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e-CFR data is current as of October 16, 2020

Title 40Chapter ISubchapter A → Part 20


Title 40: Protection of Environment


PART 20—CERTIFICATION OF FACILITIES


Contents
§20.1   Applicability.
§20.2   Definitions.
§20.3   General provisions.
§20.4   Notice of intent to certify.
§20.5   Applications.
§20.6   State certification.
§20.7   General policies.
§20.8   Requirements for certification.
§20.9   Cost recovery.
§20.10   Revocation.
Appendix A to Part 20—Guidelines for Certification

Authority: Secs. 301, 704, 80 Stat. 379, 83 Stat. 667; 5 U.S.C. 301, 26 U.S.C. 169.

Source: 36 FR 22382, Nov. 25, 1971, unless otherwise noted.

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§20.1   Applicability.

The regulations of this part apply to certifications by the Administrator of water or air pollution control facilities for purposes of section 169 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, as amended, 26 U.S.C. 169, as to which the amortization period began after December 31, 1975. Certification of air or water pollution control facilities as to which the amortization period began before January 1, 1976, will continue to be governed by Environmental Protection Agency regulations published November 25, 1971, at 36 FR 22382. Applicable regulations of the Department of Treasury are at 26 CFR 1.169 et seq.

[43 FR 1340, Jan. 9, 1978]

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§20.2   Definitions.

As used in this part, the following terms shall have the meaning indicated below:

(a) Act means, when used in connection with water pollution control facilities, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.) or, when used in connection with air pollution control facilities, the Clean Air Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 1857 et seq.).

(b) State certifying authority means:

(1) For water pollution control facilities, the State pollution control agency as defined in section 502 of the Act.

(2) For air pollution control facilities, the air pollution control agency designated pursuant to section 302(b)(1) of the Act; or

(3) For both air and water pollution control facilities, any interstate agency authorized to act in place of the certifying agency of a State.

(c) Applicant means any person who files an application with the Administrator for certification that a facility is in compliance with the applicable regulations of Federal agencies and in furtherance of the general policies of the United States for cooperation with the States in the prevention and abatement of water or air pollution under the Act.

(d) Administrator means the Administrator, Environmental Protection Agency.

(e) Regional Administrator means the Regional designee appointed by the Administrator to certify facilities under this part.

(f) Facility means property comprising any new identifiable treatment facility which removes, alters, disposes of, stores, or prevents the creation of pollutants, contaminants, wastes, or heat.

(g) State means the States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Canal Zone, Guam, American Samoa, the Virgin Islands, and the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands.

[36 FR 22382, Nov. 25, 1971, as amended at 43 FR 1340, Jan. 9, 1978]

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§20.3   General provisions.

(a) An applicant shall file an application in accordance with this part for each separate facility for which certification is sought; Provided, That one application shall suffice in the case of substantially identical facilities which the applicant has installed or plans to install in connection with substantially identical properties; Provided further, That an application may incorporate by reference material contained in an application previously submitted by the applicant under this part and pertaining to substantially identical facilities.

(b) The applicant shall, at the time of application to the State certifying authority, submit an application in the form prescribed by the Administrator to the Regional Administrator for the region in which the facility is located.

(c) Applications will be considered complete and will be processed when the Regional Administrator receives the completed State certification.

(d) Applications may be filed prior or subsequent to the commencement of construction, acquisition, installation, or operation of the facility.

(e) An amendment to an application shall be submitted in the same manner as the original application and shall be considered a part of the original application.

(f) If the facility is certified by the Regional Administrator, notice of certification will be issued to the Secretary of the Treasury or his delegate, and a copy of the notice shall be forwarded to the applicant and to the State certifying authority. If the facility is denied certification, the Regional Administrator will advise the applicant and State certifying authority in writing of the reasons therefor.

(g) No certification will be made by the Regional Administrator for any facility prior to the time it is placed in operation and the application, or amended application, in connection with such facility so states.

