(c) All poultry offered for importation from regions of Central America and the West Indies shall also meet the additional requirements in §§93.205, 93.207, 93.209, and 93.210 to qualify for entry. All poultry which fail to meet these requirements shall be rejected entry and shall be disposed of as directed by the Administrator in accordance with applicable laws.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56015, Oct. 28, 1997]

Mexico8

8Importations from Mexico shall be subject to §§93.218 to 93.220 inclusive, in addition to other sections in this part which are in terms applicable for such importations.

§93.218   Import permits and applications for inspection for poultry.

(a) For poultry intended for importation from Mexico, the importer shall first apply for and obtain from APHIS an import permit as provided in §93.204.

(b) For poultry intended for importation into the United States from Mexico, the importer or his or her agent shall deliver to the veterinary inspector at the port of entry an application, in writing, for inspection, so that the veterinary inspector and customs representatives may make mutually satisfactory arrangements for the orderly inspection of the poultry.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56016, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.219   Declaration for poultry.

For all poultry offered for importation from Mexico, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of a declaration as provided in §93.206.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56016, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.220   Inspection at port of entry.

(a) All poultry offered for entry from Mexico, including such poultry intended for movement through the United States in bond for immediate return to Mexico, shall be inspected at the port of entry, and all such poultry found to be free from communicable disease and fever tick infestation and not to have been exposed thereto, shall be admitted into the United States subject to the other applicable provisions of this part. Poultry found to be affected with or to have been exposed to a communicable disease, or infested with fever ticks, shall be refused entry. Poultry refused entry, unless exported within a time fixed in each case by the Administrator, shall be disposed of as said Administrator may direct.

(b) Poultry covered by paragraph (a) of this section shall be imported through ports designated in §93.203.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 57 FR 12190, Apr. 9, 1992. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56016, Oct. 28, 1997]

Subpart C—Horses

§93.300   Definitions.

Wherever in this subpart the following terms are used, unless the context otherwise requires, they shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

Accredited veterinarian. A veterinarian approved by the Administrator in accordance with the provisions of part 161 of this title to perform functions specified in parts 1, 2, 3, and 11 of subchapter A, and subchapters B, C, and D of this chapter, and to perform functions required by cooperative State-Federal disease control and eradication programs.

Administrator. The Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service or any other employee of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, to whom authority has been or may be delegated to act in the Administrator's stead.

Animals. Cattle, sheep, goats, other ruminants, swine, horses, asses, mules, zebras, dogs, and poultry.

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (APHIS or Service).

APHIS representative. A veterinarian or other individual employed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, who is authorized to perform the services required by this part.

Code of practice. A voluntary system of procedures designed to reduce disease spread, that is established by the veterinarians and horse industry in a region and that includes procedures for the following: Testing for and treatment of the diseases, quarantine of horses that are affected with or are suspected of being affected with the disease, certification of whether horses have been affected with or exposed to the disease, and hygiene for personnel conducting treatments and specimen collections.

Communicable disease. Any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease of domestic livestock, poultry or other animals.

Department. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Fever tick. Boophilus annulatus, including, but not limited to, the varieties Americana and Australia.

Horses. Horses, asses, mules, and zebras.

Immediate slaughter. Consignment directly from the port of entry to a recognized slaughtering establishment1 and slaughter thereat within two weeks from the date of entry.

1The name of recognized slaughtering establishments approved under this part may be obtained from the Area Veterinarian in Charge, Veterinary Services, for the State of destination of the shipment.

Inspector. An employee of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service authorized to perform duties required under this subpart.

Licensed Veterinarian. Any person licensed by any country or political subdivision thereof to practice veterinary medicine.

Lot. A group of horses that, while held on a premises or conveyance, have had opportunity for physical contact with other horses in the group or with their excrement or discharges at any time during their shipment to the United States.

Lot-holding area. That area in a permanent, privately owned quarantine facility in which a single lot of horses is held at one time.

Nonquarantine area. That area in a permanent, privately owned quarantine facility that includes offices, storage areas, and other areas outside the quarantine area, and that is off limits to horses, samples taken from horses, and any other objects or substances that have been in the quarantine area during the quarantine of horses.

Operator. A person other than the Federal Government who owns or manages and has responsibility for the services provided by a temporary, privately owned quarantine facility or a permanent, privately owned quarantine facility.

Permanent, privately owned quarantine facility. A facility that offers quarantine services for horses to the general public on a continuing basis and that is owned and operated by an entity other than the Federal Government (also permanent facility).

Persons. Any individual, corporation, company, association, firm, partnership, society or joint stock company.

Port Veterinarian. A veterinarian employed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to perform duties required under this part at a port of entry.

Quarantine area. That area in a permanent, privately owned quarantine facility that comprises all of the lot-holding areas in the facility, and any other areas in the facility that horses have access to, including loading docks for receiving and releasing horses, and any areas used to conduct examinations of horses and take samples and where samples are processed or examined.

Recognized slaughtering establishment.2 An establishment where slaughtering operations are regularly carried on under federal or state inspection and which has been approved by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to receive animals for slaughter under this part.

2See footnote 1 to subpart C.

Region. Any defined geographic land area identifiable by geological, political, or surveyed boundaries. A region may consist of any of the following:

(1) A national entity (country);

(2) Part of a national entity (zone, county, department, municipality, parish, Province, State, etc.)

(3) Parts of several national entities combined into an area; or

(4) A group of national entities (countries) combined into a single area.

State animal health official. The State official responsible for livestock and poultry disease control and eradication programs.

Temporary, privately owned quarantine facility. A facility that offers quarantine services for horses imported for a specific event and that is owned and operated by an entity other than the Federal Government (also temporary facility).

United States. All of the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands of the United States, and all other Territories and Possessions of the United States.

Veterinarian in Charge. The veterinary official of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, who is assigned by the Administrator to supervise and perform the official animal health work of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service in the State concerned.

Veterinary Services. The Veterinary Services unit of the Department.

Weanling or yearling. Any horse, weaned from its dam, that was foaled not more than 731 days prior to its being offered for entry into the United States. A horse will not be considered to be a weanling or yearling if its first permanent incisors have erupted.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 56 FR 15489, Apr. 17, 1991; 61 FR 52239, Oct. 7, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56016, Oct. 28, 1997; 74 FR 31595, July 2, 2009]

§93.301   General prohibitions; exceptions.

(a) No horse or product subject to the provisions of this part shall be brought into the United States except in accordance with the regulations in this part and part 94 of this subchapter;3 nor shall any such horse or product be handled or moved after physical entry into the United States before final release from quarantine or any other form of governmental detention except in compliance with such regulations; Provided, That, the Administrator may upon request in specific cases permit horses to be brought into or through the United States under such conditions as he or she may prescribe, when he or she determines in the specific case that such action will not endanger the livestock or poultry of the United States.

3Importations of certain animals from various regions are absolutely prohibited under part 94 because of specific diseases.

(b) The provisions in this part 93 relating to horses shall not apply to healthy horses in transit through the United States if they are not known to be infected with or exposed, within 60 days preceding the date of export from the region of origin, to communicable diseases of horses if an import permit4 has been obtained under §93.304 of this chapter and all conditions therein are observed; and if such horses are handled as follows:

4Such permit may be obtained from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231.

(1)(i) They are maintained under continuous confinement in transit through the United States aboard an aircraft, ocean vessel, or other means of conveyance; or

(ii) They are unloaded, in the course of such transit, into a horse holding facility which is provided by the carrier or its agent and has been approved5 in advance by the Administrator in accordance with paragraph (b)(3) of this section as adequate to prevent the spread within the United States of any livestock or poultry disease, and they are maintained there under continuous confinement until loaded aboard a means of conveyance for transportation from the United States and are maintained under continuous confinement aboard such means of conveyance until it leaves the United States; the import permit will specify any additional conditions necessary to assure that the transit of the horses through the United States can be made without endangering the livestock or poultry of the United States, and that Department inspectors may inspect the horses on board such means of conveyance or in such holding facility to ascertain whether the requirements of this paragraph are met, and dispose of them in accordance with the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.) if such conditions are not met; and

5See footnote 4 to subpart C.

(2) The carrier or its agent executes and furnishes to the collector of Customs at the first port of arrival a declaration stating that the horses will be retained aboard such means of conveyance or in an approved holding facility during transshipment as required by this paragraph.

(3) Provisions for the approval of facilities required in this paragraph are:

(i) They must be sufficiently isolated to prevent direct or indirect contact with all other animals and birds while in the United States.

(ii) They must be so constructed that they provide adequate protection against environmental conditions and can be adequately cleaned, washed and disinfected.

(iii) They must provide for disposal of horse carcasses, manure, bedding, waste and any related shipping materials in a manner that will prevent dissemination of disease.

(iv) They must have provisions for adequate sources of feed and water and for attendants for the care and feeding of horses in the facility.

(v) They must comply with additional requirements as may be imposed by the Administrator if deemed applicable for a particular shipment.

(vi) They must also comply with all applicable local, State and Federal requirements for environmental quality and with the provisions of the Animal Welfare Regulations in chapter I of this title, as applicable.

(c) Specific prohibitions regarding contagious equine metritis; exceptions—(1) Importation prohibited. Except as provided in paragraph (c)(2) of this section, notwithstanding the other provisions of this part concerning the importation of horses into the United States, the importation of all horses from any region that APHIS considers to be affected with contagious equine metritis (CEM) and the importation of all horses that have been in any such region within the 12 months immediately preceding their being offered for entry into the United States is prohibited.

(i) A list of regions that APHIS considers to be affected with CEM is maintained on the APHIS Web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import__export/animals/animal__disease__status.shtml. Copies of the list will also be available via postal mail, fax, or email upon request to the Sanitary Trade Issues Team, National Center for Import and Export, Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737.

(ii) APHIS will add a region to the list upon determining that the disease exists in the region based on reports APHIS receives of outbreaks of the disease from veterinary officials of the exporting country, from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), or from other sources the Administrator determines to be reliable, or upon determining that the region trades horses freely with a region in which CEM exists without testing for CEM. APHIS will remove a region from the list after conducting an evaluation of the region in accordance with §92.2 of this subchapter and finding that the disease is not present in the region. In the case of a region formerly not on this list that is added due to an outbreak, the region may be removed from the list in accordance with the procedures for reestablishment of a region's disease-free status in §92.4 of this subchapter.

(2) Exceptions. The provisions of paragraph (c)(1) of this section shall not apply to the following:

(i) Wild (non-domesticated) species of equidae if captured in the wild or imported from a zoo or other facility where it would be unlikely that the animal would come in contact with domesticated horses used for breeding;

(ii) Geldings;

(iii) Weanlings or yearlings that have never been used for breeding, and whose age and breeding status are certified on the import health certificate required under §93.314(a);

(iv) Horses imported in accordance with conditions prescribed by the Administrator as provided in §93.301(a);

(v) Spanish Pure Breed horses imported for permanent entry from Spain or thoroughbred horses imported for permanent entry from France, Germany, Ireland, or the United Kingdom if the horses meet the requirements of paragraph (d) of this section;

(vi) Stallions or mares over 731 days of age imported for permanent entry if the horses meet the requirements of paragraph (e) of this section;

(vii) Horses over 731 days of age imported into the United States for no more than 90 days to compete in specified events if the horses meet the requirements of paragraph (f)(1) of this section;

(viii) Horses over 731 days of age imported into the United States for noncompetitive public exhibition and entertainment purposes if the horses meet the requirements of paragraph (f)(2) of this section; and

(ix) Horses temporarily exported from the United States or from another region not known to be affected with CEM to a region listed under paragraph (c)(1) of this section within the 12 months immediately preceding their being offered for entry into the United States if the horses meet the requirements of paragraph (g) of this section.

(d) Spanish Pure Breed horses from Spain and thoroughbred horses from France, Germany, Ireland, and the United Kingdom. (1) Spanish Pure Breed horses from Spain and thoroughbred horses from France, Germany, Ireland, and the United Kingdom may be imported for permanent entry if the horses meet the following requirements:

(i) Each horse is accompanied at the time of importation by an import permit in accordance with §93.304;

(ii) Each horse is accompanied at the time of importation by an import health certificate issued in accordance with §93.314(a). In addition to the information required by §93.314(a), the veterinarian signing and issuing the certificate must certify that:

(A) He or she has examined the daily records of the horse's activities maintained by the trainer and certified to be current, true, and factual by the veterinarian in charge of the training or racing stable;

(B) He or she has examined the records of the horse's activities maintained by a breed association specifically approved by the Department6 and certified by the breed association to be current, true, and factual for the following information:

6The following breed associations and their record systems have been approved by the Department: Asociacion National de Criadores de Caballos de Pura Raza Espanola for Spain; Weatherby's Ltd. for the United Kingdom and Ireland; Haras du Pain for France; and Direktorium für Vollblutzucht und Rennen e.v. for Germany.

(1) Identification of the horse by name, sex, age, breed, and all identifying marks;

(2) Identification of all premises where the horse has been since reaching 731 days of age and the dates that the horse was at such premises;

(3) For thoroughbred horses, that none of the premises where the horse has been since reaching 731 days of age are breeding premises; and

(4) For Spanish Pure Breed horses from Spain, that since reaching 731 days of age:

(i) The horse has never been on a premises that is exclusively a breeding premises;

(ii) The horse has never been bred;

(iii) Breeding of the horse has never been attempted; and

(iv) The horse has never been commingled and left unattended with adult horses of the opposite sex;

(C) He or she has compared the records maintained by the approved breed association with the records kept by the trainer and has found the information in those two sets of records to be consistent and current;

(D) For Spanish Pure Breed horses and thoroughbred horses over 731 days of age, cultures negative for CEM were obtained from three sets of specimens collected within a 12-day period from the mucosal surfaces of the clitoral fossa and the clitoral sinuses, with one set of specimens including a specimen from the surfaces of the distal cervix or endometrium, of any female horses and from the surfaces of the prepuce, the urethral sinus, the distal urethra, and the fossa glandis, including the diverticulum of the fossa glandis, of any male horses. For both male and female horses, the sets of specimens must be taken within a 12-day period with no less than 72 hours between each set, and the last of these sets of specimens must be collected within 30 days prior to exportation. All specimens required by this paragraph must be collected by a licensed veterinarian who either is, or is acting in the presence of, the veterinarian signing the certificate; and

(E) All specimens required by paragraph (d)(1)(ii)(D) of this section were received within 48 hours of collection by a laboratory approved to culture for CEM by the national veterinary service of the region of export and were accompanied by a statement indicating the date and time of their collection.

(2) If any specimen collected in accordance with paragraph (d)(1)(ii)(D) of this section is found to be positive for CEM, the horse must be treated for CEM in a manner approved by the national veterinary service of the region of export. After the treatment is completed, at least 21 days must pass before the horse will be eligible to be tested again in accordance with paragraph (d)(1)(ii)(D) of this section. All treatments performed, and the dates of the treatments, must be recorded on the health certificate.

(3) Spanish Pure Breed horses and thoroughbred horses imported under paragraph (d)(1) of this section may be released upon completion of the Federal quarantine required under §93.308. Spanish Pure Breed horses and thoroughbred horses found positive for CEM that have been treated and retested as provided in paragraph (d)(2) of this section shall, upon completion of the Federal quarantine required under §93.308, be consigned to an approved State listed under paragraph (h)(6) or (h)(7) of this section, where they shall be quarantined under State or Federal supervision until the stallions have met the testing and treatment requirements of paragraph (e)(3) of this section and the mares have met the testing and treatment requirements of paragraph (e)(5) of this section.

(e) Stallions and mares over 731 days of age from CEM-affected regions. (1) Stallions or mares over 731 days of age may be imported for permanent entry from a region listed under paragraph (c)(1) of this section if the horses meet the following requirements:

(i) Each horse is accompanied at the time of importation by an import permit issued in accordance with §93.304. The import permit must indicate that, after completion of the Federal quarantine required in §93.308, the stallion or mare will be consigned to a State that the Administrator has approved to receive such horses in accordance with paragraph (h) of this section;

(ii) The horses are accompanied at the time of importation by an import health certificate issued in accordance with §93.314(a);

(iii) A set of specimens must be collected from each horse within 30 days prior to the date of export by a licensed veterinarian who either is, or is acting in the presence of, the veterinarian signing the certificate. For stallions, the set of specimens consists of one culture swab from each location shall be taken from the prepuce, the urethral sinus, the distal urethra, and the fossa glandis, including the diverticulum of the fossa glandis; for mares, the specimens must be collected from the mucosal surfaces of the clitoral fossa, clitoral sinuses, and the distal cervix or endometrium in nonpregnant mares. All of the specimens collected must be cultured for CEM with negative results in a laboratory approved to culture for CEM by the national veterinary service of the region of origin;

(iv) The horses described on the certificate must not have been used for natural breeding, for the collection of semen for artificial insemination in the case of stallions, or for artificial insemination in the case of mares, from the time the specimens were collected through the date of export;

(v) All specimens required by paragraph (e)(1)(iii) of this section must be received within 48 hours of collection by a laboratory approved to culture for CEM by the national veterinary service of the region of export and must be accompanied by a statement indicating the date and time of their collection; and

(vi) If any specimen collected in accordance with paragraph (e)(1)(iii) of this section is found to be positive for CEM, the stallion or mare must be treated for CEM in a manner approved by the national veterinary service of the region of export. After the treatment is completed, at least 21 days must pass before the horse will be eligible to be tested again in accordance with paragraph (e)(1)(ii) of this section. All treatments performed, and the dates of the treatments, must be recorded on the health certificate.

(2) Post-entry. (i) Stallions and mares imported under paragraph (e)(1) of this section must complete the Federal quarantine required under §93.308. Upon completion of the Federal quarantine, stallions must be sent to an approved State listed under paragraph (h)(6) of this section, and mares must be sent to an approved State listed under paragraph (h)(7) of this section.

(ii) Once in the approved State, the stallions or mares shall be quarantined under State or Federal supervision until the stallions have met the testing and treatment requirements of paragraph (e)(3) of this section and the mares have met the testing and treatment requirements of paragraph (e)(5) of this section.

(iii) All tests and cultures required by paragraphs (e)(3) through (e)(5) of this section shall be conducted at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories, Ames, IA, or at a laboratory approved by the Administrator in accordance with paragraph (i) of this section to conduct CEM cultures and tests.

(iv) To be eligible for CEM culture or testing, all specimens collected in accordance with paragraphs (e)(3) through (e)(5) of this section must be received by the National Veterinary Services Laboratories or the approved laboratory within 48 hours of collection and must be accompanied by a statement indicating the date and time of their collection.

(3) Testing and treatment requirements for stallions. (i) Once the stallion is in the approved State, one specimen each shall be taken from the prepuce, the urethral sinus, the distal urethra, and the fossa glandis, including the diverticulum of the fossa glandis, of the stallion and be cultured for CEM. After negative results have been obtained, the stallion must be test bred to two test mares that meet the requirements of paragraph (e)(4) of this section. Upon completion of the test breeding:

(A) The stallion must be treated for 5 consecutive days by thoroughly cleaning and washing (scrubbing) its prepuce, penis, including the fossa glandis, and urethral sinus while the stallion is in full erection with a solution of not less than 2 percent surgical scrub chlorhexidine and then thoroughly coating (packing) the stallion's prepuce, penis, including the fossa glandis, and urethral sinus with an ointment effective against the CEM organism.7 The treatment shall be performed by an accredited veterinarian and monitored by a State or Federal veterinarian.

7A list of ointments effective against the CEM organism may be obtained from the National Center for Import and Export, Import/Export Animals, VS, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 39, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231.

(B) Each mare to which the stallion has been test bred shall be cultured for CEM from three sets of specimens from the mucosal surfaces of the clitoral fossa and clitoral sinuses, with one set of specimens including a specimen from either the distal cervix or endometrium, between the third and fourteenth day after breeding, with negative results. The sets of specimens must be collected on three separate occasions within a 12-day period with no less than 72 hours between each set. A complement fixation test for CEM must be done with negative results between the twenty-first and twenty-eighth day after the breeding.

(ii) If any culture or test required by this paragraph is positive for CEM, the stallion shall be treated as described in paragraph (e)(3)(i)(A) of this section and retested by being test bred to two mares no less than 21 days after the last day of treatment.

(iii) A stallion may be released from State quarantine only if all cultures and tests of specimens from the mares used for test breeding are negative for CEM and all cultures performed on specimens taken from the stallion are negative for CEM.

(4) Requirements for test mares. (i) Mares to be used to test stallions for CEM shall be permanently identified before the mares are used for such testing with the letter “T.” The marking shall be permanently applied by an inspector, a State inspector, or an accredited veterinarian who shall use a hot iron, freezemarking, or a lip tattoo. If a hot iron or freezemarking is used, the marking shall not be less than 2 inches (5.08 cm) high and shall be applied to the left shoulder or left side of the neck of the mare. If a lip tattoo is used, the marking shall not be less than 1 inch (2.54 cm) high and 0.75 inch (1.9 cm) wide and shall be applied to the inside surface of the upper lip of the test mare.

(ii) The test mares must be qualified prior to breeding as apparently free from CEM and may not be used for breeding from the time specimens are taken to qualify the mares as free from CEM. To qualify, each mare shall be tested with negative results by a complement fixation test for CEM, and specimens taken from each mare shall be cultured negative for CEM. Sets of specimens shall be collected on three separate occasions from the mucosal surfaces of the clitoral fossa and the clitoral sinuses, with one set of specimens including a specimen from either the distal cervix or endometrium, within a 12-day period with no less than 72 hours between each set.

(iii) A test mare that has been used to test stallions for CEM may be released from quarantine only if:

(A) The test mare is found negative for CEM on all cultures and tests required under paragraph (e)(3)(ii) of this section; or

(B) The test mare is subjected to an ovariectomy by an accredited veterinarian under the direct supervision of a State or Federal veterinarian; or

(C) The test mare is treated and handled in accordance with paragraph (e)(5) of this section; or

(D) The test mare is moved directly to slaughter without unloading en route, is euthanized, or dies.

(5) Testing and treatment requirements for mares. (i) Once the mare is in the approved State, a complement fixation test for CEM must be done, and three sets of specimens shall be collected from the mucosal surfaces of the clitoral fossa and clitoral sinuses, with one set of specimens including a specimen from the surfaces of the distal cervix or endometrium in nonpregnant mares. The sets of specimens must be collected on three separate occasions within a 12-day period with no less than 72 hours between each set. An accredited veterinarian shall collect specimens and shall submit each set of specimens to the National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, IA, or to a laboratory approved by the Administrator in accordance with paragraph (i) of this section to conduct CEM cultures and tests.

(ii) After the three sets of specimens required by paragraph (e)(5)(i) of this section have been collected, an accredited veterinarian shall manually remove organic debris from the sinuses of each mare and then flush the sinuses with a cerumalytic agent.8

8Recommended protocols for the flushing of sinuses may be obtained from the National Center for Import and Export, Import/Export Animals, VS, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 39, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231.

(iii) For 5 consecutive days after the sinuses have been cleaned, an accredited veterinarian shall aseptically clean and wash (scrub) the external genitalia and vaginal vestibule, including the clitoral fossa, with a solution of not less than 2 percent chlorhexidine in a detergent base and then fill the clitoral fossa and sinuses, and coat the external genitalia and vaginal vestibule with an antibiotic ointment effective against the CEM organism.9

9A list of ointments effective against the CEM organism may be obtained from the National Center for Import and Export, Import/Export Animals, VS, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 39, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231.

(iv) A mare may be released from State quarantine only if all cultures performed on specimens taken from the mare are negative for CEM.

(v) If any culture required by this paragraph is positive for CEM, the mare shall be treated as described in paragraphs (e)(5)(ii) and (e)(5)(iii) of this section. No less than 21 days after the last day of treatment, the mare shall be tested again in accordance with paragraph (e)(5)(i) of this section. If all specimens are negative for CEM, the mare may be released from quarantine.

(f) Special provisions for temporary importation for competition or entertainment purposes. (1) Horses over 731 days of age may be imported into the United States for no more than 90 days to compete in specified events provided that the conditions in paragraphs (f)(3) through (f)(12) of this section are met.

(2) Horses over 731 days of age may be temporarily imported into the United States solely for noncompetitive public exhibition and entertainment purposes provided that the conditions in paragraphs (f)(3) through (f)(12) of this section are met.

(3) At the time of importation, each horse must be accompanied by an import permit in accordance with §93.304 and a health certificate issued in accordance with §93.314. For horses imported in accordance with paragraph (f)(2) of this section, the health certificate must also certify that cultures negative for CEM were obtained from three sets of specimens collected from the mucosal surfaces of the clitoral fossa and clitoral sinuses, with one set of specimens including a specimen from the surfaces of the distal cervix or endometrium, of any female horses and from the surfaces of the prepuce, the urethral sinus, the distal urethra, and the fossa glandis, including the diverticulum of the fossa glandis, of any male horses. For both female and male horses, the sets of specimens must be collected on three separate occasions within a 12-day period with no less than 72 hours between each set, and the last of these sets of specimens must be collected within 30 days prior to exportation. All specimens required by this paragraph must be collected by a licensed veterinarian who either is, or is acting in the presence of, the veterinarian signing the certificate.

(4) Following the horse's arrival in the United States:

(i) A horse imported in accordance with paragraph (f)(1) of this section may remain in the United States for not more than 90 days, except as provided in paragraph (f)(9) of this section.

(ii) A horse imported in accordance with paragraph (f)(2) of this section may remain in the United States indefinitely, except as provided in paragraph (f)(9) of this section, as long as the conditions of paragraphs (f)(3) through (f)(12) of this section are met and the horse's owner or importer applies for and obtains from APHIS an import permit, as provided for in §93.304, each year prior to the anniversary date of the horse's arrival in the United States.

(5) While the horse is in the United States, the following conditions must be met:

(i) A horse imported in accordance with paragraph (f)(2) of this section:

(A) Must not be entered in competitions.

(B) Must be regularly used in performances or exhibitions, unless sick or injured. A horse that is no longer performing or being exhibited must be exported or made eligible for permanent entry in accordance with paragraph (f)(9) of this section.

(C) Must be kept with the other horses listed on the import permit, unless otherwise approved by an APHIS representative.

(ii) Except as provided in paragraph (f)(5)(viii) of this section, the horse must be moved according to the itinerary and methods of transport specified in the import permit provided for in §93.304.

(iii) The horse must be monitored by an accredited veterinarian or APHIS representative to ensure that the provisions of paragraphs (f)(5)(ii), (f)(5)(vi), and (f)(5)(vii) of this section are met. If the monitoring is performed by an accredited veterinarian, the Veterinarian in Charge will ensure that the accredited veterinarian is familiar with the requirements of this section and spot checks will be conducted by an APHIS representative to ensure that the requirements of this section are being met. If an APHIS representative finds that requirements are not being met, the Administrator may require that all remaining monitoring be conducted by APHIS representatives to ensure compliance.

(iv) Except when in transit, the horse must be kept on a premises that has been approved by an APHIS representative. For horses imported in accordance with paragraph (f)(1) of this section, such approval may be oral or in writing. If the approval is oral, it will be confirmed in writing by the Administrator as soon as circumstances permit. For horses imported in accordance with paragraph (f)(2) of this section, the approval will be in writing. To receive approval, the premises:

(A) Must not be a breeding premises; and

(B) Must be or contain a building or temporary structure in which the horse can be kept in a stall that is separated from other stalls that contain horses that are not listed on the import permit, either by an empty stall, by an open area across which horses cannot touch each other, or by a solid wall that is at least 8 feet (2.4 meters) high.

(v) While in transit, the horse must be moved in either an aircraft or a sealed van or trailer. If the horse is moved in a sealed van or trailer, the seal may be broken only by an APHIS representative at the horse's destination, except in situations where the horse's life is in danger.

(vi) Except when actually competing, performing, or being exhibited or exercised, the horse must be kept in a pasture approved by APHIS or in a stall that is separated from other stalls containing horses that are not listed on the import permit, either by an empty stall, by an open area across which horses cannot touch each other, or by a solid wall that is at least 8 feet (2.4 meters) high.

(vii) The horse may not be used for breeding purposes (including artificial insemination or semen collection) and may not have any other sexual contact with other horses. The horse may not undergo any genital examinations, except that a horse imported in accordance with paragraph (f)(2) of this section may undergo genital examinations for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition with the prior approval of an APHIS representative.

(viii) The horse may be moved for diagnosis or treatment of a medical condition with the prior approval of an APHIS representative.

(ix) After the horse is transported anywhere in the United States, any vehicle in which the horse was transported must be cleaned and disinfected in the presence of an APHIS representative, according to the procedures specified in §§71.7 through 71.12 of this chapter, before any other horse is transported in the vehicle.

(x) The cleaning and disinfection specified in paragraph (f)(5)(ix) of this section must be completed before the vehicle is moved from the place where the horse is unloaded. In those cases where the facilities or equipment for cleaning and disinfection are inadequate at the place where the horse is unloaded, the Administrator may allow the vehicle to be moved to another location for cleaning and disinfection when the move will not pose a disease risk to other horses in the United States.

(xi) The owner or importer of the horse must comply with any other provisions of this part applicable to him or her.

(6) Except as provided in paragraph (f)(7) of this section, if the owner or importer wishes to change the horse's itinerary or the methods by which the horse is transported from that which he or she specified in the application for the import permit, the owner or importer must make the request for change in writing to the Administrator. Requests for change must be submitted to APHIS no less than 15 days before the proposed date of the change. Requests may be submitted to APHIS by postal mail, commercial delivery service, fax, or e-mail. The change in itinerary or method of transport may not be made without the written approval of the Administrator, who may grant the request for change when he or she determines that granting the request will not endanger other horses in the United States and that sufficient APHIS personnel are available to provide the services required by the owner or importer.

(7) In response to an emergency or other unforeseen circumstances or events (e.g., weather-related transportation delays, vehicle breakdown, medical emergencies, etc.), the horse's itinerary or methods of transportation may be changed, with the prior approval of an APHIS representative, from that which is specified in the application for an import permit. Requests for such a change may be submitted to APHIS by telephone, postal mail, commercial delivery service, fax, or e-mail. Approval may be oral or in writing. If the approval is oral, it will be confirmed in writing by the Administrator as soon as circumstances permit.

(8) The Administrator may cancel, orally or in writing, the import permit provided for under §93.304 whenever the Administrator finds that the owner or importer of the horse has not complied with the provisions of paragraphs (f)(3) through (f)(7) of this section or any conditions imposed under those provisions. If the cancellation is oral, the Administrator will confirm the cancellation and the reasons for the cancellation in writing as soon as circumstances permit. Any person whose import permit is canceled may appeal the decision in writing to the Administrator within 10 days after receiving oral or written notification of the cancellation, whichever is earlier. If the appeal is sent by mail, it must be postmarked within 10 days after the owner or importer receives oral or written notification of the cancellation, whichever is earlier. The appeal must include all of the facts and reasons upon which the person relies to show that the import permit was wrongfully canceled. The Administrator will grant or deny the appeal in writing as promptly as circumstances permit, stating the reason for his or her decision. If there is a conflict as to any material fact, a hearing will be held to resolve the conflict. Rules of practice concerning the hearing will be adopted by the Administrator.

(9) Except in those cases where an appeal is in process, any person whose import permit is canceled must move the horse identified in the import permit out of the United States within 10 days after receiving oral or written notification of cancellation, whichever is earlier. The horse is not permitted to enter competition, perform, or be exhibited from the date the owner or importer receives the notice of cancellation until the horse is moved out of the United States or until resolution of an appeal in favor of the owner or importer. Except when being exercised, the horse must be kept, at the expense of the owner or importer, in a stall on the premises where the horse is located when the notice of cancellation is received or, if the horse is in transit when the notice of cancellation is received, on the premises where it is next scheduled to compete, perform, or be exhibited according to the import permit. The stall in which the horse is kept must be separated from other stalls containing horses that are not listed on the import permit, either by an empty stall, by an open area across which horses cannot touch each other, or by a solid wall that is at least 8 feet (2.4 meters) high. In cases where the owners of the above specified premises do not permit the horse to be kept on those premises, or when the Administrator determines that keeping the horse on the above specified premises will pose a disease risk to horses in the United States, the horse must be kept, at the expense of the owner or importer, on an alternative premises approved by the Administrator.

(10) Stallions or mares over 731 days of age that are imported in accordance with paragraphs (f)(1) or (f)(2) of this section may be eligible to remain in the United States if the following is completed:

(i) Following completion of the itinerary specified in the import permit provided for in §93.304, the horse's owner or importer applies for and receives a new import permit that specifies that the stallion or mare will be moved to an approved State listed under paragraph (h)(6) or (h)(7) of this section; and

(ii) The stallion or mare is transported in a sealed vehicle that has been cleaned and disinfected to an approved facility in an approved State where it is quarantined under State or Federal supervision until the stallion or mare has met the testing and treatment requirements of paragraph (e)(3) or (e)(5) of this section.

(11) All costs and charges associated with the supervision and maintenance of a horse imported under paragraphs (f)(1) or (f)(2) of this section will be borne by the horse's owner or importer. The costs associated with the supervision and maintenance of the horse by an APHIS representative at his or her usual places of duty will be reimbursed by the horse's owner or importer through user fees payable under part 130 of this chapter.

(12) In the event that an APHIS representative must be temporarily detailed from his or her usual place of duty in connection with the supervision and maintenance of a horse imported under this paragraph (f), the owner or importer of the horse must execute a trust fund agreement with APHIS to reimburse all expenses (including travel costs, salary, per diem or subsistence, administrative expenses, and incidental expenses) incurred by the Department in connection with the temporary detail. Under the trust fund agreement, the horse's owner or importer must deposit with APHIS an amount equal to the estimated cost, as determined by APHIS, for the APHIS representative to inspect the premises at which the horse will compete, perform, or be exhibited; to conduct the monitoring required by paragraph (f)(5)(iii) of this section; and to supervise the cleaning and disinfection required by paragraph (f)(5)(ix) of this section. The estimated costs will be based on the following factors:

(i) Number of hours needed for an APHIS representative to conduct the required inspection and monitoring;

(ii) For services provided during regular business hours (8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday, except holidays), the average salary, per hour, for an APHIS representative;

(iii) For services provided outside regular business hours, the applicable rate for overtime, night differential, or Sunday or holiday pay, based on the average salary, per hour, for an APHIS representative;

(iv) Number of miles from the premises at which the horse competes, performs, or is exhibited to the APHIS office or facility that is monitoring the activities;

(v) Government rate per mile for automobile travel or, if appropriate, cost of other means of transportation between the premises at which the horse competes, performs, or is exhibited and the APHIS office or facility;

(vi) Number of trips between the premises at which the horse competes, performs, or is exhibited and the APHIS office or facility that APHIS representatives are required to make in order to conduct the required inspection and monitoring;

(vii) Number of days the APHIS representative conducting the inspection and monitoring must be in “travel status”;

(viii) Applicable Government per diem rate; and

(ix) Cost of related administrative support services.

(13) If a trust fund agreement with APHIS has been executed by the owner or importer of a horse in accordance with paragraph (f)(12) of this section and APHIS determines, during the horse's stay in the United States, that the amount deposited will be insufficient to cover the services APHIS is scheduled to provide during the remainder of the horse's stay, APHIS will issue to the horse's owner or importer a bill to restore the deposited amount to a level sufficient to cover the estimated cost to APHIS for the remainder of the horse's stay in the United States. The horse's owner or importer must pay the amount billed within 14 days after receiving the bill. If the bill is not paid within 14 days after its receipt, APHIS will cease to perform the services provided for in paragraph (f)(5) of this section until the bill is paid. The Administrator will inform the owner or importer of the cessation of services orally or in writing. If the notice of cessation is oral, the Administrator will confirm, in writing, the notice of cessation and the reason for the cessation of services as soon as circumstances permit. In such a case, the horse must be kept, at the expense of the owner or importer and until the bill is paid, in a stall either on the premises at which the horse is located when the notice of cessation of services is received or, if the horse is in transit when the notice of cessation of services is received, on the premises at which it is next scheduled to compete, perform, or be exhibited according to the import permit. The stall in which the horse is kept must be separated from other stalls containing horses that are not listed on the import permit, either by an empty stall, by an open area across which horses cannot touch each other, or by a solid wall that is at least 8 feet (2.4 meters) high. In cases where the owners of the premises where the horse would be kept following a cessation of services do not permit the horse to be kept on those premises, or when the Administrator determines that keeping the horse on the premises will pose a disease risk to other horses in the United States, the horse must be kept, at the expense of the owner or importer, on an alternative premises approved by the Administrator. Until the bill is paid, the horse is not permitted to enter competition, perform, or be exhibited. Any amount deposited in excess of the costs to APHIS to provide the required services will be refunded to the horse's owner or importer.

(g) Special provisions for the importation of horses that have been temporarily exported to a CEM-affected region. If a horse has been temporarily exported for not more than 60 days from the United States to a CEM-affected region listed under paragraph (c)(1) of this section, or if a horse has been temporarily exported for not more than 60 days from another region not known to be affected with CEM to a CEM-affected region during the 12 months preceding its exportation to the United States, the horse may be eligible for return or importation into the United States without meeting the requirements of paragraphs (d) through (f) of this section under the following conditions:

(1) The horse must be accompanied by a certificate that meets the requirements of §93.314(a) of this part issued by each CEM-affected region that the horse has visited during the term of its temporary exportation, and each certificate must contain the following additional declarations:

(i) That the horse was held separate and apart from all other horses except for the time it was actually participating in an event or was being exercised by its trainer;

(ii) That the premises on which the horse was held were not used for any equine breeding purpose;

(iii) That the horse was not bred to or bred by any animal, nor did it have any other sexual contact or genital examination while in such region; and

(iv) That all transport while in such region was carried out in cleaned and disinfected vehicles in which no other horses were transported since such cleaning and disinfection;

(2) The horse is accompanied by an import permit issued in accordance with §93.304 of this part at the time of exportation;

(3) If the horse was temporarily exported from the United States and is being returned to the United States, the horse must be accompanied by a copy of the United States health certificate issued for its exportation from the United States and endorsed in accordance with the export regulations in part 91 of this chapter;

(4) The horse must be examined by an inspector at the U.S. port of entry and found by the inspector to be the identical horse covered by the documents required by paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section and found by the inspector to be free of communicable disease and exposure thereto; and

(5) The horse must be quarantined and tested at the U.S. port of entry as provided in §93.308 of this part prior to release.

