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Title 7Subtitle BChapter III → Part 361


Title 7: Agriculture


PART 361—IMPORTATION OF SEED AND SCREENINGS UNDER THE FEDERAL SEED ACT


Contents
§361.1   Definitions.
§361.2   Preemption of State and local laws; general restrictions on the importation of seed and screenings.
§361.3   Declarations and labeling.
§361.4   Inspection at the port of first arrival.
§361.5   Sampling of seeds.
§361.6   Noxious weed seeds.
§361.7   Special provisions for Canadian-origin seed and screenings.
§361.8   Cleaning of imported seed and processing of certain Canadian-origin screenings.
§361.9   Recordkeeping.
§361.10   Costs and charges.

Authority: 7 U.S.C. 1581-1610; 7 CFR 2.22, 2.80, and 371.3.

Source: 62 FR 48460, Sept. 16, 1997, unless otherwise noted.

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§361.1   Definitions.

Terms used in the singular form in this part shall be construed as the plural, and vice versa, as the case may demand. The following terms, when used in this part, shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

Administrator. The Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, or any other individual to whom the Administrator delegates authority to act in his or her stead.

Agricultural seed. The following kinds and varieties of grass, forage, and field crop seed that are used for seeding purposes in the United States:

Agrotricum—x Agrotriticum Ciferri and Giacom.

Alfalfa—Medicago sativa L.

Alfilaria—Erodium cicutarium (L.) L'Her.

Alyceclover—Alysicarpus vaginalis (L.) DC.

Bahiagrass—Paspalum notatum Fluegge

Barley—Hordeum vulgare L.

Barrelclover—Medicago truncatula Gaertn.

Bean, adzuki—Vigna angularis (Willd.) Ohwi and Ohashi

Bean, field—Phaseolus vulgaris L.

Bean, mung—Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek

Beet, field—Beta vulgaris L. subsp. vulgaris

Beet, sugar—Beta vulgaris L. subsp. vulgaris

Beggarweed, Florida—Desmodium tortuosum (Sw.) DC.

Bentgrass, colonial—Agrostis capillaris L.

Bentgrass, creeping—Agrostis stolonifera L. var. palustris (Huds.) Farw.

Bentgrass, velvet—Agrostis canina L.

Bermudagrass—Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. var. dactylon

Bermudagrass, giant—Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. var. aridus Harlan and de Wet

Bluegrass, annual—Poa annua L.

Bluegrass, bulbous—Poa bulbosa L.

Bluegrass, Canada—Poa compressa L.

Bluegrass, glaucantha—Poa glauca Vahl

Bluegrass, Kentucky—Poa pratensis L.

Bluegrass, Nevada—Poa secunda J.S. Presl

Bluegrass, rough—Poa trivialis L.

Bluegrass, Texas—Poa arachnifera Torr.

Bluegrass, wood—Poa nemoralis L.

Bluejoint—Calamagrostis canadensis (Michx.) P. Beauv.

Bluestem, big—Andropogon gerardii Vitm. var. gerardii

Bluestem, little—Schizachyrium scoparium (Michx.) Nash

Bluestem, sand—Andropogon hallii Hack.

Bluestem, yellow—Bothriochloa ischaemum (L.) Keng

Bottlebrush-squirreltail—Elymus elymoides (Raf.) Swezey

Brome, field—Bromus arvensis L.

Brome, meadow—Bromus biebersteinii Roem. and Schult.

Brome, mountain—Bromus marginatus Steud.

Brome, smooth—Bromus inermis Leyss.

Broomcorn—Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench

Buckwheat—Fagopyrum esculentum Moench

Buffalograss—Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.

Buffelgrass—Cenchrus ciliaris L.

Burclover, California—Medicago polymorpha L.

Burclover, spotted—Medicago arabica (L.) Huds.

Burnet, little—Sanguisorba minor Scop.

Buttonclover—Medicago orbicularis (L.) Bartal.

Canarygrass—Phalaris canariensis L.

Canarygrass, reed—Phalaris arundinacea L.

Carpetgrass—Axonopus fissifolius (Raddi) Kuhlm.

Castorbean—Ricinus communis L.

Chess, soft—Bromus hordeaceus L.

Chickpea—Cicer arietinum L.

Clover, alsike—Trifolium hybridum L.

Clover, arrowleaf—Trifolium vesiculosum Savi

Clover, berseem—Trifolium alexandrinum L.

Clover, cluster—Trifolium glomeratum L.

Clover, crimson—Trifolium incarnatum L.

Clover, Kenya—Trifolium semipilosum Fresen.

Clover, ladino—Trifolium repens L.

Clover, lappa—Trifolium lappaceum L.

Clover, large hop—Trifolium campestre Schreb.

Clover, Persian—Trifolium resupinatum L.

Clover, red or

Red clover, mammoth—Trifolium pratense L.

Red clover, medium—Trifolium pratense L.

Clover, rose—Trifolium hirtum All.

Clover, small hop or suckling—Trifolium dubium Sibth.

Clover, strawberry—Trifolium fragiferum L.

Clover, sub or subterranean—Trifolium subterraneum L.

Clover, white—Trifolium repens L. (also see Clover, ladino)

Clover—(also see Alyceclover, Burclover, Buttonclover, Sourclover,

Sweetclover)

Corn, field—Zea mays L.

Corn, pop—Zea mays L.

Cotton—Gossypium spp.

Cowpea—Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. subsp. unguiculata

Crambe—Crambe abyssinica R.E. Fries

Crested dogtail—Cynosurus cristatus L.

Crotalaria, lance—Crotalaria lanceolata E. Mey.

Crotalaria, showy—Crotalaria spectabilis Roth

Crotalaria, slenderleaf—Crotalaria brevidens Benth. var. intermedia (Kotschy) Polh.

Crotalaria, striped or smooth—Crotalaria pallida Ait.

Crotalaria, sunn—Crotalaria juncea L.

Crownvetch—Coronilla varia L.

Dallisgrass—Paspalum dilatatum Poir.

Dichondra—Dichondra repens Forst. and Forst. f.

Dropseed, sand—Sporobolus cryptandrus (Torr.) A. Gray

Emmer—Triticum dicoccon Schrank

Fescue, chewings—Festuca rubra L. subsp. commutata Gaud.

Fescue, hair—Festuca tenuifolia Sibth.

Fescue, hard—Festuca brevipila Tracey

Fescue, meadow—Festuca pratensis Huds.

Fescue, red—Festuca rubra L. subsp. rubra

Fescue, sheep—Festuca ovina L. var. ovina

Fescue, tall—Festuca arundinacea Schreb.

Flax—Linum usitatissimum L.

Galletagrass—Hilaria jamesii (Torr.) Benth.

Grama, blue—Bouteloua gracilis (Kunth) Steud.

Grama, side-oats—Bouteloua curtipendula (Michx.) Torr.

Guar—Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Taub.

Guineagrass—Panicum maximum Jacq. var. maximum

Hardinggrass—Phalaris stenoptera Hack.

Hemp—Cannabis sativa L.

Indiangrass, yellow—Sorghastrum nutans (L.) Nash

Indigo, hairy—Indigofera hirsuta L.

