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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR data is current as of November 13, 2019

Title 46Chapter ISubchapter L → Part 125


Title 46: Shipping


PART 125—GENERAL


Contents
§125.100   Applicability.
§125.103   Tonnage measurement.
§125.105   International certificates for OSVs of at least 6,000 GT ITC.
§125.110   Carriage of flammable or combustible liquid cargoes in bulk.
§125.115   Oil fuel tank protection.
§125.120   Carriage of noxious liquid substances in bulk by OSVs of less than 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned).
§125.125   Carriage of noxious liquid substances in bulk by OSVs of at least 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned).
§125.130   Carriage of packaged hazardous materials.
§125.140   Loadlines.
§125.150   Lifesaving systems.
§125.160   Definitions.
§125.170   Equivalents.
§125.180   Incorporation by reference.
§125.190   Right of appeal.

Authority: 46 U.S.C. 2103, 3306, 3307; 49 U.S.C. App. 1804; sec. 617, Pub. L. 111-281, 124 Stat. 2905; Department of Homeland Security Delegation No. 0170.1.

Source: CGD 82-004 and CGD 86-074, 62 FR 49321, Sept. 19, 1997, unless otherwise noted.

§125.100   Applicability.

(a) Except as provided by paragraphs (c) or (e) of this section, this subchapter applies to each offshore supply vessel (OSV) of United States flag contracted for, or the keel of which was laid, on or after March 15, 1996.

(b) Each OSV contracted for, or the keel of which was laid, before March 15, 1996, must have been constructed and inspected to comply with—

(1) The regulations in effect until March 15, 1996 (46

CFR subchapter I or subchapter T, as appropriate), as they existed at the time of construction; or

(2) The regulations in this subchapter.

(c) Each OSV permitted grandfathering under paragraph (b)(1) of this section must have completed construction and have a Certificate of Inspection by March 16, 1998.

(d) Each OSV of at least 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned), as defined in §125.160 of this part, contracted for, or the keel of which was laid, before August 18, 2014, must be constructed and inspected to comply with--

(1) The regulations in effect until August 18, 2014 (46 CFR subchapter I), as they existed at the time of construction; or

(2) The regulations in this subchapter.

(e) Each OSV constructed and inspected in accordance with paragraph (d)(1) of this section must complete construction and have a Certificate of Inspection by August 18, 2016.

(f) The regulations in this subchapter have preemptive effect over State or local regulations in the same field.

(g) As used in this subchapter, the term “vessels contracted for” refers not only to the contracting for the construction of a vessel, but also to the contracting for a major conversion to a vessel, the contracting for the conversion of a vessel to an offshore supply vessel or liftboat, and the changing of service or route of a vessel if such changing increases or modifies the general requirements for the vessel or increases the hazards to which it might be subjected.

Note to §125.100: Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular 8-91, “Initial and Subsequent Inspection of Uncertificated Existing Offshore Supply Vessels, Including Liftboats”, contains guidance on how to apply the regulations in 46 CFR subchapters I and T to OSVs.

[CGD 82-004 and CGD 86-074, 62 FR 49321, Sept. 19, 1997, as amended by USCG-2012-0208, 79 FR 48932, Aug. 18, 2014; USCG-2012-0196, 81 FR 48271, July 22, 2016]

§125.103   Tonnage measurement.

(a) An OSV of at least 6,000 gross tonnage, as measured under section 14302 of Title 46, United States Code (hereafter referred to as an OSV of at least 6,000 GT ITC), must apply all regulations of the Coast Guard that depend on the vessel's tonnage using the tonnage as measured under the Convention measurement system.

(b) An OSV that is measured only under section 14502 of Title 46, United States Code, and that is at least 500 gross register tons as measured under that system (hereafter referred to as an OSV of at least 500 GRT), must apply all regulations of the Coast Guard that depend on the vessel's tonnage as if the vessel's tonnage were at least 6,000 GT ITC.