(h) Approval of States. In order for a State to be approved to receive stallions or mares over 731 days of age from a CEM-affected region listed under paragraph (c)(1) of this section that are imported under paragraph (e) of this section, the State must meet the following conditions:

(1) The State must enter into a written agreement with the Administrator, whereby the State agrees to enforce its laws and regulations to control CEM and to abide by the conditions of approval established by the regulations in this part.

(2) The State must agree to quarantine all stallions and mares over 731 days of age imported under the provisions of paragraph (e) of this section until the stallions have been treated in accordance with paragraph (e)(3) of this section and the mares have been treated in accordance with paragraph (e)(5) of this section.

(3) The State must agree to quarantine all mares used to test stallions for CEM until the mares have been released from quarantine in accordance with paragraph (e)(4) of this section.

(4) The State must have laws or regulations requiring that stallions over 731 days of age imported under paragraph (e) of this section be treated in the manner specified in paragraph (e)(3) of this section, and that mares over 731 days of age imported under paragraph (e) of this section be treated in the manner specified in paragraph (e)(5) of this section.

(5) Approval of any State to receive stallions or mares imported from regions affected with CEM may be suspended by the Administrator upon his or her determination that any requirements of this section are not being met. After such action is taken, the animal health authorities of the approved State will be informed of the reasons for the action and afforded an opportunity to present their views thereon before such suspension is finalized; however, such suspension of approval shall continue in effect unless otherwise ordered by the Administrator. In those instances where there is a conflict as to the facts, a hearing shall be held to resolve such conflict.

(6) A list of States approved by APHIS to receive stallions over 731 days of age imported under paragraph (e) of this section is maintained on the APHIS Web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import__export/animals/downloads/states__app__conduct__cem__testing.pdf. Copies of the list will also be available via postal mail, fax, or email upon request to the Sanitary Trade Issues Team, National Center for Import and Export, Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737.

(7) A list of States approved by APHIS to receive mares over 731 days of age imported under paragraph (e) of this section is maintained on the APHIS Web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import__export/animals/downloads/states__app__conduct__cem__testing.pdf. Copies of the list will also be available via postal mail, fax, or email upon request to the Sanitary Trade Issues Team, National Center for Import and Export, Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737.

(i) Approval of laboratories. (1) The Administrator will approve a laboratory to conduct CEM cultures and tests only after consulting with the State animal health official in the State in which the laboratory is located and after determining that the laboratory:

(i) Has technical personnel assigned to conduct the CEM culturing and testing who possess the following minimum qualifications:

(A) A bachelor's degree in microbiology;

(B) A minimum of 2 years experience working in a bacteriology laboratory; and

(C) Experience working with the CEM organism, including knowledge of the specific media requirements, atmospheric requirements, and procedures for the isolation and identification of the CEM organism.10

10When training regarding CEM culturing and testing is necessary, it may be obtained at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories, Ames, IA 50010.

(ii) Follows standard test protocols that will reliably and consistently provide for the isolation and identification of the CEM organism;11 and

11Standard test protocols recommended by the National Veterinary Services Laboratories and a list of approved laboratories can be obtained from the National Veterinary Services Laboratories, Ames, IA 50010.

(iii) Reports all official test results to the State animal health official and the Veterinarian in Charge.

(2) To retain approval, the laboratory must meet the requirements prescribed in paragraph (i)(1) of this section, and shall test with the CEM organism each lot of media it prepares to ensure that the media will support growth of the laboratory's reference culture. Media that will not support growth of the reference culture must be discarded.

(3) The Administrator may deny or withdraw approval of any laboratory to conduct CEM culturing or testing upon a determination that the laboratory does not meet the criteria for approval or maintenance of approval under paragraphs (i)(1) and (i)(2) of this section.

(i) In the case of a denial of approval, the operator of the laboratory will be informed of the reasons for denial and, upon request, will be afforded an opportunity for a hearing with respect to the merits or validity of the denial in accordance with rules of practice that will be adopted for the hearing.

(ii) In the case of a withdrawal of approval, before such action is taken, the operator of the laboratory will be informed of the reasons for the proposed withdrawal and, upon request, will be afforded an opportunity for a hearing with respect to the merits or validity of the proposed withdrawal in accordance with rules of practice that will be adopted for the hearing. However, the withdrawal will become effective pending a final determination in the hearing when the Administrator determines that such action is necessary to protect the public health, interest, or safety. The withdrawal will be effective upon oral or written notification, whichever is earlier, to the operator of the laboratory. In the event of oral notification, written confirmation will be given as promptly as circumstances allow. The withdrawal will continue in effect pending completion of the hearing and any judicial review of the hearing, unless otherwise ordered by the Administrator.

(iii) Approval for a laboratory to conduct CEM culturing or testing will be automatically withdrawn by the Administrator when the operator of the approved laboratory notifies the National Veterinary Services Laboratories, Ames, IA 50010, in writing, that the laboratory no longer conducts CEM culturing and testing.

(j) Examination and treatment for screwworm. Horses from regions where APHIS considers screwworm to exist may be imported into the United States only if they meet the requirements in paragraphs (j)(1) through (7) of this section and all other applicable requirements of this part. APHIS will maintain a list of regions where screwworm is considered to exist on the APHIS Web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import__export/animals/animal__disease__status.shtml. Copies of the list will also be available via postal mail, fax, or email upon request to the Sanitary Trade Issues Team, National Center for Import and Export, Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737. APHIS will add a region to the list upon determining that screwworm exists in the region based on reports APHIS receives of detections of the pest from veterinary officials of the exporting country, from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), or from other sources the Administrator determines to be reliable. APHIS will remove a region from the list after conducting an evaluation of the region in accordance with §92.2 of this subchapter and finding that screwworm is not present in the region. In the case of a region formerly not on this list that is added due to a detection, the region may be removed from the list in accordance with the procedures for reestablishment of a region's disease-free status in §92.4 of this subchapter.

(1) A veterinarian must treat horses with ivermectin 3 to 5 days prior to the date of export to the United States according to the recommended dose prescribed on the product's label.

(2) Horses must be examined for screwworm by a full-time salaried veterinary official of the exporting country within 24 hours prior to shipment to the United States. The official must fully examine the horses, including their external genitalia. If horses are found to be infested with screwworm, they must be treated until free from infestation.

(3) At the time horses are loaded onto a means of conveyance for export, a veterinarian must treat any visible wounds on the animals with a solution of coumaphos dust at a concentration of 5 percent active ingredient.

(4) Horses must be accompanied to the United States by a certificate signed by a full-time salaried veterinary official of the exporting country. The certificate must state that the horses, including their external genitalia, have been thoroughly examined and found free of screwworm and that the horses have been treated in accordance with paragraphs (j)(1) and (j)(3) of this section.

(5) Horses must be quarantined upon arrival in the United States at an APHIS animal import center for at least 7 days.

(6) Horses must be examined for screwworm by a veterinarian within 24 hours after arrival at an APHIS animal import center in the United States. The examining veterinarian must examine horses, including their external genitalia, to determine whether the horse is infested with screwworm.

(7) Horses must be held at the animal import center for a minimum of 7 days. On day 7, prior to the horses' release, the horses must be examined by a veterinarian at the expense of the owner or broker. For this examination, male horses must be tranquilized or sedated so that the external genitalia of the horses can be thoroughly examined. If screwworm is found during this examination, the horses must be held in quarantine and treated until free of infestation.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control numbers 0579-0040, 0579-0165, and 0579-0324)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56016, Oct. 28, 1997]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §93.301, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

§93.302   Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon; unloading, cleaning, and disinfection requirements.

(a) Inspection: All aircraft and other means of conveyance (including shipping containers thereon) moving into the United States from any foreign region are subject to inspection without a warrant by properly identified and designated inspectors to determine whether they are carrying any animal, carcass, product or article regulated or subject to disposal under any law or regulation administered by the Secretary of Agriculture for prevention of the introduction or dissemination of any communicable animal disease.

(b) Unloading requirements: Whenever in the course of any such inspection at any port in the United States the inspector has reason to believe that the means of conveyance or container is contaminated with material of animal (including poultry) origin, such as, but not limited to, meat, organs, glands, extracts, secretions, fat, bones, blood, lymph, urine, or manure, so as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, the inspector may require the unloading of the means of conveyance and the emptying of the container if he or she deems it necessary to enable him or her to determine whether the means of conveyance or container is in fact so contaminated. The principal operator of the means of conveyance and his or her agent in charge of the means of conveyance shall comply with any such requirement under the immediate supervision of, and in the time and manner prescribed by, the inspector.

(c) Cleaning and disinfection: Whenever, upon inspection under this section, an inspector determines that a means of conveyance or shipping container is contaminated with material of animal origin so as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, he or she shall notify the principal operator of the means of conveyance or his or her agent in charge, of such determination and the requirements under this section. The person so notified shall cause the cleaning and disinfection of such means of conveyance and container under the immediate supervision of, and in the time and manner prescribed by, the inspector.

(d) For purposes of this section, the term “shipping container” means any container of a type specially adapted for use in transporting any article on the means of conveyance involved.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56016, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003]

§93.303   Ports designated for the importation of horses.

(a) Air and ocean ports. The following ports have APHIS inspection and quarantine facilities necessary for quarantine stations and all horses shall be entered into the United States through these stations, except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of this section, §§93.308(a), (b) and (c) and 93.317: Los Angeles, California; Miami, Florida; and Newburgh, New York.

(b) Canadian border ports. (1) The following land border ports are designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of horses from Canada: Eastport, Idaho; Houlton and Jackman, Maine; Detroit, Port Huron, and Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan; Baudette, Minnesota; Opheim, Raymond, and Sweetgrass, Montana; Alexandria Bay, Buffalo, and Champlain, New York; Dunseith, Pembina, and Portal, North Dakota; Derby Line and Highgate Springs, Vermont; Oroville and Sumas, Washington.

(2) International Falls, Minnesota, is designated as a port of entry for horses from Canada.

(c) Mexican border ports. The following land border ports are designated for the entry of horses from Mexico: Brownsville, Hidalgo, Laredo, Eagle Pass, Del Rio, Presidio, and El Paso, Texas; Douglas, Naco, Nogales, Sasabe, and San Luis, Arizona; Calexico and San Ysidro, California; and Antelope Wells, Columbus, and Santa Teresa, New Mexico.

(d) Limited ports. The following ports are designated as having inspection facilities for the entry of horses and horse products such as horse test specimens which do not appear to require restraint and holding inspection facilities: Anchorage and Fairbanks, Alaska; San Diego, California; Jacksonville, St. Petersburg-Clearwater, and Tampa, Florida; Atlanta, Georgia; Honolulu, Hawaii; Chicago, Illinois; New Orleans, Louisiana; Portland, Maine; Baltimore, Maryland; Boston, Massachusetts; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Great Falls, Montana; Dayton, Ohio; Portland, Oregon; San Juan, Puerto Rico; Memphis, Tennessee (no live animals); Galveston and Houston, Texas; and Seattle, Spokane, and Tacoma, Washington.

(e) Ports for horses to be quarantined at privately owned quarantine facilities. Horses, except horses from or which have transited any region in which African horsesickness is declared to exist,12 may be entered into the United States at any port specified in paragraph (a) of this section, or at any other port designated as an international port or airport by the U.S. Customs Service and quarantined at privately owned quarantine facilities provided that applicable provisions of §§93.301(c), 93.304(a), 93.306, 93.308(a), (b) and (c), and 93.314 are met.

12Information as to the regions where African horsesickness is declared to exist may be obtained from the Administrator.

(f) Designation of other ports. The Secretary of the Treasury has approved the designation as quarantine stations of the ports specified in this section. In special cases other ports may be designated as quarantine stations under this section by the Administrator, with the concurrence of the Secretary of the Treasury.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §93.303, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

§93.304   Import permits for horses from regions affected with CEM and for horse specimens for diagnostic purposes; reservation fees for space at quarantine facilities maintained by APHIS.

(a) Application for permit; reservation required. (1)(i) For horses from regions listed in §93.301(c)(1) of the regulations, horses intended for quarantine at a privately owned quarantine facility, and horse test specimens for diagnostic screening purposes, intended for importation from any part of the world, except as otherwise provided for in §§93.315, 93.319, and 93.321, the importer shall first apply for and obtain from APHIS an import permit. The application shall specify the name and address of the importer; the species, breed, number or quantity of horses or horse test specimens to be imported; the purpose of the importation; individual horse identification which includes a description of the horse, name, age, markings, if any, registration number, if any, and tattoo or eartag; the region of origin; the name and address of the exporter; the port of embarkation in the foreign region; the mode of transportation, route of travel, and the port of entry in the United States; the proposed date of arrival of the horses or horse test specimens to be imported; and the name of the person to whom the horses or horse test specimens will be delivered and the location of the place in the United States to which delivery will be made from the port of entry. Additional information may be required in the form of certificates concerning specific diseases to which the horses are susceptible, as well as vaccinations or other precautionary treatments to which the horses or horse test specimens have been subjected. Notice of any such requirements will be given to the applicant in each case.

(ii) Horses intended for importation under §93.301(f)(1) of this part must meet the permit requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section. Additionally, for horses intended for importation under §93.301(f)(1) of this part, the horse's owner or importer must include the following information with the application for permit that is required by paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section:

(A) That the application is being made for a horse that will remain in the United States for no more than 90 days;

(B) The names, dates, and locations of the events in which the horse will compete while in the United States;

(C) The names and locations of the premises on which the horse will be kept while in the United States, and the dates the horse will be kept on each premises; and

(D) The methods and routes by which the horse will be transported while in the United States.

(iii) Horses intended for importation under §93.301(f)(2) must meet the permit requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section. Additionally, for horses intended for importation under §93.301(f)(2), the horse's owner or importer must include the following information with the application for permit that is required by paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section:

(A) The individual identifying information required in paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section for all horses to be imported.

(B) The permanent electronic identification of each horse to be imported, if applicable. In the event that a horse has permanent electronic identification, the horse must be accompanied by a compatible reader.

(C) Photographs (head and lateral views) that are sufficient to identify each horse on an electronic medium approved by APHIS.

(D) The proposed total length of stay in the United States.

(E) A description of the shows or events in which the horse will perform while in the United States.

(F) The names, dates, and locations of the venues in which the horse will perform while in the United States.

(G) The names and locations of the premises on which the horse will be kept while in the United States, and the dates the horse will be kept on each premises.

(H) The methods and routes by which the horse will be transported while in the United States.

(I) A written plan for handling sick or injured horses that includes:

(1) The name, address, and phone number of each accredited veterinarian who will provide veterinary services in the United States;

(2) The name, address, and phone number of medical facilities to be used to diagnose or treat sick or injured horses while in the United States; and

(3) A plan to return sick or injured horses to performance condition.

(J) An application for a trust fund or escrow account agreement with APHIS in accordance with §93.301(f)(12).

(iv) Approval of an application for a permit to import a horse under §93.301(f) of this part is contingent upon a determination by the Administrator that sufficient APHIS personnel are available to provide the services required. If more than one application for an import permit is received, APHIS personnel will be assigned in the order that applications that otherwise meet the requirements of this section are received.

(2) An application for permit to import horses from regions listed in §93.301(c)(1) or horses intended for quarantine at a privately owned quarantine facility, may also be denied because of: Communicable disease conditions in the area or region of origin, or in a region where the shipment has been or will be held or through which the shipment has been or will be transported; deficiencies in the regulatory programs for the control or eradication of animal diseases and the unavailability of veterinary services in the above mentioned regions; the importer's failure to provide satisfactory evidence concerning the origin, history, and health status of the horses; the lack of satisfactory information necessary to determine that the importation will not be likely to transmit any communicable disease to livestock or poultry of the United States; or any other circumstances which the Administrator believes require such denial to prevent the dissemination of any communicable disease of livestock or poultry into the United States.

(3)(i) The importer or importer's agent shall pay or ensure payment of a reservation fee for each lot of horses to be quarantined in a facility maintained by USDA. For horses, the reservation fee shall be 100 percent of the cost of providing care, feed, and handling during quarantine, as estimated by the quarantine facility's veterinarian in charge.

(ii) At the time the importer or the importer's agent requests a reservation of quarantine space, the importer or importer's agent shall pay the reservation fee by check or U.S. money order or ensure payment of the reservation fee by an irrevocable letter of credit from a commercial bank (the effective date on such letter of credit shall run to 30 days after the date the horses are scheduled to be released from quarantine); except that anyone who issues a check to the Department for a reservation fee which is returned because of insufficient funds shall be denied any further request for reservation of a quarantine space until the outstanding amount is paid.

(iii) Any reservation fee paid by check or U.S. money order shall be applied against the expenses incurred for services received by the importer or importer's agent in connection with the quarantine for which the reservation was made. Any part of the reservation fee which remains unused after being applied against the expenses incurred for services received by the importer or the importer's agent in connection with the quarantine for which the reservation was made, shall be returned to the individual who paid the reservation fee. If the reservation fee is ensured by a letter of credit, the Department will draw against the letter of credit unless payment for services received by the importer or importer's agent in connection with the quarantine is otherwise made at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(iv) Any reservation fee shall be forfeited if the importer or the importer's agent fails to present for entry, within 24 hours following the designated time of arrival, the horse for which the reservation was made: Except that a reservation fee shall not be forfeited if the Administrator determines that services, other than provided by carriers, necessary for the importation of the horses within the required period are unavailable because of unforeseen circumstances as determined by the Administrator (such as the closing of an airport due to inclement weather or the unavailability of the reserved space due to the extension of another quarantine).

(v) If the reservation fee was ensured by a letter of credit and the fee is to be forfeited under paragraph (a)(3)(iv) of this section, the Department will draw against the letter of credit unless the reservation fee is otherwise paid at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(vi) If a reservation is canceled, the importer or the importer's agent will be charged a fee according to the following schedule:

Cancellation date Fee
30 or more days before the scheduled reservation date25 percent of the reservation fee.
15-29 days before the scheduled reservation date50 percent of the reservation fee.
Less than 15 days before the scheduled reservation date100 percent of the reservation fee.

(vii) If the reservation fee was ensured by a letter of credit, the Department will draw the amount of the cancellation fee against the letter of credit unless the cancellation fee is otherwise paid at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(b) Permit. (1) When a permit is issued, the original and two copies will be sent to the importer. It shall be the responsibility of the importer to forward the original permit and one copy to the shipper in the region of origin, and it shall also be the responsibility of the importer to ensure that the shipper presents the copy of the permit to the carrier and makes the necessary arrangements for the original permit to accompany the shipment to the specified U.S. port of entry for presentation to the collector of customs.

(2) Horses and horse test specimens for which a permit is required under paragraph (a) of this section will be received at the port of entry specified on the permit within the time prescribed in the permit, which shall not exceed 14 days from the first day that the permit is effective.

(3) Horses and horse test specimens for which a permit is required under paragraph (a) of this section will not be eligible for entry if:

(i) A permit has not been issued for the importation of the horse or horse test specimen;

(ii) If the horse or horse test specimen is unaccompanied by the permit issued for its importation;

(iii) If the horse or horse test specimen is shipped from any port other than the one designated in the permit;

(iv) If the horse or horse test specimen arrives in the United States at any port other than the one designated in the permit;

(v) If the horse or horse test specimen offered for entry differs from that described in the permit; or

(vi) If the horse or horse test specimen is not handled as outlined in the application for the permit and as specified in the permit issued.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control numbers 0579-0040 and 0579-0324)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §93.304, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

§93.305   Declaration and other documents for horses.

(a) The certificates, declarations, and affidavits required by the regulations in this part shall be presented by the importer or his or her agent to the collector of customs at the port of entry, upon arrival of horses at such port, for the use of the veterinary inspector at the port of entry.

(b) For all horses offered for importation, the importer or his or her agent shall first present two copies of a declaration which shall list the port of entry, the name and address of the importer, the name and address of the broker, the origin of the horses, the number, breed, species, and purpose of the importation, the name of the person to whom the horses will be delivered, and the location of the place to which such delivery will be made.

(c) Any declaration, permit, or other document for horses required under this subpart may be issued and presented using a U.S. Government electronic information exchange system or other authorized method.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990,as amended at 81 FR 40151, June 21, 2016]

§93.306   Inspection at the port of entry.

Inspection shall be made at the port of entry of all horses imported from any part of the world except as provided in §§93.318 and 93.323. All horses found to be free from communicable disease and not to have been exposed thereto within 60 days prior to their exportation to the United States shall be admitted subject to the other provisions in this part; all other horses shall be refused entry. Horses refused entry, unless exported within a time fixed in each case by the Administrator of Veterinary Service, and in accordance with other provisions he or she may require in each case for their handling shall be disposed of as the Administrator may direct. Such portions of the transporting vessel, and of its cargo, which have been exposed to any such horses or their emanations shall be disinfected in such manner as may be considered necessary by the inspector in charge at the port of entry, to prevent the introduction or spread of livestock or poultry disease, before the cargo is allowed to land.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56016, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003]

§93.307   Articles accompanying horses.

No litter or manure, fodder or other aliment, nor any equipment such as boxes, buckets, ropes, chains, blankets, or other things used for or about horses governed by the regulations this part, shall be landed from any conveyance except under such restrictions as the inspector in charge at the port of entry shall direct.

§93.308   Quarantine requirements.

(a) Except as provided in this section and in §93.324, horses intended for importation into the United States from any part of the world shall be shipped directly to a port designated in §§93.303 and 92.324 and be quarantined at said port until negative results to port of entry tests are obtained and the horses are certified by the port veterinarian to be free from clinical evidence of disease.

(1) Except as provided in §§93.317 and 93.324 and in paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section, horses intended for importation from the Western Hemisphere shall be quarantined at a port designated in §93.303 for not less than 7 days to be evaluated for signs of Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis.

(i) Horses imported from regions of the Western Hemisphere that APHIS considers to be free of Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis are exempt from the requirements of paragraph (a)(1) of this section. A list of regions that APHIS has declared free of Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis is maintained on the APHIS Web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import__export/animals/animal__import/equine/equine__import__quarantine.shtml. Copies of the list will also be available via postal mail, fax, or email upon request to the Sanitary Trade Issues Team, National Center for Import and Export, Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737.

(ii) APHIS will add a region to the list of those it has declared free of Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis after it conducts an evaluation of the region in accordance with §92.2 of this subchapter and finds that the disease is not present. In the case of a region formerly on this list that is removed due to an outbreak, the region may be returned to the list in accordance with the procedures for reestablishment of a region's disease-free status in §92.4 of this subchapter. APHIS will remove a region from the list of those it has declared free of Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis upon determining that the disease exists in the region based on reports APHIS receives of outbreaks of the disease from veterinary officials of the exporting country, from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), or from other sources the Administrator determines to be reliable.

(2) Horses intended for importation from regions APHIS considers to be affected with African horse sickness may enter the United States only at the port of New York, and must be quarantined at the New York Animal Import Center in Newburgh, New York, for at least 60 days. This restriction also applies to horses that have stopped in or transited a region considered affected with African horse sickness.

(i) A list of regions that APHIS considers affected with African horse sickness is maintained on the APHIS Web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import__export/animals/animal__disease__status.shtml. Copies of the list will also be available via postal mail, fax, or email upon request to the Sanitary Trade Issues Team, National Center for Import and Export, Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737.

(ii) APHIS will add a region to the list upon determining that the disease exists in the region based on reports APHIS receives of outbreaks of the disease from veterinary officials of the exporting country, from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), or from other sources the Administrator determines to be reliable. APHIS will remove a region from the list after conducting an evaluation of the region in accordance with §92.2 of this subchapter and finding that the disease is not present in the region. In the case of a region formerly not on this list that is added due to an outbreak, the region may be removed from the list in accordance with the procedures for reestablishment of a region's disease-free status in §92.4 of this subchapter.

(3) To qualify for release from quarantine, all horses, except horses from Iceland, must test negative to official tests for dourine, glanders, equine piroplasmosis, and equine infectious anemia.13 However, horses imported from Australia and New Zealand are exempt from testing for dourine and glanders. In addition, all horses must undergo any other tests, inspections, disinfections, and precautionary treatments that may be required by the Administrator to determine their freedom from communicable diseases.

13Because the official tests for dourine and glanders are performed only at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, IA, the protocols for those tests have not been published and are, therefore, not available; however, copies of “Protocol for the Complement-Fixation Test for Equine Piroplasmosis” and “Protocol for the Immunno-Diffusion (Coggins) Test For Equine Infectious Anemia” may be obtained from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231.

(4) Any quarantine period required for a horse shall be counted using the first day after arrival of the horse at the quarantine facility as the first day of quarantine and may be extended for such additional period as the Administrator may require to determine its freedom from disease. Any horse which is positive to any of the port of entry tests named in this paragraph or any other test required by the Administrator, or which is found by the port veterinarian to exhibit evidence of communicable disease during quarantine shall be refused entry into the United States and removed by the importer to a country other than the United States within 10 days of the date that the importer is notified by APHIS that such horse has been refused entry into the United States. Upon request, the Administrator may grant additional time for the removal of a horse from the United States in any case in which he or she determines that delay is unavoidable due to unforseen circumstances and the additional time for removal of the horse will not present a threat of the spread of communicable disease to other animals in the United States. At the option of the importer, such horse may be disposed of in accordance with such conditions as the Administrator believes necessary to prevent the dissemination of communicable disease into the United States. The importer shall be responsible for all costs of such removal or disposal.

(b) Temporary, privately owned quarantine facilities. Horses presented for entry into the United States as provided in §93.303(e) may be quarantined in temporary, privately owned quarantine facilities that meet the requirements of paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section and that have been approved by the Administrator for a specific importation.

(1) Approval. Requests for approval and plans for proposed temporary facilities must be submitted no less than 15 days before the proposed date of entry of horses into the facility to APHIS, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import and Export, 4700 River Road Unit 39, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231. Before facility approval can be granted, a veterinary medical officer of APHIS must inspect the facility to determine whether it complies with the standards set forth in this section: Provided, however, that approval of any temporary facility and use of such facility will be contingent upon a determination made by the Administrator that adequate personnel are available to provide required services at the facility. Approval of any facility may be refused and approval of any quarantine facility may be withdrawn at any time by the Administrator, upon his or her determination that any requirements of this section are not being met. Before such action is taken, the operator of the facility will be informed of the reasons for the proposed action by the Administrator and afforded an opportunity to present his or her views. If there is a conflict as to any material fact, a hearing will be held to resolve the conflict. The cost of the facility and all maintenance and operational costs of the facility will be borne by the operator.

(2) Standards and handling procedures. The facility must be maintained and operated in accordance with the following standards:

(i) Inspection. Inspection and quarantine services must be arranged by the operator or his or her agent with the APHIS Veterinarian in Charge for the State in which the approved facility is located14 no less than 7 days before the proposed date of entry of the horses into the quarantine facility.

14The name and the address of the Veterinarian in Charge in any State is available from APHIS, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import and Export, 4700 River Road Unit 39, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231.

(ii) Physical plant requirements. (A) The facility must be located and constructed to prevent horses from having physical contact with animals outside the facility.

(B) The facility must be constructed only with materials that can withstand repeated cleaning and disinfection. Disinfectants authorized in 9 CFR part 71 must be used. All walls, floors, and ceilings must be constructed of solid material that is impervious to moisture. Doors, windows, and other openings of the facility must be provided with double screens that will prevent insects from entering the facility.

(iii) Sanitation and security. (A) The operator of the facility must arrange for a supply of water adequate to clean and disinfect the facility.

(B) All feed and bedding must originate from an area not under quarantine because of splenetic or tick fever (see part 72 of this chapter) and must be stored within the facility.

(C) Upon the death of any horse, the operator must arrange for the disposal of the horse's carcass by incineration. Disposal of all other waste removed from the facility during the time the horses are in quarantine or from horses that are refused entry into the United States must be either by incineration or in a public sewer system that meets all applicable environmental quality control standards. Following completion of the quarantine period and the release of the horses into the United States, all waste may be removed from the quarantine facility without further restriction.

(D) The facility must be maintained and operated in accordance with any additional requirements the Administrator deems appropriate to prevent the dissemination of any communicable disease.

(E) The facility must comply with all applicable local, State, and Federal requirements for environmental quality.

(iv) Personnel. (A) Access to the facility will be granted only to persons working at the facility or to persons specifically granted such access by an APHIS representative.

(B) The operator must provide attendants for the care and feeding of horses while in the quarantine facility.

(C) Persons working in the quarantine facility may not come in contact with any horses outside the quarantine facility during the quarantine period for any horses in the facility.

(v) Handling of horses in quarantine. Horses offered for importation into the United States that are quarantined in an approved temporary facility must be handled in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section while in quarantine.

(c) Permanent, privately owned quarantine facilities. Horses presented for entry into the United States as provided in §93.303(e) may be quarantined in permanent, privately owned quarantine facilities approved by the Administrator as meeting the requirements of paragraphs (c)(1) through (c)(6) of this section.

(1) APHIS approval—(i) Approval procedures. Persons seeking APHIS approval of a permanent, privately owned quarantine facility must write to the Administrator, c/o National Center for Import and Export, Veterinary Services, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 39, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231. The application letter must include the full name and mailing address of the applicant; the location and street address of the facility for which approval is sought; blueprints of the facility; a description of the financial resources available for construction, operation, and maintenance of the facility; the anticipated source or origin of horses to be quarantined, as well as the expected size and frequency of shipments; a contingency plan for horses needing emergency veterinary care; and a contingency plan for the disposal of all the horses capable of being housed in the facility.

(A) If APHIS determines that an application is complete and merits further consideration, the person applying for facility approval must enter into a service agreement with APHIS wherein the applicant agrees to pay the cost of all APHIS services associated with APHIS' evaluation of the application and facility. APHIS charges for the evaluation of the application and facility at hourly rates listed in §130.30 of this chapter. This service agreement applies only to fees accrued during the application process. If the facility is approved by APHIS, facility owners must enter into a compliance agreement in accordance with paragraph (c)(2) of this section.

(B) Requests for approval must be submitted to APHIS at least 120 days prior to the date of application for local building permits. Requests for approval will be evaluated on a first-come, first-served basis.

(ii) Criteria for approval. Before a facility may operate as a permanent, privately owned quarantine facility for horses, it must be approved by APHIS. To be approved:

(A) The facility must meet all of the requirements of this section;

(B) The facility must meet any additional requirements that may be imposed by the Administrator in each specific case, as specified in the compliance agreement required under paragraph (c)(2) of this section, to ensure that the quarantine of horses in the facility will be adequate to determine their health status, as well as to prevent the transmission of diseases into, within, and from the facility; and

(C) The Administrator must determine that sufficient personnel, including one or more APHIS veterinarians and other professional, technical, and support personnel, are available to serve as APHIS representatives at the facility. If the facility is approved, APHIS representatives will be present at all import quarantine operations in order to monitor them and will be present in order to provide other technical services to ensure the biological security of the facility, including, but not limited to, those specified in paragraph (c)(4)(v)(H) of §93.308. The Administrator's determination will be based on the expected size and frequency of shipments to the facility, as described in the application for approval of a permanent facility, as well as any other pertinent information in the application. APHIS will assign personnel to facilities requesting approval in the order that the facilities are approved. The Administrator has sole discretion on the number of APHIS personnel to be assigned to the facility.

(iii) Maintaining approval. To maintain APHIS approval, the operator must continue to comply with all the requirements of paragraph (c) of this section and the terms of the compliance agreement executed in accordance with paragraph (c)(2) of this section.

(iv) Denial or withdrawal of approval. Approval for a proposed permanent, privately owned quarantine facility may be denied or approval for a facility already in operation may be withdrawn at any time by the Administrator for any of the reasons provided in paragraph (c)(1)(iv)(C) of this section.

(A) Before facility approval is denied or withdrawn, the operator of the facility will be informed of the reasons for the proposed action by the Administrator and afforded an opportunity to present his or her views. If there is a conflict as to any material fact, APHIS will afford the operator, upon request, the opportunity for a hearing with respect to the merits or validity of such action.

(B) The Administrator may withdraw approval of an existing facility prior to a final determination in the hearing if the Administrator determines that such action is necessary to protect animal health or the public health, interest, or safety. Such withdrawal will be effective upon oral or written notification, whichever is earlier, to the operator of the facility. In the event of oral notification, APHIS will promptly give written confirmation to the operator of the facility. This withdrawal will continue in effect pending the completion of the hearing and any judicial review, unless otherwise ordered by the Administrator. In addition to withdrawal of approval for the reasons provided in paragraph (c)(1)(iv)(C) of this section, the Administrator will also automatically withdraw approval when the operator of any approved facility notifies the APHIS Veterinarian in Charge for the State in which the facility is located, in writing, that the facility is no longer in operation.15

15The name and address of the Veterinarian in Charge in any State is available from APHIS, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import and Export, 4700 River Road Unit 39, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231.

(C) The Administrator may deny or withdraw approval of a permanent, privately owned facility if:

(1) Any requirement of this section or the compliance agreement is not complied with; or

(2) The operator fails to remit any charges for APHIS services rendered; or

(3) The operator or a person responsibly connected with the business of the quarantine facility acts as a paid agent (broker) for the importation or subsequent sale of horses; or

(4) The operator or a person responsibly connected with the business of the quarantine facility is or has been found by a court of competent jurisdiction to have violated any law or regulation pertaining to the importation or quarantine of any animal; or

(5) The operator or a person responsibly connected with the business of the quarantine facility is or has been convicted of any crime involving fraud, bribery, or extortion or any other crime involving a lack of the integrity needed for the conduct of operations affecting the importation of animals; or

(6) The approved quarantine facility has not been in use to quarantine horses for a period of at least 1 year.

(D) For the purposes of this section, a person is deemed to be responsibly connected with the business of the quarantine facility if such person has an ownership, mortgage, or lease interest in the facility's physical plant, or if such person is a partner, officer, director, holder, or owner of 10 percent or more of its voting stock, or is an employee in a managerial or executive capacity.

(v) Approval for existing facilities. Any permanent, privately owned quarantine facility operating under APHIS authorization on August 3, 2009 must be approved by APHIS to continue quarantine operations by August 3, 2010 or else must cease horse quarantine operations.

(2) Compliance agreement. (i) All permanent, privately owned quarantine facilities for horses must operate in accordance with a compliance agreement executed by the operator or his or her agent and the Administrator, which must be renewed on an annual basis.

(ii) The compliance agreement must provide that:

(A) The facility must meet all applicable requirements of this section;

(B) The operator agrees to have APHIS representatives present at all import quarantine operations at the facility in order to monitor the import quarantine operations;

(C) The operator agrees to be responsible for the cost of the facility; all costs associated with its maintenance and operation; all costs associated with the hiring of employees and other personnel to attend to the horses as well as to maintain and operate the facility; all costs associated with the care of quarantined horses, such as feed, bedding, medicines, inspections, testing, laboratory procedures, and necropsy examinations; and all APHIS charges for the services of APHIS representatives in accordance with this section and part 130 of this chapter;

(D) The operator agrees to bar from the facility any employee or other personnel at the facility who fails to comply with paragraph (c) of this section or other provisions of this part, any terms of the compliance agreement, or related instructions from APHIS representatives;

(E) The operator agrees to demonstrate, to the satisfaction of the Administrator, that the routine cleaning and maintenance of the facility, the daily care of animals in quarantine, the disposal of wastes at the facility, the cleaning and disinfection procedures employed by the facility, the handling, washing, and disposal of soiled and contaminated clothing worn within the facility, and the disposal of dead horses, whether onsite or offsite, adhere to the best practices of biological security and animal care;

(F) The operator agrees to random spot audits by APHIS representatives to determine whether employees and other personnel are complying with these practices; and

(G) The operator of the facility allows the Administrator to amend the compliance agreement at any time after approval of the facility in order to incorporate related instructions issued by APHIS representatives while the facility is operational

(3) Physical plant requirements. The facility must meet the following requirements as determined by an APHIS inspection prior to admitting horses into the facility:

(i) Location. The quarantine facility must be located in proximity to a port authorized under §93.303(e). The site and the specific routes for the movement of horses from the port to the site must be approved by the Administrator based on consideration of whether the site or routes would put the horses in a position that could result in the transmission of communicable diseases to domestic horses.

(ii) Construction. The facility must be of sound construction, in good repair, and properly designed to prevent the escape of quarantined horses. It must have adequate capacity to receive and house shipments of horses as lots on an “all in, all out” basis, whereby separate lots of horses can be received and housed without contact with any other lots being quarantined at the facility. The facility must include the following:

(A) Perimeter fencing. The facility must be surrounded by a security fence of sufficient height and design to prevent the entry of unauthorized people and animals from outside the facility and to prevent the escape of the horses in quarantine.

(B) Entrances and exits. All entryways into the nonquarantine area of the facility must be equipped with a secure and lockable door. While horses are in quarantine, all access to the quarantine area for horses must be from within the building, and each such entryway to the quarantine area must be equipped with a series of solid self-closing double doors. Emergency exits to the outside are permitted in the quarantine area. Such emergency exits must be constructed so as to permit their being opened from the inside of the facility only.

(C) Windows and other openings. The facility must be constructed so that any windows or other openings in the quarantine area are double-screened with screening of sufficient gauge and mesh to prevent the entry or exit of insects and other vectors of diseases of horses and to provide ventilation sufficient to ensure the comfort and safety of all horses in the facility. The interior and exterior screens must be separated by at least 3 inches (7.62 cm). All screening of windows or other openings must be easily removable for cleaning, but must otherwise remain locked and secure at all times in a manner satisfactory to APHIS representatives in order to ensure the biological security of the facility.

(D) Lighting. The entire facility, including its stalls and hallways, must have adequate lighting.

(E) Loading docks. The facility must have separate docks for animal receiving and releasing and for general receiving and pickup, unless a single dock used for both purposes is cleaned and disinfected after each use in accordance with paragraph (c)(4)(iv)(F) of this section.

