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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR data is current as of December 5, 2019

Title 9Chapter ISubchapter C → Part 89


Title 9: Animals and Animal Products


PART 89—STATEMENT OF POLICY UNDER THE TWENTY-EIGHT HOUR LAW


Contents
§89.1   Amount of feed.
§89.2   Two or more feedings at same station.
§89.3   Feeding, watering, and resting livestock in the car.
§89.4   Watering.
§89.5   Feeding pens.

Authority: 49 U.S.C. 80502; 7 CFR 2.22, 2.80, and 371.4.

Source: 28 FR 5967, June 13, 1963, unless otherwise noted.

§89.1   Amount of feed.

(a) Under normal conditions, the amount of feed designated in the following schedule will be considered as sustaining rations for livestock in transit when fed at the intervals required by the Twenty-Eight Hour Law:

Species and quantity of livestockAt first feeding stationAt second and subsequent feeding stations
Cattle and beef type or range calves (for each car1)200 lbs. of hay1 2300 lbs. of hay.1 2
Dairy calves (for each car deck1)100 lbs. of hay1 2150 lbs. of hay.1 2
Horses and mules (for each car1)400 lbs. of hay1 2400 lbs. of hay.1 2
Sheep and goats (for each car deck1)200 lbs. of hay1 2300 lbs. of hay.1 2
Lambs and kids (for each car deck1)100 lbs. of hay1 2150 lbs. of hay.1 2
Swine (for each carload lot, in single or double deck car, the amount of shelled corn2 indicated):
Lots of not more than 18,000 lbs2 bushels2 bushels.
More than 18,000 lbs. but not more than 21,000 lbs212 bushels212 bushels.
More than 21,000 lbs. but not more than 24,000 lbs3 bushels3 bushels.
More than 24,000 lbs. but not more than 27,000 lbs312 bushels312 bushels.
More than 27,000 lbs. but not more than 30,000 lbs4 bushels4 bushels.
More than 30,000 lbs.—proportionately larger amounts

1The requirements set forth the sustaining rations for a full load of livestock in a railroad car 40 feet in length. The requirements for a full load of livestock in railroad cars of different sizes should be modified proportionately, i.e., a load of livestock transported in a car 50 feet in length would require an additional 25 percent of feed or 2.5 percent for each additional foot of car over 40 feet.

2Or the equivalent in other suitable feed. Dairy calves too young to eat hay or grain, or shipped without their dams, should be given a sufficient amount of prepared calf feed, milk, raw eggs, or other suitable feed. All feed should be of good quality.

(b) When the owner of a consignment of livestock desires that they be fed larger amounts of feed than those designated in paragraph (a) of this section for the particular kind and quantity of livestock, or the carrier believes that they should be fed larger amounts, the amounts to be fed should be agreed upon, if practicable, by the owner and the carrier at the time the animals are offered for shipment.

(c) When emergency conditions arise, such as severe changes in the weather, which increase the rigors of transportation, the livestock should receive amounts of feed, additional to those designated in paragraph (a) of this section, sufficient to sustain them until they arrive at the next feeding station or destination.

(d) When the movement of livestock is delayed en route so that the period of their confinement in the cars materially exceeds that specified by the Twenty-Eight Hour Law, the livestock should receive additional feed in proportion to such excess time.

§89.2   Two or more feedings at same station.

When livestock are held at a feeding station 12 hours after the last previous feed has been substantially consumed, they should again be fed the ration prescribed by §89.1(a) for that station: Provided, however, That they may be held without such feeding for a period longer than 12 hours if the time they are so held, added to the time required to reach the next feeding station or destination, whichever is closer, would not ordinarily exceed 40 hours.

§89.3   Feeding, watering, and resting livestock in the car.

(a) Livestock should be unloaded into pens of the character described in §89.5(a) for feeding, watering, and resting, unless there is ample room in the car for all of the animals to lie down at the same time.

(b) If livestock are watered in the car, adequate facilities should be provided and ample water furnished to insure all the animals an opportunity to drink their fill. In the case of hogs, water should be available for not less than 1 hour.

(c) Livestock unloaded for feed and water and returned to the car for rest should be allowed to remain in the pens not less than 2 hours.

(d) Livestock unloaded for water and returned to the car for feed and rest should be allowed to remain in the pens not less than 1 hour.

(e) When livestock are fed in the car, the feed should be evenly distributed throughout the car.

§89.4   Watering.

Livestock should be furnished an ample supply of potable water. Water treated with chemicals for industrial or boiler use, or taken from streams or ponds containing sewage, mud, or other objectionable matter should not be used. Troughs and other receptacles should be clean. In cold weather, the water should be free from ice.

§89.5   Feeding pens.

(a) Stock pens and other enclosures for feeding, watering, and resting livestock in transit should have (1) sufficient space for all of the livestock to lie down at the same time, (2) properly designed facilities for feeding and watering the livestock, (3) reasonably well-drained, clean, and safe floors of concrete, cinders, gravel, hard-packed earth, or other suitable material, and (4) suitable protection from weather reasonably to be expected in the region in which the pens are located.

(b) Care should be taken to protect livestock unloaded en route at a point having marked difference in temperature from that at the point from which they were shipped.

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