Japanese lawngrass—Zoysia japonica Steud.

Johnsongrass—Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers.

Kenaf—Hibiscus cannabinus L.

Kochia, forage—Kochia prostrata (L.) Schrad.

Kudzu—Pueraria montana (Lour.) Merr. var. lobata (Willd.) Maesen and S. Almeida

Lentil—Lens culinaris Medik.

Lespedeza, Korean—Kummerowia stipulacea (Maxim.) Makino

Lespedeza, sericea or Chinese—Lespedeza cuneata (Dum.-Cours.) G. Don

Lespedeza, Siberian—Lespedeza juncea (L. f.) Pers.

Lespedeza, striate—Kummerowia striata (Thunb.) Schindler

Lovegrass, sand—Eragrostis trichodes (Nutt.) Wood

Lovegrass, weeping—Eragrostis curvula (Schrad.) Nees

Lupine, blue—Lupinus angustifolius L.

Lupine, white—Lupinus albus L.

Lupine, yellow—Lupinus luteus L.

Manilagrass—Zoysia matrella (L.) Merr.

Meadow foxtail—Alopecurus pratensis L.

Medic, black—Medicago lupulina L.

Milkvetch or cicer milkvetch—Astragalus cicer L.

Millet, browntop—Brachiaria ramosa (L.) Stapf

Millet, foxtail—Setaria italica (L.) Beauv.

Millet, Japanese—Echinochloa frumentacea Link

Millet, pearl—Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.

Millet, proso—Panicum miliaceum L.

Molassesgrass—Melinis minutiflora Beauv.

Mustard, black—Brassica nigra (L.) Koch

Mustard, India—Brassica juncea (L.) Czernj. and Coss.

Mustard, white—Sinapis alba L.

Napiergrass—Pennisetum purpureum Schumach.

Needlegrass, green—Stipa viridula Trin.

Oat—Avena byzantina C. Koch, A. sativa L., A. nuda L.

Oatgrass, tall—Arrhenatherum elatius (L.) J.S. Presl and K.B. Presl

Orchardgrass—Dactylis glomerata L.

Panicgrass, blue—Panicum antidotale Retz.

Panicgrass, green—Panicum maximum Jacq. var. trichoglume Robyns

Pea, field—Pisum sativum L.

Peanut—Arachis hypogaea L.

Poa trivialis—(see Bluegrass, rough)

Rape, annual—Brassica napus L. var. annua Koch

Rape, bird—Brassica rapa L. subsp. rapa

Rape, turnip—Brassica rapa L. subsp. silvestris (Lam.) Janchen

Rape, winter—Brassica napus L. var. biennis (Schubl. and Mart.) Reichb.

Redtop—Agrostis gigantea Roth

Rescuegrass—Bromus catharticus Vahl

Rhodesgrass—Chloris gayana Kunth

Rice—Oryza sativa L.

Ricegrass, Indian—Oryzopsis hymenoides (Roem. and Schult.) Ricker

Roughpea—Lathyrus hirsutus L.

Rye—Secale cereale L.

Rye, mountain—Secale strictum (K.B. Presl) K.B. Presl subsp. strictum

Ryegrass, annual or Italian—Lolium multiflorum Lam.

Ryegrass, intermediate—Lolium × hybridum Hausskn.

Ryegrass, perennial—Lolium perenne L.

Ryegrass, Wimmera—Lolium rigidum Gaud.

Safflower—Carthamus tinctorius L.

Sagewort, Louisiana—Artemisia ludoviciana Nutt.

Sainfoin—Onobrychis viciifolia Scop.

Saltbush, fourwing—Atriplex canescens (Pursh) Nutt.

Sesame—Sesamum indicum L.

Sesbania—Sesbania exaltata (Raf.) A.W. Hill

Smilo—Piptatherum miliaceum (L.) Coss.

Sorghum—Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench

Sorghum almum—Sorghum × almum L. Parodi

Sorghum-sudangrass—Sorghum × drummondii (Steud.) Millsp. and Chase

Sorgrass—Rhizomatous derivatives of a johnsongrass × sorghum cross or a johnsongrass × sudangrass cross Southernpea—(See Cowpea)

Sourclover—Melilotus indicus (L.) All.

Soybean—Glycine max (L.) Merr.

Spelt—Triticum spelta L.

Sudangrass—Sorghum × drummondii (Steud.) Millsp. and Chase

Sunflower—Helianthus annuus L.

Sweetclover, white—Melilotus albus Medik.

Sweetclover, yellow—Melilotus officinalis Lam.

Sweet vernalgrass—Anthoxanthum odoratum L.

Sweetvetch, northern—Hedysarum boreale Nutt.

Switchgrass—Panicum virgatum L.

Timothy—Phleum pratense L.

Timothy, turf—Phleum bertolonii DC.

Tobacco—Nicotiana tabacum L.

Trefoil, big—Lotus uliginosus Schk.

Trefoil, birdsfoot—Lotus corniculatus L.

Triticale—x Triticosecale Wittm. (Secale × Triticum)

Vaseygrass—Paspalum urvillei Steud.

Veldtgrass—Ehrharta calycina J.E. Smith

Velvetbean—Mucuna pruriens (L.) DC. var. utilis (Wight) Burck

Velvetgrass—Holcus lanatus L.

Vetch, common—Vicia sativa L. subsp. sativa

Vetch, hairy—Vicia villosa Roth subsp. villosa

Vetch, Hungarian—Vicia pannonica Crantz

Vetch, monantha—Vicia articulata Hornem.

Vetch, narrowleaf or blackpod—Vicia sativa L. subsp. nigra (L.) Ehrh.

Vetch, purple—Vicia benghalensis L.

Vetch, woollypod or winter—Vicia villosa Roth subsp. varia (Host) Corb.

Wheat, common—Triticum aestivum L.

Wheat, club—Triticum compactum Host

Wheat, durum—Triticum durum Desf.

Wheat, Polish—Triticum polonicum L.

Wheat, poulard—Triticum turgidum L.

Wheat × Agrotricum—Triticum × Agrotriticum

Wheatgrass, beardless—Pseudoroegneria spicata (Pursh) A. Love

Wheatgrass, crested or fairway crested—Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn.

Wheatgrass, crested or standard crested—Agropyron desertorum (Link) Schult.

Wheatgrass, intermediate—Elytrigia intermedia (Host) Nevski subsp. intermedia

Wheatgrass, pubescent—Elytrigia intermedia (Host) Nevski subsp. intermedia

Wheatgrass, Siberian—Agropyron fragile (Roth) Candargy subsp. sibiricum (Willd.) Meld.

Wheatgrass, slender—Elymus trachycaulus (Link) Shinn.

Wheatgrass, streambank—Elymus lanceolatus (Scribn. and J.G. Smith) Gould subsp. lanceolatus

Wheatgrass, tall—Elytrigia elongata (Host) Nevski

Wheatgrass, western—Pascopyrum smithii (Rydb.) A. Love

Wildrye, basin—Leymus cinereus (Scribn. and Merr.) A. Love

Wildrye, Canada—Elymus canadensis L.