(F) Surfaces. The facility must be constructed so that the floor surfaces with which horses have contact are nonslip and wear-resistant. All floor surfaces with which the horses, their excrement, or discharges have contact must provide for adequate drainage. All floor and wall surfaces with which the horses, their excrement, or discharges have contact must be impervious to moisture and be able to withstand frequent cleaning and disinfection without deterioration. Ceilings and wall surfaces with which the horses, their excrement, or discharges do not have contact must be able to withstand cleaning and disinfection between shipments of horses. All floor and wall surfaces must be free of sharp edges that could cause injury to horses.

(G) Horse stalls. The stalls in which horses are kept must be large enough to allow each animal to make normal postural and social adjustments with adequate freedom of movement. Exercise equipment for horses may be kept in the stalls, provided that there will still be sufficient space within the stalls for the horses to move freely once the equipment is installed.

(H) Aisleways. The aisleways through which horses are moved to and from stalls must be wide enough to provide for safe movement of horses, including allowing horses to turn around in the aisleway, preventing horses in facing stalls from coming into contact with horses in the aisleway, and adequately ventilating the stalls.

(I) Means of isolation. Physical barriers must separate different lots of horses in the facility so that horses in one lot cannot have physical contact with horses in another lot or with their excrement or discharges. Stalls must be available that are capable of isolating any horses exhibiting signs of illness.

(J) Showers. A shower must be located at each entrance to the quarantine area. If the facility has a necropsy area, a shower must be located at the entrance to the necropsy area. A clothes-storage and clothes-changing area must be provided with each shower area. There must also be one or more receptacles near each shower so that clothing that has been worn into the quarantine area can be deposited in a receptacle prior to entering the shower.

(K) APHIS space. The facility must have adequate space for APHIS representatives to conduct examinations and testing of the horses in quarantine, prepare and package samples for mailing, and store the necessary equipment and supplies for duplicate samples. The space provided to conduct examinations and testing must include a refrigerator-freezer in which to store samples. The examination space must include equipment to provide for the safe inspection of horses. The facility must also include a secure, lockable office for APHIS use with enough room for a desk, chair, and filing cabinet.

(L) Necropsy area. The facility must either include an area for conducting necropsies onsite or must have designated an alternate facility at which a suitable necropsy area is available. If the facility has a necropsy area, it must be of sufficient size to perform necropsies on horses and be equipped with adequate lighting, hot and cold running water, a drain, a cabinet for storing instruments, a refrigerator-freezer for storing specimens, and an autoclave to sterilize veterinary equipment. If the facility does not have such an area, it must specify an alternate facility at which a suitable necropsy area is available, a route from the quarantine facility to the alternate facility's necropsy area, and the safeguards that will be in place to ensure that communicable diseases of horses are not spread during transit. This alternate facility and transport methodology must be approved by the Administrator under the procedures for requesting variances outlined in paragraph (c)(6) of this section.

(M) Storage. The facility must have sufficient storage space for equipment and supplies used in import quarantine operations. Storage space must include separate, secure storage for pesticides and for medical and other biological supplies, as well as a separate vermin-proof storage area for feed and bedding, if feed and bedding are stored at the facility. If the facility has multiple lot-holding areas, then separate storage space for any reusable supplies and equipment that are not disinfected after each use in accordance with part 71 of this chapter must be provided for each lot-holding area.

(N) Additional space needs. The facility must have an area for washing and drying clothes, linens, and towels and an area for cleaning and disinfecting equipment used in the facility. The facility must also include a work area for the repair of equipment.

(O) Restrooms. The facility must have permanent restrooms in both the quarantine and nonquarantine areas of the facility.

(P) Ventilation and climate control. The facility must be constructed with an air handling system capable of controlling and maintaining the ambient temperature, air quality, humidity, and odor at levels that are not injurious or harmful to the health of horses in quarantine. Air supplied to the quarantine area must not be recirculated or reused for other ventilation needs. Air handling systems for lot-holding areas must be separate from air handling systems for other operational and administrative areas of the facility. In addition, if the facility is equipped to handle more than one lot of horses at a time, the air handling system must be adequate to ensure that there is no cross-contamination of air between separate lot-holding areas.

(Q) Fire protection. The facility, including the lot-holding areas, must have a fire alarm voice communication system.

(R) Communication system. The facility must have a communication system between the nonquarantine and quarantine areas of the facility.

(iii) Sanitation. To ensure that proper animal health and biological security measures are observed, the facility must have the following:

(A) Equipment and supplies necessary to maintain the facility in clean and sanitary condition, including pest control equipment and supplies and cleaning and disinfecting equipment with adequate capacity to disinfect the facility and equipment.

(B) Any reusable equipment and supplies that are not disinfected after each use in accordance with part 71 of this chapter maintained separately for each lot of horses.

(C) Equipment and supplies used in the quarantine area maintained separately from equipment and supplies used in the nonquarantine area.

(D) A supply of potable water adequate to meet all watering and cleaning needs, with water faucets for hoses located throughout the facility. An emergency supply of water for horses in quarantine must also be maintained.

(E) A stock of disinfectant authorized in part 71 of this chapter or otherwise approved by the Administrator that is sufficient to disinfect the entire facility.

(F) The capability to dispose of wastes, including manure, urine, and used bedding, by means of burial, incineration, or public sewer. Other waste material must be handled in such a manner that minimizes spoilage and the attraction of pests and must be disposed of by incineration, public sewer, or other preapproved manner that prevents the spread of disease. Disposal of wastes must be carried out in accordance with the terms of the compliance agreement, and is subject to spot audits by APHIS representatives.

(G) The capability to dispose of horse carcasses in a manner approved by the Administrator and under conditions that minimize the risk of disease spread from carcasses.

(H) For incineration to be carried out at the facility, the facility must have incineration equipment that is detached from other facility structures and is capable of burning animal waste and refuse. The incineration site must also include an area sufficient for solid waste holding. Incineration may also take place at a local site away from the facility premises. All incineration activities, whether onsite or offsite, must be carried out in accordance with the terms of the compliance agreement, and are subject to spot audits by APHIS representatives.

(I) The capability to control surface drainage and effluent into, within, and from the facility in a manner that prevents the spread of disease into, within, or from the facility. If the facility is approved to handle more than one lot of horses at the same time, the drainage system must be adequate to ensure that there is no cross-contamination between lot-holding areas.

(iv) Security. Facilities must provide the following security measures:

(A) The facility and premises must be kept locked and secure at all times while horses are in quarantine.

(B) The facility and premises must have signs indicating that the facility is a quarantine area and no visitors are allowed.

(C) The facility and premises must be guarded at all times by one or more representatives of a bonded security company, or, alternatively, the facility must have an electronic security system that indicates the entry of unauthorized persons into the facility. Electronic security systems must be coordinated through or with the local police so that monitoring of the quarantine facility is maintained whenever APHIS representatives are not at the facility. The electronic security system must be of the “silent type” and must be triggered to ring at the monitoring site and not at the facility. The electronic security system must be approved by Underwriter's Laboratories. The operator must provide written instructions to the monitoring agency stating that the police and a representative of APHIS designated by APHIS must be notified by the monitoring agency if the alarm is triggered. The operator must also submit a copy of those instructions to the Administrator. The operator must notify the designated APHIS representative whenever a breach of security occurs or is suspected of having occurred. In the event that disease is diagnosed in quarantined horses, the Administrator may require the operator to have the facility guarded by a bonded security company in a manner that the Administrator deems necessary to ensure the biological security of the facility.

(D) The operator must furnish a telephone number or numbers to APHIS at which the operator or his or her agent can be reached at all times.

(E) APHIS is authorized to place APHIS seals on any or all entrances and exits of the facility when determined necessary by APHIS and to take all necessary steps to ensure that such seals are broken only in the presence of an APHIS representative. If someone other than an APHIS representative breaks such seals, APHIS will consider the act a breach in security and APHIS representatives will make an immediate accounting of all horses in the facility. If a breach in security occurs, APHIS may extend the quarantine period as long as necessary to determine that the horses are free of communicable diseases.

(4) Operating procedures. The following procedures must be observed at the facility at all times:

(i) Oversight by APHIS representatives. (A) Import quarantine operations at a privately owned quarantine facility may only be conducted with the physical presence of and monitoring by APHIS representatives. APHIS representatives are also authorized to perform the services required by this section and by the compliance agreement.

(B) If, as the result of a spot audit, or for any other reason, APHIS determines that the operator has failed to properly care for, feed, or handle quarantined horses as required in this paragraph (c) or in accordance with the terms of the compliance agreement, or has failed to maintain and operate the facility as provided in this paragraph (c) or in accordance with the terms of the compliance agreement, APHIS representatives will furnish such services, will make arrangements for the sale or disposal of quarantined horses at the quarantine facility owner's expense, or will begin the process for withdrawal of approval of the quarantine facility specified in paragraph (c)(1)(iv) of this section.

(ii) Personnel. (A) The operator must provide adequate personnel to maintain the facility and care for the horses in quarantine, including attendants to care for and feed horses, and other personnel as needed to maintain, operate, and administer the facility.

(B) The operator must provide APHIS with an up-to-date list of all personnel who have access to the facility. The list must include the names, current residential addresses, and employee identification numbers of each person. When the operator wishes to grant access to the facility to persons who have not previously had access to it, the operator must update the list prior to such persons having access to the quarantine facility.

(C) The operator must provide APHIS with signed statements from each employee and any other personnel hired by the operator and working at the facility in which the person agrees to comply with paragraph (c) of this section and applicable provisions of this part, all terms of the compliance agreement, and any related instructions from APHIS representatives pertaining to import quarantine operations, including contact with animals both inside and outside the facility.

(iii) Authorized access. Access to the facility premises as well as inside the quarantine area will be granted only to APHIS representatives, authorized employees, and other personnel of the operator assigned to work at the facility. All other persons are prohibited from the premises unless specifically granted access by an APHIS representative. Any visitors granted access must be accompanied at all times by an APHIS representative while on the premises or in the quarantine area of the facility.

(iv) Sanitary requirements. (A) All persons granted access to the quarantine area must:

(1) Shower when entering and leaving the quarantine area;

(2) Shower when leaving the necropsy area if a necropsy is in the process of being performed or has just been completed, or if all or portions of the examined animal remain exposed;

(3) Wear clean protective work clothing and footwear upon entering the quarantine area;

(4) Wear disposable gloves when handling sick horses and then wash hands after removing gloves; and

(5) Change protective clothing, footwear, and gloves when they become soiled or contaminated.

(B) The operator is responsible for providing a sufficient supply of clothing and footwear to ensure that all persons provided access to the quarantine area at the facility have clean, protective clothing, and footwear when they enter the quarantine area.

(C) The operator is responsible for the handling, washing, and disposal of soiled and contaminated clothing worn within the quarantine facility in accordance with the terms of the compliance agreement. At the end of each workday, work clothing worn into the quarantine area must be collected and kept in a bag until the clothing is washed. Used footwear must either be left in the clothes-changing area or cleaned with hot water (148 °F minimum) and detergent and disinfected in accordance with the terms of the compliance agreement. APHIS representatives may conduct spot audits of all handling, cleaning, and/or disposal of used clothing or used footwear.

(D) All equipment (including tractors) must be cleaned and disinfected prior to being used in the quarantine area of the facility with a disinfectant authorized in part 71 of this chapter or otherwise approved by the Administrator. The equipment must remain dedicated to the facility for the entire quarantine period. Any equipment used with quarantined horses (e.g., halters, floats, feed, water buckets, and exercise equipment) must remain dedicated to that particular lot of quarantined horses for the duration of the quarantine period or be cleaned and disinfected before coming in contact with horses from another lot. Prior to its removal from the quarantine premises, any equipment must be cleaned and disinfected in accordance with the terms of the compliance agreement. APHIS representatives may conduct spot audits of all cleaning and disinfection of equipment.

(E) Any vehicle, before entering or leaving the quarantine area of the facility, must be cleaned and disinfected in accordance with the terms of the compliance agreement within a time period authorized by the APHIS representative and with a disinfectant authorized in part 71 of this chapter or otherwise approved by the Administrator. APHIS representatives may conduct spot audits of all cleaning and disinfection of vehicles.

(F) If the facility has a single loading dock, the loading dock must be cleaned and disinfected after each use in accordance with the terms of the compliance agreement within a time period authorized by the APHIS representative and with a disinfectant authorized in part 71 of this chapter or otherwise approved by the Administrator. APHIS representatives may conduct spot audits of all cleaning and disinfection of the loading dock.

(G) That area of the facility in which a lot of horses has been held or has had access to must be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected, with a disinfectant authorized in part 71 of this chapter or otherwise approved by the Administrator, in accordance with the terms of the compliance agreement, upon release of the horses before a new lot of horses is placed in that area of the facility. APHIS representatives may conduct spot audits of all cleaning and disinfection of lot-holding areas.

(v) Handling of the horses in quarantine. (A) All horses must be handled in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section.

(B) Each lot of horses to be quarantined must be placed in the facility on an “all-in, all out” basis. No horse may be taken out of the lot while it is in quarantine, except for diagnostic purposes or as provided in paragraph (a)(4) of this section, and no horse may be added to the lot while the lot is in quarantine. Once import quarantine operations have been completed on a lot, but while the lot is still at the facility, a horse may be removed from that lot.

(C) The facility must provide sufficient feed and bedding for the horses in quarantine, and it must be free of vermin and not spoiled. Feed and bedding must originate from an area that is not listed in part 72 of this chapter as an area quarantined for splenetic or tick fever.

(D) Breeding of horses or collection of germplasm from horses is prohibited during the quarantine period.

(E) Horses in quarantine will be subjected to such tests and procedures as directed by an APHIS representative to determine whether they are free from communicable diseases of horses.

(F) Any death or suspected illness of horses in quarantine must be reported immediately to APHIS. The affected horses must be disposed of as the Administrator may direct, or depending on the nature of the disease, must be cared for as directed by APHIS to prevent the spread of the disease.

(G) Quarantined horses requiring specialized medical attention or additional postmortem testing may be transported off the quarantine site, if authorized by APHIS. A second quarantine site must be established to house the horses at the facility of destination (e.g., veterinary teaching hospital). In such cases, APHIS may extend the quarantine period for that horse and for its lot until the results of any outstanding tests or postmortem results are received.

(H) Should a horse be determined to be infected with or exposed to a Federally regulated disease of horses, arrangements for the final disposition of the infected or exposed horse must be accomplished within 10 days of the date that the importer is notified by the overseeing APHIS representative that the horse has been refused entry into the United States. APHIS representatives must be physically present at and directly monitor the subsequent disposition of the horse. The operator must have a preapproved contingency plan for the disposal of all horses housed at the facility prior to issuance of the import permit.

(I) Vaccination of horses in quarantine is prohibited. However, once import quarantine operations have been completed on a lot, but while the lot is still at the facility, horses in that lot may be vaccinated.

(vi) Records. (A) The facility operator must maintain a current daily record to record the entry and exit of all persons entering and leaving the quarantine facility.

(B) The operator must maintain the daily record, along with any records kept by APHIS and deposited with the operator, for at least 2 years following the date of release of the horses from quarantine and must make such records available to APHIS representatives upon request.

(5) Environmental quality. If APHIS determines that a privately operated quarantine facility does not meet applicable local, State, or Federal environmental regulations, APHIS may deny or suspend approval of the facility until appropriate remedial measures have been applied.

(6) Variances. The Administrator may grant variances to existing requirements relating to location, construction, and other design features of the physical facility, as well as to sanitation, security, operating procedures, recordkeeping, and other provisions of paragraph (c) of this section, but only if the Administrator determines that the variance causes no detrimental impact to the overall biological security of the import quarantine operations. The operator must submit a request for a variance from the requirements for the construction of the facility in paragraph (c)(3) of this section to the Administrator in writing prior to the construction of the facility. The operator must submit a request for a variance from the operational requirements in paragraph (c)(4) of this section to the Administrator in writing at least 30 days in advance of the arrival of horses to the facility. Any variance must also be expressly provided for in the compliance agreement.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0313)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §93.308, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

§93.309   Horse quarantine facilities; payment information.

(a) Privately operated quarantine facilities. The importer, or his or her agent, of horses subject to quarantine under the regulations in this part shall arrange for acceptable transportation to the privately operated quarantine facility and for the care, feed, and handling of the horses from the time of unloading at the quarantine port to the time of release from quarantine. Such arrangements shall be agreed to in advance by the Administrator. All expenses resulting therefrom or incident thereto shall be the responsibility of the importer; APHIS assumes no responsibility with respect thereto. The quarantine facility must be suitable for the quarantine of such horses and must be approved by the Administrator prior to the issuance of any import permit. The facilities occupied by horses should be kept clean and sanitary to the satisfaction of the inspector assigned to supervise the quarantine. If for any cause the care, feed, or handling of horses, or the sanitation of the facilities, is neglected, in the opinion of the inspector assigned to supervise the quarantine, such services may be furnished by APHIS in the same manner as though arrangements had been made for such services as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, and/or the horses may be disposed of as the Administrator, may direct, including sale in accordance with the procedure described in paragraph (b) of this section. The importer, or his or her agent, shall request in writing such inspection and other services as may be required, and shall waive all claim against the United States and APHIS or any employee of APHIS for damages which may arise from such services. The Administrator, may prescribe reasonable rates for the services provided under this paragraph. When it is found necessary to extend the usual minimum quarantine period, the importer, or his or her agent, shall be so advised in writing and shall pay for such additional quarantine and other services required. Payment for all services received by the importer, or his or her agent, in connection with each separate lot of horses shall be made by certified check or U.S. money order prior to release of the horses. If such payment is not made, the horses may be sold in accordance with the procedure described in paragraph (b) of this section, or otherwise disposed of as directed by the Administrator.

(b) Quarantine facilities maintained by APHIS. The importer, or his or her agent, of horses subject to quarantine under the regulations in this part shall arrange for acceptable transportation to the quarantine facility, and for the care, feed, and handling of the horses from the time they arrive at the quarantine port to the time of release from quarantine. Such arrangements shall be agreed to in advance by the Administrator. The importer or his or her agent shall request in writing such inspection and other services as may be required, and shall waive all claim against the United States and APHIS or any employee of APHIS, for damages which may arise from such services. All expenses resulting therefrom or incident thereto shall be the responsibility of the importer; APHIS assumes no responsibility with respect thereto. The Administrator may prescribe reasonable rates for the services provided under this paragraph. When it is found necessary to extend the usual minimum quarantine period, the importer, or his or her agent, shall be so advised in writing and shall pay for such additional quarantine and other services required. Payment for services received by the importer, or his or her agent, in connection with each separate lot of horses shall be made by certified check or U.S. money order prior to release of the horses. If such payment is not made, the horses may be sold in accordance with the procedure described in this paragraph or otherwise disposed of as directed by the Administrator. When payment is not made and the horses are to be sold to recover payment for services received, the importer, or his or her agent, will be notified by the inspector that if said charges are not immediately paid or satisfactory arrangements made for payment, the horses will be sold at public sale to pay the expense of care, feed, and handling during that period. The sale will be held after the expiration of the quarantine period, at such time and place as may be designated by the General Services Administration or other designated selling agent. The proceeds of the sale, after deducting the charges for care, feed, and handling of the horses and other expenses, including the expense of the sale, shall be held in a Special Deposit Account in the United States Treasury for 6 months from the date of sale. If not claimed by the importer, or his or her agent, within 6 months from the date of sale, the amount so held shall be transferred from the Special Deposit Account to the General Fund Account in the United States Treasury.

(c) Amounts collected from the importer, or his or her agent, for service rendered shall be deposited so as to be available for defraying the expenses involved in this service.

§93.310   Quarantine stations, visiting restricted; sales prohibited.

Visitors are not permitted in the quarantine enclosure during any time that the horses are in quarantine unless an APHIS representative specifically grants access under such conditions and restrictions as may be imposed by APHIS. An importer (or his or her agent or accredited veterinarian) may be admitted to the lot-holding area(s) containing his or her quarantined horses at such intervals as may be deemed necessary, and under such conditions and restrictions as may be imposed, by an APHIS representative. On the last day of the quarantine period, owners, officers or registry societies, and others having official business or whose services may be necessary in the removal of the horses may be admitted upon written permission from an APHIS representative. No exhibition or sale shall be allowed within the quarantine grounds.

[74 FR 31601, July 2, 2009]

§93.311   Milk from quarantined horses.

Milk or cream from horses quarantined under the provisions of this part shall not be used by any person other than those in charge of such horses, nor be fed to any animals other than those within the same enclosure, without permission of the inspector in charge of the quarantine station and subject to such restrictions as he or she may consider necessary to each instance. No milk or cream shall be removed from the quarantine premises except in compliance with all State and local regulations.

§93.312   Manure from quarantined horses.

No manure shall be removed from the quarantine premises until the release of the horses producing same.

§93.313   Appearance of disease among horses in quarantine.

If any contagious disease appears among horses during the quarantine period special precautions shall be taken to prevent spread of the infection to other animals in the quarantine station or to those outside the grounds. The affected horses shall be disposed of as the Administrator may direct, depending upon the nature of the disease.

§93.314   Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment.

(a) Horses offered for importation from any part of the world shall be accompanied by a certificate of a salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the region of origin, or if exported from Mexico, shall be accompanied either by such a certificate or by a certificate issued by a veterinarian accredited by the National Government of Mexico and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the National Government of Mexico, thereby representing that the veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so, showing that:

(1) The horses described in the certificate have been in said region during the 60 days preceding exportation;

(2) That each horse has been inspected on the premises of origin and found free of evidence of communicable disease and, insofar as can be determined, exposure thereto during the 60 days preceding exportation;

(3) That each horse has not been vaccinated with a live or attenuated or inactivated vaccine during the 14 days preceding exportation: Provided, however, that in specific cases the Administrator may authorize horses that have been vaccinated with an inactivated vaccine to enter the United States when he or she determines that in such cases and under such conditions as he or she may prescribe such importation will not endanger the livestock in the United States, and such horses comply with all other applicable requirements of this part;

(4) That, insofar as can be determined, no case of African horse sickness, dourine, glanders, surra, epizootic lymphangitis, ulcerative lymphangitis, equine piroplasmosis, Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis, vesicular stomatitis, or equine infectious anemia has occurred on the premises of origin or on adjoining premises during the 60 days preceding exportation; and

(5) That, except as provided in §93.301(g):

(i) The horses have not been in any region listed in §93.301(c)(1) as affected with CEM during the 12 months immediately prior to their importation into the United States;

(ii) The horses have not been on any premises at any time during which time such premises were found by an official of the veterinary services of the national government of the region where such premises are located, to be affected with CEM;

(iii) The horses have not been bred by or bred to any horses from an affected premises; and

(iv) The horses have had no other contact with horses that have been found to be affected with CEM or with horses that were imported from regions affected with CEM.

(b) If a horse is presented for importation from a region where it has been for less than 60 days, the horse must be accompanied by a certificate that meets the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section that has been issued by a salaried veterinary officer of the national government of each region in which the horse has been during the 60 days immediately preceding its shipment to the United States. The dates during which the horse was in each region during the 60 days immediately preceding its exportation to the United States shall be included as a part of the certification.

(c) Following the port-of-entry inspection required by §93.306 of this part, and before a horse offered for importation from any part of the world is released from the port of entry, an inspector may require the horse and its accompanying equipment to be disinfected as a precautionary measure against the introduction of foot-and-mouth disease or any other disease dangerous to the livestock of the United States.

[61 FR 52245, Oct. 7, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997; 63 FR 53783, Oct. 7, 1998]

Canada16

16Importations from Canada shall be subject to §§93.315, 93.316, 93.317 and 93.318, in addition to other sections in this part which are in terms applicable to such importations.

§93.315   Import permit and declaration for horses.

For all horses offered for importation from Canada, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of a declaration as provided in §93.305.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.316   Horses from Canada for immediate slaughter.

Horses imported from Canada for immediate slaughter shall be consigned from the port of entry directly to a recognized slaughtering establishment and there be slaughtered within two weeks from the date of entry. Such horses shall be inspected at the port of entry and otherwise handled in accordance with §93.306. As used in this section, “directly” means without unloading en route if moved in a means of conveyance, or without stopping if moved in any other manner.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 59 FR 28216, June 1, 1994. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.317   Horses from Canada.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, horses from Canada shall be inspected as provided in §93.306; shall be accompanied by a certificate as required by §93.314 which shall include evidence of a negative test for equine infectious anemia for which blood samples were drawn during the 180 days preceding exportation to the United States and which test was conducted in a laboratory approved by the Canada Department of Agriculture or the United States Department of Agriculture; Except, that horses accompanying their dams which were foaled after their dam was so tested negative need not be so tested; and shall otherwise be handled as provided in §93.314: Provided, however, That certificates required for horses from Canada may be either issued or endorsed by a salaried veterinarian of the Canadian Government: And provided, further, That USDA veterinary port inspection is not required for horses imported from Canada under temporary Customs authorization for a period of 30 days from the date of issue of the certificate and the certificate issued is valid for an unlimited number of importations into the United States during the 30-day period.

(b) Horses of United States origin that are imported into Canada under an export health certificate valid for a period of 30 days from the date of issue may re-enter the United States an unlimited number of times during the 30-day period, without USDA veterinary port inspection, at any Custom land border port of entry designated for animals from Canada, if accompanied by the original export health certificate under which they were permitted entry into Canada.

(c) Horses for immediate slaughter may be imported from Canada without the certification prescribed in paragraph (a) of this section, but shall be subject to the other applicable provisions of this part, and shall be accompanied by a certificate issued or endorsed by a salaried veterinarian of the Canadian Government stating that:

(1) The horses were inspected on the premises where assembled for shipment to the United States within the 30 days immediately prior to the date of export and were found free of evidence of communicable disease, and

(2) As far as can be determined, they have not been exposed to any such disease during the 60 days immediately preceding their exportation.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 56 FR 33863, July 24, 1991. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.318   Special provisions.

(a) In-bond shipments from Canada. (1) Horses from Canada transported in-bond through the United States for immediate export shall be inspected at the border port of entry and, when accompanied by an import permit obtained under §93.304 of this part and all conditions therein are observed, shall be allowed entry into the United States and shall be otherwise handled as provided in paragraph (b) of §93.301. Horses not accompanied by a permit shall meet the requirements of this part in the same manner as horses destined for importation into the United States, except that the Administrator may permit their inspection at some other point when he or she finds that such action will not increase the risk that communicable diseases of livestock and poultry will be disseminated to the livestock or poultry of the United States.

(2) In-transit shipments through Canada. Horses originating in the United States and transported directly through Canada may re-enter the United States without Canadian health or test certificates when accompanied by copies of the United States export health certificates properly issued and endorsed in accordance with regulations in part 91 of this chapter: Provided, That, to qualify for entry, the date, time, port of entry, and signature of the Canadian Port Veterinarian that inspected the horses for entry into Canada shall be recorded on the United States health certificate, or a paper containing the information shall be attached to the certificate that accompanies the horses. In all cases it shall be determined by the veterinary inspector at the United States port of entry that the horses are the identical horses covered by said certificate.

(b) Exhibition horses. Except as provided in §93.317(b), horses from the United States which have been exhibited at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair at Toronto or other publicly recognized expositions in Canada, including racing, horse shows, rodeo, circus, or stage exhibitions in Canada, and have not been in that region for more than 90 days are eligible for return to the United States without Canadian health or test certificates, if they are accompanied by copies of the United States health certificate, issued and endorsed in accordance with the export regulations contained in part 91 of this chapter for entry into Canada: Provided, That in the case of horses for exhibition, including race horses, the certificates shall certify that negative results were obtained from official tests for equine infectious anemia for which blood samples were drawn within 180 days of the date that the horses are offered for return to the United States: And, provided further, That all horses offered for re-entry upon examination by the veterinary inspector at the U.S. port of entry, are found by the inspector to be free of communicable diseases and exposure thereto and are determined to be the identical horses covered by said certificates or are the natural increase of such horses born after official test dates certified on the dam's health certificate.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997]

Central America and the West Indies17

17Importations from regions of Central America and the West Indies shall be subject to §§93.319 and 93.320, in addition to other sections in this subpart, which are in terms applicable to such importations.

§93.319   Import permit and declaration for horses.

For all horses offered for importation from regions of Central America or of the West Indies, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of a declaration as provided in §93.305.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.320   Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

Horses from Central America and the West Indies shall be inspected as provided in §93.306; shall be accompanied by a certificate and otherwise handled as provided in §93.314; and shall be quarantined and tested as provided in §93.308(a), (b) and (c): Provided, That any such horses that are found to be infested with fever ticks, Boophilus annulatus, shall not be permitted entry until they have been freed therefrom by dipping in a permitted arsenical solution or by other treatment approved by the Administrator.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997]

Mexico18

18Importations from Mexico shall be subject to §§93.321 to 93.326 inclusive, in addition to other sections in this subpart which are in terms applicable for such importations.

§93.321   Import permits and applications for inspection for horses.

For horses intended for importation into the United States from Mexico, the importer or his or her agent shall deliver to the veterinary inspector at the port of entry an application, in writing, for inspection, so that the veterinary inspector and customs representatives may make mutually satisfactory arrangements for the orderly inspection of the horses. The veterinary inspector at the port of entry will provide the importer or his or her agent with a written statement assigning a date when the horses may be presented for import inspection.

§93.322   Declaration for horses.

For all horses offered for importation from Mexico, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of a declaration as provided in §93.305.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.323   Inspection.

(a) All horses offered for entry from Mexico, including such horses intended for movement through the United States in bond for immediate return to Mexico, shall be inspected at a facility described in §93.324, and all such horses found to be free from communicable disease and fever tick infestation, and not to have been exposed thereto, shall be admitted into the United States subject to the other applicable provisions of this part. Horses found to be affected with or to have been exposed to a communicable disease, or infested with fever ticks, shall be refused entry. Horses refused entry, unless exported within a time fixed in each case by the Administrator, shall be disposed of as said Administrator may direct.

(b) Horses covered by paragraph (a) of this section shall be imported through facilities described in §93.324, which are equipped with facilities necessary for proper chute inspection, dipping, and testing, as provided in this part.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 58 FR 45238, Aug. 27, 1993. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.324   Detention for quarantine.

Horses intended for importation from Mexico shall be quarantined until they qualify for release from such quarantine, either at an APHIS facility designated in §93.303 (a) or at a facility in Mexico. In order to qualify for such release, all horses while so detained shall test negative to an official test for dourine, glanders, equine piroplasmosis, equine infectious anemia,19 and such other tests that may be required by the Administrator to determine their freedom from other communicable diseases. Such horses shall also be subjected to such other inspections and disinfections deemed necessary by the Administrator, and they shall be released from quarantine only if found to be free from any communicable disease upon inspection.

19In view of the fact that official test for dourine and glanders are run exclusively at the National Veterinary Services Laboratory, Ames, Iowa, protocols for these tests have not been published and are therefore not available; copies of “Protocol for the Complement-Fixation Test for Equine Piroplasmosis” and “Protocol for the Immuno-Diffusion (Coggins) Test for Equine Infectious Anemia” may be obtained from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 56 FR 15489, Apr. 17, 1991; 58 FR 45238, Aug. 27, 1993; 59 FR 67614, Dec. 30, 1994; 60 FR 5128, Jan. 26, 1995; 61 FR 39853, July 31, 1996; 61 FR 52246, Oct. 7, 1996. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997, as amended at 63 FR 3640, Jan. 26, 1998]

§93.325   Horses from Mexico.

Horses offered for entry from Mexico shall be inspected as provided in §§93.306 and 93.323; shall be accompanied by a certificate and otherwise handled as provided in §93.314; and shall be quarantined and tested as provided in §93.324: Provided, That horses offered for importation from tick-infected areas of Mexico shall be chute inspected, unless in the judgment of the inspector a satisfactory inspection can be made otherwise. If upon inspection they are found to be apparently free from fever ticks, before entering the United States they shall be dipped once in a permitted arsenical solution or be otherwise treated in a manner approved by the Administrator.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.326   Horses for immediate slaughter.

Horses may be imported from Mexico, subject to the applicable provisions of §§93.321, 93.322, and 93.323 for immediate slaughter if accompanied by a certificate of a salaried veterinarian of the Mexican Government, or by a certificate issued by a veterinarian accredited by the Mexican Government and endorsed by a salaried veterinarian of the Mexican Government, thereby representing that the veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so, stating that he or she has inspected such horses on the premises of origin and found them free of evidence of communicable disease, and that, so far as it has been possible to determine, they have not been exposed to any such disease common to animals of their kind during the preceding 60 days, and if the horses are shipped by rail or truck, the certificate shall further specify that the horses were loaded into cleaned and disinfected cars or trucks for transportation directly to the port of entry. Such horses shall be consigned from a facility described in §93.324 to a recognized slaughtering establishment and there slaughtered within 2 weeks from the date of entry. Such horses shall be moved from the port of entry in conveyances sealed with seals of the United States Government.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 57 FR 28080, June 24, 1992; 58 FR 45238, Aug. 27, 1993; 60 FR 5128, Jan. 26, 1995; 61 FR 39853, July 31, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997; 63 FR 3640, Jan. 26, 1998]

Subpart D—Ruminants

Source: 55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, unless otherwise noted. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997.

§93.400   Definitions.

Wherever in this subpart the following terms are used, unless the context otherwise requires, they shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

Accredited herd. An accredited herd is one that has passed at least two consecutive annual official tuberculin tests and has no evidence of bovine tuberculosis. All animals in a herd must be free from tuberculosis.

Accredited veterinarian. A veterinarian approved by the Administrator in accordance with the provisions of part 161 of this title to perform functions specified in parts 1, 2, 3, and 11 of subchapter A, and subchapters B, C, and D of this chapter, and to perform functions required by cooperative state-federal disease control and eradication programs.

Administrator. The Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service or any other employee of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, to whom authority has been or may be delegated to act in the Administrator's stead.

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (APHIS or Service).

Animals. Cattle, sheep, goats, other ruminants, swine, horses, asses, mules, zebras, dogs, and poultry.

APHIS representative. A veterinarian or other individual employed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, who is authorized to perform the services required by this part.

Area veterinarian in charge (AVIC). The veterinary official of APHIS who is assigned by the Administrator to supervise and perform the official animal health work of APHIS in the State concerned.

As a group. Collectively, in such a manner that the identity of the animals as a unique group is maintained.

Authorized USDA representative. An APHIS Veterinary Services employee, a USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service inspector, a State representative, an accredited veterinarian, or an employee of an accredited veterinarian, slaughtering establishment, or feedlot who is designated by the accredited veterinarian or management of the slaughtering establishment or feedlot to perform the function involved. In order to designate an employee to break official seals, an accredited veterinarian or the management of a slaughtering establishment or feedlot must first supply in writing the name of the designated individual to the APHIS AVIC in the State where the seals will be broken. Additionally, the management of a slaughtering establishment or feedlot must enter into an agreement with Veterinary Services in which the management of the facility agrees that only designated individuals will break the seals, that the facility will contact an APHIS representative or USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service inspector immediately if the seals are not intact when the means of conveyance arrives or if the animals being transported appear to be sick or injured due to transport conditions, and that the facility will cooperate with APHIS representatives, USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service inspectors, and State representatives in maintaining records of sealed shipments received.

Bovine. Bos taurus, Bos indicus, and Bison bison.

Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) minimal risk region. A region listed in §94.18(a)(3) of this subchapter.

Brucellosis certified free herd. A herd in which all eligible cattle in the herd were negative to brucellosis tests under the Canadian requirements and which is officially certified by the Canadian Government as a brucellosis free listed herd.

Brucellosis certified-free province or territory of Canada. A province or territory of Canada in which all herds of cattle are brucellosis certified free. The brucellosis certified free provinces and territories of Canada are Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland (including Labrador), Northwest Territories, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec, Prince Edward Island, Saskatchewan, and Yukon Territory.

Camelid. All species of the family Camelidae, including camels, guanacos, llamas, alpacas, and vicunas.

Cattle. Animals of the bovine species.

Cervid. All members of the family Cervidae and hybrids, including deer, elk, moose, caribou, reindeer, and related species.

Communicable disease. Any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease of domestic livestock, poultry or other animals.

Department. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Designated feedlot. A feedlot that has been designated by the Administrator as one that is eligible to receive sheep and goats imported from a BSE minimal-risk region and whose owner or legally responsible representative has signed an agreement in accordance with §93.419(d)(8) of this subpart to adhere to, and is in compliance with, the requirements for a designated feedlot.

Exporting region. A region from which shipments are sent to the United States.

Federal veterinarian. A veterinarian employed and authorized by the Federal Government to perform the tasks required by this subpart.

Fever tick. Rhipicephalus annulatus, Rhipicephalus microplus, and any other species of tick determined by the Administrator to be a vector of bovine babesiosis and specified on the Internet at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wps/portal/aphis/ourfocus/importexport.

Flock. Any group of one or more sheep maintained on common ground; or two or more groups of sheep under common ownership or supervision on two or more premises that are geographically separated, but among which there is an interchange or movement of animals.

Herd. Any group of one or more animals maintained on common ground; or two or more groups of animals under common ownership or supervision on two or more premises that are geographically separated, but among which there is an interchange or movement of animals.

Herd of origin. The herd within which an individual animal was born and raised and that was maintained on common ground for at least 4 months. For a group of one or more animals to qualify as a herd of origin for the purposes of §93.406, animals may be added to the herd during or after the 4-month qualifying period only if they:

(1) Originated from a tuberculosis-free herd; or

(2) Originated from an accredited herd or originated from a herd of origin that tested negative to a whole herd test, and the individual cattle to be added to the herd also tested negative to any additional individual tests for tuberculosis required by the Administrator.

Immediate slaughter. Consignment directly from the port of entry to a recognized slaughtering establishment1 and slaughtered within 2 weeks from the date of entry.

1The name of recognized slaughtering establishments approved under this part may be obtained from the area veterinarian in charge for the State of destination of the shipment. The name and address of the area veterinarian in charge in any State is available from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import and Export, 4700 River Road Unit 39, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231.

Inspector. Any individual authorized by the Administrator of APHIS or the Commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security, to enforce the regulations in this subpart.