(c) In this subchapter, tonnage thresholds expressed in terms of “gross tons” are applied using GRT, if assigned, and GT ITC if GRT is not assigned.

[USCG-2012-0208, 79 FR 48932, Aug. 18, 2014]

§125.105   International certificates for OSVs of at least 6,000 GT ITC.

An OSV of at least 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned) must obtain and maintain the following international certificates as a prerequisite to obtaining a Certificate of Inspection:

(a) Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate in accordance with the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended (SOLAS, 1974, as amended).

(b) Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate in accordance with SOLAS, 1974, as amended.

(c) Safety Management Certificate in accordance with SOLAS, 1974, as amended.

(d) International Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate in accordance with the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution at Sea, as amended (MARPOL 73/78).

(e) International Air Pollution Prevention Certificate in accordance with MARPOL 73/78.

(f) International Load Line Certificate in accordance with the International Convention on Load Lines, 1966, as subsequently modified by its Protocol of 1988, as amended.

[USCG-2012-0208, 79 FR 48933, Aug. 18, 2014]

§125.110   Carriage of flammable or combustible liquid cargoes in bulk.

(a) Except as provided by this section, no OSV may carry flammable or combustible liquid cargoes in bulk without the approval of the Commandant (CG-OES).

(b) An OSV may carry the following in integral tanks:

(1) Grade-D combustible liquids listed by §30.25-1 of this chapter, in quantities not to exceed 20 percent of the vessel's deadweight, except that the vessel may carry drilling fluids and excess fuel oil, Grade-E as well as Grade-D, without limit.

(2) Grade-E combustible liquids listed by §30.25-1 of this chapter, in quantities not to exceed 20 percent of the vessel's deadweight, except that the vessel may carry drilling fluids and excess fuel oil, Grade-D as well as Grade-E, without limit.

(3) Other flammable or combustible liquids as authorized in §125.125 of this part.

(c) An OSV may carry the following in fixed independent tanks on deck: Grade-B and lower-grade flammable and combustible liquids listed by §30.25-1 of this chapter, in quantities not to exceed 20 percent of the vessel's deadweight.

(d) An OSV may carry hazardous materials in portable tanks, in compliance with part 64 and subpart 98.30 of this chapter. A portable tank may be filled or discharged aboard the vessel if authorized by an endorsement on the vessel's Certificate of Inspection.

(e) On an OSV of at least 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned), tanks authorized for carriage of oil as defined by 33 CFR 157.03, including drilling fluids containing oil as defined by 33 CFR 157.03, must comply with double hull requirements stated in 33 CFR 157.10d.

Note to §125.110(e): Additional limitations on the carriage of flammable or combustible liquid cargoes are found in §127.650 of this part.

[CGD 82-004 and CGD 86-074, 62 FR 49321, Sept. 19, 1997, as amended by USCG-2002-13058, 67 FR 61279, Sept. 30, 2002; USCG-2009-0702, 74 FR 49234, Sept. 25, 2009; USCG-2012-0832, 77 FR 59781, Oct. 1, 2012; USCG-2012-0208, 79 FR 48933, Aug. 18, 2014]

§125.115   Oil fuel tank protection.

(a) An OSV of at least 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned) that is delivered after August 1, 2010, with an aggregate capacity of 600 cubic meters or more of oil fuel, must comply with the requirements of Regulation 12A of Annex I to MARPOL 73/78 (incorporated by reference, see §125.180) at all times.

(b) Transfer of excess fuel oil from the fuel supply tanks of an OSV of at least 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned) to an offshore drilling or production facility will not cause Subchapter D of this chapter to apply to the OSV, provided that the vessel is—

(1) Not a tankship as defined in 46 CFR 30.10-67; and

(2) In the service of oil exploitation.

[USCG-2012-0208, 79 FR 48933, Aug. 18, 2014]

§125.120   Carriage of noxious liquid substances in bulk by OSVs of less than 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned).

(a) Except as provided by this section, no OSV of less than 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned) may carry a noxious liquid substance (NLS) in bulk without the approval of the Commandant (CG-ENG).