Wildrye, Russian—Psathyrostachys juncea (Fisch.) Nevski

Zoysia japonica—(see Japanese lawngrass)

Zoysia matrella—(see Manilagrass)

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

APHIS inspector. Any employee of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service or any other individual authorized by the Administrator to enforce this part.

Coated Seed. Any seed unit covered with any substance that changes the size, shape, or weight of the original seed. Seeds coated with ingredients such as, but not limited to, rhizobia, dyes, and pesticides are excluded.

Declaration. A written statement of a grower, shipper, processor, dealer, or importer giving for any lot of seed the kind, variety, type, origin, or the use for which the seed is intended.

Hybrid. When applied to kinds or varieties of seed means the first generation seed of a cross produced by controlling the pollination and by combining two or more inbred lines; one inbred or a single cross with an open-pollinated variety; or two selected clones, seed lines, varieties, or species. “Controlling the pollination” means to use a method of hybridization that will produce pure seed that is at least 75 percent hybrid seed. Hybrid designations shall be treated as variety names.

Import/importation. To bring into the territorial limits of the United States.

Kind. One or more related species or subspecies that singly or collectively is known by one common name, e.g., soybean, flax, or carrot.

Lot of seed. A definite quantity of seed identified by a lot number, every portion or bag of which is uniform, within permitted tolerances, for the factors that appear in the labeling.

Mixture. Seeds consisting of more than one kind or variety, each present in excess of 5 percent of the whole.

Official seed laboratory. An official laboratory member of the Association of Official Seed Analysts.

Pelleted seed. Any seed unit covered with a substance that changes the size, shape, or weight of the original seed in order to improve the plantability or singulation of the seed.

Person. Any individual, partnership, corporation, company, society, association, receiver, trustee, or other legal entity or organized group.

Port of first arrival. The land area (such as a seaport, airport, or land border station) where a person, or a land, water, or air vehicle, first arrives after entering the territorial limits of the United States, and where inspection of articles is carried out by APHIS inspectors.

Registered seed technologist. A registered member of the Society of Commercial Seed Technologists.

Screenings. Chaff, sterile florets, immature seed, weed seed, inert matter, and any other materials removed in any way from any seeds in any kind of cleaning or processing and which contains less than 25 percent of live agricultural or vegetable seeds.

State. Any State, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands of the United States, and any other territory or possession of the United States.

United States. All of the States.

Variety. A subdivision of a kind which is characterized by growth, plant, fruit, seed, or other characteristics by which it can be differentiated from other sorts of the same kind.

Vegetable seed. The seed of the following kinds and varieties that are or may be grown in gardens or on truck farms and are or may be generally known and sold under the name of vegetable seed:

Artichoke—Cynara cardunculus L. subsp. cardunculus

Asparagus—Asparagus officinalis Baker

Asparagusbean or yard-long bean—Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. subsp. sesquipedalis (L.) Verdc.

Bean, garden—Phaseolus vulgaris L.

Bean, lima—Phaseolus lunatus L.

Bean, runner or scarlet runner—Phaseolus coccineus L.

Beet—Beta vulgaris L. subsp. vulgaris

Broadbean—Vicia faba L.

Broccoli—Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis L.

Brussels sprouts—Brassica oleracea L. var. gemmifera DC.

Burdock, great—Arctium lappa L.

Cabbage—Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.

Cabbage, Chinese—Brassica rapa L. subsp. pekinensis (Lour.) Hanelt

Cabbage, tronchuda—Brassica oleracea L. var. costata DC.

Cantaloupe—(see Melon)

Cardoon—Cynara cardunculus L. subsp. cardunculus

Carrot—Daucus carota L. subsp. sativus (Hoffm.) Arcang.

Cauliflower—Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis L.

Celeriac—Apium graveolens L. var. rapaceum (Mill.) Gaud.

Celery—Apium graveolens L. var. dulce (Mill.) Pers.

Chard, Swiss—Beta vulgaris L. subsp. cicla (L.) Koch

Chicory—Cichorium intybus L.

Chives—Allium schoenoprasum L.

Citron—Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai var. citroides (Bailey) Mansf.

Collards—Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala DC.

Corn, sweet—Zea mays L.

Cornsalad—Valerianella locusta (L.) Laterrade

Cowpea—Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. subsp. unguiculata

Cress, garden—Lepidium sativum L.

Cress, upland—Barbarea verna (Mill.) Asch.

Cress, water—Rorippa nasturtium-aquaticum (L.) Hayek

Cucumber—Cucumis sativus L.

Dandelion—Taraxacum officinale Wigg.

Dill—Anethum graveolens L.

Eggplant—Solanum melongena L.

Endive—Cichorium endivia L.

Gherkin, West India—Cucumis anguria L.

Kale—Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala DC.

Kale, Chinese—Brassica oleracea L. var. alboglabra (Bailey) Musil

Kale, Siberian—Brassica napus L. var. pabularia (DC.) Reichb.

Kohlrabi—Brassica oleracea L. var. gongylodes L.

Leek—Allium porrum L.

Lettuce—Lactuca sativa L.

Melon—Cucumis melo L.

Muskmelon—(see Melon).

Mustard, India—Brassica juncea (L.) Czernj. and Coss.

Mustard, spinach—Brassica perviridis (Bailey) Bailey

Okra—Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench

Onion—Allium cepa L.

Onion, Welsh—Allium fistulosum L.

Pak-choi—Brassica rapa L. subsp. chinensis (L.) Hanelt

Parsley—Petroselinum crispum (Mill.) A.W. Hill

Parsnip—Pastinaca sativa L.

Pea—Pisum sativum L.

Pepper—Capsicum spp.

Pe-tsai—(see Chinese cabbage).

Pumpkin—Cucurbita pepo L., C. moschata (Duchesne) Poiret, and C. maxima Duchesne

Radish—Raphanus sativus L.

Rhubarb—Rheum rhabarbarum L.

Rutabaga—Brassica napus L. var. napobrassica (L.) Reichb.

Sage—Salvia officinalis L.

Salsify—Tragopogon porrifolius L.

Savory, summer—Satureja hortensis L.

Sorrel—Rumex acetosa L.

Southernpea—(see Cowpea).

Soybean—Glycine max (L.) Merr.

Spinach—Spinacia oleracea L.

Spinach, New Zealand—Tetragonia tetragonioides (Pall.) Ktze.

Squash—Cucurbita pepo L., C. moschata (Duchesne) Poiret, and C. maxima Duchesne

Tomato—Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.

Tomato, husk—Physalis pubescens L.

Turnip—Brassica rapa L. subsp. rapa

Watermelon—Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai var. lanatus

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§361.2   Preemption of State and local laws; general restrictions on the importation of seed and screenings.

(a) The regulations in this part preempt State and local laws regarding seed and screenings imported into the United States while the seed and screenings are in foreign commerce. Seed and screenings imported for immediate distribution and sale to the consuming public remain in foreign commerce until sold to the ultimate consumer. The question of when foreign commerce ceases in other cases must be considered on a case-by-case basis.

(b) No person shall import any agricultural seed, vegetable seed, or screenings into the United States unless the importation is in compliance with this part.

(c) Any agricultural seed, vegetable seed, or screenings imported into the United States not in compliance with this part shall be subject to exportation, destruction, disposal, or any remedial measures that the Administrator determines are necessary to prevent the dissemination into the United States of noxious weeds.