Lot. A group of ruminants that, while held on a conveyance or premises, has opportunity for physical contact with each other or with each other's excrement or discharges at any time between arrival at the quarantine facility and 60 days prior to export to the United States.

Lot-holding area. That area in a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility in which a single lot of ruminants is held at one time.

Moved directly. Moved without unloading and without stopping except for refueling, or for traffic conditions such as traffic lights or stop signs.

Moved directly by land. Moved by rail, truck, or other land vehicle without unloading and without stopping except for refueling, or for traffic conditions such as traffic lights or stop signs.

Nonquarantine area. That area of a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility that includes offices, storage areas, and other areas outside the quarantine area, and that is off limits to ruminants, samples taken from ruminants, and any other objects or substances that have been in the quarantine area during the quarantine of ruminants.

Official identification device or method. A means of officially identifying an animal or group of animals using devices or methods approved by the Administrator, including, but not limited to, official tags, tattoos, and registered brands when accompanied by a certificate of inspection from a recognized brand inspection authority. For animals intended for importation into the United States, the device or method of identification used must have been approved by the Administrator for that type of import before the animal is exported to the United States.

Official tuberculin test. A test for bovine tuberculosis that is approved by the Administrator as equivalent to the international standard test described in the Manual of Standards for Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines, Office International des Episodes, and that is administered and reported by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the region of origin, or administered and reported by a veterinarian designated or accredited by the national government of the region of origin and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the region of origin, representing that the veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so.

Officially identified. Individually identified by means of an official identification device or method.

Operator. A person other than the Federal Government who owns or operates, subject to APHIS' approval and oversight, a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility.

Permitted dip. A dip permitted by the Administrator to be used in the official dipping of cattle for fever ticks and for dipping cattle and sheep for scabies.

Persons. Any individual, corporation, company, association, firm, partnership, society or joint stock company.

Port Veterinarian. A veterinarian employed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to perform duties required under this part at a port of entry.

Positive for a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. A sheep or goat for which a diagnosis of a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy has been made.

Premises of origin. Except as otherwise used in §93.423 of this subpart, the premises where the animal was born.

Privately owned medium security quarantine facility (medium security facility). A facility that:

(1) Is owned, operated, and financed by a person other than the Federal Government;

(2) Is subject to the strict oversight of APHIS representatives;

(3) Is constructed, operated, and maintained in accordance with the requirements for medium security facilities in §93.412(d); and

(4) Provides the necessary level of quarantine services for the holding of ruminants in an indoor, vector-proof environment prior to the animals' entry into the United States. Quarantine services would have to include testing or observation for any OIE listed diseases and other livestock diseases exotic to the United States, as well as any other diseases, as necessary, to be determined by the Administrator.

Privately owned minimum security quarantine facility (minimum security facility). A facility that:

(1) Is owned, operated, and financed by a person other than the Federal Government;

(2) Is subject to the strict oversight of APHIS representatives;

(3) Is constructed, operated, and maintained in accordance with the requirements for minimum security facilities in §93.412(d);

(4) Is used for the quarantine of ruminants that pose no significant risk, as determined by the Administrator, of introducing or transmitting to the U.S. livestock population any livestock disease that is biologically transmissible by vectors; and

(5) Provides the necessary level of quarantine services for the outdoor holding of ruminants, prior to the animals' entry into the United States. Quarantine services would have to include testing or observation for any OIE listed diseases and other livestock diseases exotic to the United States, as well as any other diseases, as necessary, to be determined by the Administrator.

Processed animal protein. Meat meal, bone meal, meat-and-bone meal, blood meal, dried plasma and other blood products, hydrolyzed protein, hoof meal, horn meal, poultry meal, feather meal, fish meal, and any other similar products.

Quarantine area. That area of a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility that comprises all of the lot-holding areas in the facility and any other areas in the facility that ruminants have access to, including loading docks for receiving and releasing ruminants, and any areas used to conduct examinations of ruminants and take samples and any areas where samples are processed or examined.

Recognized slaughtering establishment. Any slaughtering establishment operating under the provisions of the Federal Meat Inspection Act (21 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) or a State meat inspection act.2

2See footnote 1.

Region. Any defined geographic land area identifiable by geological, political, or surveyed boundaries. A region may consist of any of the following:

(1) A national entity (country);

(2) Part of a national entity (zone, county, department, municipality, parish, Province, State, etc.);

(3) Parts of several national entities combined into an area; or

(4) A group of national entities (countries) combined into a single area.

Ruminants. All animals which chew the cud, such as cattle, buffaloes, sheep, goats, deer, antelopes, camels, llamas and giraffes.

State representative. A veterinarian or other person employed in livestock sanitary work by a State or political subdivision of a State who is authorized by such State or political subdivision of a State to perform the function involved under a memorandum of understanding with APHIS.

State veterinarian. A veterinarian employed and authorized by a State or political subdivision of a State to perform the tasks required by this subpart.

Suspect for a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. (1) A sheep or goat that has tested positive for a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or for the proteinase resistant protein associated with a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, unless the animal is designated as positive for a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy; or

(2) A sheep or goat that exhibits any of the following signs and that has been determined to be suspicious for a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy by a veterinarian: Weight loss despite retention of appetite; behavior abnormalities; pruritus (itching); wool pulling; biting at legs or side; lip smacking; motor abnormalities such as incoordination, high stepping gait of forelimbs, bunny hop movement of rear legs, or swaying of back end; increased sensitivity to noise and sudden movement; tremor, “star gazing,” head pressing, recumbency, or other signs of neurological disease or chronic wasting.

Swine. The domestic hog and all varieties of wild hogs.

Temporary inspection facility. A temporary facility that is constructed of metal panels that can be erected and broken down alongside the transportation vessel carrying ruminants that are imported into the United States in accordance with §93.408 of this subpart and that will be quarantined at a minimum or medium security quarantine facilities located more than 1 mile from the port of entry.

Tuberculosis-free herd. A herd which is not known to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (M. bovis) and which is certified by the Canadian Government as a tuberculosis-free herd.

United States. All of the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands of the United States, and all other Territories and Possessions of the United States.

Veterinary Services. The Veterinary Services unit of the Department.

Wether. A castrated male sheep or goat.

Whole herd test. An official tuberculin test of all cattle in a herd of origin that are 6 months of age or older, and of all cattle in the herd of origin that are less than 6 months of age and were not born into the herd of origin, except those cattle that are less than 6 months of age and:

(1) Were born in and originated from a tuberculosis-free herd; or

(2) Were born in and originated from an accredited herd or originated from a herd of origin that has tested negative to a whole herd test, and the individual cattle have tested negative to any additional individual tests for tuberculosis required by the Administrator.

World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). The international organization recognized by the World Trade Organization for setting animal health standards, reporting global animal situations and disease status, and presenting guidelines and recommendations on sanitary measures related to animal health.

Zoological park. A professionally operated zoo, park, garden or other place, maintained under the constant surveillance of a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, for the exhibition of live animals, pigeons or birds, for the purpose of public recreation or education.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §93.400, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

§93.401   General prohibitions; exceptions.

(a) No ruminant or product subject to the provisions of this part shall be brought into the United States except in accordance with the regulations in this part and part 94 of this subchapter;3 nor shall any such ruminant or product be handled or moved after physical entry into the United States before final release from quarantine or any other form of governmental detention except in compliance with such regulations. Notwithstanding any other provision of this subpart, the importation of any non-bovine ruminant that has been in a region listed in §94.24(a) of this subchapter is prohibited. Provided, however, the Administrator may upon request in specific cases permit ruminants or products to be brought into or through the United States under such conditions as he or she may prescribe, when he or she determines in the specific case that such action will not endanger the livestock or poultry of the United States.

3Importations of certain animals from various regions are absolutely prohibited under part 94 because of specified diseases.

(b) Except for ruminants prohibited entry, the provisions in this part relating to ruminants shall not apply to healthy ruminants in transit through the United States if they are not known to be infected with or exposed, within 60 days preceding the date of export from the region of origin, to communicable diseases of such ruminants, if an import permit4 has been obtained under §93.404 of this chapter and all conditions therein are observed; and if such ruminants are handled as follows:

4Such permit may be obtained from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231. Requests for approval of such facilities should also be made to the Administrator.

(1)(i) They are maintained under continuous confinement in transit through the United States aboard an aircraft, ocean vessel, or other means of conveyance; or

(ii) They are unloaded, in the course of such transit, into a ruminant holding facility which is provided by the carrier or its agent and has been approved5 in advance by the Administrator in accordance with paragraph (b)(3) of this section as adequate to prevent the spread within the United States of any livestock disease, and they are maintained there under continuous confinement until loaded aboard a means of conveyance for transportation from the United States and are maintained under continuous confinement aboard such means of conveyance until it leaves the United States; the import permit will specify any additional conditions necessary to assure that the transit of the ruminants through the United States can be made without endangering the livestock or poultry of the United States, and that Department inspectors may inspect the ruminants on board such means of conveyance or in such holding facility to ascertain whether the requirements of this paragraph are met, and dispose of them in accordance with the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.) if such conditions are not met; and

5See footnote 4 to subpart D.

(2) The carrier or its agent executes and furnishes to the collector of Customs at the first port of arrival a declaration stating that the ruminants will be retained aboard such means of conveyance or in an approved holding facility during transshipment as required by this paragraph.

(3) Provisions for the approval of facilities required in this paragraph are:

(i) They must be sufficiently isolated to prevent direct or indirect contact with all other animals and birds while in the United States.

(ii) They must be so constructed that they provide adequate protection against environmental conditions and can be adequately cleaned, washed and disinfected.

(iii) They must provide for disposal of ruminant carcasses, manure, bedding, waste and any related shipping materials in a manner that will prevent dissemination of disease.

(iv) They must have provisions for adequate sources of feed and water and for attendants for the care and feeding of ruminants in the facility.

(v) They must comply with additional requirements as may be imposed by the Administrator if deemed applicable for a particular shipment.

(vi) They must also comply with all applicable local, State and Federal requirements for environmental quality and with the provisions of the Animal Welfare Regulations in chapter I of this title, as applicable.

(c) Removal and loss of official identification devices. Official identification devices are intended to provide permanent identification of livestock and to ensure the ability to find the source of animal disease outbreaks. Removal of these devices is prohibited except at the time of slaughter. If an official identification device is lost, and it is necessary to retag an animal with a new official number, every effort should be made to correlate the new official number with the previous official number of the animal.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 59 FR 67614, Dec. 30, 1994. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003; 68 FR 31940, May 29, 2003; 69 FR 64651, Nov. 8, 2004; 78 FR 72996, Dec. 4, 2013]

§93.402   Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon; unloading, cleaning, and disinfection requirements.

(a) Inspection: All aircraft and other means of conveyance (including shipping containers thereon) moving into the United States from any foreign region are subject to inspection without a warrant by properly identified and designated inspectors to determine whether they are carrying any animal, carcass, product or article regulated or subject to disposal under any law or regulation administered by the Secretary of Agriculture for prevention of the introduction or dissemination of any communicable animal disease.

(b) Unloading requirements: Whenever in the course of any such inspection at any port in the United States the inspector has reason to believe that the means of conveyance or container is contaminated with material of animal (including poultry) origin, such as, but not limited to, meat, organs, glands, extracts, secretions, fat, bones, blood, lymph, urine, or manure, so as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, the inspector may require the unloading of the means of conveyance and the emptying of the container if he or she deems it necessary to enable him or her to determine whether the means of conveyance or container is in fact so contaminated. The principal operator of the means of conveyance and his or her agent in charge of the means of conveyance shall comply with any such requirement under the immediate supervision of, and in the time and manner prescribed by, the inspector.

(c) Cleaning and disinfection: Whenever, upon inspection under this section, an inspector determines that a means of conveyance or shipping container is contaminated with material of animal origin so as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, he or she shall notify the principal operator of the means of conveyance or his or her agent in charge, of such determination and the requirements under this section. The person so notified shall cause the cleaning and disinfection of such means of conveyance and container under the immediate supervision of, and in the time and manner prescribed by, the inspector.

(d) For purposes of this section, the term “shipping container” means any container of a type specially adapted for use in transporting any article on the means of conveyance involved.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003]

§93.403   Ports designated for the importation of ruminants.

(a) Air and ocean ports. The following ports have APHIS inspection and quarantine facilities necessary for quarantine stations and all ruminants shall be entered into the United States through these stations, except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of this section; Miami, Florida; and Newburgh, New York.

(b) Canadian border ports. The following land border ports are designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of ruminants from Canada: Eastport, Idaho; Houlton and Jackman, Maine; Detroit, Port Huron, and Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan; Baudette, Minnesota; Opheim, Raymond, and Sweetgrass, Montana; Alexandria Bay, Buffalo, and Champlain, New York; Dunseith, Pembina, and Portal, North Dakota; Derby Line and Highgate Springs, Vermont; Oroville and Sumas, Washington.

(c) Mexican border ports. The following land border ports are designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of ruminants from Mexico: Brownsville, Hidalgo, Laredo, Eagle Pass, Del Rio, and Presidio, Texas: Douglas, Naco, Nogales, Sasabe, and San Luis, Arizona; Calexico and San Ysidro, California; and Antelope Wells, Columbus, and Santa Teresa, New Mexico.

(d) Special ports. Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, and Christiansted, St. Croix, in the United States Virgin Islands, are hereby designated as quarantine stations for the entry of ruminants from the British Virgin Islands into the United States Virgin Islands for immediate slaughter.

(e) Limited ports. The following ports are designated as having inspection facilities for the entry of ruminants and ruminant products such as ruminant test specimens which do not appear to require restraint and holding inspection facilities: Anchorage and Fairbanks, Alaska; San Diego, California; Jacksonville, St. Petersburg-Clearwater, and Tampa, Florida; Atlanta, Georgia; Honolulu, Hawaii, Chicago, Illinois; New Orleans, Louisiana; Portland, Maine; Baltimore, Maryland; Boston, Massachusetts; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Great Falls, Montana; Portland, Oregon; San Juan, Puerto Rico; Memphis, Tennessee (no live animals); El Paso, Galveston, and Houston, Texas; and Seattle, Spokane, and Tacoma, Washington.

(f) Designation of other ports. The Secretary of the Treasury has approved the designation as quarantine stations of the ports specified in this section. In special cases other ports may be designated as quarantine stations under this section by the Administrator, with the concurrence of the Secretary of the Treasury.

(g) Ports and privately owned quarantine facilities. Ruminants may be imported into the United States at any port specified in paragraph (a) of this section, or at any other port designated as an international port or airport by the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, and quarantined at an APHIS-approved privately owned quarantine facility, provided the applicable provisions of §§93.401, 93.404(a), 93.407, 93.408, and 93.412 are met.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 57 FR 2010, Jan. 17, 1992; 58 FR 38283, July 16, 1993; 60 FR 16045, Mar. 29, 1995; 60 FR 25120, May 11, 1995. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997; 64 FR 23179, Apr. 30, 1999; 65 FR 38178, June 20, 2000; 67 FR 68022, Nov. 8, 2002; 71 FR 29773, May 24, 2006]

§93.404   Import permits for ruminants and for ruminant test specimens for diagnostic purposes; and reservation fees for space at quarantine facilities maintained by APHIS.

(a) Application for permit; reservation required. (1) For ruminants and ruminant test specimens for diagnostic screening purposes intended for importation from any part of the world, except as otherwise provided for in §§93.417, 93.422, and 93.424, the importer shall first apply for and obtain from APHIS an import permit. The application shall specify the name and address of the importer; the species, breed, number or quantity of ruminants or ruminant test specimens to be imported; the purpose of the importation; individual ruminant identification, which includes a description of the ruminant, name, age, markings, if any, registration number, if any, and tattoo or eartag; the region of origin; for cattle, the address of or other means of identifying the premises of the herd of origin and any other premises where the cattle resided prior to export, including the State or its equivalent, the municipality or nearest city, and the specific location of the premises, or an equivalent method, approved by the Administrator, of identifying the location of the premises; the name and address of the exporter; the port of embarkation in the foreign region; the mode of transportation, route of travel, and the port of entry in the United States; the name and address of the quarantine facility, if the ruminants are to be quarantined at a privately owned quarantine facility; the proposed date of arrival of the ruminants or ruminant test specimens to be imported; and the name of the person to whom the ruminants or ruminant test specimens will be delivered and the location of the place in the United States to which delivery will be made from the port of entry. Additional information may be required in the form of certificates concerning specific diseases to which the ruminants are susceptible, as well as vaccinations or other precautionary treatments to which the ruminants or ruminant test specimens have been subjected. Notice of any such requirement will be given to the applicant in each case.

(2) An application for permit to import will be denied for domestic ruminants from any region designated in §94.1 of this chapter as a region where foot-and-mouth disease exists.

(3) An application for permit to import ruminants may also be denied because of: Communicable disease conditions in the area or region of origin, or in a region where the shipment has been or will be held or through which the shipment has been or will be transported; deficiencies in the regulatory programs for the control or eradication of animal diseases and the unavailability of veterinary services in the above mentioned regions; the importer's failure to provide satisfactory evidence concerning the origin, history, and health status of the ruminants; the lack of satisfactory information necessary to determine that the importation will not be likely to transmit any communicable disease to livestock or poultry of the United States; or any other circumstances which the Administrator believes require such denial to prevent the dissemination of any communicable disease of livestock or poultry into the United States.

(4)(i) The importer or importer's agent shall pay or ensure payment of a reservation fee for each lot of ruminants to be quarantined in a facility maintained by USDA. For ruminants, the reservation fee shall be 100 percent of the cost of providing care, feed, and handling during quarantine, as estimated by the quarantine facility's veterinarian in charge.

(ii) At the time the importer or the importer's agent requests a reservation of quarantine space, the importer or importer's agent shall pay the reservation fee by check or U.S. money order or ensure payment of the reservation fee by an irrevocable letter of credit from a commercial bank (the effective date on such letter of credit shall run to 30 days after the date the ruminants are scheduled to be released from quarantine); except that anyone who issues a check to the Department for a reservation fee which is returned because of insufficient funds shall be denied any further request for reservation of a quarantine space until the outstanding amount is paid.

(iii) Any reservation fee paid by check or U.S. money order shall be applied against the expenses incurred for services received by the importer or importer's agent in connection with the quarantine for which the reservation was made. Any part of the reservation fee which remains unused after being applied against the expenses incurred for services received by the importer or the importer's agent in connection with the quarantine for which the reservation was made, shall be returned to the individual who paid the reservation fee. If the reservation fee is ensured by a letter of credit, the Department will draw against the letter of credit unless payment for services received by the importer or importer's agent in connection with the quarantine is otherwise made at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(iv) Any reservation fee shall be forfeited if the importer or the importer's agent fails to present for entry, within 24 hours following the designated time of arrival, the lot of ruminants for which the reservation was made: Except that a reservation fee shall not be forfeited if:

(A) Written notice of cancellation from the importer or the importer's agent is received by the office of the veterinarian in charge of the quarantine facility6 during regular business hours (8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays) no later than 15 days for ruminants prior to the beginning of the time of importation as specified in the import permit or as arranged with the veterinarian in charge of the quarantine facility if no import permit is required (the 15 days period shall not include Saturdays, Sundays, or holidays), or

6The addresses of USDA quarantine facilities may be found in telephone directories listing the facilities or by contacting the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231.

(B) The Administrator determines that services, other than provided by carriers, necessary for the importation of the ruminants within the requested period are unavailable because of unforeseen circumstances as determined by the Administrator, (such as the closing of an airport due to inclement weather or the unavailability of the reserved space due to the extension of another quarantine).

(v) If the reservation fee was ensured by a letter of credit and the fee is to be forfeited under paragraph (a)(4)(iv) of this section, the Department will draw against the letter of credit unless the reservation fee is otherwise paid at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(vi) When a reservation is cancelled in accordance with paragraph (a)(4)(iv)(A) of this section and the provisions of paragraph (a)(4)(iv)(B) of this section do not apply, a $40.00 cancellation fee shall be charged. If a reservation fee was paid, the cancellation fee shall be deducted from any reservation fee returned to the importer or the importer's agent. If the reservation fee was ensured by a letter of credit, the Department will draw the amount of the cancellation fee against the letter of credit unless the cancellation fee is otherwise paid at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(b) Permit. When a permit is issued, the original and two copies will be sent to the importer. It shall be the responsibility of the importer to forward the original permit and one copy to the shipper in the region of origin, and it shall also be the responsibility of the importer to insure that the shipper presents the copy of the permit to the carrier and makes proper arrangements for the original permit to accompany the shipment to the specified U.S. port of entry for presentation to the collector of customs. Ruminants and ruminant test specimens for diagnostic screening purposes for ruminants intended for importation into the United States for which a permit has been issued, will be received at the specified port of entry within the time prescribed in the permit which shall not exceed 14 days from the first day that the permit is effective for all permits. Ruminants and ruminant test specimens for which a permit is required by these regulations will not be eligible for entry if a permit has not been issued; if unaccompanied by such a permit; if shipment is from any port other than the one designated in the permit; if arrival in the United States is at any port other than the one designated in the permit; if the ruminants or ruminant test specimens offered for entry differ from those described in the permit; if the ruminants or ruminant test specimens are not handled as outlined in the application for the permit and as specified in the permit issued; or if ruminants or swine other than those covered by import permits are aboard the transporting carrier.

(c) Wild ruminants from regions where foot-and-mouth disease exists. This paragraph (c) applies to the importation of wild ruminants, such as, but not limited to, giraffes, deer and antelopes, from regions designated in part 94 of this subchapter as countries in which foot-and-mouth disease exists.

(1) Permits for the importation of wild ruminants will be issued only for importations through the Port of New York, and only if the animals are imported for exhibition in a PEQ Zoo. A PEQ Zoo is a zoological park or other place maintained for the exhibition of live animals for recreational or educational purposes that:

(i) Has been approved by the Administrator in accordance with paragraph (c)(2) of this section to receive and maintain imported wild ruminants; and

(ii) Has entered into the agreement with APHIS set forth in paragraph (c)(4) of this section for the maintenance and handling of imported wild ruminants.

(2) Approval of a PEQ Zoo shall be on the basis of an inspection, by an authorized representative of the Department, of the physical facilities of the establishment and its methods of operation. Standards for acceptable physical facilities shall include satisfactory pens, cages, or enclosures in which the imported ruminants can be maintained so as not to be in contact with the general public and free from contact with domestic livestock; natural or established drainage from the PEQ Zoo which will avoid contamination of land areas where domestic livestock are kept or with which domestic livestock may otherwise come in contact; provision for the disposition of manure, other wastes, and dead ruminants within the PEQ Zoo; and other reasonable facilities considered necessary to prevent the dissemination of diseases from the PEQ Zoo. The operator of the PEQ Zoo shall have available the services of a full-time or part-time veterinarian, or a veterinarian on a retainer basis, who shall make periodic examinations of all animals maintained at the PEQ Zoo for evidence of disease; who shall make a post-mortem examination of each animal that dies; and who shall make a prompt report of suspected cases of contagious or communicable diseases to an APHIS representative or the State agency responsible for livestock disease control programs.

(3) Manure and other animal wastes must be disposed of within the PEQ Zoo park for a minimum of one year following the date an imported wild ruminant enters the zoo. If an APHIS veterinarian determines that an imported ruminant shows no signs of any communicable disease or exposure to any such disease during this 1-year period, its manure and other wastes need not be disposed of within the zoo after the 1-year period. If, however, an APHIS veterinarian determines that an imported ruminant does show signs of any communicable disease during this 1-year period, an APHIS veterinarian will investigate the disease and determine whether the ruminant's manure and other wastes may safely be disposed of outside the zoo after the 1-year period has ended.

(4) Prior to the issuance of an import permit under this section, the operator of the approved PEQ Zoo to which the imported ruminants are to be consigned, and the importer of the ruminants, if such operator and importer are different parties, shall execute an agreement covering each ruminant or group of ruminants for which the import permit is requested. The agreement shall be in the following form:

Agreement for the Importation, Quarantine and Exhibition of Certain Wild Ruminants and Wild Swine

____, operator(s) of the zoological park known as __________ (Name) located at __________ (City and state), and __________ (Importer) hereby request a permit for the importation of ____ (Number and kinds of animals) for exhibition purposes at the said zoological park, said animals originating in a region where foot-and-mouth disease exists and being subject to restrictions under regulations contained in part 93, title 9, Code of Federal Regulations.

In making this request, it is understood and agreed that:

1. The animals for which an import permit is requested will be held in isolation at a port of embarkation in the region of origin, approved by the Administrator as a port having facilities which are adequate for maintaining wild animals in isolation from all other animals and having veterinary supervision by officials of the region of origin of the animals. Such animals will be held in such isolation for not less than 60 days under the supervision of the veterinary service of that region to determine whether the animals show any clinical evidence of foot-and-mouth disease, or other communicable disease that is exotic to the United States or for which APHIS has an eradication or control program in 9 CFR chapter I, and to assure that the animals will not have been exposed to such a disease within the 60 days next before their exportation from that region.

2. Shipment will be made direct from such port of embarkation to the port of New York as the sole port of entry in the United States. If shipment is made by ocean vessel the animals will not be unloaded in any foreign port en route. If shipment is made by air, the animals will not be unloaded at any port or other place of landing, except at a port approved by the Administrator as a port not located in a region where foot-and-mouth disease exists or as a port in such a region having facilities and inspection adequate for maintaining wild animals in isolation from all other animals.

3. No ruminants or swine will be aboard the transporting vehicle, vessel or aircraft, except those for which an import permit has been issued.

4. The animals will be quarantined for not less than 30 days in the Department's Animal Import Center in Newburgh, New York.

5. Upon release from quarantine the animals will be delivered to the zoological park named in this agreement to become the property of the park and they will not be sold, exchanged or removed from the premises without the prior consent of APHIS. If moved to another zoological park in the United States, the receiving zoological park must be approved by the Administrator in accordance with paragraph 6 of this agreement.

6. The Administrator will approve the movement of an imported animal subject to this agreement if the Administrator determines that the animal has spent at least one year in quarantine in a PEQ Zoo following importation without showing clinical evidence of foot-and-foot mouth disease, or other communicable disease that is exotic to the United States or for which APHIS has an eradication or control program in 9 CFR chapter I, and determines that the receiving zoological park is accredited by the American Zoo and Aquarium Association (AZA), or the receiving zoological park has facilities and procedures in place related to preventing the spread of communicable animal diseases (including but not limited to procedures for animal identification, record keeping, and veterinary care) that are equivalent to those required for AZA accreditation. The Administrator will approve the movement of a carcass, body part, or biological specimen derived from an imported animal subject to this agreement if the Administrator determines that the animal has spent at least one year in quarantine in a PEQ Zoo following importation without showing clinical evidence of foot-and-foot mouth disease, or other communicable disease that is exotic to the United States or for which APHIS has an eradication or control program in 9 CFR chapter I, and determines that the carcass, body part, or biological specimen will be moved only for scientific research or museum display purposes.

 

(Signature of importer)

Subscribed and sworn to before me this __ day of __, __.

 

(Title or designation)

 

(Name of zoological park)

   By

(Signature of officer of zoological park)

 

(Title of officer)

Subscribed and sworn to before me this __ day of __,__

 

(Title or designation)

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control numbers 0579-0040 and 0579-0224)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 59 FR 28216, June 1, 1994; 59 FR 31924, June 21, 1994; 59 FR 67615, Dec. 30, 1994; 62 FR 23637, May 1, 1997. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56018, Oct. 28, 1997; 65 FR 38178, June 20, 2000; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003; 68 FR 35533, June 16, 2003; 71 FR 29773, May 24, 2006; 83 FR 15492, Apr. 11, 2018]

§93.405   Health certificate for ruminants.

(a) All ruminants intended for importation from any part of the world, except as provided in §§93.423(c) and 93.428(d), shall be accompanied by a certificate issued by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the region of origin, or issued by a veterinarian designated or accredited by the national government of the region of origin and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the region of origin, representing that the veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so. The certificate shall state:

(1) That the ruminants have been kept in that region during the last 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment to the United States, and that during this time the region has been entirely free from foot-and-mouth disease, contagious pleuropneumonia, and surra; provided, however, that for wild ruminants for exhibition purposes, the certificate need specify only that the district of origin has been free from the listed diseases; and provided further, that for sheep and goats, with respect to contagious pleuropneumonia, the certificate may specify only that the district of origin has been free from this disease;

(2) That the ruminants are not in quarantine in the region of origin; and

(3) If the ruminants are from any region where screwworm is considered to exist, the ruminants may be imported into the United States only if they meet the requirements of paragraphs (a)(3)(i) through (iv) of this section and all other applicable requirements of this part. APHIS will maintain a list of regions where screwworm is considered to exist on the APHIS Web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import__export/animals/animal__disease__status.shtml. Copies of the list will also be available via postal mail, fax, or email upon request to the Sanitary Trade Issues Team, National Center for Import and Export, Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737. APHIS will add a region to the list upon determining that screwworm exists in the region based on reports APHIS receives of detections of the pest from veterinary officials of the exporting country, from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), or from other sources the Administrator determines to be reliable. APHIS will remove a region from the list after conducting an evaluation of the region in accordance with §92.2 of this subchapter and finding that screwworm is not present in the region. In the case of a region formerly not on this list that is added due to a detection, the region may be removed from the list in accordance with the procedures for reestablishment of a region's disease-free status in §92.4 of this subchapter.

(i) A veterinarian must treat the ruminants with ivermectin 3 to 5 days prior to the date of export to the United States according to the recommended dose prescribed on the product's label.

(ii) The ruminants must be fully examined for screwworm by a full-time salaried veterinary official of the exporting country within 24 hours prior to shipment to the United States. If ruminants are found to be infested with screwworm, they must be treated until free from infestation.

(iii) At the time ruminants are loaded onto a means of conveyance for export, a veterinarian must treat any visible wounds on the animals with a solution of coumaphos dust at a concentration of 5 percent active ingredient.

(iv) The ruminants must be accompanied to the United States by a certificate signed by a full-time salaried veterinary official of the exporting country. The certificate must state that the ruminants have been thoroughly examined and found free of screwworm and that the ruminants have been treated in accordance with paragraphs (a)(3)(i) and (a)(3)(iii) of this section.

(4) If the ruminants are sheep or goats from Canada, the certificate must also include the name and address of the importer; the species, breed, number or quantity of ruminants to be imported; the purpose of the importation; individual ruminant identification, which includes the official identification required under §93.419(c) of this subchapter, and any other identification present on the animal, including registration number, if any; a description of the ruminant, including age, color, and markings, if any; region of origin; the address of or other means of identifying the premises of origin and any other premises where the ruminants resided immediately prior to export, including the State or its equivalent, the municipality or nearest city, or an equivalent method, approved by the Administrator, of identifying the location of the premises, and the specific physical location of the destination where the ruminants are to be moved after importation; the name and address of the exporter; the port of embarkation in the foreign region; and the mode of transportation, route of travel, and port of entry in the United States.

(b) Goats. (1) In addition to the statements required by paragraph (a) of this section, the certificate accompanying goats from any part of the world, except for goats imported from Canada for immediate slaughter, must state:

(i) That none of the goats in the herd from which the goats will be imported is the progeny of a sire or dam that has been affected with scrapie or that has produced offspring that have been affected with scrapie;

(ii) That none of the female goats in the herd from which the goats will be imported has been impregnated, during the 5 years immediately preceding shipment of the goats to the United States, with germ plasm from a herd known to be infected with scrapie;

(iii) That the veterinarian issuing the certificate has inspected the goats in the herd from which the animals will be imported and found the herd to be free of any evidence of infectious or contagious disease; and

(iv) That as far as it is possible for the veterinarian who inspects the animals to determine, none of the goats in the herd from which the animals will be imported has been exposed to any infectious or contagious disease during the 60 days immediately preceding shipment to the United States.

(2) In addition, the certificate accompanying goats intended for importation from any part of the world except Australia and New Zealand must state:

(i) That the goats have not been in any herd nor had contact with sheep or goats that have been in any flock or herd where scrapie has been diagnosed or suspected during the 5 years immediately prior to shipment; and

(ii) That the goats have not had any contact with sheep during the 5 years immediately prior to shipment; provided that, this statement is not required if the goats are imported in accordance with §93.435(a) into a herd in the United States that participates in the Voluntary Scrapie Flock Certification Program.

(c) Sheep. (1) In addition to the statements required by paragraph (a) of this section, the certificate accompanying sheep intended for importation from any part of the world must state:

(i) That none of the sheep in the flock from which the sheep will be imported is the progeny of a sire or dam that has been affected with scrapie or that has produced offspring that have been affected with scrapie;

(ii) That none of the female sheep in the flock from which the sheep will be imported has been impregnated, during the 5 years immediately preceding shipment of the sheep to the United States, with germ plasm from a flock known to be infected with scrapie;

(iii) That the veterinarian issuing the certificate has inspected the sheep in the flock from which the animals will be imported and found the flock to be free of any evidence of infectious or contagious disease; and

(iv) That as far as it is possible for the veterinarian who inspects the animals to determine, none of the sheep in the flock from which the animals will be imported has been exposed to any infectious or contagious disease during the 60 days immediately preceding shipment to the United States.

(2) In addition, except for sheep imported from Canada for immediate slaughter, the certificate accompanying sheep intended for importation from any part of the world except Australia and New Zealand must state that the sheep have not been in any flock nor had contact with sheep or goats that have been in any flock or herd where scrapie has been diagnosed or suspected during the 5 years immediately prior to shipment.

(3) In addition, the certificate accompanying sheep intended for importation from Australia and New Zealand must state that none of the female sheep in the flock from which the sheep will be imported has been impregnated, during the 5 years immediately preceding shipment of the sheep to the United States, with germ plasm from a region other than Australia, New Zealand, or the United States, or from a flock of unknown scrapie status; provided that, this statement is not required if the sheep are imported in accordance with §93.435(a) into a flock in the United States that participates in the Voluntary Scrapie Flock Certification Program.

(d) If ruminants are unaccompanied by the certificate as required by paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) of this section, or if such ruminants are found upon inspection at the port of entry to be affected with a communicable disease or to have been exposed thereto, they shall be refused entry and shall be handled or quarantined, or otherwise disposed of as the Administrator may direct.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control numbers 0579-0040, 0579-0165, 0579-0234, and 0579-0393)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56018, Oct. 28, 1997]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §93.405, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

§93.406   Diagnostic tests.

(a) Tuberculosis and brucellosis tests of cattle. Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section and in §§93.418, 93.427(d), and 93.432, all cattle imported from any part of the world, except for immediate slaughter, must be accompanied by a certificate of a salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the region of origin, or if exported from Mexico, must be accompanied either by such a certificate or by a certificate issued by a veterinarian accredited by the National Government of Mexico and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the National Government of Mexico, thereby representing that the veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so, stating that:

(1) Brucellosis. The cattle have been tested for brucellosis with negative results within 30 days prior to the date of their exportation to the United States; Provided, that the brucellosis test will not be required for steers, spayed heifers, or any cattle less than 6 months old. The certificate must give the dates and places of testing, names of the consignor and consignee, and a description of the cattle, with breed, ages, and markings; and

(2) Tuberculosis. (i) For steers and spayed heifers, the cattle originated from a herd of origin that tested negative to a whole herd test for tuberculosis within 1 year prior to the date of exportation to the United States, and the animals each tested negative to an additional official tuberculin test conducted within 60 days prior to the date of exportation to the United States, and any individual cattle that had been added to the herd tested negative to any individual tests for tuberculosis required by the Administrator; or

(ii) For sexually intact cattle that are from an accredited herd, the herd was certified as an accredited herd for tuberculosis within 1 year prior to the date of exportation to the United States; or

(iii) For sexually intact cattle that are not from an accredited herd, the cattle originated from a herd of origin that tested negative to a whole herd test for tuberculosis within 1 year prior to the date of exportation to the United States, and the animals each tested negative to one additional official tuberculin test conducted no more than 6 months and no less than 60 days prior to the date of exportation to the United States, and any individual cattle that had been added to the herd tested negative to any individual tests for tuberculosis required by the Administrator, except that the additional test is not required if the animals are exported within 6 months of when the herd of origin tested negative to a whole herd test.

(b) Tuberculosis and brucellosis tests of goats. Except as provided in §§93.419 and 93.428(b), all goats offered for importation, except for immediate slaughter, shall be accompanied by a satisfactory certificate of a salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the region of origin, or if exported from Mexico, shall be accompanied either by such a certificate or by a certificate issued by a veterinarian accredited by the National Government of Mexico and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the National Government of Mexico, thereby representing that the veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so, showing that the goats have been tested for tuberculosis and brucellosis with negative results within 30 days of the date of their exportation. The said certificate shall give the dates and places of testing, method of testing, names of consignor and consignee, and a description of the goats, including breed, ages, markings, and tattoo and eartag numbers.

(c) Further tests during quarantine. Ruminants that have been tested as prescribed in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section and that are subject to quarantine at the port of entry, as provided in §93.411 or §93.427, must be retested during the last 10 days of the quarantine period under the supervision of a veterinary inspector by one or more of the methods approved by the Administrator, except that cattle tested in accordance with paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this section are not required to be retested for tuberculosis.

(d) Testing exemptions. Cattle from Australia and New Zealand are exempt from the brucellosis testing requirements of paragraph (a)(1) of this section.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 57 FR 28080, June 24, 1992; 58 FR 68509, Dec. 28, 1993. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56018, Oct. 28, 1997; 66 FR 20190, Apr. 20, 2001; 68 FR 35533, June 16, 2003; 69 FR 21042, Apr. 20, 2004]

§93.407   Declaration and other documents for ruminants.

(a) The certificates, declarations, and affidavits required by the regulations in this part shall be presented by the importer or his or her agent to the collector of customs at the port of entry, upon arrival of ruminants at such port, for the use of the veterinary inspector at the port of entry.

(b) For all ruminants offered for importation, the importer or his or her agent shall first present two copies of a declaration which shall list the port of entry, the name and address of the importer, the name and address of the broker, the origin of the ruminants, the number, breed, species, and purpose of the importation, the name of the person to whom the ruminants will be delivered, and the location of the place to which such delivery will be made.