(b) An OSV may carry in integral and fixed independent tanks NLSs listed by §153.2 of this chapter, in quantities not to exceed 20 percent of the vessel's deadweight.

(c) Each OSV carrying NLSs in bulk in integral tanks or fixed independent tanks must—

(1) Meet the definition of oceangoing in 33 CFR 151.05;

(2) Have a Certificate of Inspection or NLS Certificate (issued by the Coast Guard) endorsed with the name of the NLS cargo; and

(3) Have the Cargo Record Book prescribed in §153.490(a)(1) of this chapter.

(d) An OSV that does not meet the equipment requirements in §§153.470 through 153.491 of this chapter may not discharge NLS residues to the sea. The vessel's Certificate of Inspection or NLS Certificate will contain this restriction.

(e) Each OSV that discharges NLS residues to the sea must meet—

(1) The equipment requirements in §§153.470 through 153.491 of this chapter; and

(2) The operating requirements in §§153.901, 153.903, 153.909, and 153.1100 of this chapter.

[CGD 82-004 and CGD 86-074, 62 FR 49321, Sept. 19, 1997, as amended by USCG-2009-0702, 74 FR 49234, Sept. 25, 2009; USCG-2012-0832, 77 FR 59781, Oct. 1, 2012; USCG-2012-0208, 79 FR 48933, Aug. 18, 2014]

§125.125   Carriage of noxious liquid substances in bulk by OSVs of at least 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned).

(a) Except as provided by this section, no OSV of at least 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned) may carry a noxious liquid substance (NLS) in bulk without the approval of the Commandant (CG-ENG).

(b) An OSV of at least 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned) holding a valid Certificate of Fitness or a International Pollution Prevention Certificate for the Carriage of Noxious Liquid Substances in Bulk in accordance with the provisions of IMO Resolution A.673(16) (incorporated by reference, see §125.180), may carry in integral and fixed independent tanks—

(1) Drilling fluids, including muds, brines, and salts, subject to paragraph (c) of this section and §125.110 of this subpart; and

(2) Additional NLSs that are—

(i) Hazardous and noxious liquids listed in Appendix 1 of IMO Resolution A.673(16);

(ii) Products that may be carried on a type 3 ship, as defined by the IBC Code (incorporated by reference, see §125.180), except that cargoes with an “S” designation in the hazard column (column d) in Chapter 17 of the IBC Code may only be carried if they are not designated as toxic products as per section 15.12 of that Code; or

(iii) Not listed in Chapter 17 of the IBC Code, but otherwise meet the specific carriage requirements established by the Commandant (CG-ENG).

(c) An OSV of at least 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned) that meets the stability and cargo tank location requirements—

(1) Of IMO Resolution A.673(16) may carry any of those cargoes listed in paragraph (b) of this section up to a maximum aggregate quantity of 800 cubic meters or 40 percent of the vessel's deadweight calculated with a cargo density of 1.0, whichever is less; or

(2) Of a well stimulation vessel in accordance with IMO Resolution A.673(16) may carry—

(i) In unlimited quantity, those combustible cargoes in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, as defined in 46 CFR 30.10-15; and

(ii) In quantities not to exceed 20 percent of the vessel's deadweight, drilling fluids of Grade C, as defined in §30.10-22 of this chapter, and those cargoes in paragraph (b)(2) of this section.

(d) Each OSV carrying NLS in bulk in integral tanks or fixed independent tanks must maintain a Cargo Record Book and have on board an approved Shipboard Marine Pollution Emergency Plan in accordance with Annex II to MARPOL 73/78 (incorporated by reference, see §125.180).

(e) An OSV is not allowed to discharge NLS residues into the sea. This must be stated in the approved Procedures and Arrangements Manual required by Regulation 14 of Annex II to MARPOL 73/78. The Manual may, in lieu of the requirements as outlined in Annex II Appendix 4, be approved with the following changes:

(1) Section 2.6 may read “This vessel is prohibited from discharging Noxious Liquid Substance (NLS) residues to the sea, and is not equipped with an underwater discharge outlet.”

