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e-CFR data is current as of July 6, 2020

Title 24Subtitle BChapter VSubchapter CPart 576 → Subpart B


Title 24: Housing and Urban Development
PART 576—EMERGENCY SOLUTIONS GRANTS PROGRAM


Subpart B—Program Components and Eligible Activities


Contents
§576.100   General provisions and expenditure limits.
§576.101   Street outreach component.
§576.102   Emergency shelter component.
§576.103   Homelessness prevention component.
§576.104   Rapid re-housing assistance component.
§576.105   Housing relocation and stabilization services.
§576.106   Short-term and medium-term rental assistance.
§576.107   HMIS component.
§576.108   Administrative activities.
§576.109   Indirect costs.

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§576.100   General provisions and expenditure limits.

(a) ESG funds may be used for five program components: street outreach, emergency shelter, homelessness prevention, rapid re-housing assistance, and HMIS; as well as administrative activities. The five program components and the eligible activities that may be funded under each are set forth in §576.101 through §576.107. Eligible administrative activities are set forth in §576.108.

(b) The total amount of the recipient's fiscal year grant that may be used for street outreach and emergency shelter activities cannot exceed the greater of:

(1) 60 percent of the recipient's fiscal year grant; or

(2) The amount of Fiscal Year 2010 grant funds committed for homeless assistance activities.

(c) The total amount of ESG funds that may be used for administrative activities cannot exceed 7.5 percent of the recipient's fiscal year grant.

(d) Subject to the cost principles in 2 CFR part 200, subpart E, and other requirements in this part, employee compensation and other overhead costs directly related to carrying out street outreach, emergency shelter, homelessness prevention, rapid re-housing, and HMIS are eligible costs of those program components. These costs are not subject to the expenditure limit in paragraph (c) of this section.

[76 FR 75974, Dec. 5, 2011, as amended at 80 FR 75939, Dec. 7, 2015]

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§576.101   Street outreach component.

(a) Eligible costs. Subject to the expenditure limit in §576.100(b), ESG funds may be used for costs of providing essential services necessary to reach out to unsheltered homeless people; connect them with emergency shelter, housing, or critical services; and provide urgent, nonfacility-based care to unsheltered homeless people who are unwilling or unable to access emergency shelter, housing, or an appropriate health facility. For the purposes of this section, the term “unsheltered homeless people” means individuals and families who qualify as homeless under paragraph (1)(i) of the “homeless” definition under §576.2. The eligible costs and requirements for essential services consist of:

(1) Engagement. The costs of activities to locate, identify, and build relationships with unsheltered homeless people and engage them for the purpose of providing immediate support, intervention, and connections with homeless assistance programs and/or mainstream social services and housing programs. These activities consist of making an initial assessment of needs and eligibility; providing crisis counseling; addressing urgent physical needs, such as providing meals, blankets, clothes, or toiletries; and actively connecting and providing information and referrals to programs targeted to homeless people and mainstream social services and housing programs, including emergency shelter, transitional housing, community-based services, permanent supportive housing, and rapid re-housing programs. Eligible costs include the cell phone costs of outreach workers during the performance of these activities.

(2) Case management. The cost of assessing housing and service needs, arranging, coordinating, and monitoring the delivery of individualized services to meet the needs of the program participant. Eligible services and activities are as follows: using the centralized or coordinated assessment system as required under §576.400(d); conducting the initial evaluation required under §576.401(a), including verifying and documenting eligibility; counseling; developing, securing and coordinating services; obtaining Federal, State, and local benefits; monitoring and evaluating program participant progress; providing information and referrals to other providers; and developing an individualized housing and service plan, including planning a path to permanent housing stability.

(3) Emergency health services. (i) Eligible costs are for the direct outpatient treatment of medical conditions and are provided by licensed medical professionals operating in community-based settings, including streets, parks, and other places where unsheltered homeless people are living.

(ii) ESG funds may be used only for these services to the extent that other appropriate health services are inaccessible or unavailable within the area.

(iii) Eligible treatment consists of assessing a program participant's health problems and developing a treatment plan; assisting program participants to understand their health needs; providing directly or assisting program participants to obtain appropriate emergency medical treatment; and providing medication and follow-up services.

(4) Emergency mental health services. (i) Eligible costs are the direct outpatient treatment by licensed professionals of mental health conditions operating in community-based settings, including streets, parks, and other places where unsheltered people are living.

(ii) ESG funds may be used only for these services to the extent that other appropriate mental health services are inaccessible or unavailable within the community.

(iii) Mental health services are the application of therapeutic processes to personal, family, situational, or occupational problems in order to bring about positive resolution of the problem or improved individual or family functioning or circumstances.

(iv) Eligible treatment consists of crisis interventions, the prescription of psychotropic medications, explanation about the use and management of medications, and combinations of therapeutic approaches to address multiple problems.