(d) Except as provided in §361.7(b), and in addition to the permit requirements of §319.37-5 of this chapter, coated or pelleted seed, or seed that is embedded in a substrate that obscures visibility may enter the United States only if each lot of seed is accompanied by an officially drawn and sealed sample of seed drawn from the lot before the seed was coated or pelleted. The sample must be drawn in a manner consistent with that described in §361.5 of this part.

(e) Except as provided in §§361.4(a)(3) and 361.7(c), screenings of all agricultural seed and vegetable seed are prohibited entry into the United States.

[62 FR 48460, Sept. 16, 1997, as amended at 74 FR 53400, Oct. 19, 2009; 79 FR 74594, Dec. 16, 2014; 83 FR 11867, Mar. 19, 2018]

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§361.3   Declarations and labeling.

(a) All lots of agricultural seed, vegetable seed, and screenings imported into the United States must be accompanied by a declaration from the importer of the seed or screenings. The declaration must state the kind, variety, and origin of each lot of seed or screenings and the use for which the seed or screenings are being imported.

(b) Each container of agricultural seed and vegetable seed imported into the United States for seeding (planting) purposes must be labeled to indicate the identification code or designation for the lot of seed; the name of each kind or kind and variety of agricultural seed or the name of each kind and variety of vegetable seed present in the lot in excess of 5 percent of the whole; and the designation “hybrid” when the lot contains hybrid seed. Kind and variety names used on the label shall conform to the kind and variety names used in the definitions of “agricultural seed” and “vegetable seed” in §361.1. If any seed in the lot has been treated, each container must be further labeled, in type no smaller than 8 point, as follows:

(1) The label must indicate that the seed has been treated and provide the name of the substance or process used to treat the seed. Substance names used on the label shall be the commonly accepted coined, chemical (generic), or abbreviated chemical name.

(i) Commonly accepted coined names are commonly recognized as names of particular substances, e.g., thiram, captan, lindane, and dichlone.

(ii) Examples of commonly accepted chemical (generic) names are blue-stone, calcium carbonate, cuprous oxide, zinc hydroxide, hexachlorobenzene, and ethyl mercury acetate. The terms “mercury” or “mercurial” may be used in labeling all types of mercurials.

(iii) Examples of commonly accepted abbreviated chemical names are BHC (1,2,3,4,5,6-Hexachlorocyclohexane) and DDT (dichloro diphenyl trichloroethane).

(2) If the seed has been treated with a mercurial or similarly toxic substance harmful to humans and vertebrate animals, the label must include a representation of a skull and crossbones and a statement indicating that the seed has been treated with poison. The skull and crossbones must be at least twice the size of the type used for the information provided on the label, and the poison warning statement must be written in red letters on a background of distinctly contrasting color. Mercurials and similarly toxic substances include the following:

Aldrin, technical

Demeton

Dieldrin

p-Dimethylaminobenzenediazo sodium sulfonate

Endrin

Ethion

Heptachlor

Mercurials, all types

Parathion

Phorate

Toxaphene

O-O-Diethyl-O-(isopropyl-4-methyl-6-pyrimidyl) thiophosphate

O,O-Diethyl-S-2-(ethylthio) ethyl phosphorodithioate

(3) If the seed has been treated with a substance other than one classified as a mercurial or similarly toxic substance under paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and the amount remaining with the seed is harmful to humans or other vertebrate animals, the label must indicate that the seed is not to be used for food, feed, or oil purposes. Any amount of any substance used to treat the seed that remains with the seed will be considered harmful when the seed is in containers of more than 4 ounces, except that the following substances will not be deemed harmful when present at a rate less than the number of parts per million (p/m) indicated:

Allethrin—2 p/m

Malathion—8 p/m

Methoxyclor—2 p/m

Piperonyl butoxide—20 p/m (8 p/m on oat and sorghum)

Pyrethrins—3 p/m (1 p/m on oat and sorghum)

(c) In the case of seed in bulk, the information required under paragraph (b) of this section shall appear in the invoice or other records accompanying and pertaining to such seed. If the seed is in containers and in quantities of 20,000 pounds or more, regardless of the number of lots included, the information required on each container under paragraph (b) of this section need not be shown on each container if each container has stenciled upon it or bears a label containing a lot designation and the invoice or other records accompanying and pertaining to such seed bear the various statements required for the respective seeds.

(d) Each container of agricultural seed and vegetable seed imported into the United States for cleaning need not be labeled to show the information required under paragraph (b) of this section if:

(1) The seed is in bulk;

(2) The seed is in containers and in quantities of 20,000 pounds or more, regardless of the number of lots involved, and the invoice or other records accompanying and pertaining to the seed show that the seed is for cleaning; or

(3) The seed is in containers and in quantities of less than 20,000 pounds, and each container carries a label that bears the words “Seed for cleaning.”

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§361.4   Inspection at the port of first arrival.

(a) All agricultural seed, vegetable seed, and screenings imported into the United States shall be made available for examination by an APHIS inspector at the port of first arrival and shall remain at the port of first arrival until released by an APHIS inspector. Lots of agricultural seed, vegetable seed, or screenings may enter the United States without meeting the sampling requirements of paragraph (b) of this section if the lot is:

(1) Seed that is not being imported for seeding (planting) purposes and the declaration required by §361.3(a) states the purpose for which the seed is being imported;

(2) Seed that is being shipped in bond through the United States;

(3) Screenings from seeds of wheat, oats, barley, rye, buckwheat, field corn, sorghum, broomcorn, flax, millet, proso, soybeans, cowpeas, field peas, or field beans that are not being imported for seeding (planting) purposes and the declaration accompanying the screenings as required under §361.2(a) indicates that the screenings are being imported for processing or manufacturing purposes;

(4) Seed that is being imported for sowing for experimental or breeding purposes, is not for sale, is limited in quantity to the amount indicated in column 3 of table 1 of §361.5, and is accompanied by a declaration stating the purpose for which it is being imported (seed imported for increase purposes only will not be considered as being imported for experimental or breeding purposes); or

(5) Seed that was grown in the United States, exported, and is now returning to the United States, provided that the person importing the seed into the United States furnishes APHIS with the following documentation:

(i) Export documents indicating the quantity of seed and number of containers, the date of exportation from the United States, the distinguishing marks on the containers at the time of exportation, and the name and address of the United States exporter;

(ii) A document issued by a Customs or other government official of the country to which the seed was exported indicating that the seed was not admitted into the commerce of that country; and

(iii) A document issued by a Customs or other government official of the country to which the seed was exported indicating that the seed was not commingled with other seed after being exported to that country.

(b) Except as provided in §§361.5(a)(2) and 361.7, samples will be taken from all agricultural seed and vegetable seed imported into the United States for seeding (planting) purposes prior to being released into the commerce of the United States.