(2) Section 2.8 may be marked “N/A”.

(3) Section 2.9 may read, “This vessel is not equipped with a tank washing system.”, unless the vessel is equipped with a tank washing system.

(4) Section 3.3 may read, “This vessel is prohibited from discharging Noxious Liquid Substance (NLS) residues to the sea and is not equipped with a tank stripping system.”, unless the vessel is equipped with a tank stripping system.

(5) Section 4.4.2 may read, “This vessel is prohibited from discharging Noxious Liquid Substance (NLS) residues to the sea and is not equipped with a tank stripping system.”, unless the vessel is equipped with a tank stripping system.

(6) Section 4.4.3 may read, “This vessel is prohibited from discharging Noxious Liquid Substance (NLS) residues to the sea.”

(7) Section 4.4.6 should refer the reader to appropriate compatibility guides.

(8) Section 4.4.7 may read, “This vessel is prohibited from discharging Noxious Liquid Substance (NLS) residues to the sea. All NLS residues must be discharged to an appropriate reception facility.”

(9) Section 4.4.8 may read, “This vessel is prohibited from discharging Noxious Liquid Substance (NLS) residues to the sea.”

(10) Section 4.4.9 may read, “All cleaning agents and additives must be treated as substances of their assigned NLS category. This vessel is prohibited from discharging Noxious Liquid Substance (NLS) residues to the sea. All NLS residues must be discharged to an appropriate reception facility.”

(11) Section 4.4.10 may be marked “N/A”.

(f) An OSV of at least 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned) may transfer the following materials to and from a portable tank by following the procedures in §98.30, including §98.30-17 (b)(2), of this chapter:

(1) The materials in §98.30-5 of this chapter.

(2) Hazardous and noxious liquids listed in appendix 1 of IMO Resolution A.673(16).

(3) Products which may be carried on a type 2 or 3 ship, as defined by the IBC Code.

(4) Products which may be carried with a cargo containment system II or III, as defined by Table 1 to part 153.

(g) An OSV of at least 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned) may not transfer Certain Dangerous Cargoes, as defined by 33 CFR 160.204, to or from a portable tank.

[USCG-2012-0208, 79 FR 48933, Aug. 18, 2014]

§125.130   Carriage of packaged hazardous materials.

An OSV may carry packaged hazardous materials, or hazardous materials in portable tanks, if the materials are prepared, loaded, and stowed in compliance with 49 CFR parts 171 through 179, as applicable.

§125.140   Loadlines.

(a) For an OSV assigned a loadline, see subchapter E (Load Lines) of this chapter, for special requirements on strength, loadline markings, closure of openings, and the like.

(b) Each OSV of at least 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned) must be assigned an international load line in accordance with the International Convention on Load Lines, 1966, as amended (incorporated by reference, see §125.180).

[CGD 82-004 and CGD 86-074, 62 FR 49321, Sept. 19, 1997, as amended by USCG-2012-0208, 79 FR 48934, Aug. 18, 2014]

§125.150   Lifesaving systems.

(a) Lifesaving appliances and arrangements on OSVs of less than 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned) must comply with part 133 of this subchapter.

(b) Lifesaving appliances and arrangements on OSVs of at least 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned) must comply with subparts A, B, and D of part 199 of this chapter.

[USCG-2012-0208, 79 FR 48934, Aug. 18, 2014]

§125.160   Definitions.

Each term defined elsewhere in this chapter for a particular class of vessel applies to this subchapter unless a different definition is given in this section. As used by this subchapter—

Accommodations includes spaces such as at least the following:

(1) A space used as a messroom.

(2) A lounge.

(3) A sitting area.

(4) A recreation room.

(5) Quarters.

(6) A toilet space.

(7) A shower room.

Anniversary date means the day and the month of each year, which corresponds to the date of expiration of the Certificate of Inspection.

Anti-exposure suit means a protective suit designed for use by rescue boat crews and marine evacuation system parties.