(c) Any declaration, permit, or other document for ruminants required under this subpart may be issued and presented using a U.S. Government electronic information exchange system or other authorized method.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 81 FR 40151, June 21, 2016]

§93.408   Inspection at the port of entry.

Inspection shall be made at the port of entry of all ruminants imported from any part of the world except as provided in §§93.421 and 93.426. All ruminants found to be free from communicable disease and not to have been exposed thereto within 60 days prior to their exportation to the United States shall be admitted subject to the other provisions in this part; all other ruminants except as provided in §§93.423(c) and 93.427(a) shall be refused entry. Ruminants refused entry, unless exported within a time fixed in each case by the Administrator, and in accordance with other provisions he or she may require in each case for their handling shall be disposed of as the Administrator may direct in accordance with the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.). Such portions of the transporting vessel, and of its cargo, which have been exposed to any such ruminants or their emanations shall be disinfected in such manner as may be considered necessary by the inspector in charge at the port of entry, to prevent the introduction or spread of livestock or poultry disease, before the cargo is allowed to land.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56018, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003]

§93.409   Articles accompanying ruminants.

No litter or manure, fodder or other aliment, nor any equipment such as boxes, buckets, ropes, chains, blankets, or other things used for or about ruminants governed by the regulations in this part, shall be landed from any conveyance except under such restrictions as the inspector in charge at the port of entry shall direct.

§93.410   Movement from conveyances to quarantine station.

Platforms and chutes used for handling imported ruminants shall be cleaned and disinfected under APHIS supervision after being so used. The said ruminants shall not be unnecessarily moved over any highways nor allowed to come in contact with other animals, but shall be transferred from the conveyance to the quarantine grounds in boats, cars, or vehicles approved by the inspector in charge at the port of entry. Such cars, boats, or vehicles shall be cleaned and disinfected under APHIS supervision immediately after such use, by the carrier moving the same. The railway cars so used shall be either cars reserved for this exclusive use or box cars not otherwise employed in the transportation of animals or their fresh products. When movement of the aforesaid ruminants upon or across a public highway is unavoidable, it shall be under such careful supervision and restrictions as the inspector in charge at the port of entry and the local authorities may direct.

§93.411   Quarantine requirements.

(a) Except for cattle from Central America and the West Indies, and except for ruminants from Canada and Mexico, all ruminants imported into the United States shall be quarantined for not less than 30 days counting from the date of arrival at the port of entry.

(b) Wild ruminants shall be subject, during their quarantine, to such inspections, disinfection, blood tests, or other tests as may be required by the Administrator to determine their freedom from disease.

[61 FR 17238, Apr. 19, 1996. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.412   Ruminant quarantine facilities.

(a) Privately owned quarantine facilities. The operator of a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility subject to the regulations in this subpart shall arrange for acceptable transportation from the port to the privately owned quarantine facility and for the care, feeding, and handling of the ruminants from the time of unloading at the port to the time of release from the quarantine facility. Such arrangements shall be agreed to in advance by the Administrator. All expenses related to these activities shall be the responsibility of the operator. The privately owned quarantine facility must be suitable for the quarantine of the ruminants and must be approved by the Administrator prior to the issuance of any import permit. The facilities occupied by the ruminants should be kept clean and sanitary to the satisfaction of the APHIS representatives. If for any cause, the care, feeding, or handling of ruminants, or the sanitation of the facilities is neglected, in the opinion of the overseeing APHIS representative, such services may be furnished by APHIS in the same manner as though arrangements had been made for such services as provided by paragraph (b) of this section. The operator must request in writing inspection and other services as may be required, and shall waive all claims against the United States and APHIS or any employee of APHIS for damages which may arise from such services. The Administrator may prescribe reasonable rates for the services provided under this paragraph. When APHIS finds it necessary to extend the usual minimum quarantine period, APHIS shall advise the operator in writing, and the operator must pay for such additional quarantine and other services required. The operator must pay for all services received in connection with each separate lot of ruminants as specified in the compliance agreement required under paragraph (d)(2) of this section.

(b) Quarantine facilities maintained by APHIS. The importer, or his or her agent, of ruminants subject to quarantine under the regulations in this part shall arrange for acceptable transportation to the quarantine facility, and for the care, feed, and handling of the ruminants from the time they arrive at the quarantine port to the time of release from quarantine. Such arrangements shall be agreed to in advance by the Administrator. The importer or his or her agent shall request in writing such inspection and other services as may be required, and shall waive all claim against the United States and APHIS or any employee of APHIS, for damages which may arise from such services. All expenses resulting therefrom or incident thereto shall be the responsibility of the importer; APHIS assumes no responsibility with respect thereto. The Administrator may prescribe reasonable rates for the services provided under this paragraph. When it is found necessary to extend the usual minimum quarantine period, the importer, or his or her agent, shall be so advised in writing and shall pay for such additional quarantine and other services required. Payment for services received by the importer, or his or her agent, in connection with each separate lot of ruminants shall be made by certified check or U.S. money order prior to release of the ruminants. If such payment is not made, the ruminants may be sold in accordance with the procedure described in this paragraph or otherwise disposed of as directed by the Administrator. When payment is not made and the ruminants are to be sold to recover payment for services received, the importer, or his or her agent, will be notified by the inspector that if said charges are not immediately paid or satisfactory arrangements made for payment, the ruminants will be sold at public sale to pay the expense of care, feed, and handling during that period. The sale will be held after the expiration of the quarantine period, at such time and place as may be designated by the General Services Administration or other designated selling agent. The proceeds of the sale, after deducting the charges for care, feed, and handling of the ruminants and other expenses, including the expense of the sale, shall be held in a Special Deposit Account in the United States Treasury for 6 months from the date of sale. If not claimed by the importer, or his or her agent, within 6 months from the date of sale, the amount so held shall be transferred from the Special Deposit Account to the General Fund Account in the United States Treasury.

(c) APHIS collection of payments from the importer, or his or her agent, or the operator, for service rendered shall be deposited so as to be available for defraying the expenses involved in this service.

(d) Standards for privately owned quarantine facilities for ruminants—(1) APHIS approval of facilities—(i) Approval procedures. Persons seeking APHIS approval of a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility for ruminants must make written application to the Administrator, c/o National Center for Import and Export, Veterinary Services, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 39, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231. The application must include the full name and mailing address of the applicant; the location and street address of the facility for which approval is sought; blueprints of the facility; a description of the financial resources available for construction, operation and maintenance of the facility; copies of all approved State permits for construction and operation of the facility (but not local building permits), as well as copies of all approved Federal, State, and local environmental permits; the anticipated source(s) or origin(s) of ruminants to be quarantined, as well as the expected size and frequency of shipments, and a contingency plan for the possible destruction and disposal of all ruminants capable of being held in the facility.

(A) If APHIS determines that an application is complete and merits further consideration, the person applying for facility approval must agree to pay the costs of all APHIS services associated with APHIS' evaluation of the application and facility. APHIS charges for evaluation services at hourly rates are listed in §130.30 of this chapter. If the facility is approved by APHIS, the operator must enter into a compliance agreement in accordance with paragraph (d)(2) of this section.

(B) Requests for approval must be submitted at least 120 days prior to the date of application for local building permits. Requests for approval will be evaluated on a first-come, first-served basis.

(ii) Criteria for approval. Before a facility may be built to operate as a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility for ruminants, it must be approved by APHIS. To be approved:

(A) APHIS must find, based on an environmental assessment, and based on any required Federal, State, and local environmental permits or evaluations secured by the operator and copies of which are provided to APHIS, that the operation of the facility will not have significant environmental effects;

(B) The facility must meet all the requirements of paragraph (d) of this section;

(C) The facility must meet any additional requirements that may be imposed by the Administrator in each specific case, as specified in the compliance agreement required under paragraph (d)(2) of this section, to ensure that the quarantine of ruminants in the facility will be adequate to enable determination of their health status, as well as to prevent the transmission of livestock diseases into, within, and from the facility; and

(D) The Administrator must determine whether sufficient personnel, including one or more APHIS veterinarians and other professional, technical, and support personnel, are available to serve as APHIS representatives at the facility and provide continuous oversight and other technical services to ensure the biological security of the facility, if approved. APHIS will assign personnel to facilities requesting approval in the order that the facilities meet all of the criteria for approval. The Administrator has sole discretion on the number of APHIS personnel to be assigned to the facility.

(iii) Maintaining approval. To maintain APHIS approval, the operator must continue to comply with all the requirements of paragraph (d) of this section as well as the terms of the compliance agreement executed in accordance with paragraph (d)(2) of this section.

(iv) Withdrawal or denial of approval. Approval of a proposed privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility may be denied or approval of a facility already in operation may be withdrawn at any time by the Administrator for any of the reasons provided in paragraph (d)(1)(iv)(C) of this section.

(A) Before facility approval is denied or withdrawn, APHIS will inform the operator of the proposed or existing facility and include the reasons for the proposed action. If there is a conflict as to any material fact, APHIS will afford the operator, upon request, the opportunity for a hearing with respect to the merits or validity of such action in accordance with rules of practice that APHIS adopts for the proceeding.

(B) Withdrawal of approval of an existing facility will become effective pending final determination in the proceeding when the Administrator determines that such action is necessary to protect the public health, interest, or safety. Such withdrawal will be effective upon oral or written notification, whichever is earlier, to the operator of the facility. In the event of oral notification, APHIS will give written confirmation to the operator of the facility as promptly as circumstances allow. This withdrawal will continue in effect pending the completion of the proceeding and any judicial review, unless otherwise ordered by the Administrator. In addition to withdrawal of approval for the reasons provided in paragraph (d)(1)(iv)(C) of this section, the Administrator will also automatically withdraw approval when the operator of any approved facility notifies the area veterinarian in charge for the State in which the facility is located, in writing, that the facility is no longer in operation.7

7The name and address of the area veterinarian in charge in any State is available from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Servcie, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import and Export, 4700 River road Unit 39, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231.

(C) The Administrator may deny or withdraw the approval of a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility if:

(1) Any requirement of paragraph (d) of this section or the compliance agreement is not met; or

(2) The facility has not been in use to quarantine ruminants for a period of at least 1 year; or

(3) The operator fails to remit any charges for APHIS services rendered; or

(4) The operator or a person responsibly connected with the business of the facility is or has been convicted of any crime under any law regarding the importation or quarantine of any animal; or

(5) The operator or a person responsibly connected with the business of the facility is or has been convicted of a crime involving fraud, bribery, extortion, or any other crime involving a lack of integrity needed for the conduct of operations affecting the importation of animals; or

(6) Any other requirement under the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 8301-8317) or the regulations thereunder are not met.

(D) For the purposes of paragraph (d)(1)(iv) of this section, a person is deemed to be responsibly connected with the business of the facility if such person has an ownership, mortgage, or lease interest in the facility, or if such person is a partner, officer, director, holder, or owner of 10 percent or more of its voting stock, or an employee in a managerial or executive capacity.

(2) Compliance agreement. (i) A privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility must operate in accordance with a compliance agreement executed by the operator or other designated representative of the facility and by the Administrator. The compliance agreement must be signed by both parties before a facility may commence operations. The compliance agreement must provide that:

(A) The facility must meet all applicable requirements of paragraph (d) of this section;

(B) The facility's quarantine operations are subject to the strict oversight of APHIS representatives;

(C) The operator agrees to be responsible for the cost of building the facility; all costs associated with its maintenance and operation; all costs associated with the hiring of personnel to attend to the ruminants, as well as to maintain and operate the facility; all costs associated with the care of quarantined ruminants, such as feed, bedding, medicines, inspections, testing, laboratory procedures, and necropsy examinations; all costs associated with the death or destruction and disposition of quarantined ruminants; and all APHIS charges for the services of APHIS representatives in accordance with this section and part 130 of this chapter;

(D) The operator obtained, prior to execution of this agreement, a financial instrument (insurance or surety bond) approved by APHIS that financially guarantees the operator's ability to cover all costs and other financial liabilities and obligations of the facility, including a worst case scenario in which all quarantined ruminants must be destroyed and disposed of because of an animal health emergency, as determined by the Administrator.

(E) The operator will deposit with the Administrator, prior to commencing quarantine operations, a certified check or U.S. money order to cover the estimated costs, as determined by the Administrator, of professional, technical, and support services to be provided by APHIS at the facility over the duration of the quarantine. If actual costs incurred by APHIS over the quarantine period exceed the deposited amount, the operator will pay for any additional costs incurred by APHIS, based on official accounting records. Payment for all services received in connection with each lot of ruminants in quarantine shall be made prior to release of the ruminants. The operator must pay for any other costs incurred by APHIS with respect to the quarantine following the release of the ruminants, based on official records, within 14 days of receipt of the bill showing the balance due. APHIS will return to the operator any unobligated funds deposited with APHIS, after the release of the lot of ruminants from the facility and termination or expiration of the compliance agreement, or, if requested, credit to the operator's account such funds to be applied towards payment of APHIS services at a future date.

(ii) Prior to the entry of each subsequent lot of ruminants into the medium or minimum security facility, a new compliance agreement must be executed, and a certified check or U.S. money order to the Administrator must be deposited to cover the estimated costs, as determined by the Administrator, of professional, technical, and support services to be provided by APHIS at the facility over the duration of the quarantine.

(3) Physical plant requirements. A privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility must meet the following requirements as determined by an APHIS inspection before ruminants may be admitted to it.

(i) Location. (A) The medium or minimum security facility must be located at a site approved by the Administrator, and the specific routes for the movement of ruminants from the port must be approved in advance by the Administrator, based on consideration of whether the site or routes would put the animals in a position that could result in their transmitting communicable livestock diseases.

(B) In the case of a medium security facility, the facility must be located at least one-half mile from any premises holding livestock. In the case of a minimum security facility, the Administrator will establish the required minimum distance between the facility and other premises holding livestock on a case-by-case basis.

(C) If the medium or minimum security facility is to be located more than 1 mile from a designated port, the operator must make arrangements for the imported ruminants to be held in a temporary inspection facility to allow for the inspection of the imported ruminants by a Federal or State veterinarian prior to the animals' movement to the medium or minimum security facility.

(1) The temporary inspection facility must have adequate space for Federal or State veterinarians to conduct examinations and testing of the imported ruminants.

(2) The examination space of the temporary inspection facility must be equipped with appropriate animal restraining devices for the safe inspection of ruminants.

(3) The temporary inspection facility may not hold more than one lot of animals at the same time.

(4) In seeking APHIS approval of the temporary inspection facility, the operator must provide APHIS with the following information: The port of entry; a description of the temporary inspection facility; and the anticipated source(s) of the materials to be used for the facility.

(5) If the ruminants, upon inspection at the temporary inspection facility, are determined to be infected with or exposed to a disease that precludes their entry into the United States, the animals will be refused entry. Ruminants refused entry remain the responsibility of the operator, but subject to further handling or disposition as directed by the Administrator in accordance with §93.408 of this subpart.

(6) APHIS' approval to build and operate a medium or minimum security facility outside the immediate vicinity of a designated port is contingent upon APHIS' approval of the temporary inspection facility at the port, as well as approval of the routes for the movement of ruminants from the port to the medium or minimum security facility.

(ii) Construction. The medium or minimum security facility must be of sound construction, in good repair, and properly designed to prevent the escape of quarantined ruminants. It must have adequate capacity to receive and hold a shipment of ruminants as a lot on an “all-in, all-out” basis and must include the following:

(A) Loading docks. The facility must include separate docks for animal receiving and releasing and for general receiving and pickup, or, alternatively, a single dock may be used for both purposes if the dock is cleaned and disinfected after each use in accordance with paragraph (d)(4)(iv)(D) of this section.

(B) Perimeter fencing. The facility must be surrounded by double-security perimeter fencing separated by at least 30 feet and of sufficient height and design to prevent the entry of unauthorized persons and animals from outside the facility and to prevent the escape of any ruminants in quarantine.

(C) Means of isolation. The facility must provide pens, chutes, and other animal restraining devices, as appropriate, for inspection and identification of each animal, as well as for segregation, treatment, or both, of any ruminant exhibiting signs of illness. The medium or minimum security facility must also have lot-holding areas of sufficient size to prevent overcrowding. A medium security facility may hold more than one lot of ruminants as long as the lots are separated by physical barriers such that ruminants in one lot do not have physical contact with ruminants in another lot or with their excrement or discharges. A minimum security facility may not hold more than one lot of animals at the same time.

(D) APHIS space. The facility must have adequate space for APHIS representatives to conduct examinations and draw samples for testing of ruminants in quarantine, prepare and package samples for mailing, and store duplicate samples and the necessary equipment and supplies for each lot of ruminants. The examination space must be equipped with appropriate animal restraining devices for the safe inspection of ruminants. The facility must also provide a secure, lockable office for APHIS use with enough room for a desk, chair, and filing cabinet.

(E) Storage. The facility must have sufficient storage space for equipment and supplies used in quarantine operations. Storage space must include separate, secure storage for pesticides and for medical and other biological supplies, as well as a separate storage area for feed and bedding, if feed and bedding are stored at the facility.

(F) Other work areas. The facility must include work areas for the repair of equipment and for cleaning and disinfecting equipment used in the facility.

(iii) Additional construction requirements for medium security facilities. For medium security facilities only, the following requirements must also be met:

(A) Self-contained building. The medium security facility must be constructed so that the quarantine area is located in a secure, self-contained building that contains appropriate control measures against the spread of livestock diseases biologically transmissible by vectors. All entryways into the nonquarantine area of the building must be equipped with a secure and lockable door. While ruminants are in quarantine, all access to the quarantine area must be from within the building. Each entryway to the quarantine area must be equipped with a solid self-closing door. Separate access must be provided within the quarantine area to each lot-holding area so that it is not necessary to move through one lot-holding area to gain access to another lot-holding area. Entryways to each lot-holding area within the quarantine area would also have to be equipped with a solid lockable door. Emergency exits to the outside may exist in the quarantine area if required by local fire ordinances. Such emergency exits must be constructed so as to permit their opening from the inside of the facility only.

(B) Windows and other openings. Any windows or other openings in the quarantine area must be double-screened with screening of sufficient gauge and mesh to prevent the entry or exit of insects and other vectors of livestock diseases and to provide ventilation sufficient to ensure the comfort and safety of all ruminants in the facility. The interior and exterior screens must be separated by at least 3 inches (7.62 cm). All screening of windows or other openings must be easily removable for cleaning, yet otherwise remain locked and secure at all times in a manner satisfactory to APHIS representatives in order to ensure the biological security of the facility.

(C) Surfaces. The medium security facility must be constructed so that the floor surfaces with which ruminants have contact are nonslip and wear-resistant. All floor surfaces with which the ruminants, their excrement, or discharges have contact must slope gradually to the center, where one or more drains of at least 8 inches in diameter are located for adequate drainage, or, alternatively, must be of slatted or other floor design that allows for adequate drainage. All floor and wall surfaces with which the ruminants, their excrement, or discharges have contact must be impervious to moisture and be able to withstand frequent cleaning and disinfection without deterioration. Other ceiling and wall surfaces with which the ruminants, their excrement, or discharges do not have contact must be able to withstand cleaning and disinfection between shipments of ruminants. All floor and wall surfaces must be free of sharp edges that could cause injury to ruminants.

(D) Ventilation and climate control. The medium security facility must be constructed with a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system capable of controlling and maintaining the ambient temperature, air quality, moisture, and odor at levels that are not injurious or harmful to the health of ruminants in quarantine. Air supplied to lot-holding areas must not be recirculated or reused for other ventilation needs. HVAC systems for lot-holding areas must be separate from air handling systems for other operational and administrative areas of the facility. In addition, if the facility is approved to handle more than one lot of ruminants at a time, each lot-holding area must have its own separate HVAC system that is designed to prevent cross-contamination between the separate lot-holding areas.

(E) Lighting. The medium security facility must have adequate lighting throughout, including in the lot-holding areas and other areas used to examine ruminants and conduct necropsies.

(F) Fire protection. The medium security facility, including the lot-holding areas, must have a fire alarm and voice communication system.

(G) Monitoring system. The medium security facility must have a television monitoring system or other arrangement sufficient to provide a full view of the lot-holding areas.

(H) Communication system. The medium security facility must have a communication system between the nonquarantine and quarantine areas of the facility.

(I) Necropsy area. The medium security facility must have an area that is of sufficient size to perform necropsies on ruminants and that is equipped with adequate lighting, hot and cold running water, a drain, a cabinet for storing instruments, a refrigerator-freezer for storing specimens, and an autoclave to sterilize veterinary equipment.

(J) Additional storage requirements. Feed storage areas in the medium security facility must be vermin-proof. Also, if the medium security facility has multiple lot-holding areas, then separate storage space for supplies and equipment must be provided for each lot-holding area.

(K) Showers. In a medium security facility, there must be a shower at the entrance to the quarantine area. A shower also must be located at the entrance to the necropsy area. A clothes-storage and clothes-changing area must be provided at each end of each shower area. There also must be one or more receptacles near each shower so that clothing that has been worn in a lot-holding area or elsewhere in the quarantine area can be deposited in the receptacle(s) prior to entering the shower.

(L) Restrooms. The medium security facility must have permanent restrooms in both the nonquarantine and quarantine areas of the facility.

(M) Break room. The medium security facility must have an area within the quarantine area for breaks and meals.

(N) Laundry area. The medium security facility must have an area for washing and drying clothes, linens, and towels.

(iv) Sanitation. To ensure that proper animal health and biological security measures are observed, a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility must provide the following:

(A) Equipment and supplies necessary to maintain the facility in a clean and sanitary condition, including pest control equipment and supplies and cleaning and disinfecting equipment with adequate capacity to disinfect the facility and equipment.

(B) Separately maintained sanitation and pest control equipment and supplies for each lot-holding area if the facility will hold more than one lot of ruminants at a time (applicable to medium security facilities only).

(C) A supply of potable water adequate to meet all watering and cleaning needs, with water faucets for hoses located throughout the facility. An emergency supply of water for ruminants in quarantine also must be maintained.

(D) A stock of disinfectant authorized in §71.10(a)(5) of this chapter or otherwise approved by the Administrator that is sufficient to disinfect the entire facility.

(E) The capability to dispose of wastes, including manure, urine, and used bedding, by means of burial, incineration, or public sewer. Other waste material must be handled in such a manner that minimizes spoilage and the attraction of pests and must be disposed of by incineration, public sewer, or other preapproved manner that prevents the spread of disease. Disposal of wastes must be carried out under the direct oversight of APHIS representatives.

(F) The capability to dispose of ruminant carcasses in a manner approved by the Administrator and under conditions that prevent the spread of disease from the carcasses.

(G) For incineration to be carried out at the facility, incineration equipment that is detached from other facility structures and is capable of burning wastes or carcasses as required. The incineration site must include an area sufficient for solid waste holding. Incineration may also take place at a local site away from the facility premises. All incineration activities must be carried out under the direct oversight of an APHIS representative.

(H) The capability to control surface drainage and effluent into, within, and from the facility in a manner that prevents the spread of disease into, within, and from the facility. If the facility is approved to handle more than one lot of ruminants at the same time, there must be separate drainage systems for each lot-holding area in order to prevent cross contamination.

(v) Security. (A) A privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility must provide the following security measures:

(1) The facility and premises must be kept locked and secure at all times while the ruminants are in quarantine.

(2) The facility and premises must have signs indicating that the facility is a quarantine area and no visitors are allowed.

(3) The operator must furnish a telephone number or numbers to APHIS at which the operator or his or her agent can be reached at all times.

(4) APHIS is authorized to place seals on any or all entrances and exits of the facility, when determined necessary by APHIS to ensure security, and to take all necessary steps to ensure that the seals are broken only in the presence of an APHIS representative. If the seals are broken by someone other than an APHIS representative, it will be considered a breach in security, and an immediate accounting of all ruminants in the facility will be made by an APHIS representative. If a breach in security occurs, APHIS may extend the quarantine period as long as necessary to determine that the ruminants are free of communicable livestock diseases.

(5) In the event that a communicable livestock disease is diagnosed in quarantined ruminants, the Administrator may require that the operator have the facility guarded by a bonded security company, at the expense of the operator of the facility, in a manner that the Administrator deems necessary to ensure the biological security of the facility.

(B) A privately owned medium security facility also must provide the following security measures:

(1) The medium security facility and premises must be guarded at all times by one or more representatives of a bonded security company, or, alternatively, the medium security facility must have an electronic security system that prevents the entry of unauthorized persons into the facility and prevents animals outside the facility from having contact with ruminants in quarantine;

(2) If an electronic security system is used, the electronic security system must be coordinated through or with the local police so that monitoring of the facility is maintained whenever APHIS representatives are not at the facility. The electronic security system must be of the “silent type” and must be triggered to ring at the monitoring site and, if the operator chooses, at the facility. The operator must provide written instructions to the monitoring agency stating that the police and an APHIS representative designated by APHIS must be notified by the monitoring agency if the alarm is triggered. The operator also must submit a copy of those instructions to the Administrator. The operator must notify the designated APHIS representative whenever a break in security occurs or is suspected of occurring.

(4) Operating procedures. The following procedures must be followed at a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility at all times:

(i) APHIS oversight. (A) The quarantine of ruminants at the facility will be subject to the strict oversight of APHIS representatives authorized to perform the services required by this subpart.

(B) If, for any reason, the operator fails to properly care for, feed, or handle the quarantined ruminants as required in paragraph (d) of this section, or in accordance with animal health and husbandry standards provided elsewhere in this chapter, or fails to maintain and operate the facility as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, APHIS representatives are authorized to furnish such neglected services at the operator's expense, as authorized in paragraph (a) of this section.

(ii) Personnel. (A) The operator must provide adequate personnel to maintain the facility and care for the ruminants in quarantine, including attendants to care for and feed ruminants, and other personnel as needed to maintain, operate, and administer the facility.

(B) The operator must provide APHIS with an updated list of all personnel who have access to the facility. The list must include the names, current residential addresses, and identification numbers of each person, and must be updated with any changes or additions in advance of such person having access to the quarantine facility.

(C) The operator must provide APHIS with signed statements from all personnel having access to the facility in which the person agrees to comply with paragraph (d) of this section and applicable provisions of this part, all terms of the compliance agreement, and any related instructions from APHIS representatives pertaining to quarantine operations, including contact with animals both inside and outside the facility.

(iii) Authorized access. (A) Access to the facility premises as well as inside the quarantine area will be granted only to APHIS representatives and other persons specifically authorized to work at the facility. All other persons are prohibited from the premises unless specifically granted access by an APHIS representative. Any visitors granted access must be accompanied at all times by an APHIS representative while on the premises.

(B) All visitors, except veterinary practitioners who enter the facility to provide emergency care, must sign an affidavit before entering the quarantine area, if determined necessary by the overseeing APHIS representative, declaring that they will not have contact with any susceptible animals outside the facility for at least 5 days after contact with the ruminants in quarantine, or for a period of time determined by the overseeing APHIS representative as necessary to prevent the transmission of communicable livestock diseases of ruminants.

(iv) Sanitary practices. (A) All persons granted access to the quarantine area must:

(1) Wear clean protective work clothing and footwear upon entering the quarantine area.

(2) Wear disposable gloves when handling sick animals and then wash hands after removing gloves.

(3) Change protective clothing, footwear, and gloves when they become soiled or contaminated.

(4) Be prohibited, if determined necessary by the overseeing APHIS representative, from having contact with any susceptible animals outside the facility for at least 5 days after the last contact with ruminants in quarantine, or for a longer period of time determined necessary by the overseeing APHIS representative to prevent the transmission of livestock diseases.

(B) All equipment (including tractors) must be cleaned and disinfected prior to being used in the quarantine area of the facility with a disinfectant that is authorized in §71.10(a)(5) of this chapter or that is otherwise approved by the Administrator. The equipment must remain dedicated to the facility for the entire quarantine period. Any equipment used with quarantined ruminants must remain dedicated to that particular lot of ruminants for the duration of the quarantine period or be cleaned and disinfected before coming in contact with ruminants from another lot. Prior to its use on another lot of ruminants or its removal from the quarantine area, such equipment must be cleaned and disinfected to the satisfaction of an APHIS representative.

(C) Any vehicle, before entering or leaving the quarantine area of the facility, must be immediately cleaned and disinfected under the oversight of an APHIS representative with a disinfectant that is authorized in §71.10(a)(5) of this chapter or that is otherwise approved by the Administrator.

(D) If the facility has a single loading dock, the loading dock must be immediately cleaned and disinfected after each use under the oversight of an APHIS representative with a disinfectant that is authorized in §71.10(a)(5) of this chapter or that is otherwise approved by the Administrator.

(E) That area of the facility in which a lot of ruminants had been held or had access must be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected under the oversight of an APHIS representative upon release of the ruminants, with a disinfectant that is authorized in §71.10(a)(5) of this chapter or that is otherwise approved by the Administrator, before a new lot of ruminants is placed in that area of the facility.

(F) For medium security facilities only, the following additional sanitary practices also must be followed:

(1) All persons granted access to the quarantine area, must:

(i) Shower when leaving the quarantine area.

(ii) Shower before entering a lot-holding area if previously exposed from access to another lot-holding area.

(iii) Shower when leaving the necropsy area if a necropsy is in the process of being performed or has just been completed, or if all or portions of the examined animal remain exposed.

(iv) Be prohibited, unless specifically allowed otherwise by the overseeing APHIS representative, from having contact with any ruminants in the facility, other than the lot or lots of ruminants to which the person is assigned or is granted access.

(2) The operator is responsible for providing a sufficient supply of clothing and footwear to ensure that workers and others provided access to the quarantine area of the facility have clean, protective clothing and footwear before entering the facility.

(3) The operator is responsible for the proper handling, washing, and disposal of soiled and contaminated clothing worn in the quarantine area in a manner approved by an APHIS representative as adequate to preclude the transmission of disease within and from the facility. At the end of each workday, work clothing worn into each lot-holding area and elsewhere in the quarantine area must be collected and kept in bags until the clothing is washed. Used footwear must either be left in the clothes changing area or cleaned with hot water (148 °F minimum) and detergent and disinfected as directed by an APHIS representative.

(v) Handling of ruminants in quarantine. (A) Each lot of ruminants to be quarantined must be placed in the facility on an “all-in, all-out” basis. No ruminant may be taken out of a lot while the lot is in quarantine, except for diagnostic purposes, and no ruminant may be added to a lot while in quarantine.

(B) The facility must provide sufficient feed and bedding for the ruminants in quarantine, and it must be free of vermin and not spoiled. Feed and bedding must originate from a region that has been approved by APHIS as a source for feed and bedding.

(C) Breeding of ruminants or collection of germ plasm from ruminants is prohibited during the quarantine period unless necessary for a required import testing procedure.

(D) Ruminants in quarantine will be subjected to such tests and procedures as directed by an APHIS representative to determine whether the ruminants are free of communicable livestock diseases. While in quarantine, ruminants may be vaccinated only with vaccines that have been approved by the APHIS representative and licensed in accordance with §102.5 of this chapter.8 Vaccines must be administered either by an APHIS veterinarian or an accredited veterinarian under the direct oversight of an APHIS representative.

8A list of approved vaccines is available from the Center for Veterinary Biologics, USDA, APHIS, VS, 510 south 17th Street6, Suite 104, Ames, IA 50010.

(E) Any death or suspected illness of ruminants in quarantine must be reported immediately to the overseeing APHIS representative. The affected ruminants must be disposed of as the Administrator may direct or, depending on the nature of the disease, must be cared for as directed by APHIS to prevent the spread of disease.

(F) Quarantined ruminants requiring specialized medical attention or additional postmortem testing may be transported off the quarantine site, if authorized by APHIS. A second quarantine site must be established to house the ruminants at the facility of destination (e.g., veterinary college hospital). In such cases, APHIS may extend the quarantine period until the results of any outstanding tests or postmortems are received.

(G) Should the Administrator determine that an animal health emergency exists at the facility, arrangements for the final disposition of the infected or exposed lot of ruminants must be accomplished within 4 workdays following disease confirmation. Subsequent disposition of the ruminants must occur under the direct oversight of APHIS representatives.

(vi) Recordkeeping. (A) The operator must maintain a current daily log, to record the entry and exit of all persons entering and leaving the facility.

(B) The operator must retain the daily log, along with any logs kept by APHIS and deposited with the operator, for at least 2 years following the date of release of the ruminants from quarantine and must make such logs available to APHIS representatives upon request.

(5) Environmental quality. If APHIS determines that a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility does not meet applicable local, State, or Federal environmental regulations, APHIS may deny or suspend approval of the facility until appropriate remedial measures have been applied.

(6) Other laws. A privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility must comply with other applicable Federal laws and regulations, as well as with all applicable State and local codes and regulations.

(7) Variances. The Administrator may grant variances to existing requirements relating to location, construction, and other design features of a privately owned medium security quarantine facility or minimum security quarantine facility as well as to sanitation, security, operating procedures, recordkeeping, and other provisions in paragraph (d) of this section, but only if the Administrator determines that the variance causes no detrimental impact to the health of the ruminants or to the overall biological security of the quarantine operations. The operator must submit a request for a variance to the Administrator in writing at least 30 days in advance of the arrival of the ruminants to the facility. Any variance also must be expressly provided for in the compliance agreement.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0232)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997, as amended at 71 FR 29773, May 24, 2006]

§93.413   Quarantine stations, visiting restricted; sales prohibited.

Visitors are not permitted in the quarantine enclosures during any time that ruminants are in quarantine unless the APHIS representative or inspector in charge specifically grants access under such conditions and restrictions as may be imposed by the APHIS representative or inspector in charge. An importer (or his or her accredited agent or veterinarian) may be admitted to the yards and buildings containing his or her quarantined ruminants at such intervals as may be deemed necessary, and under such conditions and restrictions as may be imposed, by the APHIS representative or the inspector in charge of the quarantine facility or station. On the last day of the quarantine period, owners, officers, or registry societies, and others having official business or whose services may be necessary in the removal of the ruminants may be admitted upon written permission from the APHIS representative or inspector in charge. No exhibition or sale shall be allowed within the quarantine grounds.

[71 FR 29779, May 24, 2006]

§93.414   Milk from quarantined ruminants.

Milk or cream from ruminants quarantined under the provisions of this part shall not be used by any person other than those in charge of such ruminants, nor be fed to any animals other than those within the same enclosure, without permission of the APHIS representative or inspector in charge of the quarantine station and subject to such restrictions as he or she may consider necessary to each instance. No milk or cream shall be removed from the quarantine premises except in compliance with all State and local regulations.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997, as amended at 71 FR 29779, May 24, 2006]

§93.415   Manure from quarantined ruminants.

No manure shall be removed from the quarantine premises until the release of the ruminants producing same.

§93.416   Appearance of disease among ruminants in quarantine.

If any contagious disease appears among ruminants during the quarantine period special precautions shall be taken to prevent spread of the infection to other animals in the quarantine station or to those outside the grounds. The affected ruminants shall be disposed of as the Administrator may direct, depending upon the nature of the disease.

Canada8

8Importations from Canada shall be subject to §§93.417 to 93.421, inclusive, in addition to other sections in this part which are in terms applicable to such importations.

§93.417   Import permit and declaration for ruminants.

(a) For ruminants intended for importation from Canada, the importer shall first apply for and obtain from APHIS an import permit as provided in §93.404: Provided, That an import permit is not required for ruminants offered for entry at a land border port designated in §93.403(b) if such ruminant is:

(1) A wether;

(2) A sheep or goat imported for immediate slaughter; or

(3) A ruminant other than a sheep or goat and that ruminant:

(i) Was born in Canada or the United States, and has been in no region other than Canada or the United States, or

(ii) Has been legally imported into Canada from some other region and unconditionally released in Canada so as to be eligible to move freely within that region without restriction of any kind and has been in Canada after such release for 60 days or longer.

(b) For all ruminants offered for importation from Canada, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of a declaration as provided in §93.407.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 60 FR 13900, Mar. 15, 1995. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56018, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.418   Cattle and other bovines from Canada.

(a) Health certificates. Cattle intended for importation from Canada must be accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with §93.405(a). The certificate must state that the cattle have been inspected and were found to be free from any evidence of communicable disease and that, as far as can be determined, they have not been exposed to any such disease during the preceding 60 days. Cattle found unqualified upon inspection at the port of entry will be refused entry into the United States.

(b) Tuberculin-test certificates. (1) Cattle from Canada from a herd in which any cattle have been determined to have tuberculosis shall not be imported into the United States.

(2) Except for cattle prohibited from importation under paragraph (b)(1) of this section, cattle from Canada may be imported into the United States if:

(i) The cattle are imported for immediate slaughter in accordance with §93.420; or

(ii) The cattle are imported for movement to a feedlot and then to slaughter and the certificate accompanying the cattle shows, in addition to the information required under §93.405, the breed of the animal, and:

(A) That the cattle are from a tuberculosis-free herd; or

(B) The date and place the cattle were last tested for tuberculosis; that the cattle were found negative for tuberculosis on such test; and that such test was performed within 60 days preceding the arrival of the cattle at the port of entry; or

(C) That the cattle are at least five days but not more than four weeks of age and, therefore, exempt from the tuberculosis testing requirement; or

(D) For a calf imported with its dam, the date and place the calf's dam was last tested for tuberculosis; that the dam was found negative for tuberculosis on such test; that such test was performed within 60 days preceding the arrival of the calf and dam at the port of entry; and that the calf was born after such test was performed.

(c) Brucellosis test or vaccination certificates. (1) Cattle from Canada from a herd in which any cattle have been determined to have brucellosis may not be imported into the United States;

(2) Except for cattle prohibited from importation into the United States under paragraph (c)(1) of this section, cattle 6 months of age or older from Canada may be imported into the United States if the following conditions are met:

(i) The cattle are imported for immediate slaughter in accordance with §93.420;

(ii) The cattle are steers; or

(iii) The cattle are imported for movement to a feedlot and then to slaughter and the certificate accompanying the cattle shows, in addition to the information required under §93.405, the breed of the animal, and:

(A) That the cattle are from a brucellosis certified-free herd, province, or territory; or

(B) The date and place the cattle were last tested for brucellosis; that the cattle were found negative for brucellosis on such test; and that such test was performed within 30 days preceding the arrival of the cattle at the port of entry; or

(C) That the female cattle under 18 months of age were vaccinated against brucellosis in accordance with Canadian regulations; the date of such vaccination; the dosage of vaccine used; and the age of each animal on the date of vaccination.