(h) An applicant may appeal any decision of the Regional Administrator which:

(1) Denies certification;

(2) Disapproves the applicant's suggested method of allocating costs pursuant to §20.8(e); or

(3) Revokes a certification pursuant to §20.10.

Any such appeal may be taken by filing with the Administrator within 30 days from the date of the decision of the Regional Administrator a written statement of objections to the decision appealed from. Within 60 days after receipt of such appeal the Administrator shall affirm, modify, or revoke the decision of the Regional Administrator, stating in writing his reasons therefor.

[36 FR 22382, Nov. 25, 1971, as amended at 43 FR 1340, Jan. 9, 1978]

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§20.4   Notice of intent to certify.

(a) On the basis of applications submitted prior to the construction, reconstruction, erection, acquisition, or operation of a facility, the Regional Administrator may notify applicants that such facility will be certified if:

(1) The Regional Administrator determines that such facility, if constructed, reconstructed, erected, acquired, installed, and operated in accordance with such application will be in compliance with requirements identified in §20.8; and if

(2) The application is accompanied by a statement from the State certifying authority that such facility, if constructed, reconstructed, acquired, erected, installed, and operated in accordance with such application, will be in conformity with the State program or requirements for abatement or control of water or air pollution.

(b) Notice of actions taken under this section will be given to the appropriate State certifying authority.

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§20.5   Applications.

Applications for certification under this part shall be submitted in such manner as the Administrator may prescribe, shall be signed by the applicant or agent thereof, and shall include the following information:

(a) Name, address, and Internal Revenue Service identifying number of the applicant;

(b) Type and narrative description of the new identifiable facility for which certification is (or will be) sought, including a copy of schematic or engineering drawings, and a description of the function and operation of such facility;

(c) Address (or proposed address) of facility location;

(d) A general description of the operation in connection with which the facility is (or will be) used and a description of the specific process or processes resulting in discharges or emissions which are (or will be) controlled or prevented by the facility.

(e) If the facility is (or will be) used in connection with more than one plant or other property, one or more of which were not in operation before January 1, 1976, a description of the operations of the facility in respect to each plant or other property, including a reasonable allocation of the costs of the facility among the plants being serviced, and a description of the reasoning and accounting method or methods used to arrive at these allocations.

(f) A description of the effect of the facility in terms of type and quantity of pollutants, contaminants, wastes, or heat, removed, altered, stored, disposed of, or prevented by the facility.

(g) If the facility performs a function other than removal, alteration, storage, prevention, or disposal of pollutants, contaminants, wastes, or heat, a description of all functions performed by the facility, including a reasonable identification of the costs of the facility allocable to removal, alteration, storage, prevention, or disposal of pollutants, contaminants, wastes, or heat and a description of the reasoning and accounting method or methods used to arrive at the allocation.

(h) Date when such construction, reconstruction, or erection will be completed or when such facility was (or will be) acquired;

(i) Date when such facility is placed (or is intended to be placed) in operation;

(j) Identification of the applicable State and local water or air pollution control requirements and standards, if any;

(k) Expected useful life of facility;

(l) Cost of construction, acquisition, installation, operation, and maintenance of the facility;

(m) Estimated profits reasonably expected to be derived through the recovery of wastes or otherwise in the operation of the facility over the period referred to in paragraph (a)(6) of 26 CFR 1.169-2;

(n) The percentage (if any, and if the taxpayer claims that the percentage is 5 percent or less) by which the facility (1) increases the output or capacity, (2) extends the useful life, or (3) reduces the total operating costs of the operating unit of the plant or other property most directly associated with the pollution control facility and a description of the reasoning and accounting method or methods used to arrive at this percentage.

(o) Such other information as the Administrator deems necessary for certification.

[36 FR 22382, Nov. 25, 1971, as amended at 43 FR 1340, Jan. 9, 1978]

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§20.6   State certification.

