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e-CFR data is current as of October 19, 2020

Title 49Subtitle BChapter ISubchapter DPart 192 → Appendix


Title 49: Transportation
PART 192—TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS


Appendix D to Part 192—Criteria for Cathodic Protection and Determination of Measurements

I. Criteria for cathodic protection— A. Steel, cast iron, and ductile iron structures. (1) A negative (cathodic) voltage of at least 0.85 volt, with reference to a saturated copper-copper sulfate half cell. Determination of this voltage must be made with the protective current applied, and in accordance with sections II and IV of this appendix.

(2) A negative (cathodic) voltage shift of at least 300 millivolts. Determination of this voltage shift must be made with the protective current applied, and in accordance with sections II and IV of this appendix. This criterion of voltage shift applies to structures not in contact with metals of different anodic potentials.

(3) A minimum negative (cathodic) polarization voltage shift of 100 millivolts. This polarization voltage shift must be determined in accordance with sections III and IV of this appendix.

(4) A voltage at least as negative (cathodic) as that originally established at the beginning of the Tafel segment of the E-log-I curve. This voltage must be measured in accordance with section IV of this appendix.

(5) A net protective current from the electrolyte into the structure surface as measured by an earth current technique applied at predetermined current discharge (anodic) points of the structure.

B. Aluminum structures. (1) Except as provided in paragraphs (3) and (4) of this paragraph, a minimum negative (cathodic) voltage shift of 150 millivolts, produced by the application of protective current. The voltage shift must be determined in accordance with sections II and IV of this appendix.

(2) Except as provided in paragraphs (3) and (4) of this paragraph, a minimum negative (cathodic) polarization voltage shift of 100 millivolts. This polarization voltage shift must be determined in accordance with sections III and IV of this appendix.

(3) Notwithstanding the alternative minimum criteria in paragraphs (1) and (2) of this paragraph, aluminum, if cathodically protected at voltages in excess of 1.20 volts as measured with reference to a copper-copper sulfate half cell, in accordance with section IV of this appendix, and compensated for the voltage (IR) drops other than those across the structure-electrolyte boundary may suffer corrosion resulting from the build-up of alkali on the metal surface. A voltage in excess of 1.20 volts may not be used unless previous test results indicate no appreciable corrosion will occur in the particular environment.

(4) Since aluminum may suffer from corrosion under high pH conditions, and since application of cathodic protection tends to increase the pH at the metal surface, careful investigation or testing must be made before applying cathodic protection to stop pitting attack on aluminum structures in environments with a natural pH in excess of 8.

C. Copper structures. A minimum negative (cathodic) polarization voltage shift of 100 millivolts. This polarization voltage shift must be determined in accordance with sections III and IV of this appendix.

D. Metals of different anodic potentials. A negative (cathodic) voltage, measured in accordance with section IV of this appendix, equal to that required for the most anodic metal in the system must be maintained. If amphoteric structures are involved that could be damaged by high alkalinity covered by paragraphs (3) and (4) of paragraph B of this section, they must be electrically isolated with insulating flanges, or the equivalent.

II. Interpretation of voltage measurement. Voltage (IR) drops other than those across the structure-electrolyte boundary must be considered for valid interpretation of the voltage measurement in paragraphs A(1) and (2) and paragraph B(1) of section I of this appendix.

III. Determination of polarization voltage shift. The polarization voltage shift must be determined by interrupting the protective current and measuring the polarization decay. When the current is initially interrupted, an immediate voltage shift occurs. The voltage reading after the immediate shift must be used as the base reading from which to measure polarization decay in paragraphs A(3), B(2), and C of section I of this appendix.

IV. Reference half cells. A. Except as provided in paragraphs B and C of this section, negative (cathodic) voltage must be measured between the structure surface and a saturated copper-copper sulfate half cell contacting the electrolyte.

B. Other standard reference half cells may be substituted for the saturated cooper-copper sulfate half cell. Two commonly used reference half cells are listed below along with their voltage equivalent to −0.85 volt as referred to a saturated copper-copper sulfate half cell:

(1) Saturated KCl calomel half cell: −0.78 volt.

(2) Silver-silver chloride half cell used in sea water: −0.80 volt.

C. In addition to the standard reference half cells, an alternate metallic material or structure may be used in place of the saturated copper-copper sulfate half cell if its potential stability is assured and if its voltage equivalent referred to a saturated copper-copper sulfate half cell is established.

[Amdt. 192-4, 36 FR 12305, June 30, 1971]

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