(d) In addition to meeting the requirements of paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, bovines may be imported from Canada only under the following conditions:

(1) The bovines are imported for immediate slaughter under §93.420; or

(2) The bovines are imported for other than immediate slaughter under the following conditions:

(i) The bovines were born after March 1, 1999, the date determined by APHIS to be the date of effective enforcement of a ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban in Canada;

(ii) The bovines are imported only through a port of entry listed in §93.403(b) or as provided for in §93.403(f);

(iii) The bovines were officially identified prior to arriving at the port of entry in the United States with unique individual identification that is traceable to each bovine's premises of origin. No person may alter, deface, remove, or otherwise tamper with the official identification while the animal is in the United States or moving into or through the United States, except that the identification may be removed at slaughter; and

(iv) The bovines are permanently and humanely identified using one of the following additional methods:

(A) A “CΛN” mark properly applied with a freeze brand, hot iron, or other method, and easily visible on the live animal and on the carcass before skinning. Such a mark must be not less than 2 inches nor more than 3 inches high, and must be applied to each animal's right hip, high on the tail-head (over the junction of the sacral and first coccygeal vertebrae); or

(B) A tattoo with the letters “CΛN” applied to the inside of one ear of the animal; or

(C) Other means of permanent identification upon request if deemed adequate by the Administrator to humanely identify the animal in a distinct and legible way as having been imported from Canada.

(3) The bovines are accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with §93.405 that states, in addition to the statements required by §93.405, that the conditions of paragraph (d)(2) of this section, as applicable, have been met.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0393)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 55 FR 49990, Dec. 4, 1990; 58 FR 37641, July 13, 1993; 59 FR 28216, June 1, 1994; 61 FR 17238, Apr. 19, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56018, Oct. 28, 1997; 71 FR 12997, Mar. 14, 2006; 78 FR 72996, Dec. 4, 2013; 78 FR 73993, Dec. 10, 2013]

§93.419   Sheep and goats from Canada.

(a) Sheep and goats intended for importation from Canada must be accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with §93.405.

(b) If the sheep or goats are unaccompanied by the certificate required by paragraph (a) of this section, or if they are found upon inspection at the port of entry to be affected with or exposed to a communicable disease, they shall be refused entry and shall be handled or quarantined, or otherwise disposed of, as the Administrator may direct.

(c) Any sheep or goats imported from Canada must not be pregnant, must be less than 12 months of age when imported into the United States and when slaughtered, must be from a flock or herd subject to a ruminant feed ban equivalent to the requirements established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration at 21 CFR 589.2000, and, before the animal's arrival at the port of entry into the United States, must be officially identified with unique individual identification that is traceable to the premises of origin of the animal. No person may alter, deface, remove, or otherwise tamper with the official identification while the animal is in the United States or moving into or through the United States, except that the identification may be removed at the time of slaughter. The animals must be accompanied by the certification issued in accordance with §93.405 that states, in addition to the statements required by §93.405, that the conditions of this paragraph have been met. Additionally, for sheep and goats imported for immediate slaughter, the certificate must state that the conditions of paragraphs (d)(1) through (d)(3) of this section have been met, and, for sheep and goats imported for other than immediate slaughter, the certificate must state that the conditions of paragraphs (e)(1) and (e)(2) of this section have been met.

(d) Sheep and goats imported for immediate slaughter. Sheep and goats imported from Canada for immediate slaughter must be imported only through a port of entry listed in §93.403(b) or as provided for in §93.403(f) in a means of conveyance sealed in Canada with seals of the Canadian Government, and must be moved directly as a group from the port of entry to a recognized slaughtering establishment for slaughter as a group. The sheep and goats shall be inspected at the port of entry and otherwise handled in accordance with §93.408. The seals on the means of conveyance must be broken only at the port of entry by the APHIS port veterinarian or at the recognized slaughtering establishment by an authorized USDA representative. If the seals are broken by the APHIS port veterinarian at the port of entry, the means of conveyance must be resealed with seals of the U.S. Government before being moved to the recognized slaughtering establishment. The shipment must be accompanied from the port of entry to the recognized slaughtering establishment by APHIS Form VS 17-33, which must include the location of the recognized slaughtering establishment. Additionally, the sheep and goats must meet the following conditions:

(1) The animals have not tested positive for and are not suspect for a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy;

(2) The animals have not resided in a flock or herd that has been diagnosed with BSE; and

(3) The animals' movement is not restricted within Canada as a result of exposure to a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy.

(e) Imported for feeding. Any sheep or goats imported from Canada for feeding at a feedlot must be imported only through a port of entry listed in §93.403(b) or as provided for in §93.403(f) in a means of conveyance sealed in the region of origin with seals of the national government of the region of origin, must be moved directly as a group from the port of entry to a designated feedlot, must not be commingled with any sheep or goats that are not being moved directly to slaughter from the designated feedlot at less than 12 months of age, and must meet the following conditions:

(1) The sheep and goats must be permanently and humanely identified before arrival at the port of entry with a distinct and legible “C” mark, properly applied with a freeze brand, hot iron, or other method, and easily visible on the live animal and on the carcass before skinning. The mark must be not less than 1 inch or more than 114 inches high. Other means of permanent identification may be used upon request if deemed adequate by the Administrator to humanely identify the animal in a distinct and legible way as having been imported from Canada;

(2) The animals may be moved from the port of entry only to a feedlot designated in accordance with paragraph (e)(7) of this section and must be accompanied from the port of entry to the designated feedlot by APHIS Form VS 17-130 or other movement documentation deemed acceptable by the Administrator, which must identify the physical location of the feedlot, the individual responsible for the movement of the animals, and the individual identification of each animal, which includes the official identification required under paragraph (c) of this section and any other identification present on the animal, including registration number, if any:

(3) The seals of the national government of Canada must be broken only at the port of entry by the APHIS port veterinarian or at the designated feedlot by an authorized USDA representative. If the seals are broken by the APHIS port veterinarian at the port of entry, the means of conveyance must be resealed with seals of the U.S. Government before being moved to the designated feedlot;

(4) The animals must remain at the designated feedlot until transported to a recognized slaughtering establishment. The animals must be moved directly to the recognized slaughtering establishment in a means of conveyance sealed with seals of the U.S. Government by an accredited veterinarian, a State representative, or an APHIS representative. The seals must be broken at the recognized slaughtering establishment only by an authorized USDA representative;

(5) The animals must be accompanied to the recognized slaughtering establishment by APHIS Form VS 1-27 or other documentation deemed acceptable by the Administrator, which must identify the physical location of the recognized slaughtering establishment, the individual responsible for the movement of the animals, and the individual identification of each animal, which includes the official identification required under paragraph (c) of this section and any other identification present on the animal, including registration number, if any;

(6) The animals must be less than 12 months of age when slaughtered;

(7) To be approved to receive sheep or goats imported for feeding, a feedlot must have signed a written agreement with the Administrator stating that the feedlot:

(i) Will not remove official identification from animals unless medically necessary, in which case new official identification will be applied and cross referenced in the records;

(ii) Will monitor all incoming imported feeder animals to ensure that they have the required “C” brand;

(iii) Will maintain records of the acquisition and disposition of all imported sheep and goats entering the feed lot, including the official identification number and all other identifying information, the age of each animal, the date each animal was acquired and the date each animal was shipped to slaughter, and the name and location of the plant where each animal was slaughtered. For Canadian animals that die in the feedlot, the feedlot will remove the official identification device if affixed to the animal, or will record any other official identification on the animal and place the official identification device or record of official identification in a file with a record of the disposition of the carcass;

(iv) Will maintain copies of the APHIS Forms VS 17-130 and VS 1-27 or other movement documentation deemed acceptable by the Administrator that have been issued for incoming animals and for animals moved to slaughter and that list the official identification of each animal;

(v) Will allow State and Federal animal health officials access to inspect its premises and animals and to review inventory records and other required files upon request;

(vi) Will keep required records for at least 5 years;

(vii) Will designate either the entire feedlot or pens within the feedlot as terminal for sheep and goats to be moved only directly to slaughter at less than 12 months of age, and

(viii) Agrees that if inventory cannot be reconciled or if animals are not moved to slaughter as required the approval of the feedlot will be immediately withdrawn.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control numbers 0579-0040, 0579-0234, and 0579-0277)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 59 FR 28216, June 1, 1994; 61 FR 17239, Apr. 19, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56018, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003; 70 FR 547, Jan. 4, 2005; 70 FR 71217, Nov. 28, 2005; 71 FR 12997, Mar. 14, 2006; 72 FR 53376, Sept. 18, 2007; 73 FR 3383, Jan. 18, 2008]

§93.420   Ruminants from Canada for immediate slaughter other than sheep and goats.

(a) General requirements. The requirements for the importation of sheep and goats from Canada for immediate slaughter are contained in §93.419. There are no BSE-related restrictions on the importation of cervids or camelids from Canada. All other ruminants imported from Canada for immediate slaughter, in addition to meeting all other applicable requirements of this part, may be imported only under the following conditions:

(1) The ruminants must be imported only through a port of entry listed in §93.403(b) or as provided for in §93.403(f) and be inspected at the port of entry and otherwise handled in accordance with §93.408.

(2) The ruminants must be moved directly from the port of entry to a recognized slaughtering establishment in conveyances that are sealed with seals of the U.S. Government at the port of entry. The seals may be broken only at the recognized slaughtering establishment by an authorized USDA representative.

(3) The ruminants must be accompanied from the port of entry to the recognized slaughtering establishment by APHIS Form VS 17-33, which must include the location of the recognized slaughtering establishment.

(b) Bovines. In addition to meeting the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section, bovines may be imported from Canada for immediate slaughter only under the following conditions:

(1) The bovines must have been born after March 1, 1999, the date determined by APHIS to be the date of effective enforcement of a ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban in Canada;

(2) Before the animal's arrival at the port of entry into the United States, each bovine imported into the United States from Canada must be officially identified with unique individual identification that is traceable to the premises of origin of the animal. No person may alter, deface, remove, or otherwise tamper with the official identification while the animal is in the United States or moving into or through the United States, except that the identification may be removed at slaughter; and

(3) The bovines must be accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with §93.405 that states, in addition to the statements required by §93.405, that the conditions of paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section have been met.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control numbers 0579-0234 and 0579-0393)

[78 FR 72996, Dec. 4, 2013]

§93.421   Special provisions.

(a) In-bond shipments from Canada. (1) Cattle, sheep, and goats from Canada transported in-bond through the United States for immediate export shall be inspected at the border port of entry and, when accompanied by an import permit obtained under §93.404 of this part and all conditions therein are observed, shall be allowed entry into the United States and shall be otherwise handled as provided in paragraph (b) of §93.401. Ruminants not accompanied by a permit shall meet the requirements of this part in the same manner as ruminants destined for importation into the United States, except that the Administrator may permit their inspection at some other point when he or she finds that such action will not increase the risk that communicable diseases of livestock and poultry will be disseminated to the livestock or poultry of the United States.

(2) In-transit shipments through Canada. Ruminants originating in the United States and transported directly through Canada may re-enter the United States without Canadian health or test certificates when accompanied by copies of the United States export health certificates properly issued and endorsed in accordance with regulations in part 91 of this chapter: Provided, That, to qualify for entry, the date, time, port of entry, and signature of the Canadian Port Veterinarian that inspected the ruminants for entry into Canada shall be recorded on the United States health certificate, or a document containing information shall be included with the certificate that accompanies the ruminants. In all cases it shall be determined by the veterinary inspector at the United States port of entry that the ruminants are the identical ruminants covered by said certificate.

(b) Exhibition ruminants. Ruminants from the United States which have been exhibited at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair at Toronto or other publicly recognized expositions in Canada, including racing, rodeo, circus, or stage exhibitions in Canada, and have not been in that region for more than 90 days are eligible for return to the United States without Canadian health or test certificates, if they are accompanied by copies of the United States health certificate, issued and endorsed in accordance with the export regulations contained in part 91 of this chapter for entry into Canada: Provided, That all ruminants offered for re-entry upon examination by the veterinary inspector at the U.S. port of entry, are found by the inspector to be free of communicable diseases and exposure thereto and are determined to be the identical ruminants covered by said certificates or are the natural increase of such ruminants born after official test dates certified on the dam's health certificate.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56018, Oct. 28, 1997; 81 FR 40151, June 21, 2016]

Central America and West Indies9

9Importations from regions of Central America and the West Indies shall be subject to §§93.422 and 93.423, in addition to other sections in this part, which are in terms applicable to such importations.

§93.422   Import permit and declaration for ruminants.

(a) For ruminants intended for importation from regions of Central America or of the West Indies, the importer shall first apply for and obtain from APHIS an import permit as provided in §93.404: Provided, That the Administrator, when he or she finds that such action may be taken without endangering the livestock or poultry industry of the United States, may, upon request by any person, authorize the importation by such person, without such application or permit, from the British Virgin Islands into the Virgin Islands of the United States, of ruminants consigned for immediate slaughter, and such authorization may be limited to a particular shipment or extend to all shipments under this paragraph by such person during a specified period of time. The importation of cattle from any area infested with cattle fever ticks is prohibited except as provided in paragraph (c) of §93.423.

(b) For all ruminants offered for importation from countries of Central America or of the West Indies, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of a declaration as provided in §93.407.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.423   Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

(a) Ruminants intended for importation from Central America and the West Indies, except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, must be accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with §93.405(a) stating that the animals have been in that region at least 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment to the United States; that he or she has inspected the ruminants on the premises of origin and found them free from evidence of any communicable disease; and that, as far as it has been possible to determine, the ruminants have not been exposed to any communicable disease during the preceding 60 days. If no such veterinary officer is available in the region of origin, ruminants, other than sheep and goats, may be accompanied by an affidavit of the owner or importer stating that such ruminants have been in the region from which they were directly shipped to the United States for a period of at least 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment therefrom, and that during such period no communicable disease has existed among them or among animals of their kind with which they have come in contact. Ruminants for which such affidavit is presented, unless imported for immediate slaughter, shall be quarantined at the port of entry at least seven days and during that time shall be subjected to such dipping, blood tests or other tests, as may be required by the Administrator to determine their freedom from communicable diseases. If imported for immediate slaughter, such animals shall be handled as provided in §93.420.

(b) The certificate accompanying sheep and goats intended for importation from Central America and the West Indies must, in addition to the statements required by paragraph (a) of this section, meet all of the requirements of §93.405.

(c) Cattle, which have been infested with or exposed to fever ticks, may be imported from the British Virgin Islands into the United States Virgin Islands, for immediate slaughter, only, if they are free from fever ticks at the time of such importation; if they are entered through one of the ports designated in §93.403(d) and are consigned to a recognized slaughtering establishment with facilities approved by the Administrator for holding the animals in isolation until slaughtered, which shall be within 14 days after the date of entry into the United States Virgin Islands; and if they are accompanied by a certificate of a responsible official of the government of the British Virgin Islands certifying that the cattle originated in and are being shipped directly from the British Virgin Islands, that they are free of fever ticks, and that, as far as it has been possible to determine, such cattle are free from evidence of communicable disease and have not been exposed to any such disease common to animals of their kind, other than bovine babesiosis, during the 60 days preceding their movement to the United States Virgin Islands.

(d) If ruminants are unaccompanied by the certificate or affidavit as required by paragraphs (a), (b), or (c) of this section, or if they are found upon inspection at the port of entry to be affected with a communicable disease or to have been exposed thereto, they shall be refused entry, except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section. Ruminants refused entry shall be handled or quarantined, or otherwise disposed of as the Administrator may direct.

(e) In addition to meeting all other applicable requirements of this part, bovines from Central America and the West Indies may be imported only in accordance with §93.436.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0040)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 61 FR 17239, Apr. 19, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003; 78 FR 72997, Dec. 4, 2013; 80 FR 10324, Feb. 26, 2015]

Mexico10

10Importations from Mexico shall be subject to §§93.424 to 93.429, inclusive, in addition to other sections in this part which are in terms applicable for such importations.

§93.424   Import permits and applications for inspection of ruminants.

(a) For ruminants intended for importation from Mexico, the importer shall first apply for and obtain from APHIS an import permit as provided in §93.404: Provided, That an import permit is not required for a ruminant offered for entry at a land border port designated in §93.403(c), if such animal is:

(1) A wether; or

(2) A sheep or goat imported for immediate slaughter.

(b) For ruminants intended for importation into the United States from Mexico, the importer or his or her agent shall deliver to the veterinary inspector at the port of entry an application, in writing, for inspection, so that the veterinary inspector and customs representatives may make mutually satisfactory arrangements for the orderly inspection of the animals. For all cattle, except those entering pursuant to the third proviso in §93.427(d), and except for steers, an official record of negative brucellosis test conducted on the herd of origin as required in §93.427(d) shall be presented to the veterinary inspector at the port of entry when application is made for inspection. The veterinary inspector at the port of entry will provide the importer or his or her agent with a written statement assigning a date when the animals may be presented for import inspection.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 60 FR 13898, 13900, Mar. 15, 1995. Redesignated and amended at 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 35534, June 16, 2003]

§93.425   Declaration for ruminants.

For all ruminants offered for importation from Mexico, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of a declaration as provided in §93.407.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.426   Inspection at port of entry.

(a) All ruminants offered for entry from Mexico, including such ruminants intended for movement through the United States in bond for immediate return to Mexico, shall be inspected at the port of entry, and all such ruminants found to be free from communicable disease and fever tick infestation, and not to have been exposed thereto, shall be admitted into the United States subject to the other applicable provisions of this part. Ruminants found to be affected with or to have been exposed to a communicable disease, or infested with fever ticks, shall be refused entry except as provided in §93.427(b)(2). Ruminants refused entry shall be handled or quarantined or otherwise disposed of as the Administrator may direct.

(b) Ruminants covered by paragraph (a) of this section shall be imported through ports, designated in §93.403, which are equipped with facilities necessary for proper chute inspection, dipping, and testing, as provided in this part.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 60 FR 13898, Mar. 15, 1995. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003]

§93.427   Cattle and other bovines from Mexico.

Link to an amendment published at 74 FR 5, Jan. 2, 2009.

Link to a correction published at 74 FR 22091, May 12, 2009.

(a) Cattle and other ruminants imported from Mexico, except animals being transported in bond for immediate return to Mexico or animals imported for immediate slaughter, may be detained at the port of entry, and there subjected to such disinfection, blood tests, other tests, and dipping as required in this part to determine their freedom from any communicable disease or infection of such disease. The importer shall be responsible for the care, feed, and handling of the animals during the period of detention.

(b)(1) Cattle from regions of Mexico that APHIS has determined to be free from fever ticks. APHIS has evaluated certain regions of Mexico in accordance with §92.2 of this chapter, and determined that they are free from fever ticks; a list of all such regions is found on the Internet http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wps/portal/aphis/ourfocus/importexport. Copies of the list are also available by contacting APHIS at the following address: Regionalization Evaluation Services, National Import Export Services, Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, MD 20737. Regions may be removed from the list based on a determination by APHIS that fever ticks exist in the region, on the discovery of tick-infested cattle from the region at a port of entry into the United States, or on information provided by a representative of the government of that region that fever ticks exist in the region. Cattle from regions of Mexico that APHIS has determined to be free from fever ticks may be imported into the United States subject to the following conditions:

(i) The cattle are accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with §93.405 that states that the cattle originate from a region of Mexico that APHIS has determined to be free from fever ticks.

(ii) If the cattle will transit to the United States through an area of Mexico that APHIS has not determined to be free from fever ticks, they are moved in a sealed means of conveyance, and that seal remains intact throughout such transit.

(iii) The cattle are presented for entry into the United States at a land border port of entry listed in §93.403(c).

(iv) The cattle are segregated at the U.S. port of entry from cattle from regions of Mexico that APHIS has not determined to be free from fever ticks.

(v) The importer, or his or her agent, executes and delivers to the inspector at the port of entry an application for inspection or supervised dipping. In this application, the importer, or his or her agent, waive all claims against the United States for any loss or damage to the cattle occasioned by or resulting from inspection or dipping or from the fact that the cattle are later found still to be tick infested, and for any loss or damage to any other cattle in the importer's possession or control that come in contact with the dipped cattle.

(vi) The cattle are either inspected by an APHIS inspector at the port of entry for evidence of tick infestation or are treated with a tickicidal dip that is listed in §72.13 of this chapter under the supervision of an inspector at the port of entry.

(vii) If any cattle are determined to be infested with fever ticks, the lot of cattle is refused entry and may only be imported into the United States subject to the requirements in paragraph (b)(2) of this section.

(2) Cattle from regions of Mexico that APHIS has not determined to be free from fever ticks. Cattle from regions of Mexico that APHIS has not determined to be free from fever ticks may only be imported into the United States subject to the following conditions:

(i) The cattle have been inspected by a veterinarian in Mexico and, in the determination of the veterinarian, are free from fever ticks and all evidence of communicable diseases, and have not been exposed to communicable diseases, other than bovine babesiosis, during the 60 days prior to movement to a port of entry into the United States.

(ii) The cattle have been treated in Mexico with a tickicidal dip that is listed in §72.13 of this chapter within 7 to 14 days before being offered for entry into the United States.

(iii) The cattle are accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with §93.405 that states that this inspection and dipping have occurred.

(iv) The cattle are presented for entry into the United States at the port of entry at Santa Teresa, NM, or a port of entry within Texas that is listed in §93.403(c).

(v) The importer, or his or her agent, executes and delivers to the inspector at the port of entry an application for inspection and supervised dipping. In this application, the importer, or his or her agent, agrees to waive all claims against the United States for any loss or damage to the cattle occasioned by or resulting from this dipping or from the fact that the cattle are later found to still be infested with ticks, and for any loss or damage to any other cattle in the importer's possession or control that come in contact with the dipped cattle.

(vi) When offered for entry, the cattle receive an inspection by an inspector. If free from fever ticks, the cattle are treated once with a tickicidal dip that is listed in §72.13 of this chapter 7 to 14 days after the dipping required in paragraph (b)(2)(ii) of this section. If found to be infested with fever ticks, the cattle are refused entry and may not be inspected again at a port of entry until they are again dipped and 7 to 14 days have elapsed.

(vii) The cattle are not imported into an area of Texas that is quarantined in accordance with §72.5 of this chapter for bovine babesiosis, or for tick infestation.

(c) Tuberculosis. (1) Each steer or spayed heifer imported into the United States from Mexico shall be identified with a distinct, permanent, and legible “M” mark applied with a freeze brand, hot iron, or other method prior to arrival at a port of entry, unless the steer or spayed heifer is imported for slaughter in accordance with §93.429. The “M” mark shall be between 3 inches (7.5 cm) and 5 inches (12.5 cm) high and wide, and shall be applied to each animal's right hip, within 4 inches (10 cm) of the midline of the tailhead (that is, the top of the brand should be within 4 inches (10 cm) of the midline of the tailhead, and placed above the hook and pin bones). The brand should also be within 18 inches (45.7 cm) of the anus.

(2) Cattle from a herd or herds in which one or more reactors to the tuberculin test have been disclosed shall not be eligible for importation until the herd to which the animals in the lot belong achieve accredited herd status as defined in §93.400, and provided that the animals offered for entry have met the other applicable requirements of this section.

(3) All sexually intact cattle accompanied by the certificate required by §93.405(a) will be detained at the port of entry under the supervision of the port veterinarian until tested for tuberculosis with negative results: Provided, That if any reactor is disclosed in any lot when so tested at the port of entry, the entire lot will be refused entry and the entire lot or any portion of it will not be eligible for importation until the herd to which the animals in the lot belong achieve accredited herd status as defined in §93.400, and provided that the animals offered for entry have met the other applicable requirements of this section.

(4) The importation of Holstein steers, Holstein spayed heifers, Holstein cross steers, and Holstein cross spayed heifers from Mexico is prohibited.

(d) Brucellosis. All cattle offered for importation into the United States from Mexico shall be individually identified with a numbered, blue metal eartag issued by the Mexican Ministry of Agriculture and Water Resources (SARH); and except in the case of steers, shall be eligible for entry into the United States only if, in addition to complying with other applicable provisions of this part, they:

(1) Are accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with §93.405(a) stating:

(i) That such cattle originated in a herd in which all cattle (except calves under 6 months of age and steers) were tested for brucellosis not less than 30 days nor more than 90 days prior to the date of certification and were found to be negative;

(ii) The date and place such herd was tested; and

(iii) That the cattle in the herd have been isolated from all other cattle from the time the herd was tested negative for brucellosis to the date of the offer of the cattle for entry into the United States; and

(2) Except for calves under 6 months of age, are subjected to an additional test for brucellosis at the port of entry and found negative to such test: Provided, That if any reactor is disclosed in any lot when so tested at the port of entry, the entire lot shall be refused entry and the entire lot or any portion thereof may not be reoffered for entry until retested and recertified in accordance with paragraphs (d)(1) and (2) of this section or any cattle found to be negative to such test and any calves under 6 months of age in such lot may enter if consigned and moved under U.S. Department of Agriculture seal and without diversion to recognized slaughtering establishment as defined in §78.1 of this chapter for immediate slaughter, or if consigned and moved under U.S. Department of Agriculture seal and without diversion to a quarantined feedlot, as defined in §78.1 of this chapter and thereafter handled in accordance with the provisions of §78.12 of this chapter: Provided, further, That if any suspect but no reactor is disclosed in any lot when so tested at the port of entry, any cattle found to be negative to such test and any calves under 6 months of age in such lot may enter without further restriction under this paragraph (d): And provided further, That any cattle other than cattle which are classified as a reactor or suspect to a test for brucellosis may enter the United States from Mexico without the certificate or any test otherwise required by this paragraph, if they are individually identified with a numbered, blue metal eartag issued by the Mexican Ministry of Agriculture and Water Resources (SARH) and are consigned and moved to a slaughtering establishment for immediate slaughter, or to a quarantined feedlot, in accordance with the first proviso in this paragraph and otherwise comply with the applicable provisions of this part.

(e) BSE. In addition to meeting the requirements of paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section and all other applicable requirements of this part, bovines may be imported from Mexico only under the following conditions:

(1) The bovines were born after November 30, 2007, the date determined by APHIS to be the date of effective enforcement of a ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban in Mexico.

(2) The bovines were officially identified prior to arriving at the port of entry in the United States with unique individual identification that is traceable to each bovine's premises of origin. No person may alter, deface, remove, or otherwise tamper with the official identification while the animal is in the United States or moving into or through the United States, except that the identification may be removed at slaughter.

(3) The bovines, if sexually intact, are permanently and humanely identified using one of the following additional methods:

(i) An “M” mark properly applied with a freeze brand, hot iron, or other method, and easily visible on the live animal and on the carcass before skinning. Such a mark must be between 3 inches (7.5 cm) and 5 inches (12.5 cm) high and wide, and must be applied to the upper right front shoulder of each animal; or

(ii) A tattoo with the letters “MX” applied to the inside of one ear of the animal; or

(iii) Other means of permanent identification upon request if deemed adequate by the Administrator to humanely identify the animal in a distinct and legible way as having been imported from Mexico.

(4) The bovines are accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with §93.405 that states, in addition to the statements required by §93.405, that the conditions of paragraphs (e)(1) through (e)(3) of this section have been met.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control numbers 0579-0040, 0579-0224, 0579-0393, and 0579-0425)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 57 FR 2010, Jan. 17, 1992; 57 FR 28080, 28081, June 24, 1992; 58 FR 68509, Dec. 28, 1993; 59 FR 24886, May 13, 1994; 59 FR 65897, Dec. 22, 1994; 60 FR 13898, Mar. 15, 1995; 61 FR 17239, Apr. 19, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997; 62 FR 64266, Dec. 5, 1997; 66 FR 20190, Apr. 20, 2001; 69 FR 9750, Mar. 2, 2004; 74 FR 5, Jan. 2, 2009; 78 FR 72997, Dec. 4, 2013; 80 FR 10324, Feb. 26, 2015; 83 FR 64225, Dec. 14, 2018]

Effective Date Note: At 74 FR 5, Jan. 2, 2009, as corrected at 74 FR 22091, May 12, 2009, §93.427 was amended by revising paragraph (b)(2) introductory text, effective date delayed indefinitely. For the convenience of the user, the revised text is set forth as follows:

§93.427   Cattle from Mexico.

*   *   *   *   *

(b) *  *  *

(2) Cattle that have been exposed to splenetic, southern, or tick fever, or that have been infested with or exposed to fever ticks, may be imported from Mexico for admission into the United States, except into areas of Texas quarantined because of said disease or tick infestation as specified in §72.5 of this chapter, at one of the land border ports in Texas listed in §93.403(c), the port of Santa Teresa, NM, or the port of San Luis, AZ, provided that the following conditions are strictly observed and complied with:

*   *   *   *   *

§93.428   Sheep and goats and wild ruminants from Mexico.

(a) Sheep and goats intended for importation from Mexico shall be accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with §93.405 and stating, if such sheep and goats are shipped by rail or truck, that such animals were loaded into cleaned and disinfected cars or trucks for transportation direct to the port of entry. Notwithstanding such certificate, such sheep and goats shall be detained as provided in §93.427(a) and shall be dipped at least once in a permitted scabies dip under supervision of an inspector.

(b) The certificate accompanying goats offered for importation from Mexico shall, in addition to the statements required by paragraph (a) of this section, state that such goats have been tested for tuberculosis and brucellosis with negative results within 30 days preceding their being offered for entry, and give the date and method of testing, the name of the consignor and of the consignee, and a description of the animals including breed, ages, markings, and tattoo and eartag numbers. Notwithstanding such certification, such goats shall be detained or quarantined as provided in §93.427 and retested for brucellosis.

(c) If sheep or goats are unaccompanied by the certificate as required by paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, or if they are found upon inspection or retesting, as provided for in this part, to be affected with a communicable disease or to have been exposed thereto, they shall be refused entry and shall be handled or quarantined, or otherwise disposed of as the Administrator may direct.

(d) Certificates will not be required for wild ruminants, other than sheep and goats, originating in and shipped direct from Mexico, but such animals are subject to inspection at the port of entry as provided in §93.426.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0040)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 56 FR 367, Jan. 4, 1991; 57 FR 28081, June 24, 1992; 61 FR 17239, Apr. 19, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003]

§93.429   Ruminants for immediate slaughter.

Ruminants, other than sheep and goats, may be imported from Mexico, subject to the applicable provisions of §§93.424, 93.425, 93.426, and 93.427(b)(2) for immediate slaughter if accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with §93.405(a) and stating that the veterinarian who issued the certificate has inspected the animals in the herd from which the ruminants will be imported and found them free of evidence of communicable disease, and that, so far as it has been possible to determine, they have not been exposed to any such disease common to animals of their kind during the preceding 60 days, and if the ruminants are shipped by rail or truck, the certificate shall further specify that the ruminants were loaded into cleaned and disinfected cars or trucks for transportation directly to the port of entry. Such ruminants shall be moved from the port of entry in conveyances sealed with seals of the United States Government. Sheep and goats from any part of Mexico may be imported only in compliance with other applicable sections in this part.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 57 FR 28081, June 24, 1992; 61 FR 17239, Apr. 19, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997]

Additional General Provisions

§§93.430-93.431   [Reserved]

§93.432   Cattle and other bovines from the Republic of Ireland.

(a) All cattle to be imported from the Republic of Ireland shall be accompanied by a certificate issued or endorsed by a salaried veterinarian of the Republic of Ireland showing that the cattle originated from a herd which is officially certified by the Republic of Ireland as a brucellosis qualified for export herd and that the cattle meet the requirements in §93.432(c).

(b) A brucellosis qualified for export herd is a herd in which all of the cattle have been maintained as a herd unit for at least two years prior to importation and all of the test eligible cattle in the herd (i.e., cattle over 6 months of age, except steers and spayed heifers) have been tested annually for brucellosis and found negative in accordance with Republic of Ireland requirements for at least two years prior to importation. The most recent negative herd test must have been conducted within 12 months of the date of importation. In addition:

(1) Such herd unit may include cattle which were born and raised within such herd unit during the two year period, or cattle which were moved directly to the herd from another herd unit of like status; or

(2) Such herd unit may include other cattle (except brucellosis reactors, suspects and animals listed in §93.432(c)(1)) if:

(i) Such other cattle have been tested for brucellosis and found negative within 30 days prior to entry into the herd unit and all eligible cattle in the herd unit have been tested for brucellosis and found negative not less than 90 days following the date when the last of the other cattle had been added to the herd unit; or

(ii) All eligible cattle in the herd unit have been tested negative for brucellosis no less than 180 days nor more than 12 months (365 days) following the date when the last of the other cattle had been added to the herd unit.

(c) The certificate accompanying cattle offered for importation from the Republic of Ireland shall show that the cattle are from a brucellosis qualified for export herd and that they meet the following requirements:

(1) The cattle to be exported were not born to or nursed by brucellosis reactors and they were not born in a herd at the time the herd was under quarantine due to brucella infection.

(2) The cattle were placed in an isolation facility approved by a full-time, salaried, Government of Ireland veterinary official, on separate premises a minimum of 500 yards from other livestock not destined for export to the United States for at least 60 days prior to export.

(3) The cattle were negative to the following tests conducted not less than 60 nor more than 120 days from the date of export and a second set of tests conducted within 30 days of the date of export;

(i) Plate or Tube agglutination test conducted in dilutions to detect reactions at 30, 60, 120, and 240 International Units per milliliter (IU/ml);

(ii) Brucellosis card test (Rose Bengal test);

(iii) Complement Fixation (CF) test conducted in dilutions to detect prozone reactions, when present.

(4) Cattle are eligible for entry only if classified as negative at 30 IU to the Plate or Tube agglutination test, negative to the brucellosis card test and negative to the CF test as performed and interpreted by standard methods at the Republic of Ireland Brucellosis Diagnostic Laboratory. Any animal exhibiting a prozone serological reaction is ineligible for export to the United States.

(5) Cattle showing a serological titer more than 60 IU to the Plate or Tube agglutination test, or a reaction to the Brucellosis card test (Rose Bengal) or CF test that would be interpreted to be an infected animal (reactor) under the Republic of Ireland brucellosis control program. Animals from that herd of origin and all other cattle having the opportunity for contact with the reactor animal shall not be eligible for export to the United States. Brucellosis bacteriologically positive animals, if known, regardless of serologic reactions, are not eligible for importation nor are any animals in contact with such animals.

(6) The cattle were moved directly to the port of export from the isolation facility without contact with any other cattle which are not qualified for export to the United States.

(d) The certificate accompanying the cattle offered for importation must also show the dates and places of testing, names of the consignor and consignee, and descriptions of the cattle, including breed, ages, markings, and tattoo and eartag numbers.

(e) In addition to meeting all other applicable requirements of this part, bovines from the Republic of Ireland may be imported only in accordance with §93.436.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997; 78 FR 72997, Dec. 4, 2013]

§§93.433-93.434   [Reserved]

§93.435   Sheep and goats.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, all sheep and goats imported into the United States must be placed in a flock or herd in the United States that participates in the Voluntary Scrapie Flock Certification Program (see 9 CFR part 54, subpart B) and:

(1) The flock or herd qualifies as a “Certified” flock or herd; or

(2) The flock or herd owner has agreed, in writing, to maintain the flock or herd in compliance with all requirements of the Voluntary Scrapie Flock Certification Program until the flock or herd qualifies as a “Certified” flock or herd.

(b) The following sheep and goats are not subject to paragraph (a) of this section:

(1) Goats intended for importation from Australia, Canada, or New Zealand;

(2) Goats intended for importation from any region other than Australia, Canada, or New Zealand, provided that such goats have not had any contact with sheep during the 5 years immediately prior to shipment, in accordance with §93.405(b)(2)(ii);

(3) Sheep intended for importation from Australia, Canada, or New Zealand, provided that none of the female sheep in the flock from which the sheep will be imported has been impregnated, during the 5 years immediately preceding shipment of the sheep to the United States, with germ plasm from a region other than Australia, Canada, New Zealand, or the United States, in accordance with §93.405(c)(3);

(4) Wethers;

(5) Sheep or goats imported for immediate slaughter; and

(6) Wild sheep or goats imported for exhibition purposes to an approved zoological park in accordance with §93.404(c).

(c) Sheep or goats may be imported under paragraph (a) of this section only if the importer provides the Voluntary Scrapie Flock Certification Program identification number of the receiving flock or herd as part of the application for an import permit.

(d) Sheep and goats may be imported under paragraph (a)(1) of this section only if they come from a flock or herd in the region of origin that participates in a program determined by the Administrator to be equivalent to the Voluntary Scrapie Flock Certification Program, and the flock or herd has been determined by the Administrator to be at a level equivalent to “Certified” in the Voluntary Scrapie Flock Certification Program.

(e) Sheep and goats may be imported under paragraph (a)(2) of this section only if they are placed in a Certifiable Class C flock or herd participating in the Voluntary Scrapie Flock Certification Program; except, that if the sheep and goats come from a flock or herd in the region of origin that participates in a program determined by the Administrator to be equivalent to the Voluntary Scrapie Flock Certification Program, then the sheep and goats may be placed in a herd or flock in the United States which would be classified at a level equivalent to or lower (i.e., at a greater risk) than the certification level, as determined by the Administrator, of the flock or herd from which the sheep or goats are to be imported.

(f) Sheep and goats imported under paragraph (a)(2) of this section must be monitored for scrapie disease until the flock or herd qualifies as a “Certified” flock or herd.

(g) Except for imported sheep and goats placed in Certifiable Class C flocks or herds, the certificate accompanying sheep or goats imported under paragraph (a) of this section must contain the following statement: “The animals identified on this certificate have been monitored by a salaried veterinary officer of [name of country of origin], for [number of months], in the same source flock or herd which had been determined by the Administrator, APHIS, prior to the exportation of these animals to the United States, to be equivalent to [certification level] of the Voluntary Scrapie Flock Certification Program authorized under 9 CFR part 54, subpart B.”