The State certification shall be by the State certifying authority having jurisdiction with respect to the facility in accordance with 26 U.S.C. 169(d)(1)(A) and (d)(2). The certification shall state that the facility described in the application has been constructed, reconstructed, erected, or acquired in conformity with the State program or requirements for abatement or control of water or air pollution. It shall be executed by an agent or officer authorized to act on behalf of the State certifying authority.

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§20.7   General policies.

(a) The general policies of the United States for cooperation with the States in the prevention and abatement of water pollution are: To enhance the quality and value of our water resources; to eliminate or reduce the pollution of the nation's waters and tributaries thereof; to improve the sanitary condition of surface and underground waters; and to conserve such waters for public water supplies, propagation of fish and aquatic life and wildlife, recreational purposes, and agricultural, industrial, and other legitimate uses.

(b) The general policy of the United States for cooperation with the States in the prevention and abatement of air pollution is to cooperate with and to assist the States and local governments in protecting and enhancing the quality of the Nation's air resources by the prevention and abatement of conditions which cause or contribute to air pollution which endangers the public health or welfare.

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§20.8   Requirements for certification.

(a) Subject to §20.9, the Regional Administrator will certify a facility if he makes the following determinations:

(1) It has been certified by the State certifying authority.

(2) That the facility:

(i) Removes, alters, disposes of, stores, or prevents the creation of pollutants, contaminants, wastes, or heat, which, but for the facility, would be released into the environment;

(ii) Does not by a factor or more than 5 percent: (A) Increase the output or capacity, (B) extend the useful life, or (C) reduce the total operating costs of the operating unit (of the plant or other property) most directly associated with the pollution control facility; and

(iii) Does not significantly alter the nature of the manufacturing or production process or facility.

(3) The applicant is in compliance with all regulations of Federal agencies applicable to use of the facility, including conditions specified in any NPDES permit issued to the applicant under section 402 of the Act.

(4) The facility furthers the general policies of the United States and the States in the prevention and abatement of pollution.

(5) The applicant has complied with all the other requirements of this part and has submitted all requested information.

(b) In determining whether use of a facility furthers the general policies of the United States and the States in the prevention and abatement of water pollution, the Regional Administrator shall consider whether such facility is consistent with the following, insofar as they are applicable to the waters which will be affected by the facility:

(1) All applicable water quality standards, including water quality criteria and plans of implementation and enforcement established pursuant to section 303 of the Act or State laws or regulations;

(2) Decisions issued pursuant to section 310 of the Act;

(3) Water pollution control programs required pursuant to any one or more of the following sections of the Act: Section 306, section 307, section 311, section 318, or section 405; or in order to be consistent with a plan under section 208.

(c) In determining whether use of a facility furthers the general policies of the United States and the States in the prevention and abatement of air pollution, the Regional Administrator shall consider whether such facility is consistent with and meets the following requirements, insofar as they are applicable to the air which will be affected by the facility;

(1) Plans for the implementation, maintenance, and enforcement of ambient air quality standards adopted or promulgated pursuant to section 110 of the Act;

(2) Recommendations issued pursuant to sections 103(e) and 115 of the Act which are applicable to facilities of the same type and located in the area to which the recommendations are directed;

(3) Local government requirements for control of air pollution, including emission standards;

(4) Standards promulgated by the Administrator pursuant to the Act.

(d) A facility that removes elements or compounds from fuels that would be released as pollutants when such fuels are burned is eligible for certification if the facility is—

(1) Used in connection with a plant or other property in operation before January 1, 1976 (whether located and used at a particular plant or as a centralized facility for one or more plants), and

(2) Is otherwise eligible for certification.

(e) Where a facility is used in connection with more than one plant or other property, one or more of which were not in operation before January 1, 1976, or where a facility will perform a function other than the removal, alteration, storage, disposal, or prevention of pollutants, contaminants, wastes, or heat, the Regional Administrator will so indicate on the notice of certification and will approve or disapprove the applicant's suggested method of allocating costs. If the Regional Administrator disapproves the applicant's suggested method, he shall identify the proportion of costs allocable to each such plant, or to the removal, alteration, storage, disposal, or prevention of pollutants, contaminants, wastes, or heat.