(1) Samples of seed will be taken from each lot of seed in accordance with §361.5 to determine whether any seeds of noxious weeds listed in §361.6(a) are present. If seeds of noxious weeds are present at a level higher than the tolerances set forth in §361.6(b), the lot of seed will be deemed to be adulterated and will be rejected for entry into the United States for seeding (planting) purposes. Once deemed adulterated, the lot of seed must be:

(i) Exported from the United States;

(ii) Destroyed under the monitoring of an APHIS inspector;

(iii) Cleaned under APHIS monitoring at a seed-cleaning facility that is operated in accordance with §361.8(a); or

(iv) If the lot of seed is adulterated with the seeds of a noxious weed listed in §361.6(a)(2), the seed may be allowed entry into the United States for feeding or manufacturing purposes, provided the importer withdraws the original declaration and files a new declaration stating that the seed is being imported for feeding or manufacturing purposes and that no part of the seed will be used for seeding (planting) purposes.

(2) Seed deemed adulterated may not be mixed with any other seed unless the Administrator determines that two or more lots of seed deemed adulterated are of substantially the same quality and origin. In such cases, the Administrator may allow the adulterated lots of seed to be mixed for cleaning as provided in paragraph (b)(1)(iii) of this section.

(3) If the labeling of a lot of seed is false or misleading in any respect, the seed will be rejected for entry into the United States. A falsely labeled lot of seed must be:

(i) Exported from the United States;

(ii) Destroyed under the monitoring of an APHIS inspector; or

(iii) The seed may be allowed entry into the United States if the labeling is corrected under the monitoring of an APHIS inspector to accurately reflect the character of the lot of seed.

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§361.5   Sampling of seeds.

(a) Sample sizes. As provided in §361.4(b), samples of seed will be taken from each lot of seed being imported for seeding (planting) purposes to determine whether any seeds of noxious weeds listed in §361.6(a) are present. The samples shall be drawn in the manner described in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section. Unused portions of samples of rare or expensive seeds will be returned by APHIS upon request of the importer.

(1) A minimum sample of not less than 1 quart shall be drawn from each lot of agricultural seed; a minimum sample of not less than 1 pint shall be drawn from each lot of vegetable seed, except that a sample of 14 pint will be sufficient for a vegetable seed importation of 5 pounds or less. The minimum sample shall be divided repeatedly until a working sample of proper weight has been obtained. If a mechanical divider cannot be used or is not available, the sample shall be thoroughly mixed, then placed in a pile; the pile shall be divided repeatedly into halves until a working sample of the proper weight remains. The weights of the working samples for noxious weed examination for each lot of seed are shown in column 1 of table 1 of this section. If the lot of seed is a mixture, the following methods shall be used to determine the weight of the working sample:

(i) If the lot of seed is a mixture consisting of one predominant kind of seed or a group of kinds of similar size, the weight of the working sample shall be the weight shown in column 1 of table 1 of this section for the kind or group of kinds that comprises more than 50 percent of the sample.

(ii) If the lot of seed is a mixture consisting of two or more kinds or groups of kinds of different sizes, none of which comprises over 50 percent of the sample, the weight of the working sample shall be the weighted average (to the nearest half gram) of the weight shown in column 1 of table 1 of this section for each of the kinds that comprise the sample, as determined by the following method:

(A) Multiply the percentage of each component of the mixture (rounded off to the nearest whole number) by the sample sizes shown in column 1 of table 1 of this section;

(B) Add all these products;

(C) Total the percentages of all components of the mixtures; and

(D) Divide the sum in paragraph (a)(1)(ii)(B) of this section by the total in paragraph (a)(1)(ii)(C) of this section.

(2) It is not ordinarily practical to sample and test small lots of seed offered for entry. The maximum sizes of lots of each kind of seed not ordinarily sampled are shown in column 2 of table 1 of this section.

(3) The maximum sizes of lots of each kind of seed allowed entry without sampling for sowing for experimental or breeding purposes as provided in §361.4(a)(4) are shown in column 3 of table 1 of this section.