Approval series means the first six digits of a number assigned by the Coast Guard to approved equipment. Where approval is based on a subpart of subchapter Q of this chapter, the approval series corresponds to the number of the subpart. A listing of current and formerly approved equipment and materials may be found on the Internet at: http://cgmix.uscg.mil/equipment.

Approved means approved by the Commandant, unless otherwise defined.

Bulkhead deck means the uppermost deck to which transverse watertight bulkheads and the watertight shell extend.

Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander means an officer of the Coast Guard designated by the Commandant to command activities of the Coast Guard within a Coast Guard district described by 33 CFR part 3, whose duties include the inspection, enforcement, and administration of laws for the safety and navigation of vessels.

Coastwise refers to a route not more than 20 nautical miles offshore on any of the following waters:

(1) Any ocean.

(2) The Gulf of Mexico.

(3) The Caribbean Sea.

(4) The Gulf of Alaska.

(5) The Bering Sea.

(6) Such other, similar waters as may be designated by the District Commander.

Combustible liquid means the same as in subpart 30.10 of this chapter.

Commandant means the Commandant of the Coast Guard or an authorized staff officer at Coast Guard headquarters designated by §1.01-05 of this chapter.

Commanding Officer, Marine Safety Center, means an officer of the Coast Guard designated by the Commandant to command activities of the Coast Guard within the Marine Safety Center, whose duties include review of plans for commercial vessels to ensure compliance with applicable laws and standards.

Crane means a revolving, gantry-mounted, or other type of fixed lifting device used for lifting or moving equipment or supplies. It does not include material handling equipment used for general ship's service, such as lifeboat davits, chain falls, come-alongs, or the like.

Credential means any or all of the following:

(1) Merchant mariner's document.

(2) Merchant mariner's license.

(3) STCW endorsement.

(4) Certificate of registry.

(5) Merchant mariner credential.

Crew means all persons carried on board the OSV to provide navigation and maintenance of the OSV, its machinery, systems, and arrangements essential for propulsion and safe navigation or to provide services for other persons on board.

Deadweight means, when measured in water of specific gravity 1.025, the difference in long tons between—

(1) The displacement of the vessel on even trim at “lightweight” as defined by subpart F of part 170 of this chapter; and

(2) The displacement of the vessel on even trim at the deepest load waterline.

Embarkation ladder means the ladder provided at survival craft embarkation stations to permit safe access to survival craft after launching.

Embarkation station means the place where a survival craft is boarded.

Existing offshore supply vessel is one contracted for, or the keel of which was laid, before March 15, 1996.

Flammable liquid means the same as in §30.10-22 of this chapter.

Float-free launching means that method of launching a survival craft or lifesaving appliance whereby the craft or appliance is automatically released from a sinking vessel and is ready for use.

Gas-free means free from dangerous concentrations of flammable or toxic gases.

Gross register tons or GRT means the gross ton measurement of the vessel under the Regulatory Measurement System described in 46 U.S.C. 14502.

Gross tonnage ITC or GT ITC means the gross tonnage measurement of the vessel under the Convention Measurement System described in 46 U.S.C. 14302.

Hazardous material means the same as in §153.2 of this chapter.

Immersion suit means a protective suit that reduces loss of body heat of a person wearing it in cold water.

Inflatable appliance means an appliance that depends upon nonrigid, gas-filled chambers for buoyancy and that is normally kept uninflated until ready for use.

Inflated appliance means an appliance that depends upon nonrigid, gas-filled chambers for buoyancy and that is kept inflated and ready for use at all times.

International voyage means a voyage between a country to which the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended (SOLAS 74/83) applies and a port outside that country.

Jacking system means any type of mechanical (including hydraulic) or electrical system used for elevating a liftboat.

Launching appliance or launching arrangement means the method or devices for transferring a survival craft or rescue boat from its stowed position to the water. For a launching arrangement using a davit, the term includes the davit, winch, and falls.