[36 FR 22382, Nov. 25, 1971, as amended at 43 FR 1341, Jan. 9, 1978]

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§20.9   Cost recovery.

Where it appears that, by reason of estimated profits to be derived through the recovery of wastes, through separate charges for use of the facility in question, or otherwise in the operation of such facility, all or a portion of its costs may be recovered over the period referred to in paragraph (a)(6) of 26 CFR 1.169-2, the Regional Administrator shall so signify in the notice of certification. Determinations as to the meaning of the term estimated profits and as to the percentage of the cost of a certified facility which will be recovered over such period shall be made by the Secretary of the Treasury, or his delegate: Provided, That in no event shall estimated profits be deemed to arise from the use or reuse by the applicant of recovered waste.

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§20.10   Revocation.

Certification hereunder may be revoked by the Regional Administrator on 30 days written notice to the applicant, served by certified mail, whenever the Regional Administrator shall determine that the facility in question is no longer being operated consistent with the §20.8 (b) and (c) criteria in effect at the time the facility was placed in service. Within such 30-day period, the applicant may submit to the Regional Administrator such evidence, data or other written materials as the applicant may deem appropriate to show why the certification hereunder should not be revoked. Notification of a revocation under this section shall be given to the Secretary of the Treasury or his delegate. See 26 CFR 1.169-4(b)(1).

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Appendix A to Part 20—Guidelines for Certification

1. General.

2. Air Pollution Control Facilities.

a. Pollution control or treatment facilities normally eligible for certification.

b. Air pollution control facility boundaries.

c. Examples of eligibility limits.

d. Replacement of manufacturing process by another nonpolluting process.

3. Water Pollution Control Facilities.

a. Pollution control or treatment facilities normally eligible for certification.

b. Examples of eligibility limits.

4. Multiple-purpose facilities.

5. Facilities serving both old and new plants.

6. State certification.

7. Dispersal of pollutants.

8. Profit-making facilities.

9. Multiple applications.

1. General. Section 2112 of the Tax Reform Act of 1976 (Pub. L. 94-455, October 4, 1976) amended section 169 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, “Amortization of Pollution Control Facilities.” The amendment made permanent the rapid amortization provisions of section 704 of the Tax Reform Act of 1969 (Pub. L. 91-172, December 30, 1969) and redefined eligibility limits to allow certification of facilities which prevent the creation or emission of pollutants.

The law defines a certified pollution control facility as a new identifiable treatment facility which is:

(a) Used in connection with a plant or other property in operation before January 1, 1976, to abate or control air or water pollution by removing, altering, disposing of, storing, or preventing the creation or emission of pollutants, contaminants, wastes, or heat;

(b) Constructed, reconstructed, erected or (if purchased) first placed in service by the taxpayer after December 31, 1975;

(c) Not to significantly increase the output or capacity, extend the useful life, alter the nature of the manufacturing or production process or facility or reduce the total operating costs of the operating unit of the plant or other property most directly associated with the pollution control facility (as suggested by the legislative history, EPA regulations define the term significant as any increase, reduction or extension greater than 5%); and

(d) Certified by both State and Federal authorities, as provided in section 169(d)(1) (A) and (B) of the Internal Revenue Code.

If the facility is a building, the statute requires that it be exclusively devoted to pollution control. Most questions as to whether a facility is a building and, if so, whether it is exclusively devoted to pollution control are resolved by §1.169-2(b)(2) of the Treasury Department regulations.

Since a treatment facility is eligible only if it furthers the general policies of the United States under the Clean Air Act and the Clean Water Act, a facility will be certified only if its purpose is to improve the quality of the air or water outside the plant. Facilities to protect the health or safety of employees inside the plant are not eligible.