(5) Transportation. The transportation costs of travel by outreach workers, social workers, medical professionals, or other service providers are eligible, provided that this travel takes place during the provision of services eligible under this section. The costs of transporting unsheltered people to emergency shelters or other service facilities are also eligible. These costs include the following:

(i) The cost of a program participant's travel on public transportation;

(ii) If service workers use their own vehicles, mileage allowance for service workers to visit program participants;

(iii) The cost of purchasing or leasing a vehicle for the recipient or subrecipient in which staff transports program participants and/or staff serving program participants, and the cost of gas, insurance, taxes and maintenance for the vehicle; and

(iv) The travel costs of recipient or subrecipient staff to accompany or assist program participants to use public transportation.

(6) Services for special populations. ESG funds may be used to provide services for homeless youth, victim services, and services for people living with HIV/AIDS, so long as the costs of providing these services are eligible under paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(5) of this section. The term victim services means services that assist program participants who are victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, including services offered by rape crisis centers and domestic violence shelters, and other organizations with a documented history of effective work concerning domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

(b) Minimum period of use. The recipient or subrecipient must provide services to homeless individuals and families for at least the period during which ESG funds are provided.

(c) Maintenance of effort. (1) If the recipient or subrecipient is a unit of general purpose local government, its ESG funds cannot be used to replace funds the local government provided for street outreach and emergency shelter services during the immediately preceding 12-month period, unless HUD determines that the unit of general purpose local government is in a severe financial deficit.

(2) Upon the recipient's request, HUD will determine whether the unit of general purpose local government is in a severe financial deficit, based on the recipient's demonstration of each of the following:

(i) The average poverty rate in the unit of general purpose local government's jurisdiction was equal to or greater than 125 percent of the average national poverty rate, during the calendar year for which the most recent data are available, as determined according to information from the U.S. Census Bureau.

(ii) The average per-capita income in the unit of general purpose local government's jurisdiction was less than 75 percent of the average national per-capita income, during the calendar year for which the most recent data are available, as determined according to information from the Census Bureau.

(iii) The unit of general purpose local government has a current annual budget deficit that requires a reduction in funding for services for homeless people.

(iv) The unit of general purpose local government has taken all reasonable steps to prevent a reduction in funding of services for homeless people. Reasonable steps may include steps to increase revenue generation, steps to maximize cost savings, or steps to reduce expenditures in areas other than services for homeless people.

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§576.102   Emergency shelter component.

(a) General. Subject to the expenditure limit in §576.100(b), ESG funds may be used for costs of providing essential services to homeless families and individuals in emergency shelters, renovating buildings to be used as emergency shelter for homeless families and individuals, and operating emergency shelters.

(1) Essential services. ESG funds may be used to provide essential services to individuals and families who are in an emergency shelter, as follows:

(i) Case management. The cost of assessing, arranging, coordinating, and monitoring the delivery of individualized services to meet the needs of the program participant is eligible. Component services and activities consist of:

(A) Using the centralized or coordinated assessment system as required under §576.400(d);

(B) Conducting the initial evaluation required under §576.401(a), including verifying and documenting eligibility;

(C) Counseling;

(D) Developing, securing, and coordinating services and obtaining Federal, State, and local benefits;

(E) Monitoring and evaluating program participant progress;

(F) Providing information and referrals to other providers;

(G) Providing ongoing risk assessment and safety planning with victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; and

(H) Developing an individualized housing and service plan, including planning a path to permanent housing stability.

(ii) Child care. The costs of child care for program participants, including providing meals and snacks, and comprehensive and coordinated sets of appropriate developmental activities, are eligible. The children must be under the age of 13, unless they are disabled. Disabled children must be under the age of 18. The child-care center must be licensed by the jurisdiction in which it operates in order for its costs to be eligible.

(iii) Education services. When necessary for the program participant to obtain and maintain housing, the costs of improving knowledge and basic educational skills are eligible. Services include instruction or training in consumer education, health education, substance abuse prevention, literacy, English as a Second Language, and General Educational Development (GED). Component services or activities are screening, assessment and testing; individual or group instruction; tutoring; provision of books, supplies and instructional material; counseling; and referral to community resources.

(iv) Employment assistance and job training. The costs of employment assistance and job training programs are eligible, including classroom, online, and/or computer instruction; on-the-job instruction; and services that assist individuals in securing employment, acquiring learning skills, and/or increasing earning potential. The cost of providing reasonable stipends to program participants in employment assistance and job training programs is an eligible cost. Learning skills include those skills that can be used to secure and retain a job, including the acquisition of vocational licenses and/or certificates. Services that assist individuals in securing employment consist of employment screening, assessment, or testing; structured job skills and job-seeking skills; special training and tutoring, including literacy training and prevocational training; books and instructional material; counseling or job coaching; and referral to community resources.