Length, relative to a vessel, means the length listed on the vessel's certificate of documentation or the “registered length” as defined by §69.53 of this chapter.

Lifejacket means a flotation device approved as a life preserver or lifejacket.

Liftboat means an OSV with movable legs capable of raising its hull above the surface of the sea.

Major conversion means a conversion of a vessel that, as determined by the Commandant—

(1) Substantially changes the dimensions or carrying capacity of the vessel;

(2) Changes the type of vessel;

(3) Substantially prolongs the life of the vessel; or

(4) Otherwise so changes the vessel that it is essentially a new vessel.

Marine evacuation system means an appliance designed to rapidly transfer large numbers of persons from an embarkation station by means of a passage to a floating platform for subsequent embarkation into associated survival craft, or directly into associated survival craft.

Marine inspector means any person authorized by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection (OCMI), to perform duties concerning the inspection, enforcement, and administration of laws for the safety and navigation of vessels.

Muster station means the place where the crew and offshore workers assemble before boarding a survival craft.

New offshore supply vessel is one—

(1) Contracted for, or the keel of which was laid, on or after March 15, 1996; or

(2) Which underwent a major conversion that was initiated on or after March 15, 1996.

Novel lifesaving appliance or arrangement means one that has new features not fully covered by the provisions of this part but that provides an equal or higher standard of safety.

Noxious liquid substance or NLS means the same as in §153.2 of this chapter.

Ocean refers to a route more than 20 nautical miles offshore on any of the following waters:

(1) Any ocean.

(2) The Gulf of Mexico.

(3) The Caribbean Sea.

(4) The Gulf of Alaska.

(5) The Bering Sea.

(6) Such other, similar waters as may be designated by the District Commander.

OCMI means the same as Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection.

Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection means any person of the Coast Guard so designated by the Commandant, to be in charge of an inspection zone for the performance of duties concerning the inspection, enforcement, and administration of laws for the safety and navigation of vessels.

Offshore supply vessel or OSV means a vessel that—

(1) Is propelled by machinery other than steam;

(2) Does not meet the definition of a passenger-carrying vessel in 46 U.S.C. 2101(22) or 46 U.S.C. 2101(35);

(3) Is more than 15 gross tons; and

(4) Regularly carries goods, supplies, individuals in addition to the crew, or equipment in support of exploration, exploitation, or production of offshore mineral or energy resources.

Offshore worker means an individual carried aboard an OSV and employed in a phase of exploration, exploitation, or production of offshore mineral or energy resources served by the vessel; but it does not include the master or a member of the crew engaged in the business of the vessel, who has contributed no consideration for carriage aboard and is paid for services aboard.

Quarters means any space where sleeping accommodations are provided.

Rescue boat means a boat designed to rescue persons in distress and to marshal survival craft.

Restricted service means service in areas within 12 hours of a harbor of safe refuge or in areas where a liftboat may be jacked up to meet the 100-knot-wind severe-storm criteria of §174.255(c) of this chapter.

Seagoing condition means the operating condition of the OSV with the personnel, equipment, fluids, and ballast necessary for safe operation on the waters where the OSV operates.

Survival craft means a craft capable of sustaining the lives of persons in distress from the time of abandoning the OSV on which the persons were originally carried. The term includes lifeboats, liferafts, buoyant apparatus, and lifefloats, but does not include rescue boats.

Underwater survey means the examination of the vessel's underwater hull including all through-hull fittings and appurtenances, while the vessel is afloat.

[CGD 82-004 and CGD 86-074, 62 FR 49321, Sept. 19, 1997, as amended by USCG-1999-4976, 65 FR 6505, Feb. 9, 2000; USCG-2000-6858, 67 FR 21082, Apr. 29, 2002; USCG-2007-29018, 72 FR 53966, Sept. 21, 2007; USCG-2006-24371, 74 FR 11266, Mar. 16, 2009; USCG-2012-0208, 79 FR 48934, Aug. 18, 2014; USCG-2015-0867, 80 FR 62469, Oct. 16, 2015]

§125.170   Equivalents.