Facilities installed before January 1, 1976, in plants placed in operation after December 31, 1968, are ineligible for certification under the statute. 26 U.S.C. 169.

2. Air pollution control facilities.

a. Pollution control or treatment facilities normally eligible for certification. The following devices are illustrative of facilities for removal, alteration, disposal, storage or preventing the creation or emission of air pollution:

(1) Inertial separators (cyclones, etc.).

(2) Wet collection devices (scrubbers).

(3) Electrostatic precipitators.

(4) Cloth filter collectors (baghouses).

(5) Director fired afterburners.

(6) Catalytic afterburners.

(7) Gas absorption equipment.

(8) Vapor condensers.

(9) Vapor recovery systems.

(10) Floating roofs for storage tanks.

(11) Fuel cleaning equipment.

(12) Combinations of the above.

(b) Air Pollution control facility boundaries. Most facilities are systems consisting of several parts. A facility need not start at the point where the gaseous effluent leaves the last unit of the processing equipment, nor will it always extend to the point where the effluent is emitted to the atmosphere or existing stack, breeching, ductwork or vent. It includes all the auxiliary equipment used to operate the control system, such as fans, blowers, ductwork, valves, dampers and electrical equipment. It also includes all equipment used to handle, store, transport or dispose of the collected pollutants.

(c) Examples of eligibility limits. The amortization deduction is limited to new identifiable treatment facilities which remove, alter, destroy, dispose of, store, or prevent the creation or emission of pollutants, contaminants or wastes. It is not available for all expenditures for air pollution control and is limited to devices which are installed for the purpose of pollution control and which actually remove, alter, destroy, dispose of, store or prevent the creation or emission of pollutants by removing potential pollutants at any stage of the production process.

(1) Boiler modifications or replacements. Modifications of boilers to accommodate cleaner fuels are not eligible for rapid amortization: e.g., removal of stokers from a coal-fired boiler and the addition of gas or oil burners. The purpose of the burners is to produce heat, and they are not identifiable as treatment facilities nor do they prevent the creation or emission of pollutants by removing potential pollutants. A new gas or oil-fired boiler that replaces a coal-fired boiler would also be ineligible for certification.

(2) Fuel processing. Eligible air pollution control facilities include preprocessing equipment which removes potential air pollutants from fuels before they are burned. A desulfurization facility would thus be eligible provided it is used in connection with the plant where the desulfurized coal will be burned or is used as a centralized facility for one or more plants. However, fluidized bed facilities would generally not be eligible for rapid amortization. Such facilities would almost certainly increase output or capacity, reduce total operating costs, or extend the useful life of the plant or other property by more than 5%, since the boiler itself would be the operating unit of the plant most closely associated with the pollution control facility. Where the Regional Office and the taxpayer disagree as to the applicability of the 5% rule, the Regional office should nonetheless certify the facility if it is otherwise eligible and leave the ultimate determination to the Treasury Department. The certification should alert Treasury to the possibility that the facility is ineligible for rapid amortization.

(3) Incinerators. The addition of an afterburner, secondary combustion chamber or particulate collector would be eligible as would any device added to effect more efficient combustion.

(4) Collection devices used to collect products or process material. In some manufacturing operations, devices are used to collect product or process material, as in the case of the manufacture of carbon black. The baghouse would be eligible for certification, but the certification should notify the Treasury Department of the profitable waste recovery involved. (See paragraph 8 below.)