Table 1

Name of seedWorking weight for noxious weed examination
(grams)
(1)
Maximum weight of seed lot not ordinarily sampled
(pounds)
(2)
Maximum weight of seed lot permitted entry for experimental or breeding purposes without sampling
(pounds)
(3)
VEGETABLE SEED:
Artichoke5002550
Asparagus5002550
Asparagusbean5002550
Bean25200
Garden500100500
Lima50025200
Runner50025200
Beet3002550
Broadbean50025200
Broccoli50510
Brussels sprouts50510
Burdock, great1501050
Cabbage50510
Cabbage, Chinese50510
Cabbage, tronchuda100510
Cantaloupe (see Melon)
Cardoon5002550
Carrot50510
Cauliflower50510
Celeriac25510
Celery25510
Chard, Swiss3002550
Chicory50510
Chives50510
Citron5002550
Collards50510
Corn, sweet50025200
Cornsalad50510
Cowpea50025200
Cress, garden50510
Cress, upland35510
Cress, water25510
Cucumber5002550
Dandelion35510
Dill50510
Eggplant50510
Endive50510
Gherkin, West India1602550
Kale50510
Kale, Chinese50510
Kale, Siberian80510
Kohlrabi50510
Leek50510
Lettuce50510
Melon5002550
Mustard, India5025100
Mustard, spinach50510
Okra5002550
Onion50510
Onion, Welsh50510
Pak-choi50510
Parsley50510
Parsnip50510
Pea50025200
Pepper150510
Pumpkin5002550
Radish3002550
Rhubarb300510
Rutabaga50510
Sage1502550
Salsify3002550
Savory, summer35510
Sorrel35510
Soybean50025200
Spinach1502550
Spinach, New Zealand5002550
Squash5002550
Tomato50510
Tomato, husk35510
Turnip50510
Watermelon5002550
AGRICULTURAL SEED:
Agrotricum500100500
Alfalfa5025100
Alfilaria5025100
Alyceclover5025100
Bahiagrass5025100
Barrelclover10025100
Barley500100500
Bean, adzuki500100500
Bean, field500100500
Bean, mung500100500
Bean (see Velvetbean)
Beet, field500100500
Beet, sugar5001001,000
Beggarweed5025100
Bentgrass, colonial2.525100
Bentgrass, creeping2.525100
Bentgrass, velvet2.525100
Bermudagrass1025100
Bermudagrass, giant1025100
Bluegrass, annual1025100
Bluegrass, bulbous4025100
Bluegrass, Canada525100
Bluegrass, glaucantha1025100
Bluegrass, Kentucky1025100
Bluegrass, Nevada1025100
Bluegrass, rough525100
Bluegrass, Texas1025100
Bluegrass, wood525100
Bluejoint525100
Bluestem, big7025100
Bluestem, little5025100
Bluestem, sand10025100
Bluestem, yellow1025100
Bottlebrush-squirreltail9025100
Brome, field5025100
Brome, meadow13025100
Brome, mountain20025100
Brome, smooth7025100
Broomcorn400100500
Buckwheat500100500
Buffalograss:
(Burs)20025100
(Caryopses)3025100
Buffelgrass:
(Fascicles)6625100
(Caryopses)2025100
Burclover, California:
(In bur)500100500
(Out of bur)7025100
Burclover, spotted:
(In bur)500100500
(Out of bur)5025100
Burnet, little25025100
Buttonclover7025100
Canarygrass20025100
Canarygrass, reed2025100
Carpetgrass1025100
Castorbean500100500
Chess, soft5025100
Chickpea500100500
Clover, alsike2025100
Clover, arrowleaf4025100
Clover, berseem5025100
Clover, cluster1025100
Clover, crimson10025100
Clover, Kenya2025100
Clover, Ladino2025100
Clover, Lappa2025100
Clover, large hop1025100
Clover, Persian2025100
Clover, red5025100
Clover, rose7025100
Clover, small hop (suckling)2025100
Clover, strawberry5025100
Clover, sub (subterranean)25025100
Clover, white2025100
Corn, field5001001,000
Corn, pop5001001,000
Cotton500100500
Cowpea500100500
Crambe25025100
Crested dogtail2025100
Crotalaria, lance7025100
Crotalaria, showy25025100
Crotalaria, slenderleaf10025100
Crotalaria, striped10025100
Crotalaria, Sunn50025100
Crownvetch10025100
Dallisgrass4025100
Dichondra5025100
Dropseed, sand2.525100
Emmer500100500
Fescue, Chewings3025100
Fescue, hair1025100
Fescue, hard2025100
Fescue, meadow5025100
Fescue, red3025100
Fescue, sheep2025100
Fescue, tall5025100
Flax15025100
Galletagrass:
(Other than caryopses)10025100
(Caryopses)5025100
Grama, blue2025100
Grama, side-oats:
(Other than caryopses)6025100
(Caryopses)2025100
Guar50025100
Guineagrass2025100
Hardinggrass3025100
Hemp500100500
Indiangrass, yellow7025100
Indigo, hairy7025100
Japanese lawngrass2025100
Johnsongrass10025100
Kenaf500100500
Kochia, forage2025100
Kudzu25025100
Lentil50025100
Lespedeza, Korean5025100
Lespedeza, sericea or Chinese3025100
Lespedeza, Siberian3025100
Lespedeza, striate5025100
Lovegrass, sand1025100
Lovegrass, weeping1025100
Lupine, blue500100500
Lupine, white500100500
Lupine, yellow500100500
Manilagrass2025100
Meadow foxtail3025100
Medick, black5025100
Milkvetch9025100
Millet, browntop8025100
Millet, foxtail5025100
Millet, Japanese9025100
Millet, pearl15025100
Millet, proso15025100
Molassesgrass525100
Mustard, black2025100
Mustard, India5025100
Mustard, white15025100
Napiergrass5025100
Needlegrass, green7025100
Oat500100500
Oatgrass, tall6025100
Orchardgrass3025100
Panicgrass, blue2025100
Panicgrass, green2025100
Pea, field500100500
Peanut500100500
Poa trivialis (see bluegrass, rough)
Rape, annual7025100
Rape, bird7025100
Rape, turnip5025100
Rape, winter10025100
Redtop2.525100
Rescuegrass20025100
Rhodesgrass1025100
Rice500100500
Ricegrass, Indian7025100
Roughpea500100500
Rye500100500
Rye, mountain28025100
Ryegrass, annual5025100
Ryegrass, intermediate8025100
Ryegrass, perennial5025100
Ryegrass, Wimmera5025100
Safflower500100500
Sagewort, Louisiana525100
Sainfoin500100500
Saltbush, fourwing15025100
Seasame7025100
Sesbania25025100
Smilo2025100
Sorghum5001001,000
Sorghum almum15025100
Sorghum-sudangrass hybrid5001001,000
Sorgrass15025100
Sourclover5025100
Soybean500100500
Spelt500100500
Sudangrass25025100
Sunflower500100500
Sweetclover, white5025100
Sweetclover, yellow5025100
Sweet vernalgrass2025100
Sweetvetch, northern19025100
Switchgrass4025100
Timothy1025100
Timothy, turf1025100
Tobacco511
Trefoil, big2025100
Trefoil, birdsfoot3025100
Triticale500100500
Vaseygrass3025100
Veldtgrass4025100
Velvetbean500100500
Velvetgrass1025100
Vetch, common500100500
Vetch, hairy500100500
Vetch, Hungarian500100500
Vetch, Monantha500100500
Vetch, narrowleaf500100500
Vetch, purple500100500
Vetch, woolypod500100500
Wheat, common500100500
Wheat, club500100500
Wheat, durum500100500
Wheat, Polish500100500
Wheat, poulard500100500
Wheat × Agrotricum500100500
Wheatgrass, beardless8025100
Wheatgrass, fairway crested4025100
Wheatgrass, standard crested5025100
Wheatgrass, intermediate15025100
Wheatgrass, pubescent15025100
Wheatgrass, Siberian5025100
Wheatgrass, slender7025100
Wheatgrass, streambank5025100
Wheatgrass, tall15025100
Wheatgrass, western10025100
Wildrye, basin8025100
Wild-rye, Canada11025100
Wild-rye, Russian6025100
Zoysia Japonica (see Japanese lawngrass)
Zoysia matrella (see Manilagrass)

(b) Method of sampling. (1) When an importation consists of more than one lot, each lot shall be sampled separately.

(2) For lots of six or fewer bags, each bag shall be sampled. A total of at least five trierfuls shall be taken from the lot.

(3) For lots of more than six bags, five bags plus at least 10 percent of the number of bags in the lot shall be sampled. (Round off numbers with decimals to the nearest whole number, raising 0.5 to the next whole number.) Regardless of the lot size, it is not necessary to sample more than 30 bags.

(4) When the lot of seed to be sampled is comprised of seed in small containers that cannot practically be sampled as described in paragraph (b)(2) or (b)(3) of this section, entire unopened containers may be taken in sufficient number to supply a sample that meets the minimum size requirements of paragraph (a)(1) of this section.

(c) Drawing samples. Samples will not be drawn unless each container is labeled to show the lot designation and the name of the kind and variety of each agricultural seed, or kind and variety of each vegetable seed, appearing on the invoice and other entry papers, and a declaration has been filed by the importer as required under §361.2(a). In order to secure a representative sample, an APHIS inspector will draw equal portions from evenly distributed parts of the quantity of seed to be sampled; the APHIS inspector, therefore, must be given access to all parts of that quantity.

(1) For free-flowing seed in bags or in bulk, a probe or trier shall be used. For small free-flowing seed in bags, a probe or trier long enough to sample all portions of the bag shall be used. When drawing more than one trierful of seed from a bag, a different path through the seed shall be used when drawing each sample.

(2) For non-free-flowing seed in bags or bulk that may be difficult to sample with a probe or trier, samples shall be obtained by thrusting one's hand into the seed and withdrawing representative portions. The hand shall be inserted in an open position with the fingers held closely together while the hand is being inserted and the portion withdrawn. When more than one handful is taken from a bag, the handfuls shall be taken from well-separated points.

(3) When more than one sample is drawn from a single lot, the samples may be combined into a composite sample unless it appears that the quantity of seed represented as a lot is not of uniform quality, in which case the separate samples shall be forwarded together, but without being combined into a composite sample.