A substitution for fittings, materials, equipment, arrangements, calculations, information, or tests required by this subchapter may be accepted by the cognizant OCMI; by the Commanding Officer, Marine Safety Center; by the District Commander; or by the Commandant, if the substitution provides an equivalent level of safety.

§125.180   Incorporation by reference.

(a) Certain material is incorporated by reference into this subchapter with the approval of the Director of the Federal Register under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. To enforce any edition other than that specified in this section, the Coast Guard must publish notice of change in the Federal Register and the material must be available to the public. All approved material is available for inspection at the U.S. Coast Guard, Office of Operating and Environmental Standards (CG-OES), 2703 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue SE., Stop 7509, Washington, DC 20593-7126, and is available from the sources listed below. It is also available for inspection at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal__register/code__of__federal__regulations/ibr__locations.html.

(b) American Bureau of Shipping (ABS), ABS Plaza, 16855 Northchase Drive, Houston, TX 77060, 281-877-5800, http://www.eagle.org.

(1) Rules for Building and Classing Steel Vessels Under 61 Meters (200 Ft) in Length, 1983, IBR approved for §127.210.

(2) Rules for Building and Classing Steel Vessels, 1995, IBR approved for §§127.210 and 129.360.

(3) Rules for Building and Classing Aluminum Vessels, 1975, IBR approved for §127.210.

(4) Rules for Building and Classing Mobile Offshore Drilling Units, 1994, IBR approved for §§133.140 and 133.150.

(c) American National Standards Institute (ANSI), 25 West 43rd St., New York, NY 10036, 212-642-4900, http://www.ansi.org.

(1) B 31.1-1986—Code for Pressure Piping, Power Piping, IBR approved for §128.240.

(2) Z 26.1-1977 (including 1980 Supplement)—Safety Code for Safety Glazing Materials for Glazing Motor Vehicles Operating on Land Highways, IBR approved for §127.430.

(d) American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) International, Three Park Avenue, New York, NY 10016-5990, 800-843-2763, http://www.asme.org.

(1) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section I, Power Boilers, July 1989 with 1989 addenda, IBR approved for §128.240.

(2) [Reserved]

(e) ASTM International (formerly American Society for Testing and Materials), 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA 19428-2959, 610-832-9500, http://www.astm.org.

(1) ASTM D 93-97—Standard Test Methods for Flash Point by Pensky-Martens Closed Cup Tester (“ASTM D 93”), IBR approved for §128.310(a) and (b).

(2) ASTM F1014—02 (Reapproved 2007)—Standard Specification for Flashlights on Vessels, approved May 1, 2007, IBR approved for §132.365(b).

(f) American Yacht and Boat Council, Inc. (AYBC): 3069 Solomon's Island Rd., Edgewater, MD 21037-1416, 410-990-4460, http://www.abycinc.org.

(1) A-3-1993—Galley Stoves, IBR approved for §129.550.

(2) A-7-1970—Recommended Practices and Standards Covering Boat Heating Systems, IBR approved for §129.550.

(3) E-1-1972—Bonding of Direct-Current Systems, IBR approved for §129.120.

(4) E-8-1994—Alternating-Current (AC) Electrical Systems on Boats, IBR approved for §129.120.

(5) E-9-1990—Direct-Current (DC) Electrical Systems on Boats, IBR approved for §129.120.

(g) Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), IEEE Service Center, 445 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08855, 732-981-0060, http://www.ieee.org.

(1) No. 45-1977—Recommended Practice for Electric Installations on Shipboard, IBR approved for §129.340.

(2) [Reserved]

(h) International Maritime Organization (IMO), Publications Section, 4 Albert Embankment, London SE1 7SR, United Kingdom, + 44 (0)20 7735 7611, http://www.imo.org.

(1) International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, as modified by the Protocol of 1978 relating thereto, Consolidated Edition, 2006 (“MARPOL 73/78”), IBR approved for §§125.115(a) and 125.125(d) and (e).