(5) Intermittent control systems. Measuring devices which inform the taxpayer that ambient air quality standards are being exceeded are not eligible for certification since they do not physically remove, alter, destroy, dispose of, store or prevent the creation or emission of pollutants, but merely act as a signal to curtail operations. Of course, measuring devices used in connection with an eligible pollution control facility would be eligible.

d. Replacement of manufacturing process by another, nonpolluting process. An installation does not qualify for certification where it uses a process known to be cleaner than an alternative, but which does not actually remove, alter, destroy, dispose of, store or prevent the creation or emission of pollutants by removing potential pollutants at any stage in the production process. For example, a minimally polluting electric induction furnace to melt cast iron which replaces, or is installed instead of, a heavily polluting iron cupola furnace would be ineligible for this reason and because it is not an identifiable treatment facility. However, if the replacement equipment has an air pollution control device added to it, the control device would be eligible even though the process equipment would not. For example, where a primary copper smelting reverberatory furnace is replaced by a flash smelting furnace, followed by the installation of a contact sulfuric acid plant, the acid plant would qualify since it is a control device not necessary to the production process. The flash smelting furnace would not qualify because its purpose is to produce copper matte.

3. Water Pollution Control Facilities.

a. Pollution control or treatment facilities normally eligible for certification. The following types of equipment are illustrative of facilities to remove, alter, destroy, store or prevent the creation of water pollution:

(1) Pretreatment facilities which neutralize or stabilize industrial or sanitary wastes, or both, from a point immediately preceding the point of such treatment to the point of disposal to, and acceptance by, a publicly-owned treatment works. The necessary pumping and transmitting facilities are also eligible.

(2) Treatment facilities which neutralize or stabilize industrial or sanitary wastes, or both, to comply with Federal, State or local effluent or water quality standards, from a point immediately preceding the point of such treatment to the point of disposal, including necessary pumping and transmitting facilities, including those for recycle or segregation of wastewater.

(3) Ancillary devices and facilities such as lagoons, ponds and structures for storage, recycle, segregation or treatment, or any combination of these, of wastewaters or wastes from a plant or other property.

(4) Devices, equipment or facilities constructed or installed for the primary purpose of recovering a by-product of the operation (saleable or otherwise) previously lost either to the atmosphere or to the waste effluent. Examples are:

(A) A facility to concentrate and recover vaporous by-products from a process stream for reuse as raw feedstock or for resale, unless the estimated profits from resale exceed the cost of the facility (see paragraph 8 below).

(B) A facility to concentrate or remove gunk or similar tars or polymerized tar-like materials from the process waste effluent previously discharged in the plant effluents. Removal may occur at any stage of the production process.

(C) A device used to extract or remove insoluble constitutents from a solid or liquid by use of a selective solvent; an open or closed tank or vessel in which such extraction or removal occurs; a diffusion battery of tanks or vessels for countercurrent decantation, extraction, or leaching, etc.

(D) A skimmer or similar device for removing grease, oils and fat-like materials from the process or effluent stream.

(b) Examples of eligibility limits. (1) In-plant process changes which may result in the reduction or elimination of pollution but which do not themselves remove, alter, destroy, dispose of, store or prevent the creation of pollutants by removing potential pollutants at some point in the process stream are not eligible for certification.

(2) A device, piece of equipment or facility is not eligible if it is associated with or included in a stream for subsurface injection of untreated or inadequately treated industrial or sanitary waste.

4. Multiple-purpose facilities. A facility can qualify for rapid amortization if it serves a function other than the abatement of pollution (unless it is a building). Otherwise, the effect might be to discourage installation of sensible pollution abatement facilities in favor of less efficient single-function facilities.

The regulations require applicants to state what percentage of the cost of a facility is properly allocable to its abatement function and to justify the allocation. The Regional Office will review these allocations, and the certification will inform the Treasury Department if the allocation appears to be incorrect. Although not generally necessary or desireable, site inspections may be appropriate in cases involving large sums of money or unusual types of equipment.

5. Facilities serving both old and new plants. The statute provides that pollution control facilities must be used in connection with a plant or other property in operation before January 1, 1976. When a facility is used in connection with both pre-1976 and newer property, it may qualify for rapid amortization to the extent it is used in connection with pre-1976 property.

Again, the applicant will submit a theory of allocation for review by the Regional Office. The usual method of allocation is to compare the effluent capacity of the pre-1976 plant to the treatment capacity of the control facility. For example, if the old plant has a capacity of 80 units of effluent (but an average output of 60 units), the new plant has a capacity of 40 units (but an average output of 20 units), and the control facility has a capacity of 150 units, then 80150 of the cost of the control facility would be eligible for rapid amortization.