(d) In most cases, samples will be drawn and examined by an APHIS inspector at the port of first arrival. The APHIS inspector may release a shipment if no contaminants are found and the labeling is sufficient. If contaminants are found or the labeling of the seed is insufficient, the APHIS inspector may forward the sample to the USDA Seed Examination Facility (SEF), Beltsville, MD, for analysis, testing, or examination. APHIS will notify the owner or consignee of the seed that samples have been drawn and forwarded to the SEF and that the shipment must be held intact pending a decision by APHIS as to whether the seed is within the noxious weed seed tolerances of §361.6 and is accurately labeled. If the decision pending is with regard to the noxious weed seed content of the seed and the seed has been determined to be accurately labeled, the seed may be released for delivery to the owner or consignee under the following conditions:

(1) The owner or consignee executes with Customs either a Customs single-entry bond or a Customs term bond, as appropriate, in such amount as is prescribed by applicable Customs regulations;

(2) The bond must contain a condition for the redelivery of the seed or any part thereof upon demand of the Port Director of Customs at any time;

(3) Until the seed is approved for entry upon completion of APHIS' examination, the seed must be kept intact and not tampered with in any way, or removed from the containers except under the monitoring of an APHIS inspector; and

(4) The owner or consignee must keep APHIS informed as to the location of the seed until it is finally entered into the commerce of the United States.

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§361.6   Noxious weed seeds.

(a) Seeds of the plants listed in paragraphs (a)(1) and (a)(2) of this section shall be considered noxious weed seeds.

(1) Seeds with no tolerances applicable to their introduction:

Acacia nilotica (Linnaeus) Wildenow ex Delile

Aeginetia spp.

Ageratina adenophora (Sprengel) King & Robinson

Ageratina riparia (Regel) R.M. King and H. Robinson

Alectra spp.

Alternanthera sessilis (L.) R. Brown ex de Candolle

Arctotheca calendula (Linnaeus) Levyns

Asphodelus fistulosus L.

Avena sterilis L. (including Avena ludoviciana Durieu)

Azolla pinnata R. Brown

Carthamus oxyacantha M. Bieberstein

Chrysopogon aciculatus (Retzius) Trinius

Commelina benghalensis L.

Crupina vulgaris Cassini

Cuscuta spp.

Digitaria abyssinica (Hochstetter ex A. Richard) Stapf

Digitaria velutina (Forsskal) Palisot de Beauvois

Drymaria arenariodes Humboldt & Bonpland ex J.A. Schultes

Eichhornia azurea (Swartz) Kunth

Emex australis Steinheil

Emex spinosa (L.) Campdera

Euphorbia terracina Linnaeus

Galega officinalis L.

Heracleum mantegazzianum Sommier & Levier

Hydrilla verticillata (Linnaeus f.) Royle

Hygrophila polysperma T. Anderson

Imperata brasiliensis Trinius

Imperata cylindrica (Linnaeus) Palisot de Beauvois

Inula britannica Linnaeus

Ipomoea aquatica Forsskal

Ischaemum rugosum Salisbury

Lagarosiphon major (Ridley) Moss

Leptochloa chinensis (L.) Nees

Limnophila sessiliflora (Vahl) Blume

Lycium ferocissimum Miers

Lygodium flexuosum (Linnaeus) Swartz (maidenhair creeper)

Lygodium microphyllum (Cavanilles) R. Brown (Old World climbing fern)

Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav.) Blake

Melastoma malabathricum L.

Mikania cordata (Burman f.) B. L. Robinson

Mikania micrantha Kunth

Mimosa diplotricha C. Wright

Mimosa pigra L. var. pigra

Monochoria hastata (L.) Solms-Laubach

Monochoria vaginalis (Burman f.) C. Presl

Moraea collina Thunberg

Moraea flaccida (Sweet) Steudel

Moraea miniata Andrews

Moraea ochroleuca (Salisbury) Drapiez

Moraea pallida (Baker) Goldblatt

Nassella trichotoma (Nees) Hackel ex Arechavaleta

Onopordum acaulon Linnaeus

Onopordum illyricum Linnaeus

Opuntia aurantiaca Lindley

Orobanche spp.

Oryza longistaminata A. Chevalier & Roehrich

Oryza punctata Kotschy ex Steudel

Oryza rufipogon Griffith

Ottelia alismoides (L.) Pers.

Paspalum scrobiculatum L.

Pennisetum clandestinum Hochstetter ex Chiovenda

Pennisetum macrourum Trinius

Pennisetum pedicellatum Trinius

Pennisetum polystachion (L.) Schultes

Prosopis alapataco R. A. Philippi

Prosopis argentina Burkart

Prosopis articulata S. Watson

Prosopis burkartii Munoz

Prosopis caldenia Burkart

Prosopis calingastana Burkart

Prosopis campestris Grisebach

Prosopis castellanosii Burkart

Prosopis denudans Bentham

Prosopis elata (Burkart) Burkart

Prosopis farcta (Banks & Solander) J.F. Macbride

Prosopis ferox Grisebach

Prosopis fiebrigii Harms

Prosopis hassleri Harms

Prosopis humilis Gillies ex Hooker & Arnott

Prosopis kuntzei Harms

Prosopis pallida (Humboldt & Bonpland ex Willdenow) Kunth

Prosopis palmeri S. Watson

Prosopis reptans Bentham var. reptans

Prosopis rojasiana Burkart

Prosopis ruizlealii Burkart

Prosopis ruscifolia Grisebach

Prosopis sericantha Gillies ex Hooker & Arnott

Prosopis strombulifera (Lamarck) Bentham

Prosopis torquata (Cavanilles ex Lagasca y Segura) de Candolle

Rottboellia cochinchinensis (Lour.) W. Clayon

Rubus fruticosus L. (complex)

Rubus moluccanus L.

Saccharum spontaneum L.

Sagittaria sagittifolia L.

Salsola vermiculata L.

Salvinia auriculata Aublet

Salvinia biloba Raddi

Salvinia herzogii de la Sota

Salvinia molesta D.S. Mitchell

Senecio inaequidens DC.

Senecio madagascariensis Poir.

Setaria pumila (Poir.) Roem. & Schult. subsp. pallidefusca (Schumach.) B.K. Simon

Solanum tampicense Dunal (wetland nightshade)

Solanum torvum Swartz

Solanum viarum Dunal

Sparganium erectum L.

Spermacoce alata Aublet

Striga spp.

Tridax procumbens L.

Urochloa panicoides Beauvois

(2) Seeds with tolerances applicable to their introduction:

Acroptilon repens (L.) DC. (=Centaurea repens L.) (=Centaurea picris)

Cardaria draba (L.) Desv.

Cardaria pubescens (C. A. Mey.) Jarmol.

Convolvulus arvensis L.

Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop.

Elytrigia repens (L.) Desv. (=Agropyron repens (L.) Beauv.)

Euphorbia esula L.

Sonchus arvensis L.

Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers.

(b) The tolerance applicable to the prohibition of the noxious weed seeds listed in paragraph (a)(2) of this section shall be two seeds in the minimum amount required to be examined as shown in column 1 of table 1 of §361.5. If fewer than two seeds are found in an initial examination, the shipment from which the sample was drawn may be entered. If two seeds are found in an initial examination, a second sample must be examined. If two or fewer seeds are found in the second examination, the shipment from which the samples were drawn may be entered. If three or more seeds are found in the second examination, the shipment from which the samples were drawn may not be entered. If three or more seeds are found in an initial examination, the shipment from which the sample was drawn may not be entered.