(1) The Administrator will determine, based upon information supplied by the importer, whether the flock or herd from which the animals are to be imported participates in a program in the country of origin that is equivalent to the Voluntary Scrapie Flock Certification Program, and if so, at what level the source flock or herd should be classified.

(2) In order for the Administrator to make a determination, the importer must supply the following information with the application for an import permit no less than 1 month prior to the anticipated date of importation:

(i) The name, title, and address of a knowledgeable official in the veterinary services of the region of origin;

(ii) The details of scrapie control programs in the region of origin, including information on disease surveillance and border control activities and the length of time such activities have been in effect;

(iii) Any available information concerning additions, within the 5 years immediately preceding shipment to the United States, to the flock or herd from which the sheep and goats will be imported;

(iv) Any available data concerning disease incidence, within the 5 years immediately preceding shipment to the United States, in the flock or herd from which the sheep or goats are to be imported, including, but not limited to, the results of diagnostic tests, especially histopathology tests, conducted on any animals in the flock or herd;

(v) Information concerning the health, within the 5 years immediately preceding shipment to the United States, of other ruminants, flocks, and herds with which the imported sheep and goats, and with which animals in the sheep or goats' flock or herd might have had physical contact, and a description of the type and frequency of such physical contact; and

(vi) Any other information requested by the Administrator in specific cases as needed to make a determination.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control numbers 0579-0040 and 0579-0101)

[61 FR 17240, Apr. 19, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.436   Bovines from regions of negligible risk, controlled risk, and undetermined risk for BSE.

The importation of bovines is prohibited, unless the conditions of this section and any other applicable conditions of this part are met. Once the bovines are imported, if they do not meet the conditions of this section, they must be disposed of as the Administrator may direct.

(a) Bovines from a region of negligible risk for BSE in which there has been no indigenous case of BSE. Bovines from a region of negligible risk for BSE, as defined in §92.1 of this subchapter, in which there has been no indigenous case of BSE, may be imported only if the bovines are accompanied by an original certificate issued by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the exporting region, or issued by a veterinarian designated or accredited by the national government of the exporting region and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the exporting region, representing that the veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so, and the certificate attests that the exporting region of the bovines is classified by APHIS as a negligible-risk region for BSE in which there has been no indigenous case of BSE.

(b) Bovines from a region of negligible risk for BSE in which there has been an indigenous case of BSE and bovines from a region of controlled risk for BSE. Bovines from a region of negligible risk for BSE, as defined in §92.1 of this subchapter, in which there has been an indigenous case of BSE, and bovines from a region of controlled risk for BSE, as defined in §92.1 of this subchapter, may be imported only under the following conditions:

(1) Prior to importation into the United States, each bovine is officially identified with unique individual identification that is traceable to the premises of origin of the animal. No person may alter, deface, remove, or otherwise tamper with the official identification while the animal is in the United States or moving into or through the United States, except that the identification may be removed at slaughter.

(2) The bovines are permanently and humanely identified before arrival at the port of entry with a distinct and legible mark identifying the exporting country. Acceptable means of permanent identification include the following:

(i) A mark properly applied with a freeze brand, hot iron, or other method, and easily visible on the live animal and on the carcass before skinning. Such a mark must be not less than 2 inches nor more than 3 inches high, and must be applied to each animal's right hip, high on the tail-head (over the junction of the sacral and first coccygeal vertebrae);

(ii) A tattoo with letters identifying the exporting country must be applied to the inside of one ear of the animal; or

(iii) Other means of permanent identification upon request if deemed adequate by the Administrator to humanely identify the animal in a distinct and legible way as having been imported from a region of negligible risk for BSE in which there has been an indigenous case of BSE or from a region of controlled risk for BSE.

(3) The bovines were born after the date from which the ban on the feeding of ruminants meat-and-bone meal or greaves derived from ruminants has been effectively enforced.

(4) The bovines are accompanied by an original certificate issued by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the exporting region, or issued by a veterinarian designated or accredited by the national government of the exporting region and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the exporting region, representing that the veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so, and the certificate attests to the BSE risk classification of the exporting region and that the conditions of paragraphs (b)(1) through (b)(3) of this section have been met.

(5) If there has been an indigenous case of BSE in the exporting region, the following restrictions apply:

(i) Bovines that, during their first year of life, were reared with a bovine determined to be infected with BSE during its first year of life, and that an investigation showed consumed the same potentially contaminated feed as the infected animal during that period are not eligible for importation into the United States; and

(ii) If the investigation was unable to determine whether the feed source that was used to feed the bovine known to be infected was also used to feed other bovines in the herd of the infected animal, all bovines born in the same herd as a BSE-infected bovine either within 12 months before or 12 months after the birth of the infected animal are not eligible for importation into the United States.

(c) Bovines from a region of undetermined risk for BSE. Importation of bovines from a region of undetermined risk for BSE, as defined in §92.1 of this subchapter, is prohibited; Except that: The Administrator may allow such imports on a case-by-case basis if the live bovines are imported for specific uses, including, but not limited to, show or exhibition, and under conditions determined by the Administrator to be adequate to prevent the spread of BSE.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0234)

[78 FR 72997, Dec. 4, 2013]

Subpart E—Swine

§93.500   Definitions.

Wherever in this subpart the following terms are used, unless the context otherwise requires, they shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

Accredited veterinarian. A veterinarian approved by the Administrator in accordance with the provisions of part 161 of this title to perform functions specified in parts 1, 2, 3, and 11 of subchapter A, and subchapters B, C, and D of this chapter, and to perform functions required by cooperative state-federal disease control and eradication programs.

Administrator. The Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service or any other employee of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, to whom authority has been or may be delegated to act in the Administrator's stead.

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (APHIS or Service).

Animals. Cattle, sheep, goats, other ruminants, swine, horses, asses, mules, zebras, dogs, and poultry.

APHIS representative. A veterinarian or other individual employed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, who is authorized to perform the services required by this part.

Communicable disease. Any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease of domestic livestock, poultry or other animals.

Department. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Immediate slaughter. Consignment directly from the port of entry to a recognized slaughtering establishment1 and slaughter thereat within two weeksfrom the date of entry.

1The name of recognized slaughtering establishments approved under this part may be obtained from the Area Veterinarian in Charge, Veterinary Services, for the State of destination of the shipment.

Inspector. An employee of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service authorized to perform duties required under this subpart.

Official identification device or method. A means of officially identifying an animal or group of animals using devices or methods approved by the Administrator, including, but not limited to, official tags, tattoos, and registered brands when accompanied by a certificate of inspection from a recognized brand inspection authority.

Port veterinarian. A veterinarian employed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to perform duties required under this part at a port of entry.

Recognized slaughtering establishment.2 An establishment where slaughtering operations are regularly carried on under federal or state inspection and which has been approved by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to receive animals for slaughter under this part.

2The name of recognized slaughtering establishments approved under this part may be obtained from the Area Veterinarian in Charge, Veterinary Services, for the State of destination of the shipment.

Region. Any defined geographic land area identifiable by geological, political, or surveyed boundaries. A region may consist of any of the following:

(1) A national entity (country);

(2) Part of a national entity (zone, county, department, municipality, parish, Province, State, etc.);

(3) Parts of several national entities combined into an area; or

(4) A group of national entities (countries) combined into a single area.

Ruminants. All animals which chew the cud, such as cattle, buffaloes, sheep, goats, deer, antelopes, camels, llamas and giraffes.

Swine. The domestic hog and all varieties of wild hogs.

United States. All of the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands of the United States, and all other Territories and Possessions of the United States.

Veterinary Services. The Veterinary Services unit of the Department.

Zoological park. A professionally operated zoo, park, garden or other place, maintained under the constant surveillance of a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, for the exhibition of live animals, pigeons or birds, for the purpose of public recreation or education.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56020, Oct. 28, 1997; 69 FR 64651, Nov. 8, 2004; 71 FR 29070, May 19, 2006; 72 FR 67232, Nov. 28, 2007; 76 FR 70039, Nov. 10, 2011; 77 FR 1391, Jan. 10, 2012]

§93.501   General prohibitions; exceptions.

(a) No swine or product subject to the provisions of this part shall be brought into the United States except in accordance with the regulations in this part and part 94 of this subchapter;3 nor shall any such swine or product be handled or moved after physical entry into the United States before final release from quarantine or any other form of governmental detention except in compliance with such regulations; Provided, That, the Administrator may upon request in specific cases permit swine or products to be brought into or through the United States under such conditions as he or she may prescribe, when he or she determines in the specific case that such action will not endanger the livestock or poultry of the United States.

3Importations of certain animals from various countries are absolutely prohibited under part 94 because of specified diseases.

(b) Except for swine prohibited entry, the provisions in this part 93 relating to swine shall not apply to healthy swine in transit through the United States if they are not known to be infected with or exposed, within 60 days preceding the date of export from the region of origin, to communicable diseases of such swine, if an import permit4 has been obtained under §93.504 of this Chapter and all conditions therein are observed; and if such swine are handled as follows:

4Such permit may be obtained from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231. Requests for approval of such facilities should also be made to the Administrator.

(1)(i) They are maintained under continuous confinement in transit through the United States aboard an aircraft, ocean vessel, or other means of conveyance; or

(ii) They are unloaded, in the course of such transit, into a swine holding facility which is provided by the carrier or its agent and has been approved5 in advance by the Administrator in accordance with paragraph (d)(3) of this section as adequate to prevent the spread within the United States of any livestock or poultry disease, and they are maintained there under continuous confinement until loaded aboard a means of conveyance for transportation from the United States and are maintained under continuous confinement aboard such means of conveyance until it leaves the United States; the import permit will specify any additional conditions necessary to assure that the transit of the swine through the United States can be made without endangering the livestock or poultry of the United States, and that Department inspectors may inspect the swine on board such means of conveyance or in such holding facility to ascertain whether the requirements of this paragraph are met, and dispose of them in accordance with the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.) if such conditions are not met; and

5See footnote 4 to subpart E.

(2) The carrier or its agent executes and furnishes to the collector of Customs at the first port of arrival a declaration stating that the swine will be retained aboard such means of conveyance or in an approved holding facility during transshipment as required by this paragraph.

(3) Provisions for the approval of facilities required in this paragraph are:

(i) They must be sufficiently isolated to prevent direct or indirect contact with all other animals and birds while in the United States.

(ii) They must be so constructed that they provide adequate protection against environmental conditions and can be adequately cleaned, washed and disinfected.

(iii) They must provide for disposal of swine carcasses, manure, bedding, waste and any related shipping materials in a manner that will prevent dissemination of disease.

(iv) They must have provisions for adequate sources of feed and water and for attendants for the care and feeding of swine in the facility.

(v) They must comply with additional requirements as may be imposed by the Administrator if deemed applicable for a particular shipment.

(vi) They must also comply with all applicable local, State and Federal requirements for environmental quality and with the provisions of the Animal Welfare Regulations in chapter I of this title, as applicable.

(c) Removal and loss of official identification devices. Official identification devices are intended to provide permanent identification of livestock and to ensure the ability to find the source of animal disease outbreaks. Removal of these devices is prohibited except at the time of slaughter. If an official identification device is lost and it is necessary to retag an animal with a new official number, every effort should be made to correlate the new official number with the previous official number of the animal.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 59 FR 67615, Dec. 30, 1994. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56020, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003; 69 FR 64651, Nov. 8, 2004]

§93.502   Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon; unloading, cleaning, and disinfection requirements.

(a) Inspection: All aircraft and other means of conveyance (including shipping containers thereon) moving into the United States from any foreign region are subject to inspection without a warrant by properly identified and designated inspectors to determine whether they are carrying any animal, carcass, product or article regulated or subject to disposal under any law or regulation administered by the Secretary of Agriculture for prevention of the introduction or dissemination of any communicable animal disease.

(b) Unloading requirements: Whenever in the course of any such inspection at any port in the United States the inspector has reason to believe that the means of conveyance or container is contaminated with material of animal (including poultry) origin, such as, but not limited to, meat, organs, glands, extracts, secretions, fat, bones, blood, lymph, urine, or manure, so as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, the inspector may require the unloading of the means of conveyance and the emptying of the container if he or she deems it necessary to enable him or her to determine whether the means of conveyance or container is in fact so contaminated. The principal operator of the means of conveyance and his or her agent in charge of the means of conveyance shall comply with any such requirement under the immediate supervision of, and in the time and manner prescribed by, the inspector.

(c) Cleaning and disinfection: Whenever, upon inspection under this section, an inspector determines that a means of conveyance or shipping container is contaminated with material of animal origin so as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, he or she shall notify the principal operator of the means of conveyance or his or her agent in charge, of such determination and the requirements under this section. The person so notified shall cause the cleaning and disinfection of such means of conveyance and container under the immediate supervision of, and in the time and manner prescribed by, the inspector.

(d) For purposes of this section, the term “shipping container” means any container of a type specially adapted for use in transporting any article on the means of conveyance involved.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56020, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003]

§93.503   Ports designated for the importation of swine.

(a) Air and ocean ports. The following ports have APHIS inspection and quarantine facilities necessary for quarantine stations and all swine shall be entered into the United States through these stations, except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of this section: Los Angeles, California; Miami, Florida; and Newburgh, New York.

(b) Canadian border ports. The following land border ports are designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of swine from Canada: Eastport, Idaho; Houlton and Jackman, Maine; Detroit, Port Huron, and Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan; Baudette, Minnesota; Opheim, Raymond, and Sweetgrass, Montana; Alexandria Bay, Buffalo, and Champlain, New York; Dunseith, Pembina, and Portal, North Dakota; Derby Line and Highgate Springs, Vermont; Oroville and Sumas, Washington.

(c) Mexican border ports. The following land border ports are designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of swine from Mexico: Brownsville, Hidalgo, Laredo, Eagle Pass, Del Rio, Presidio, and El Paso, Texas; Douglas, Naco, Nogales, Sasabe, and San Luis, Arizona; Calexico and San Ysidro, California; and Antelope Wells, and Columbus, New Mexico.

(d) Special ports. Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, and Christiansted, St. Croix, in the United States Virgin Islands, are hereby designated as quarantine stations for the entry of swine from the British Virgin Islands into the United States Virgin Islands for immediate slaughter.

(e) Limited ports. The following ports are designated as having inspection facilities for the entry of swine and swine products such as swine test specimens which do not appear to require restraint and holding inspection facilities: Anchorage and Fairbanks, Alaska; San Diego, California; Jacksonville, St. Petersburg-Clearwater, and Tampa, Florida; Atlanta, Georgia; Honolulu, Hawaii; Chicago, Illinois; New Orleans, Louisiana; Portland, Maine; Baltimore, Maryland; Boston, Massachusetts; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Great Falls, Montana; Portland, Oregon; San Juan, Puerto Rico; Memphis, Tennessee (no live animals); Galveston and Houston, Texas; and Seattle, Spokane, and Tacoma, Washington.

(f) Designation of other ports. The Secretary of the Treasury has approved the designation as quarantine stations of the ports specified in this section. In special cases other ports may be designated as quarantine stations under this section by the Administrator, with the concurrence of the Secretary of the Treasury.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 58 FR 38283, July 16, 1993; 60 FR 16045, Mar. 29, 1995; 60 FR 25120, May 11, 1995. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997, as amended at 64 FR 23179, Apr. 30, 1999; 65 FR 38178, June 20, 2000; 67 FR 68022, Nov. 8, 2002]

§93.504   Import permits for swine and for swine specimens for diagnostic purposes; and reservation fees for space at quarantine facilities maintained by APHIS.

(a) Application for permit; reservation required. (1) For swine and swine test specimens for diagnostic screening purposes, intended for importation from any part of the world, except as otherwise provided for in §§93.516 and 93.520, the importer shall first apply for and obtain from APHIS an import permit. The application shall specify the name and address of the importer; the species, breed, number or quantity of swine or swine test specimens to be imported; the purpose of the importation; individual swine identification which includes a description of the swine, name, age, markings, if any, registration number, if any, and tattoo or eartag; the region of origin; the name and address of the exporter; the port of embarkation in the foreign region; the mode of transportation, route of travel, and the port of entry in the United States; the proposed date of arrival of the swine or swine test specimens to be imported; and the name of the person to whom the swine or swine test specimens will be delivered and the location of the place in the United States to which delivery will be made from the port of entry. Additional information may be required in the form of certificates concerning specific diseases to which the swine are susceptible, as well as vaccinations or other precautionary treatments to which the swine or swine test specimens have been subjected. Notice of any such requirements will be given to the applicant in each case.

(2) An application for permit to import will be denied for domestic swine from any region designated in §94.1 of this chapter as a region where foot-and-mouth disease exists.

(3) An application for permit to import swine may also be denied because of: Communicable disease conditions in the area or region of origin, or in a region where the shipment has been or will be held or through which the shipment has been or will be transported; deficiencies in the regulatory programs for the control or eradication of animal diseases and the unavailability of veterinary services in the above mentioned regions; the importer's failure to provide satisfactory evidence concerning the origin, history, and health status of the swine; the lack of satisfactory information necessary to determine that the importation will not be likely to transmit any communicable disease to livestock or poultry of the United States; or any other circumstances which the Administrator believes require such denial to prevent the dissemination of any communicable disease of livestock or poultry into the United States.

(4)(i) The importer or importer's agent shall pay or ensure payment of a reservation fee for each lot of swine to be quarantined in a facility maintained by USDA. For swine the reservation fee shall be 100 percent of the cost of providing care, feed, and handling during quarantine, as estimated by the quarantine facility's veterinarian in charge.

(ii) At the time the importer or the importer's agent requests a reservation of quarantine space, the importer or importer's agent shall pay the reservation fee by check or U.S. money order or ensure payment of the reservation fee by an irrevocable letter of credit from a commercial bank (the effective date on such letter of credit shall run to 30 days after the date the swine are scheduled to be released from quarantine); except that anyone who issues a check to the Department for a reservation fee which is returned because of insufficient funds shall be denied any further request for reservation of a quarantine space until the outstanding amount is paid.

(iii) Any reservation fee paid by check or U.S. money order shall be applied against the expenses incurred for services received by the importer or importer's agent in connection with the quarantine for which the reservation was made. Any part of the reservation fee which remains unused after being applied against the expenses incurred for services received by the importer or the importer's agent in connection with the quarantine for which the reservation was made, shall be returned to the individual who paid the reservation fee. If the reservation fee is ensured by a letter of credit, the Department will draw against the letter of credit unless payment for services received by the importer or importer's agent in connection with the quarantine is otherwise made at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(iv) Any reservation fee shall be forfeited if the importer or the importer's agent fails to present for entry, within 24 hours following the designated time of arrival the lot of swine for which the reservation was made: Except that a reservation fee shall not be forfeited if:

(A) Written notice of cancellation from the importer or the importer's agent is received by the office of the veterinarian in charge of the quarantine facility6 during regular business hours (8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays) no later than 15 days prior to the beginning of the time of importation as specified in the import permit or as arranged with the veterinarian in charge of the quarantine facility if no import permit is required (the 15 day period shall not include Saturdays, Sundays, or holidays), or

6The addresses of USDA quarantine facilities may be found in telephone directories listing the facilities or by contacting the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231.

(B) The Administrator determines that services, other than provided by carriers, necessary for the importation of the swine within the requested period are unavailable because of unforeseen circumstances as determined by the Administrator, (such as the closing of an airport due to inclement weather or the unavailability of the reserved space due to the extension of another quarantined.)

(v) If the reservation fee was ensured by a letter of credit and the fee is to be forfeited under paragraph (a)(4)(iv) of this section, the Department will draw against the letter of credit unless the reservation fee is otherwise paid at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(vi) When a reservation is cancelled in accordance with paragraph (a)(4)(iv)(A) of this section and the provisions of paragraph (a)(4)(iv)(B) of this section do not apply, a $40.00 cancellation fee shall be charged. If a reservation fee was paid, the cancellation fee shall be deducted from any reservation fee returned to the importer or the importer's agent. If the reservation fee was ensured by a letter of credit, the Department will draw the amount of the cancellation fee against the letter of credit unless the cancellation fee is otherwise paid at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(b) Permit. When a permit is issued, the original and two copies will be sent to the importer. It shall be the responsibility of the importer to forward the original permit and one copy to the shipper in the region of origin, and it shall also be the responsibility of the importer to insure that the shipper presents the copy of the permit to the carrier and makes proper arrangements for the original permit to accompany the shipment to the specified U.S. port of entry for presentation to the collector of customs. Swine and swine test specimens for diagnostic screening purposes for swine intended for importation into the United States for which a permit has been issued, will be received at the specified port of entry within the time prescribed in the permit which shall not exceed 14 days from the first day that the permit is effective for all permits. Swine and swine test specimens for which a permit is required by these regulations will not be eligible for entry if a permit has not been issued; if unaccompanied by such a permit; if shipment is from any port other than the one designated in the permit; if arrival in the United States is at any port other than the one designated in the permit; if the swine or swine test specimens offered for entry differ from those described in the permit; if the swine or swine test specimens are not handled as outlined in the application for the permit and as specified in the permit issued; or if ruminants or swine other than those covered by import permits are aboard the transporting carrier.

(c) Wild swine from regions where foot-and-mouth disease exists. This paragraph (c) applies to the importation of wild swine from countries designated in part 94 of this subchapter as regions in which foot-and-mouth disease exists.

(1) Permits for the importation of wild swine will be issued only for importations through the Port of New York, and only if the animals are imported for exhibition in a PEQ Zoo. A PEQ Zoo is a zoological park or other place maintained for the exhibition of live animals for recreational or educational purposes that:

(i) Has been approved by the Administrator in accordance with paragraph (c)(2) of this section to receive and maintain imported wild swine; and

(ii) Has entered into the agreement with APHIS set forth in paragraph (c)(4) of this section for the maintenance and handling of imported wild swine.

(2) Approval of a PEQ Zoo shall be on the basis of an inspection, by an authorized representative of the Department, of the physical facilities of the establishment and its methods of operation. Standards for acceptable physical facilities shall include satisfactory pens, cages, or enclosures in which the imported swine can be maintained so as not to be in contact with the general public and free from contact with domestic livestock; natural or established drainage from the PEQ Zoo which will avoid contamination of land areas where domestic livestock are kept or with which domestic livestock may otherwise come in contact; provision for the disposition of manure, other wastes, and dead swine within the PEQ Zoo; and other reasonable facilities considered necessary to prevent the dissemination of diseases from the PEQ Zoo. The operator of the PEQ Zoo shall have available the services of a full-time or part-time veterinarian, or a veterinarian on a retainer basis, who shall make periodic examinations of all animals maintained at the PEQ Zoo for evidence of disease; who shall make a post-mortem examination of each animal that dies; and who shall make a prompt report of suspected cases of contagious or communicable diseases to appropriate state or federal livestock sanitary officials.

(3) Manure and other animal wastes must be disposed of within the PEQ Zoo park for a minimum of one year following the date an imported wild swine enters the zoo. If an APHIS veterinarian determines that an imported swine shows no signs of any communicable disease during this 1-year period, its manure and other wastes need not be disposed of within the zoo after the 1-year period. If, however, an APHIS veterinarian determines that the swine does show signs of any communicable disease during this 1-year period, an APHIS veterinarian will investigate the disease and determine whether the swine's manure and other wastes may safely be disposed of outside the zoo after the 1-year period has ended.

(4) Prior to the issuance of an import permit under this section, the operator of the approved PEQ Zoo to which the imported swine are to be consigned, and the importer of the swine, if such operator and importer are different parties, shall execute an agreement covering each swine or group of swine for which the import permit is requested. The agreement shall be in the following form:

Agreement for the Importation, Quarantine and Exhibition of Certain Wild Ruminants and Wild Swine

____, operator(s) of the zoological park known as ______ (Name) located at _______ (City and state), and ______ (Importer) hereby request a permit for the importation of ____ (Number and kinds of animals) for exhibition purposes at the said zoological park, said animals originating in a region where foot-and-mouth disease exists and being subject to restrictions under regulations contained in part 93, title 9, Code of Federal Regulations.

In making this request, it is understood and agreed that:

1. The animals for which an import permit is requested will be held in isolation at a port of embarkation in the region of origin, approved by the Administrator as a port having facilities which are adequate for maintaining wild animals in isolation from all other animals and having veterinary supervision by officials of the region of origin of the animals. Such animals will be held in such isolation for not less than 60 days under the supervision of the veterinary service of that region to determine whether the animals show any clinical evidence of foot-and-mouth disease, or other communicable disease that is exotic to the United States or for which APHIS has an eradication or control program in 9 CFR chapter I, and to assure that the animals will not have been exposed to such a disease within the 60 days next before their exportation from that region.

2. Shipment will be made direct from such port of embarkation to the port of New York as the sole port of entry in this region. If shipment is made by ocean vessel, the animals will not be unloaded in any foreign port en route. If shipment is made by air, the animals will not be unloaded at any port or other place of landing, except at a port approved by the Administrator as a port not located in a region where foot-and-mouth disease exists or as a port in such a region having facilities and inspection adequate for maintaining wild animals in isolation from all other animals.

3. No ruminants or swine will be aboard the transporting vehicle, vessel or aircraft, except those for which an import permit has been issued.

4. The animals will be quarantined for not less than 30 days in the Department's Animal Import Center in Newburgh, New York.

5. Upon release from quarantine the animals will be delivered to the zoological park named in this agreement to become the property of the park and they will not be sold, exchanged or removed from the premises without the prior consent of APHIS. If moved to another zoological park in the United States, the receiving zoological park must be approved by the Administrator in accordance with paragraph 6 of this agreement.

6. The Administrator will approve the movement of an imported animal subject to this agreement if the Administrator determines that the animal has spent at least one year in quarantine in a PEQ Zoo following importation without showing clinical evidence of foot-and-mouth disease, or other communicable disease that is exotic to the United States or for which APHIS has an eradication or control program in 9 CFR chapter I, and determines that the receiving zoological park is accredited by the American Zoo and Aquarium Association (AZA), or the receiving zoological park has facilities and procedures in place related to preventing the spread of communicable animal diseases (including but not limited to procedures for animal identification, record keeping, and veterinary care) that are equivalent to those required for AZA accreditation. The Administrator will approve the movement of a carcass, body part, or biological specimen derived from an imported animal subject to this agreement if the Administrator determines that the animal has spent at least one year in quarantine in a PEQ Zoo following importation without showing clinical evidence of foot-and-foot mouth disease, or other communicable disease that is exotic to the United States or for which APHIS has an eradication or control program in 9 CFR chapter I, and determines that the carcass, body part, or biological specimen will be moved only for scientific research or museum display purposes.

 

(Signature of importer)

Subscribed and sworn to before me this __ day of __, __

 

(Title or designation)

 

(Name of zoological park)

   By

(Signature of officer of zoological park)

 

(Title of officer)

Subscribed and sworn to before me this __ day of __,__

 

(Title or designation)

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0040)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 59 FR 28216, June 1, 1994; 59 FR 31924, June 21, 1994; 59 FR 67615, Dec. 30, 1994; 62 FR 23638, May 1, 1997. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56020, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003; 83 FR 15492, Apr. 11, 2018]

§93.505   Certificate for swine.

(a) All swine offered for importation from any part of the world except as provided in §93.517 shall be accompanied by a certificate of a salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the region of origin, or if exported from Mexico, shall be accompanied either by such a certificate or by a certificate issued by a veterinarian accredited by the National Government of Mexico and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the National Government of Mexico, thereby representing that the veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so, stating that such swine have been kept in said region at least 60 days immediately preceding the date of movement therefrom and that said region during such period has been entirely free from foot-and-mouth disease, contagious pleuropneumonia, and surra: Provided, however, That certificates for wild swine for exhibition purposes need specify freedom from the said diseases of the district of origin only: And provided further, That in the case of swine the certificate, as far as it relates to contagious pleuropneumonia, may specify freedom from such disease of the district of origin only. For domestic swine, the certificate shall also show that the entire region of origin is free of African swine fever and swine vesicular disease and that, for 60 days immediately preceding the time of movement from the premises of origin, no swine erysipelas or swine plague has existed on such premises or on adjoining premises. Additionally, except for the APHIS-defined European CSF region, as defined in §94.0 of this subchapter, for which additional certification is required under §94.24(b)(6), for domestic swine the certificate shall show that the entire region of origin is free of classical swine fever.

(b) Swine from any region where screwworm is considered to exist may only be imported into the United States if they meet the requirements of paragraphs (b)(1) through (b)(4) of this section and all other applicable requirements of this part. APHIS will maintain a list of regions where screwworm is considered to exist on the APHIS Web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import__export/animals/animal__disease__status.shtml. Copies of the list will also be available via postal mail, fax, or email upon request to the Sanitary Trade Issues Team, National Center for Import and Export, Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737. APHIS will add a region to the list upon determining that screwworm exists in the region based on reports APHIS receives of detections of the pest from veterinary officials of the exporting country, from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), or from other sources the Administrator determines to be reliable. APHIS will remove a region from the list after conducting an evaluation of the region in accordance with §92.2 of this subchapter and finding that screwworm is not present in the region. In the case of a region formerly not on this list that is added due to a detection, the region may be removed from the list in accordance with the procedures for reestablishment of a region's disease-free status in §92.4 of this subchapter.

(1) A veterinarian must treat the swine with ivermectin 3 to 5 days prior to the date of export to the United States according to the recommended dose prescribed on the product's label.

(2) The swine must be fully examined for screwworm by a full-time salaried veterinary official of the exporting country within 24 hours prior to shipment to the United States. If swine are found to be infested with screwworm, they must be treated until free from infestation.

(3) At the time swine are loaded onto a means of conveyance for export, a veterinarian must treat any visible wounds on the animals with a solution of coumaphos dust at a concentration of 5 percent active ingredient.

(4) The swine must be accompanied to the United States by a certificate signed by a full-time salaried veterinary official of the exporting country. The certificate must state that the swine have been thoroughly examined and found free of screwworm and that the swine have been treated in accordance with paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(3) of this section.

(c) If swine are unaccompanied by the certificate as required by paragraph (a) of this section, or if such swine are found upon inspection at the port of entry to be affected with a communicable disease or to have been exposed thereto, they shall be refused entry and shall be handled or quarantined, or otherwise disposed of as the Administrator may direct.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0165)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 57 FR 28081, June 24, 1992. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56020, Oct. 28, 1997; 65 FR 67623, Nov. 13, 2000; 67 FR 11565, Mar. 15, 2002; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003; 68 FR 16938, Apr. 7, 2003; 71 FR 29070, May 19, 2006; 71 FR 31069, June 1, 2006; 72 FR 67232, Nov. 28, 2007; 73 FR 50878, Aug. 29, 2008; 76 FR 70039, Nov. 10, 2011; 77 FR 1391, Jan. 10, 2012; 83 FR 15492, Apr. 11, 2018]

§93.506   Declaration and other documents for swine.

(a) The certificates, declarations, and affidavits required by the regulations in this part shall be presented by the importer or his or her agent to the collector of customs at the port of entry, upon arrival of swine at such port, for the use of the veterinary inspector at the port of entry.

(b) For all swine offered for importation, the importer or his or her agent shall first present two copies of a declaration which shall list the port of entry, the name and address of the importer, the name and address of the broker, the origin of the swine, the number, breed, species, and purpose of the importation, the name of the person to whom the swine will be delivered, and the location of the place to which such delivery will be made.

(c) Any declaration, permit, or other document for swine required under this subpart may be issued and presented using a U.S. Government electronic information exchange system or other authorized method.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 81 FR 40151, June 21, 2016]

§93.507   Inspection at the port of entry.

Inspection shall be made at the port of entry of all swine imported from any part of the world except as provided in §93.519. All swine found to be free from communicable disease and not to have been exposed thereto within 60 days prior to their exportation to the United States shall be admitted subject to the other provisions in this part; all other swine shall be refused entry. Swine refused entry, unless exported within a time fixed in each case by the Administrator, and in accordance with other provisions he or she may require in each case for their handling shall be disposed of as the Administrator may direct. Such portions of the transporting vessel, and of its cargo, which have been exposed to any such swine or their emanations shall be disinfected in such manner as may be considered necessary by the inspector in charge at the port of entry, to prevent the introduction or spread of livestock or poultry disease, before the cargo is allowed to land.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56020, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003]

§93.508   Articles accompanying swine.

No litter or manure, fodder or other aliment, nor any equipment such as boxes, buckets, ropes, chains, blankets, or other things used for or about swine governed by the regulations in this part, shall be landed from any conveyance except under such restrictions as the inspector in charge at the port of entry shall direct.

§93.509   Movement from conveyances to quarantine station.

Platforms and chutes used for handling imported swine shall be cleaned and disinfected under APHIS supervision after being so used. The said swine shall not be unnecessarily moved over any highways nor allowed to come in contact with other swine, but shall be transferred from the conveyance to the quarantine grounds in boats, cars, or vehicles approved by the inspector in charge at the port of entry. Such cars, boats, or vehicles shall be cleaned and disinfected under APHIS supervision immediately after such use, by the carrier moving the same. The railway cars so used shall be either cars reserved for this exclusive use or box cars not otherwise employed in the transportation of swine or their fresh products. When movement of the aforesaid swine upon or across a public highway is unavoidable, it shall be under such careful supervision and restrictions as the inspector in charge at the port of entry and the local authorities may direct.

§93.510   Quarantine requirements.

Swine shall be quarantined for not less than 15 days, counting from the date of arrival at the port of entry. During their quarantine, wild swine shall be subject to such inspections, disinfection, blood tests, or other tests as may be required by the Administrator, to determine their freedom from disease and the infection of disease.

§93.511   Swine quarantine facilities.

(a) Privately operated quarantine facilities. The importer, or his or her agent, of swine subject to quarantine under the regulations in this part shall arrange for acceptable transportation to the privately operated quarantine facility and for the care, feed, and handling of the swine from the time of unloading at the quarantine port to the time of release from quarantine. Such arrangements shall be agreed to in advance by the Administrator. All expenses resulting therefrom or incident thereto shall be the responsibility of the importer; APHIS assumes no responsibility with respect thereto. The quarantine facility must be suitable for the quarantine of such swine and must be approved by the Administrator prior to the issuance of any import permit. The facilities occupied by swine should be kept clean and sanitary to the satisfaction of the inspector assigned to supervise the quarantine. If for any cause the care, feed, or handling of swine, or the sanitation of the facilities, is neglected, in the opinion of the inspector assigned to supervise the quarantine, such services may be furnished by APHIS in the same manner as though arrangements had been made for such services as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, and/or the swine may be disposed of as the Administrator, may direct, including sale in accordance with the procedure described in paragraph (b) of this section. The importer, or his or her agent, shall request in writing such inspection and other services as may be required, and shall waive all claim against the United States and APHIS or any employee of APHIS for damages which may arise from such services. The Administrator, may prescribe reasonable rates for the services provided under this paragraph. When it is found necessary to extend the usual minimum quarantine period, the importer, or his or her agent, shall be so advised in writing and shall pay for such additional quarantine and other services required. Payment for all services received by the importer, or his or her agent, in connection with each separate lot of swine shall be made by certified check or U.S. money order prior to release of the swine. If such payment is not made, the swine may be sold in accordance with the procedure described in paragraph (b) of this section, or otherwise disposed of as directed by the Administrator.

(b) Quarantine facilities maintained by APHIS. The importer, or his or her agent, of swine subject to quarantine under the regulations in this part shall arrange for acceptable transportation to the quarantine facility, and for the care, feed, and handling of the swine from the time they arrive at the quarantine facility, and for the care, feed, and handling of the swine from the time they arrive at the quarantine port to the time of release from quarantine. Such arrangements shall be agreed to in advance by the Administrator. The importer or his or her agent shall request in writing such inspection and other services as may be required, and shall waive all claim against the United States and APHIS or any employee of APHIS, for damages which may arise from such services. All expenses resulting therefrom or incident thereto shall be the responsibility of the importer; APHIS assumes no responsibility with respect thereto. The Administrator may prescribe reasonable rates for the services provided under this paragraph. When it is found necessary to extend the usual minimum quarantine period, the importer, or his or her agent, shall be so advised in writing and shall pay for such additional quarantine and other services required. Payment for services received by the importer, or his or her agent, in connection with each separate lot of swine shall be made by certified check or U.S. money order prior to release of the swine. If such payment is not made, the swine may be sold in accordance with the procedure described in this paragraph or otherwise disposed of as directed by the Administrator. When payment is not made and the swine are to be sold to recover payment for services received, the importer, or his or her agent, will be notified by the inspector that if said charges are not immediately paid or satisfactory arrangements made for payment, the swine will be sold at public sale to pay the expense of care, feed, and handling during that period. The sale will be held after the expiration of the quarantine period, at such time and place as may be designated by the General Services Administration or other designated selling agent. The proceeds of the sale, after deducting the charges for care, feed, and handling of the swine and other expenses, including the expense of the sale, shall be held in a Special Deposit Account in the United States Treasury for 6 months from the date of sale. If not claimed by the importer, or his or her agent, within 6 months from the date of sale, the amount so held shall be transferred from the Special Deposit Account to the General Fund Account in the United States Treasury.

(c) Amounts collected from the importer, or his or her agent, for service rendered shall be deposited so as to be available for defraying the expenses involved in this service.

§93.512   Quarantine stations, visiting restricted; sales prohibited.

Visitors shall not be admitted to the quarantine enclosure during any time that swine are in quarantine except that an importer (or his or her accredited agent or veterinarian) may be admitted to the yards and buildings containing his or her quarantined swine at such intervals as may be deemed necessary, and under such conditions and restrictions as may be imposed, by the inspector in charge of the quarantine station. On the last day of the quarantine period, owners, officers or registry societies, and others having official business or whose services may be necessary in the removal of the swine may be admitted upon written permission from the said inspector. No exhibition or sale shall be allowed within the quarantine grounds.

§93.513   Milk from quarantined swine.