If a taxpayer presents a seemingly reasonable method of allocation different from the foregoing, Regional Office personnel should consult with the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards or the Office of Water Planning and Standards, and with the Office of General Counsel.

6. State certification. To qualify for rapid amortization under section 169, a facility must first be certified by the State as having been installed “in conformity with the State program or requirements for abatement or control of water or atmospheric pollution or contamination.” Significantly, the statute does not say that the State must require that a facility be installed. If use of a facility will not actually contravene a State requirement, the State may certify. However, since State certification is a prerequisite to EPA certification, EPA may not certify if the State has denied certification for whatever reason.

It should be noted that certification of a facility does not constitute the personal warranty of the certifying official that the conditions of the statute have been met. EPA certification is binding on the Government only to the extent the submitted facts are accurate and complete.

7. Dispersal of pollutants. Section 169 applies to facilities which remove, alter, destroy, dispose of, store or prevent the creation or emission of pollutants—including heat. Facilities which merely disperse pollutants (such as tall stacks) do not qualify. However, there is no way to dispose of heat other than by transferring B.t.u.'s to the environment. A cooling tower is therefore eligible for certification provided it is used in connection with a pre-1976 plant. A cooling pond or an addition to an outfall structure which results in a decrease in the amount by which the temperature of the receiving water is raised and which meets applicable State standards is likewise eligible.

8. Profit-making facilities. The statute denies rapid amortization where the cost of pollution control facilities will be recovered from profits derived through the recovery or wastes or otherwise.

If a facility recovers marketable wastes, estimated profits on which are not sufficient to recover the entire cost of the facility, the amortization basis of the facility will be reduced in accordance with Treasury Department regulations. The responsibility of the Regional Offices is merely to identify for the Treasury Department those cases in which estimated profits will arise. The Treasury Department will determine the amount of such profits and the extent to which they can be expected to result in cost recovery, but the EPA certification should inform the Treasury whether cost recovery is possible.

The phrase or otherwise also includes situations where the taxpayer is in the business of renting the facility for a fee or charging for the treatment of waste. In such cases, the facility may theoretically qualify for EPA certification. The decision as to the extent of its profitability is for the Treasury Department. Situations may also arise where use of a facility is furnished at no additional charge to a number of users, or to the public, as part of a package of other services. In such cases, no profits will be deemed to arise from operation of the facility unless the other services included in the package are merely ancillary to use of the facility. Of course, the cost recovery provision does not apply where a taxpayer merely recovers the cost of a facility through general revenues; otherwise no profitable firm would ever be eligible for rapid amortization.

It should be noted that §20.9 of the EPA regulation is not meant to affect general principles of Federal income tax law. An individual other than the title holder of a piece of property may be entitled to take depreciation deductions on it if the arrangements by which such individual has use of the property may, for all practical purposes, be viewed as a purchase. In any such case, the facility could qualify for full rapid amortization, notwithstanding the fact that the title holder charges a separate fee for the use of the facility, so long as the taxpayer—in such a case, the user—does not charge a separate fee for use of the facility.

9. Multiple applications. Under EPA regulations, a multiple application may be submitted by a taxpayer who applies for certification of substantially identical pollution abatement facilities used in connection with substantially identical properties. It is not contemplated that the multiple application option will be used with respect to facilities in different States, since each such facility would require a separate application for certification to the State involved. EPA regulations also permit an applicant to incorporate by reference in an application material contained in an application previously filed. The purpose of this provision is to avoid the burden of furnishing detailed information (which may in some cases include portions of catalogs or process flow diagrams) which the certifying official has previously received. Accordingly, material filed with a Regional Office of EPA may be incorporated by reference only in an application subsequently filed with the same Regional Office.

[47 FR 38319, Aug. 31, 1982]

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