(v) Outpatient health services. Eligible costs are for the direct outpatient treatment of medical conditions and are provided by licensed medical professionals. Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) funds may be used only for these services to the extent that other appropriate health services are unavailable within the community. Eligible treatment consists of assessing a program participant's health problems and developing a treatment plan; assisting program participants to understand their health needs; providing directly or assisting program participants to obtain appropriate medical treatment, preventive medical care, and health maintenance services, including emergency medical services; providing medication and follow-up services; and providing preventive and noncosmetic dental care.

(vi) Legal services. (A) Eligible costs are the hourly fees for legal advice and representation by attorneys licensed and in good standing with the bar association of the State in which the services are provided, and by person(s) under the supervision of the licensed attorney, regarding matters that interfere with the program participant's ability to obtain and retain housing.

(B) Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) funds may be used only for these services to the extent that other appropriate legal services are unavailable or inaccessible within the community.

(C) Eligible subject matters are child support, guardianship, paternity, emancipation, and legal separation, orders of protection and other civil remedies for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, appeal of veterans and public benefit claim denials, and the resolution of outstanding criminal warrants.

(D) Component services or activities may include client intake, preparation of cases for trial, provision of legal advice, representation at hearings, and counseling.

(E) Fees based on the actual service performed (i.e., fee for service) are also eligible, but only if the cost would be less than the cost of hourly fees. Filing fees and other necessary court costs are also eligible. If the subrecipient is a legal services provider and performs the services itself, the eligible costs are the subrecipient's employees' salaries and other costs necessary to perform the services.

(F) Legal services for immigration and citizenship matters and issues relating to mortgages are ineligible costs. Retainer fee arrangements and contingency fee arrangements are ineligible costs.

(vii) Life skills training. The costs of teaching critical life management skills that may never have been learned or have been lost during the course of physical or mental illness, domestic violence, substance use, and homelessness are eligible costs. These services must be necessary to assist the program participant to function independently in the community. Component life skills training are budgeting resources, managing money, managing a household, resolving conflict, shopping for food and needed items, improving nutrition, using public transportation, and parenting.

(viii) Mental health services. (A) Eligible costs are the direct outpatient treatment by licensed professionals of mental health conditions.

(B) ESG funds may only be used for these services to the extent that other appropriate mental health services are unavailable or inaccessible within the community.

(C) Mental health services are the application of therapeutic processes to personal, family, situational, or occupational problems in order to bring about positive resolution of the problem or improved individual or family functioning or circumstances. Problem areas may include family and marital relationships, parent-child problems, or symptom management.

(D) Eligible treatment consists of crisis interventions; individual, family, or group therapy sessions; the prescription of psychotropic medications or explanations about the use and management of medications; and combinations of therapeutic approaches to address multiple problems.

(ix) Substance abuse treatment services. (A) Eligible substance abuse treatment services are designed to prevent, reduce, eliminate, or deter relapse of substance abuse or addictive behaviors and are provided by licensed or certified professionals.

(B) ESG funds may only be used for these services to the extent that other appropriate substance abuse treatment services are unavailable or inaccessible within the community.

(C) Eligible treatment consists of client intake and assessment, and outpatient treatment for up to 30 days. Group and individual counseling and drug testing are eligible costs. Inpatient detoxification and other inpatient drug or alcohol treatment are not eligible costs.

(x) Transportation. Eligible costs consist of the transportation costs of a program participant's travel to and from medical care, employment, child care, or other eligible essential services facilities. These costs include the following:

(A) The cost of a program participant's travel on public transportation;

(B) If service workers use their own vehicles, mileage allowance for service workers to visit program participants;

(C) The cost of purchasing or leasing a vehicle for the recipient or subrecipient in which staff transports program participants and/or staff serving program participants, and the cost of gas, insurance, taxes, and maintenance for the vehicle; and

(D) The travel costs of recipient or subrecipient staff to accompany or assist program participants to use public transportation.

(xi) Services for special populations. ESG funds may be used to provide services for homeless youth, victim services, and services for people living with HIV/AIDS, so long as the costs of providing these services are eligible under paragraphs (a)(1)(i) through (a)(1)(x) of this section. The term victim services means services that assist program participants who are victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, including services offered by rape crisis centers and domestic violence shelters, and other organizations with a documented history of effective work concerning domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

(2) Renovation. Eligible costs include labor, materials, tools, and other costs for renovation (including major rehabilitation of an emergency shelter or conversion of a building into an emergency shelter). The emergency shelter must be owned by a government entity or private nonprofit organization.

(3) Shelter operations. Eligible costs are the costs of maintenance (including minor or routine repairs), rent, security, fuel, equipment, insurance, utilities, food, furnishings, and supplies necessary for the operation of the emergency shelter. Where no appropriate emergency shelter is available for a homeless family or individual, eligible costs may also include a hotel or motel voucher for that family or individual.