(c) Any seed of any noxious weed that can be determined by visual inspection (including the use of transmitted light or dissection) to be within one of the following categories shall be considered inert matter and not counted as a weed seed:

(1) Damaged seed (other than grasses) with over one half of the embryo missing;

(2) Grass florets and caryopses classed as inert:

(i) Glumes and empty florets of weedy grasses;

(ii) Damaged caryopses, including free caryopses, with over one-half the root-shoot axis missing (the scutellum excluded);

(iii) Immature free caryopses devoid of embryo or endosperm;

(iv) Free caryopses of quackgrass (Elytrigia repens) that are 2 mm or less in length; or

(v) Immature florets of quackgrass (Elytrigia repens) in which the caryopses are less than one-third the length of the palea. The caryopsis is measured from the base of the rachilla.

(3) Seeds of legumes (Fabaceae) with the seed coats entirely removed.

(4) Immature seed units, devoid of both embryo and endosperm, such as occur in (but not limited to) the following plant families: buckwheat (Polygonaceae), morning glory (Convolvulaceae), nightshade (Solanaceae), and sunflower (Asteraceae).

(5) Dodder (Cuscuta spp.) seeds devoid of embryos and seeds that are ashy gray to creamy white in color are inert matter. Dodder seeds should be sectioned when necessary to determine if an embryo is present, as when the seeds have a normal color but are slightly swollen, dimpled, or have minute holes.

[62 FR 48460, Sept. 16, 1997, as amended at 64 FR 12884, Mar. 16, 1999; 65 FR 33743, May 25, 2000; 71 FR 35381, June 20, 2006; 74 FR 53400, Oct. 19, 2009; 75 FR 68956, Nov. 10, 2010]

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§361.7   Special provisions for Canadian-origin seed and screenings.

(a) In addition to meeting the declaration and labeling requirements of §361.2 and all other applicable provisions of this part, all Canadian-origin agricultural seed and Canadian-origin vegetable seed imported into the United States from Canada for seeding (planting) purposes or cleaning must be accompanied by a certificate of analysis issued by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency or by a private seed laboratory accredited by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Samples of seed shall be drawn using sampling methods comparable to those detailed in §361.5 of this part. The seed analyst who examines the seed at the laboratory must be accredited to analyze the kind of seed covered by the certificate.

(1) If the seed is being imported for seeding (planting) purposes, the certificate of analysis must verify that the seed meets the noxious weed seed tolerances of §361.6. Such seed will not be subject to the sampling requirements of §361.3(b).

(2) If the seed is being imported for cleaning, the certificate of analysis must name the kinds of noxious weed seeds that are to be removed from the lot of seed. Seed being imported for cleaning must be consigned to a facility operated in accordance with §361.8(a).

(b) Coated or pelleted agricultural seed and coated or pelleted vegetable seed of Canadian origin may be imported into the United States if the seed was analyzed prior to being coated or pelleted and is accompanied by a certificate of analysis issued in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section.

(c) Screenings otherwise prohibited under this part may be imported from Canada if the screenings are imported for processing or manufacture and are consigned to a facility operating under a compliance agreement as provided by §361.8(b).

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0124)

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§361.8   Cleaning of imported seed and processing of certain Canadian-origin screenings.

(a) Imported seed that is found to contain noxious weed seeds at a level higher than the tolerances set forth in §361.6(b) may be cleaned under the monitoring of an APHIS inspector. The cleaning will be at the expense of the owner or consignee.

(1) At the location where the seed is being cleaned, the identity of the seed must be maintained at all times to the satisfaction of the Administrator. The refuse from the cleaning must be placed in containers and securely sealed and identified. Upon completion of the cleaning, a representative sample of the seed will be analyzed by a registered seed technologist, an official seed laboratory, or by APHIS; if the seed is found to be within the noxious weed tolerances set forth in §361.6(b), the seed may be allowed entry into the United States;

(2) The refuse from the cleaning must be destroyed under the monitoring of an APHIS inspector at the expense of the owner or consignee of the seed.

(3) Any person engaged in the business of cleaning imported seed may enter into a compliance agreement under paragraph (c) of this section to facilitate the cleaning of seed imported into the United States under this part.

(b) Any person engaged in the business of processing screenings who wishes to process screenings imported from Canada under §361.7(c) that are otherwise prohibited under this part must enter into a compliance agreement under paragraph (c) of this section.

(c) A compliance agreement for the cleaning of imported seed or processing of otherwise prohibited screenings from Canada shall be a written agreement1 between a person engaged in such a business, the State in which the business operates, and APHIS, wherein the person agrees to comply with the provisions of this part and any conditions imposed pursuant thereto. Any compliance agreement may be canceled orally or in writing by the APHIS inspector who is monitoring its enforcement whenever the inspector finds that the person who entered into the compliance agreement has failed to comply with the provisions of this part or any conditions imposed pursuant thereto. If the cancellation is oral, the decision and the reasons for the decision shall be confirmed in writing, as promptly as circumstances permit. Any person whose compliance agreement has been canceled may appeal the decision to the Administrator, in writing, within 10 days after receiving written notification of the cancellation. The appeal shall state all of the facts and reasons upon which the person relies to show that the compliance agreement was wrongfully canceled. The Administrator shall grant or deny the appeal, in writing, stating the reasons for such decision, as promptly as circumstances permit. If there is a conflict as to any material fact, a hearing shall be held to resolve such conflict. Rules of practice concerning such a hearing will be adopted by the Administrator.

1Compliance Agreement forms are available without charge from Permit Unit, PPQ, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 136, Riverdale, MD 20737-1236, and from local offices of the Plant Protection and Quarantine. (Local offices are listed in telephone directories).

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§361.9   Recordkeeping.

(a) Each person importing agricultural seed or vegetable seed under this part must maintain a complete record, including copies of the declaration and labeling required under this part and a sample of seed, for each lot of seed imported. Except for the seed sample, which may be discarded 1 year after the entire lot represented by the sample has been disposed of by the person who imported the seed, the records must be maintained for 3 years following the importation.

(b) Each sample of vegetable seed and each sample of agricultural seed must be at least equal in weight to the sample size prescribed for noxious weed seed examination in table 1 of §361.5.

(c) An APHIS inspector shall, during normal business hours, be allowed to inspect and copy the records.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0124)

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§361.10   Costs and charges.

Unless a user fee is payable under §354.3 of this chapter, the services of an APHIS inspector during regularly assigned hours of duty and at the usual places of duty will be furnished without cost. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's provisions relating to overtime charges for an APHIS inspector's services are set forth in part 354 of this chapter. The U.S. Department of Agriculture will not be responsible for any costs or charges incident to inspections or compliance with this part, other than for the services of the APHIS inspector during regularly assigned hours of duty and at the usual places of duty. All expenses incurred by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (including travel, per diem or subsistence, and salaries of officers or employees of the Department) in connection with the monitoring of cleaning, labeling, other reconditioning, or destruction of seed, screenings, or refuse under this part shall be reimbursed by the owner or consignee of the seed or screenings.

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