(2) International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, Consolidated Edition, 1992 (“SOLAS 74/83”), IBR approved for §126.170.

(3) International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended, Consolidated Edition, 2009, including Erratum (“SOLAS, 1974, as amended”), IBR approved for §§127.225(a), 127.610(a), 127.620, 127.630, and 127.640(a).

(4) Resolution A.520(13)—Code of Practice for the Evaluation, Testing and Acceptance of Prototype Novel Life-saving Appliances and Arrangements, dated 17 November, 1983, IBR approved for §133.40.

(5) Resolution A.658(16)—Use and Fitting of Retro-Reflective Materials on Life-saving Appliances, dated 20 November, 1989, IBR approved for §§131.855, 131.875, and 133.70.

(6) Guidelines for the Transport and Handling of Limited Amounts of Hazardous and Noxious Liquid Substances in Bulk on Offshore Support Vessels, 2007 edition (“Resolution A.673(16)”), IBR approved for §125.125(b).

(7) Resolution A.760(18)—Symbols Related to Life-Saving Appliances and Arrangements, dated 17 November, 1993, IBR approved for §§131.875, 133.70, and 133.90.

(8) International Convention on Load Lines, 1966 and Protocol of 1988, as amended in 2003, Consolidated Edition, 2005 (“International Convention on Load Lines, 1966”), IBR approved for §125.140(b).

(9) Annex 7 to IMO MEPC 52/54, Report of the Marine Environment Protection Committee on its Fifty-Second Session, “Resolution MEPC.119(52), 2004 Amendments to the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk (IBC Code),” adopted October 15, 2004 (“IBC Code”), IBR approved for §125.125(b).

(i) National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02269-9101, 617-770-3000, http://www.nfpa.org:

(1) NFPA 10—Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers, 1994 Edition, IBR approved for §132.350.

(2) NFPA 70, National Electrical Code, 2011 Edition, IBR approved for §§129.320(e), 129.340(d) and (n), and 129.370(c).

(3) NFPA 302—Fire Protection Standard for Pleasure and Commercial Motor Craft, 1994 Edition, IBR approved for §129.550.

(4) NFPA 306—Control of Gas Hazards on Vessels, 1993 Edition, IBR approved for §126.160.

(5) NFPA 1963—Fire Hose Connections, 1993 Edition, IBR approved for §132.130.

(j) UL (formerly Underwriters Laboratories), 12 Laboratory Drive, P.O. Box 13995, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, 919-549-1400, http://www.ul.com.

(1) UL 19, Standard for Safety for Lined Fire Hose and Hose Assemblies, Twelfth Edition, approved November 30, 2001, IBR approved for §132.130.

(2) UL 57-1976—Electric Lighting Fixtures, IBR approved for §129.410.

(3) UL 486A-1992—Wire Connectors and Soldering Lugs for Use with Copper Conductors, IBR approved for §129.340.

(4) UL 489-1995—Molded-Case Circuit Breakers and Circuit-Breaker Enclosures, IBR approved for §129.380.

(5) UL 595-1991—Marine-Type Electric Lighting Fixtures, IBR approved for §129.410.

(6) UL 1570-1995—Fluorescent Lighting Fixtures, IBR approved for §129.410.

(7) UL 1571-1995—Incandescent Lighting Fixtures, IBR approved for §129.410.

(8) UL 1572-1995—High Intensity Discharge Lighting Fixtures, IBR approved for §129.410.

(9) UL 1573-1995—Stage and Studio Lighting Units, IBR approved for §129.410.

(10) UL 1574-1995—Track Lighting Systems, IBR approved for §129.410.

[USCG-2012-0208, 79 FR 48934, Aug. 18, 2014, amended by 79 FR 62358, Oct. 17, 2014; USCG-2012-0196, 81 FR 48271, July 22, 2016]

§125.190   Right of appeal.

Any person directly affected by a decision or action taken under this part, by or on behalf of the Coast Guard, may appeal from the decision or action in compliance with subpart 1.03 of this chapter.

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