Milk or cream from swine quarantined under the provisions of this part shall not be used by any person other than those in charge of such swine, nor be fed to any animals other than those within the same enclosure, without permission of the inspector in charge of the quarantine station and subject to such restrictions as he or she may consider necessary to each instance. No milk or cream shall be removed from the quarantine premises except in compliance with all State and local regulations.

§93.514   Manure from quarantined swine.

No manure shall be removed from the quarantine premises until the release of the swine producing same.

§93.515   Appearance of disease among swine in quarantine.

If any contagious disease appears among swine during the quarantine period special precautions shall be taken to prevent spread of the infection to other animals in the quarantine station or to those outside the grounds. The affected swine shall be disposed of as the Administrator may direct, depending upon the nature of the disease.

Canada7

7Importations from Canada shall be subject to §§93.516 to 93.519, inclusive, in addition to other sections in this part which are in terms applicable to such importations.

§93.516   Import permit and declaration for swine.

(a) For swine intended for importation from Canada, the importer shall first apply for and obtain from APHIS an import permit as provided in §93.504: Provided, That an import permit is not required for swine offered for entry at a land border port designated in §93.503(b) if such swine:

(1) Was born in Canada or the United States, and has been in no region other than Canada or the United States, or

(2) Has been legally imported into Canada from some other region and unconditionally released in Canada so as to be eligible to move freely within that region without restriction of any kind and has been in Canada after such release for 60 days or longer.

(b) For all swine offered for importation from Canada, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of a declaration as provided in §93.506.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56020, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.517   Swine from Canada.

(a) For purposes other than immediate slaughter. Swine offered for importation from Canada for purposes other than immediate slaughter shall be accompanied by a certificate issued or endorsed by a salaried veterinarian of the Canadian Government showing that said swine have been inspected on the premises of origin immediately before the date of movement therefrom and found to be free of evidence of communicable disease and that, as far as it has been possible to determine, they were not exposed to any such disease during the preceding 60 days; in addition, the certificate shall show that no classical swine fever or swine plague has existed on the premises of origin or on adjoining premises for such 60 days.

(b) For immediate slaughter. Swine for immediate slaughter may be imported from Canada without certification as prescribed in paragraph (a) of this section but shall be subject to the provisions of §§93.507, 93.516, and 93.518.

[55 FR 34195, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56020, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 16938, Apr. 7, 2003]

§93.518   Swine from Canada for immediate slaughter.

Swine imported from Canada for immediate slaughter shall be consigned from the port of entry directly to a recognized slaughtering establishment and there be slaughtered within two weeks from the date of entry. As used in this section, “directly” means without unloading en route if moved in a means of conveyance, or without stopping if moved in any other manner.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 59 FR 28216, June 1, 1994. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.519   Special provisions.

(a) In-bond shipments from Canada. (1) Swine from Canada transported in-bond through the United States for immediate export shall be inspected at the border port of entry and, when accompanied by an import permit obtained under §93.504 of this part and all conditions therein are observed, shall be allowed entry into the United States and shall be otherwise handled as provided in paragraph (b) of §93.501. Swine not accompanied by a permit shall meet the requirements of this part in the same manner as swine destined for importation into the United States, except that the Administrator may permit their inspection at some other point when he or she finds that such action will not increase the risk that communicable diseases of livestock and poultry will be disseminated to the livestock or poultry of the United States.

(2) In-transit shipments through Canada. Swine originating in the United States and transported directly through Canada may re-enter the United States without Canadian health or test certificates when accompanied by copies of the United States export health certificates properly issued and endorsed in accordance with regulations in part 91 of this chapter: Provided, That, to qualify for entry, the date, time, port of entry, and signature of the Canadian Port Veterinarian that inspected the swine for entry into Canada shall be recorded on the United States health certificate, or a document containing the information shall be included with the certificate that accompanies the swine. In all cases it shall be determined by the veterinary inspector at the United States port of entry that the swine are the identical swine covered by said certificate.

(b) Exhibition swine. Swine from the United States which have been exhibited at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair at Toronto or other publicly recognized expositions in Canada, including racing, rodeo, circus, or stage exhibitions in Canada, and have not been in that region for more than 90 days are eligible for return to the United States without Canadian health or test certificates, if they are accompanied by copies of the United States health certificate, issued and endorsed in accordance with the export regulations contained in Part 91 of this chapter for entry into Canada: Provided, That all swine offered for re-entry upon examination by the veterinary inspector at the U.S. port of entry, are found by the inspector to be free of communicable diseases and exposure thereto and are determined to be the identical swine covered by said certificates or are the natural increase of such swine born after official test dates certified on the dam's health certificate.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0020)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 59 FR 67133, Dec. 29, 1994. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56020, Oct. 28, 1997; 81 FR 40151, June 21, 2016]

Central America and West Indies8

8Importations from regions of Central America and the West Indies shall be subject to §93.520, in addition to other sections in this part, which are in terms applicable to such importations.

§93.520   Import permit and declaration for swine.

For all swine offered for importation from countries of Central America or of the West Indies, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of a declaration as provided in §93.506.

[55 FR 34195, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56020, Oct. 28, 1997]

Mexico9

9Importations from Mexico shall be subject to §93.521, in addition to other sections in this subpart, which are in terms applicable to such importations.

§93.521   Declaration for swine.

For all swine offered for importation from Mexico, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of a declaration as provided in §93.506.

[55 FR 34195, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56020, Oct. 28, 1997]

Subpart F—Dogs

§93.600   Importation of dogs.

(a) All dogs. Dogs from any region of the world where screwworm is considered to exist may only be imported into the United States if they meet the requirements of paragraphs (a)(1) and (2) of this section and all other applicable requirements of this part. APHIS will maintain a list of regions where screwworm is considered to exist on the APHIS Web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import__export/animals/animal__disease__status.shtml. Copies of the list will also be available via postal mail, fax, or email upon request to the Sanitary Trade Issues Team, National Center for Import and Export, Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737. APHIS will add a region to the list upon determining that screwworm exists in the region based on reports APHIS receives of detections of the pest from veterinary officials of the exporting country, from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), or from other sources the Administrator determines to be reliable. APHIS will remove a region from the list after conducting an evaluation of the region in accordance with §92.2 of this subchapter and finding that screwworm is not present in the region. In the case of a region formerly not on this list that is added due to a detection, the region may be removed from the list in accordance with the procedures for reestablishment of a region's disease-free status in §92.4 of this subchapter.

(1) Dogs must be accompanied by a certificate signed by a full-time salaried veterinary official of the region of origin stating that the dog has been inspected for screwworm within 5 days preceding its shipment to the United States.

(2) The certificate must state that the dog is either free from screwworm or was found to be infested with screwworm and was held in quarantine and treated until free from screwworm prior to leaving the region of origin.

(b) Dogs for handling livestock. Collie, Shepherd, and other dogs that are imported from any part of the world except Canada, Mexico, and regions of Central America and the West Indies and that are to be used in the handling of sheep or other livestock must be inspected and quarantined at the port of entry for a sufficient time to determine their freedom from tapeworm (Taenia spp.). If found to be infested with tapeworm, dogs must be treated under the supervision of an inspector at the port of entry until they are free from infestation.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0165)

[65 FR 67623, Nov. 13, 2000, as amended at 67 FR 11565, Mar. 15, 2002; 73 FR 50878, Aug. 29, 2008; 77 FR 1391, Jan. 10, 2012]

Subpart G—Miscellaneous Animals

Source: 60 FR 55181, unless otherwise noted. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997.

§93.700   Definitions.

Wherever in this subpart the following terms are used, unless the context otherwise requires, they shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

Administrator. The Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service or any other employee of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, delegated to act in the Administrator's stead.

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (APHIS).

Brushtail possum. Vulpine phalangers (Trichosurus vulpecula) of the family Phalangeridae.

Delivery. The transfer of goods or interest in goods from one person to another.

Enter (entry). To introduce into the commerce of the United States after release from government detention.

Hedgehog. All members of the family Erinaceidae.

Import (imported, importation). To bring into the territorial limits of the United States.

Inspector. An employee of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service authorized to perform duties required under this subpart.

Person. Any individual, corporation, company, association, firm, partnership, society, or joint stock company.

Region. Any defined geographic land area identifiable by geological, political, or surveyed boundaries. A region may consist of any of the following:

(1) A national entity (country);

(2) Part of a national entity (zone, county, department, municipality, parish, Province, State, etc.)

(3) Parts of several national entities combined into an area; or

(4) A group of national entities (countries) combined into a single area.

Tenrec. All members of the family Tenrecidae.

United States. All of the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands of the United States, and all other territories and possessions of the United States.

[55 FR 34195, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56020, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.701   Prohibitions.

(a) No person may import a hedgehog or tenrec into the United States from any region designated in §94.1 of this chapter as a region where foot-and-mouth disease exists.

(b) No person may import a brushtail possum or hedgehog into the United States from New Zealand.

(c) No person may import leopard tortoise (Geochelone pardalis), African spurred tortoise (Geochelone sulcata), or Bell's hingeback tortoise (Kinixys belliana) into the United States.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 56012, 56021, Oct. 28, 1997; 65 FR 15218, Mar. 22, 2000]

§93.702   Restrictions.

Hedgehogs and tenrecs not specifically prohibited from being imported under §93.701 may be imported into the United States only in accordance with the regulations in this subpart.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56021, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.703   Ports designated for importation.

(a) Any person importing a hedgehog or tenrec into the United States may import it, except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, only through the following ports:

(1) Air and ocean ports. Anchorage and Fairbanks, AK; San Diego and Los Angeles, CA; Denver, CO; Jacksonville, Miami, St. Petersburg-Clearwater, and Tampa, FL; Atlanta, GA; Chicago, IL; New Orleans, LA; Portland, ME; Baltimore, MD; Boston, MA; Minneapolis, MN; Great Falls, MT; Newburgh, NY; Portland, OR; San Juan, PR; Galveston and Houston, TX; and Seattle, Spokane, and Tacoma, WA.

(2) Canadian border ports. Eastport, ID; Houlton and Jackman, ME; Detroit, Port Huron, and Sault Ste. Marie, MI; Opheim, Raymond, and Sweetgrass, MT; Alexandria Bay, Buffalo, and Champlain, NY; Dunseith, Pembina, and Portal, ND; Derby Line and Highgate Springs, VT; Oroville and Sumas, WA.

(3) Mexican border ports. Douglas, Naco, Nogales, Sasabe, and San Luis, AZ; Calexico and San Ysidro, CA; Antelope Wells, and Columbus, NM; and Brownsville, Hidalgo, Laredo, Eagle Pass, Del Rio, Presidio, and El Paso, TX.

(b) The Secretary of the Treasury has approved the designation, as inspection stations, of the ports specified in paragraph (a) of this section. In special cases, the Administrator may designate other ports as inspection stations in accordance with this section, with the concurrence of the Secretary of the Treasury.

[60 FR 55181, Oct. 30, 1995. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997, as amended at 65 FR 38178, June 20, 2000; 67 FR 68022, Nov. 8, 2002]

§93.704   Import permit.

(a) General requirements. No person may import a hedgehog or tenrec into the United States unless it is accompanied by an import permit issued by APHIS and is imported into the United States within 30 days after the proposed date of arrival stated in the import permit. The importer or his or her agent must notify the inspector at the port of first arrival of the date of arrival at least 72 hours before the hedgehog or tenrec arrives in the United States.

(b) Import permit required. Any person who desires to import a hedgehog or tenrec must submit an application (VS Form 17-129) for an import permit. Applications are available from the Import-Export Animals Staff, National Center for Import-Export, Veterinary Services, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 39, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231 or by visiting http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal__health/permits/. A separate application must be prepared for each shipment.

(c) Application for an import permit. The importer must complete, sign, and date the application for an import permit, which must include the following information:

(1) The name and address of the shipper in the region of origin of the hedgehog or tenrec intended for importation into the United States.

(2) The name, address, and telephone number of the importer.

(3) The port of embarkation.

(4) The region from which the hedgehog or tenrec will be shipped to the United States.

(5) The mode of transportation.

(6) The number, breed, species, and descriptions of the hedgehogs or tenrecs to be imported.

(7) The purpose of the importation.

(8) The route of travel, including all carrier stops en route.

(9) The proposed shipping and arrival dates.

(10) The port of first arrival in the United States.

(11) The name, mailing address, and telephone number of the person to whom the hedgehog or tenrec will be delivered in the United States.

(12) The location of the place where delivery will be made in the United States.

(13) Any remarks regarding the shipment.

(d) Issuance of an import permit. Upon receipt of the application, APHIS will review the application. If the hedgehog or tenrec appears to be eligible to be imported into the United States, APHIS will issue an import permit indicating the applicable requirements under this subpart for the importation of the hedgehog or tenrec. Even though an import permit has been issued for the importation of a hedgehog or tenrec, the animal may enter the United States only if all other applicable requirements of this subpart have been met.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0040)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56021, Oct. 28, 1997; 81 FR 40151, June 21, 2016]

§93.705   Health certificate.

(a) No person may import a hedgehog or tenrec into the United States unless it is accompanied by a health certificate either issued by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the exporting region or issued by a veterinarian authorized or accredited by the national government of the exporting region and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of that region. The health certificate must contain the names and street addresses of the consignor and consignee and must state:

(1) That the hedgehog or tenrec originated in a region that has been recognized as free of foot-and-mouth disease by the USDA;

(2) That the hedgehog or tenrec has never been in a region where foot-and-mouth disease exists;

(3) That the hedgehog or tenrec has not been commingled with any other hedgehog or tenrec that originated in or has ever been in a region where foot-and-mouth disease exists;

(4) That the hedgehog or tenrec was inspected by the individual issuing the health certificate and was found free of any ectoparasites not more than 72 hours before being loaded on the means of conveyance which transported the animal to the United States;

(5) That all body surfaces of the hedgehog or tenrec were treated for ectoparasites under the supervision of the veterinarian issuing the health certificate at least 3 days but not more than 14 days before being loaded on the means of conveyance that transported the animal to the United States;

(6) That the pesticide and the concentration used would kill the types of ectoparasites that may infest the animal to be imported;

(7) That the hedgehog or tenrec, after being treated for ectoparasites in accordance with paragraphs (a)(5) and (a)(6) of this section, had physical contact only with, or shared a pen or bedding materials only with, treated hedgehogs or tenrecs in the same shipment to the United States; and

(8) The name and concentration of the pesticide used to treat the hedgehog or tenrec.

(b) [Reserved]

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0040)

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56021, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.706   Notification of arrival.

Upon the arrival of a hedgehog or tenrec at the port of first arrival in the United States, the importer or his or her agent must present the import permits and health certificates required by this subpart to the collector of customs for the use of the inspector at that port.

§93.707   Inspection at the port of first arrival.

(a) A hedgehog or tenrec from any part of the world must be inspected by an APHIS inspector at the port of first arrival. Subject to the other provisions in this subpart, a shipment of hedgehogs or tenrecs may enter the United States only if each hedgehog or tenrec in the shipment is found free of ectoparasites and any clinical signs of communicable diseases.

(b) If any hedgehog or tenrec in a shipment is found to be infested with ectoparasites or demonstrates any clinical signs of communicable diseases, then the entire shipment will be refused entry. The importer will be given the following options:

(1) Remove the shipment from the United States; or

(2) Release the shipment to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Administrator will destroy or otherwise dispose of the shipment as necessary to prevent the possible introduction into the United States of communicable animal diseases.

Subpart H—Elephants, Hippopotami, Rhinoceroses, and Tapirs

§93.800   Definitions.

The following terms, when used in this part, shall be construed as defined. Those terms used in the singular form in this part shall be construed as the plural form and vice versa, as the case may demand.

Accredited veterinarian. A veterinarian approved by the Administrator in accordance with part 161 of this chapter to perform functions specified in parts 1, 2, 3, and 11 of this chapter, and subchapters B, C, and D of this chapter; and to perform functions required by cooperative State-Federal disease control and eradication programs.

Administrator. The Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, or any person authorized to act for the Administrator.

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (APHIS).

APHIS representative. A veterinarian or other person employed by APHIS in animal health activities, who is authorized to perform the function involved.

Enter (entered, entry) into the United States. To introduce into the commerce of the United States after release from government detention.

Import (imported, importation) into the United States. To bring into the territorial limits of the United States.

Incinerate (incinerated). To reduce to ash by burning.

Inspector. An employee of APHIS who is authorized to perform the function involved.

Person. Any individual, corporation, company, association, firm, partnership, society, joint stock company, or any other legal entity.

Region. Any defined geographic land area identifiable by geological, political, or surveyed boundaries. A region may consist of any of the following:

(1) A national entity (country);

(2) Part of a national entity (zone, county, department, municipality, parish, Province, State, etc.)

(3) Parts of several national entities combined into an area; or

(4) A group of national entities (countries) combined into a single area.

United States. All of the several States of the United States, the District of Columbia, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands of the United States, and all other territories and possessions of the United States.

United States health certificate. An official document issued by an APHIS representative or an accredited veterinarian at the point of origin of a movement of animals. It must show the identification tag, tattoo, or registration number of each animal to be moved; the age and sex of each animal to be moved; the number of animals covered by the document; the points of origin and destination; the consignor; and the consignee.

Veterinary Services. The Veterinary Services unit of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[52 FR 29502, Aug. 10, 1987, as amended at 57 FR 23048, 23049, June 1, 1992. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56021, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.801   Prohibitions.

Elephants, hippopotami, rhinoceroses, or tapirs shall not be imported or entered into the United States unless in accordance with this part.

[52 FR 29502, Aug. 10, 1987. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.802   Import permit.

(a) An elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir shall not be imported into the United States unless accompanied by an import permit issued by APHIS and unless imported into the United States within 30 days after the proposed date of arrival stated in the import permit. The port veterinarian must be notified of the date of arrival at least 72 hours before the animal arrives in the United States.

(b) An application for an import permit may be obtained from the Import-Export Animals Staff, National Center for Import-Export, Veterinary Services, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231 or by visiting http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal__health/permits/.

(c) The completed application shall include the following information:

(1) The name and address of the person intending to export an elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir to the United States;

(2) The name and address of the person intending to import an elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir into the United States;

(3) The species, breed, and number of elephants, hippopotami, rhinoceroses, or tapirs to be imported;

(4) The purpose of the importation;

(5) The port of embarkation;

(6) The name and concentration of the pesticide intended to be used to treat the elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir for ectoparasites prior to the animal being transported to the United States;

(7) The mode of transportation;

(8) The route of travel;

(9) The port of entry in the United States and, if applicable, the address of the facility to be provided by the importer for inspection, treatment, and incineration pursuant to §93.6 of this part;

(10) The proposed date of arrival in the United States; and

(11) The name and address of the person to whom the elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir will be delivered in the United States.

(d) After receipt and review of the application by APHIS, an import permit indicating the applicable conditions under this part for importation into the United States shall be issued for the importation of the elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir described in the application if such animal appears to be eligible to be imported. Even though an import permit has been issued for the importation of an elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir, the animal may be imported only if all applicable requirements of this part are met.

[52 FR 29502, Aug. 10, 1987, as amended at 57 FR 23049, June 1, 1992; 59 FR 67615, Dec. 30, 1994. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997; 81 FR 40151, June 21, 2016]

§93.803   Health certificate.

(a) An elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir shall not be imported into the United States unless accompanied by a health certificate either signed by a salaried veterinarian of the national veterinary services of the region where the inspection and treatment required by this section occurred or signed by a veterinarian authorized by the national veterinary services of such region and endorsed by a salaried veterinarian of the national veterinary services of such region (the endorsement representing that the veterinarian signing the health certificate was authorized to do so), certifying:

(1) That the elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir was inspected by the individual signing the health certificate and found free of any ectoparasites not more than 72 hours before being loaded on the means of conveyance which transported the animal to the United States; and

(2) That the elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir was treated for ectoparasites at least 3 days but not more than 14 days before being loaded on the means of conveyance which transported the animal to the United States. The animal shall have been treated, under the supervision of the individual signing the health certificate, by being thoroughly wetted with a pesticide applied with either a sprayer with a hand-held nozzle, a spray-dip machine, or a dip vat; and

(3) That the elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir, after being treated for ectoparasites in accordance with paragraph (a)(2) of this section, did not have physical contact with or share a pen or bedding materials with any elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir not in the same shipment to the United States; and

(4) The name and concentration of the pesticide used to treat the animal (such pesticide and the concentration used must be adequate to kill the types of ectoparasites likely to infest the animal to be imported; a list of recommended pesticides and concentrations may be obtained from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231; and

(5) The name and address of the consignor and consignee.

[52 FR 29502, Aug. 10, 1987; 52 FR 35350, Sept. 18, 1987, as amended at 57 FR 23049, June 1, 1992; 59 FR 67615, Dec. 30, 1994. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56021, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.804   Declaration upon arrival.

Upon arrival of an elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir at a port of entry, the importer or the importer's agent shall notify APHIS of the arrival by giving an inspector a completed VS Form 17-29, “Declaration of Importation for Animals, Animal Semen, Birds, Poultry, and Eggs for Hatching.” (This form is available from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import-Export, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231 or by visiting http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal__health/permits/.) Forms may be provided to the inspector using a U.S. Government electronic information exchange system or other authorized method. The completed form must state:

(a) The port of entry;

(b) The date of arrival;

(c) The import permit number;

(d) The name of the carrier and identification of the means of conveyance;

(e) The name and address of the importer;

(f) The name and address of the broker;

(g) The region from which the elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir was shipped;

(h) The number, species, and purpose of importation of the elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir; and

(i) The name and address of the person to whom the elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir will be delivered.

[52 FR 29502, Aug. 10, 1987; 52 FR 35350, Sept. 18, 1987, as amended at 57 FR 23049, June 1, 1992; 59 FR 67615, Dec. 30, 1994. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56021, Oct. 28, 1997, as amended at 81 FR 40151, June 21, 2016]

§93.805   Ports of entry, inspection, and treatment.1

1Importers must also meet all requirements of the U.S. Department of the Interior regulations relevant to the importation of elephants, hippopotami, rhinoceroses, and tapirs, including regulations concerning ports of entry.

(a) An elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir shall be imported into the United States only:

(1) At Los Angeles, California; Miami, Florida; and Newburgh, New York; or

(2) On a case-by-case basis, at another port of entry if:

(i) The animals will be inspected and treated at a facility provided by the importer;

(ii) The Administrator has determined that the importer's facility is adequate for inspection, treatment, and incineration required under this section;

(iii) The Administrator has determined that an inspector is available to perform at the importer's facility the services that are required under this section; and

(iv) The Administrator has determined that an inspector is available to perform at the port of entry the services that are required under this section if the animals will be inspected and treated at a facility provided by the importer.

(b) An elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir shall be entered into the United States only under the following conditions:

(1) Any documents accompanying the animal shall be subject to inspection by an inspector at the port of entry;

(2) If the animal is to be moved from the port of entry to a facility provided by the importer:

(i) At the port of entry the animal shall be subject to as much inspection by an inspector as is feasible and shall be sprayed or dipped, as feasible, under the supervision of an inspector and with a permitted dip listed in §72.13(b) of this chapter;

(ii) At the port of entry, as much hay, straw, feed, bedding, and other material as can feasibly be removed from the shipping crate or vehicle containing the animal shall be removed, sealed in plastic bags, and incinerated by the importer under the supervision of an inspector;

(iii) At the port of entry, the shipping crate or the vehicle containing the animal shall be sealed by an inspector with an official seal of the United States Department of Agriculture:

(iv) If the animal is moved from the port of entry in a shipping crate, plastic must be fastened around the shipping crate so that all animal waste, hay, straw, feed, bedding, and other material accompanying the animal are retained inside the crate, but not so as to interefere with ventilation, feeding, and watering of the animal;

(v) After the arrival of the animal at the facility provided by the importer, the seal shall be broken by an inspector;

(3) The animal shall be inspected by an inspector within 24 hours of being unloaded at the port of entry or at a facility provided by the importer, and shall be treated under the supervision of an inspector, as follows:

(i) The animal shall be removed from its shipping crate or cargo hold, placed on a concrete or other nonporous surface, and physically inspected for ectoparasites by an inspector. If inspection and treatment are not performed upon unloading, the animal must be isolated from all other animals, except those in the same shipment, and kept in a facility with a nonporous floor and where any ectoparasites that may drop off the animal can be contained and destroyed, until the animal has been inspected and treated;

(ii) If the inspector finds no ectoparasites, the animal shall be sprayed or dipped one time in accordance with label instructions with a permitted dip listed in §72.13(b) of this chapter; or

(iii) If the inspector finds ectoparasites, the animal shall be sprayed or dipped in accordance with label instructions with a permitted dip listed in §72.13(b) of this chapter for as many times as necessary until the inspector finds no ectoparasites; and thereafter the animal shall be sprayed or dipped one additional time in accordance with label instructions with a permitted dip listed in §72.13(b) of this chapter;

(4) All hay, straw, feed, bedding, and other material that has been placed with the animal at any time prior to the final treatment referred to in paragraph (b)(3) of this section, and any plastic sheet used to wrap any shipping crate, shall be sealed in plastic bags and incinerated under the supervision of an inspector;

(5) Any shipping crate shall be, under the supervision of an inspector, either cleaned and disinfected using a disinfectant listed in §71.10 of this chapter or incinerated; and if the shipping crate is cleaned and disinfected, it shall then be treated under the supervision of an inspector with a permitted dip listed in §72.13(b) of this chapter;

(6) Any means of conveyance used to transport an animal not in a shipping crate shall be, under the supervision of an inspector, cleaned and disinfected using a disinfectant listed in §71.10 of this chapter and then treated with a permitted dip listed in §72.13(b) of this chapter.

[52 FR 29502, Aug. 10, 1987, as amended at 57 FR 23049, June 1, 1992. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997; 65 FR 38178, June 20, 2000]

§93.806   Animals refused entry.

Any elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir refused entry into the United States for noncompliance with the requirements of this part shall be removed from the United States within a time period specified by the Administrator or shall be considered abandoned by the importer, and pending removal or abandonment, the animal shall be subject to such safeguards as the inspector determines necessary to prevent the possible introduction of ectoparasites into the United States. If such animal is not removed from the United States within such time period or is abandoned, it may be seized, destroyed, or otherwise disposed of as the Administrator determines necessary to prevent the possible introduction of ectoparasites into the United States.

[52 FR 29502, Aug. 10, 1987, as amended at 57 FR 23049, June 1, 1992. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997]

§93.807   Other importations.

(a) Elephants, hippopotami, rhinoceroses, and tapirs are exempt from the regulations in this part under the following circumstances:

(1) They are imported from Canada and are accompanied by a document signed by a salaried veterinarian of the Canadian Government that states:

(i) They were not imported into Canada during the year preceding their importation into the United States; and

(ii) They did not, during the year preceding their importation into the United States, have physical contact with or share a pen or bedding materials with any elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir imported into Canada during that year; or

(2) They were exported into Canada from the United States and then imported back into the United States accompanied by a United States health certificate.

(b) Notwithstanding other provisions in this part, the Administrator may in specific cases allow the importation and entry of elephants, hippopotami, rhinoceroses, or tapirs into the United States other than as provided for in this part under such conditions as the Administrator may prescribe to prevent the introduction of ectoparasites into the United States.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0020)

[52 FR 29502, Aug. 10, 1987; 52 FR 35350, Sept. 18, 1987, as amended at 57 FR 23049, June 1, 1992; 59 FR 67133, Dec. 29, 1994. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997, as amended at 64 FR 23179, Apr. 30, 1999]

Subpart I—Aquatic Animal Species

Source: 71 FR 51435, Aug. 30, 2006, unless otherwise noted.

§93.900   Definitions.

Wherever in this subpart the following terms are used, unless the context otherwise requires, they shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

Administrator. The Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, or any person authorized to act for the Administrator.

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (APHIS).

APHIS representative. A veterinarian or other individual employed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, who is authorized to perform the services required by this part.

Certifying official. An individual authorized by the competent authority of a country to sign health certificates for aquatic animals.

Competent authority. The national veterinary services or other authority of a country, having the responsibility and competence for ensuring or supervising the implementation of aquatic animal health measures.

Container. A transport receptacle that is specially constructed to facilitate transportation of aquatic animals or aquatic animal products by one or several means of transport.

Department. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Fertilized egg. A viable fertilized ovum of an aquatic animal.

Gamete. The sperm or unfertilized egg of aquatic animals that is held or transported separately.

Inspector. An employee of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service authorized to perform duties required under this subpart.

Person. Any individual, corporation, company, association, firm, partnership, society or joint stock company.

Port veterinarian. A veterinarian employed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to perform duties required under this subpart at a port of entry.

Region. Any defined geographic land area identifiable by geological, political, or surveyed boundaries. A region may consist of any of the following:

(1) A national entity (country);

(2) Part of a national entity (zone, county, department, municipality, parish, Province, State, etc.);

(3) Parts of several national entities combined into an area; or

(4) A group of national entities (countries) combined into a single area.

Spring viremia of carp (SVC). A disease caused by infection with spring viremia of carp virus, a rhabodivrus capable of infecting several carp species, in addition to some other cyprinid and ictalurid fish species.

SVC-susceptible species. Common carp (Cyprinus carpio), grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus), silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix), bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis), Crucian carp (Carassius carassius), goldfish (Carassius auratus), tench (Tinca tinca), and sheatfish (Silurus glanis).

United States. All of the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands of the United States, and all other territories and possessions of the United States.

§93.901   General restrictions; exceptions.

(a) No live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes of SVC-susceptible species may be imported into the United States except in accordance with this subpart,11 nor shall any such live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes be moved from the port of entry after arrival until released by the port veterinarian; provided that the Administrator may, upon request in specific cases, allow the importation of SVC-susceptible live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes under conditions other than those set forth in this subpart when the Administrator determines that such movement will not result in the introduction of SVC into the United States.

11The importation of live cultures of SVC virus, preserved SVC virus viral RNA or DNA, tissue samples containing viable SVC virus, or other specimens intended for diagnostic or research purposes and which contain viable SVC virus may be imported only under permit in accordance with 9 CFR part 122.

(b) Other provisions of this subpart relating to the importation of live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes shall not apply to shipments of SVC-susceptible species of live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes in transit through the United States if an import permit has been obtained under §93.903 and all conditions of the permit are observed; and if the live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes are handled as follows:

(1) They are maintained under continuous confinement while in transit through the United States aboard an aircraft, ocean vessel, or other means of conveyance; or

(2) They are unloaded, in the course of such transit, into a holding facility12 that is provided by the carrier or its agent and has been approved by the Administrator in accordance with paragraph (b)(4) of this section as adequate to prevent the spread within the United States of any finfish disease; they are maintained there under continuous confinement until loaded aboard a means of conveyance for transportation from the United States; and are maintained under continuous confinement aboard such means of conveyance until it leaves the United States.

12Requests for approval of such facilities should be made to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service at the address provided in §93.903 for permit applications.

(3) They are moved in accordance with any additional conditions prescribed in the permit and determined by the Administrator to be necessary to ensure that the live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes through the United States do not introduce SVC into the United States.

(4) For a holding facility to be approved by the Administrator:

(i) The holding facility must be sufficiently isolated to prevent direct or indirect contact of the live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes it contains with any other SVC-susceptible species in the United States;

(ii) The holding facility must be constructed to provide adequate protection against environmental conditions and so that it can be adequately cleaned, washed and disinfected;

(iii) Provision must be made for disposal of fish carcasses, shipping water, waste and any associated shipping materials in a manner that will prevent dissemination of disease;

(iv) Provision must be made for adequate sources of feed and water and for attendants for the care and feeding of live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes in the facility;

(v) The holding facility must comply with all applicable local, State and Federal requirements for environmental quality.

(vi) The holding facility must comply with any additional requirements that may be imposed by the Administrator for a particular shipment if necessary to prevent the dissemination of disease.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0301)

[71 FR 51435, Aug. 30, 2006; 71 FR 54552, Sept. 15, 2006]

§93.902   Ports designated for the importation of live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes.

(a) The following ports are designated as ports of entry for live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes of SVC-susceptible species imported under this subpart:

(1) Air and ocean ports. Los Angeles and San Francisco, CA; Miami and Tampa, FL; Atlanta, GA; Honolulu, HI; Chicago, IL; Boston, MA; Newark, NJ; New York, NY; Portland, OR; Dallas-Ft. Worth, TX; and San Juan, PR.

(2) Canadian border ports. Detroit, MI; Buffalo-Niagara, NY; and Blaine and Seattle, WA.

(3) Mexican border ports. Otay Mesa, CA.

(b) Designation of other ports. Other ports may be designated by the Administrator in specific cases with the concurrence of the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security.

§93.903   Import permits for live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes.

(a) Live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes of SVC-susceptible species imported into the United States must be accompanied by an import permit issued by APHIS and must be imported within 30 days after the proposed date of arrival stated in the import permit.

(b) An application for an import permit must be submitted for each shipment of live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes of SVC-susceptible species to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, National Center for Import and Export, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231. Application forms for import permits may be obtained from this address.

(c) A completed application shall include the following information:

(1) The name and address of the person intending to export live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes of SVC-susceptible species to the United States;

(2) The proposed date of shipment to the United States;

(3) The name and address of the person intending to import live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes of SVC-susceptible species into the United States;

(4) The species and number of live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes of SVC-susceptible species to be imported into the United States;

(5) The purpose of the importation;

(6) The port of embarkation;

(7) The mode of transportation;

(8) The route of travel, including all carrier stops en route;

(9) The port of entry in the United States;

(10) The proposed date of arrival in the United States; and

(11) The name and address of the person to whom the live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes of SVC-susceptible species will be delivered in the United States.

(d) If APHIS determines that the live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes are eligible for importation, APHIS will issue an import permit indicating the applicable conditions for importation. An import permit does not guarantee that any live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes will be allowed entry into the United States; the fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes will be allowed to enter the United States only if they meet all applicable requirements of the permit and regulations.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0301)

§93.904   Health certificate for live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes.

(a) General. All live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes of SVC-susceptible species that are imported from any region of the world must be accompanied by a health certificate issued by a full-time salaried veterinarian of the national government of the exporting region, or issued by a certifying official and endorsed by the competent authority of that country. The health certificate must be written in English or contain an English translation. The health certificate will be valid for 30 days from the date of issuance. The health certificate for the live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes must state that:

(1) The live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes were inspected by the veterinarian or certifying official who issued the certificate within 72 hours prior to shipment, and were found to be free of any clinical signs of disease consistent with SVC; and

(2) The live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes covered by the health certificate meet the requirements of this section.

(b) Surveillance. The live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes must meet the following conditions to be eligible for importation into the United States:

(1) The live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes must originate in a region or establishment which conducts a surveillance program for SVC under the supervision of the competent authority.

(2) The region or establishment must demonstrate freedom from SVC through a minimum of 2-years' continuous health history, supported by laboratory testing by a pathogen detection facility approved for SVC viral assays by the competent authority.

(3) SVC-susceptible fish populations in the region or establishment must be tested at least twice annually, with at least 3 months between the tests and at times or under environmental conditions that would facilitate the detection of SVCV if it were present. Sampling procedures must utilize an assumed pathogen prevalence of 2 percent, with a corresponding confidence level of 95 percent. Samples must be collected and submitted by a certifying official or veterinarian recognized by the competent authority. The standard screening method for SVC must include isolation of SVCV in cell culture, using either the epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) or fathead minnow (FHM) cell lines. However, the Administrator may authorize other assays for SVCV detection in lieu of virus isolation through cell culture, if the Administrator determines that such assays provide equivalent assurance of the SVC status of an exporting region or establishment. All viral testing results must be negative.

(c) Shipping containers. All live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes must be shipped to the United States in new containers or in used containers that have been cleaned and disinfected in accordance with this section.

(1) Cleaning and disinfection of shipping containers must take place under the supervision of the veterinarian or certifying official who issues the health certificate.

(2) Cleaning and disinfection must be sufficient to neutralize any SVC virus to which shipping containers may have been exposed. Acceptable disinfection procedures include individual or combination treatments with: Solutions having a pH of 12 or higher or 3 or lower with a contact time of at least 10 minutes; heat at or above 56 °C for at least 15 minutes; chlorine solutions having a concentration of at least 500 ppm with a contact time of at least 10 minutes; iodine solutions having a concentration of at least 100 ppm with a contact time of at least 10 minutes; ultraviolet exposure (254 nm; min exposure of 10,000 microwatt seconds/cm2); or other disinfectants such as Virkon used according to the manufacturer's directions. The Administrator may authorize other procedures if the Administrator determines they are adequate to neutralize the SVC virus.

(3) Cleaning and disinfection protocols must be referenced in the health certificate or in a separate cleaning and disinfection certificate accompanying the shipment to the U.S. port of entry.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0301)

§93.905   Declaration and other documents for live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes.

(a) For all live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes offered for importation under this subpart, the importer or his or her agent must submit the following documents to the collector of customs for use by the port veterinarian:

(1) All permits, certificates, or other documentation required by this subpart; and

(2) Two copies of a declaration that lists the port of entry, the name and address of the importer, the name and address of the broker, the origin of the live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes, the number, species, and the purpose of the importation, the name of the person to whom the fish will be delivered, and the location of the place to which such delivery will be made.

(b) Any declaration, permit, or other document for live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes required under this subpart may be issued and presented using a U.S. Government electronic information exchange system or other authorized method.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0301)

[71 FR 51435, Aug. 30, 2006, as amended at 81 FR 40152, June 21, 2016]

§93.906   Inspection at the port of entry.

(a) All live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes of SVC-susceptible species imported from any part of the world must be presented for inspection at a port of entry designated under §93.902. The APHIS port veterinarian must be notified at least 72 hours in advance of the arrival in the United States of a shipment of live fish, fertilized eggs, or gametes of SVC-susceptible species. Any shipment of live SVC-susceptible fish species that the port veterinarian determines to exhibit clinical signs consistent with SVCV infection or disease, or any shipments of live fish, fertilized eggs, and gametes of SVC-susceptible species that otherwise do not meet the requirements of this subpart, shall be refused entry.

(b) Shipments refused entry, unless exported within a time fixed in each case by the Administrator, and in accordance with other provisions he or she may require in each case for their handling, shall be disposed of as the Administrator may direct.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0301)

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