(4) Assistance required under the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970 (URA). Eligible costs are the costs of providing URA assistance under §576.408, including relocation payments and other assistance to persons displaced by a project assisted with ESG funds. Persons that receive URA assistance are not considered “program participants” for the purposes of this part, and relocation payments and other URA assistance are not considered “rental assistance” or “housing relocation and stabilization services” for the purposes of this part.

(b) Prohibition against involuntary family separation. The age, of a child under age 18 must not be used as a basis for denying any family's admission to an emergency shelter that uses Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) funding or services and provides shelter to families with children under age 18.

(c) Minimum period of use. (1) Renovated buildings. Each building renovated with ESG funds must be maintained as a shelter for homeless individuals and families for not less than a period of 3 or 10 years, depending on the type of renovation and the value of the building. The “value of the building” is the reasonable monetary value assigned to the building, such as the value assigned by an independent real estate appraiser. The minimum use period must begin on the date the building is first occupied by a homeless individual or family after the completed renovation. A minimum period of use of 10 years, required for major rehabilitation and conversion, must be enforced by a recorded deed or use restriction.

(i) Major rehabilitation. If the rehabilitation cost of an emergency shelter exceeds 75 percent of the value of the building before rehabilitation, the minimum period of use is 10 years.

(ii) Conversion. If the cost to convert a building into an emergency shelter exceeds 75 percent of the value of the building after conversion, the minimum period of use is 10 years.

(iii) Renovation other than major rehabilitation or conversion. In all other cases where ESG funds are used for renovation, the minimum period of use is 3 years.

(2) Essential services and shelter operations. Where the recipient or subrecipient uses ESG funds solely for essential services or shelter operations, the recipient or subrecipient must provide services or shelter to homeless individuals and families at least for the period during which the ESG funds are provided. The recipient or subrecipient does not need to limit these services or shelter to a particular site or structure, so long as the site or structure serves the same type of persons originally served with the assistance (e.g., families with children, unaccompanied youth, disabled individuals, or victims of domestic violence) or serves homeless persons in the same area where the recipient or subrecipient originally provided the services or shelter.

(d) Maintenance of effort. The maintenance of effort requirements under §576.101(c), which apply to the use of ESG funds for essential services related to street outreach, also apply for the use of such funds for essential services related to emergency shelter.

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§576.103   Homelessness prevention component.

ESG funds may be used to provide housing relocation and stabilization services and short- and/or medium-term rental assistance necessary to prevent an individual or family from moving into an emergency shelter or another place described in paragraph (1) of the “homeless” definition in §576.2. This assistance, referred to as homelessness prevention, may be provided to individuals and families who meet the criteria under the “at risk of homelessness” definition, or who meet the criteria in paragraph (2), (3), or (4) of the “homeless” definition in §576.2 and have an annual income below 30 percent of median family income for the area, as determined by HUD. The costs of homelessness prevention are only eligible to the extent that the assistance is necessary to help the program participant regain stability in the program participant's current permanent housing or move into other permanent housing and achieve stability in that housing. Homelessness prevention must be provided in accordance with the housing relocation and stabilization services requirements in §576.105, the short-term and medium-term rental assistance requirements in §576.106, and the written standards and procedures established under §576.400.

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§576.104   Rapid re-housing assistance component.

ESG funds may be used to provide housing relocation and stabilization services and short- and/or medium-term rental assistance as necessary to help a homeless individual or family move as quickly as possible into permanent housing and achieve stability in that housing. This assistance, referred to as rapid re-housing assistance, may be provided to program participants who meet the criteria under paragraph (1) of the “homeless” definition in §576.2 or who meet the criteria under paragraph (4) of the “homeless” definition and live in an emergency shelter or other place described in paragraph (1) of the “homeless” definition. The rapid re-housing assistance must be provided in accordance with the housing relocation and stabilization services requirements in §576.105, the short- and medium-term rental assistance requirements in §576.106, and the written standards and procedures established under §576.400.

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§576.105   Housing relocation and stabilization services.

(a) Financial assistance costs. Subject to the general conditions under §576.103 and §576.104, ESG funds may be used to pay housing owners, utility companies, and other third parties for the following costs:

(1) Rental application fees. ESG funds may pay for the rental housing application fee that is charged by the owner to all applicants.

(2) Security deposits. ESG funds may pay for a security deposit that is equal to no more than 2 months' rent.

(3) Last month's rent. If necessary to obtain housing for a program participant, the last month's rent may be paid from ESG funds to the owner of that housing at the time the owner is paid the security deposit and the first month's rent. This assistance must not exceed one month's rent and must be included in calculating the program participant's total rental assistance, which cannot exceed 24 months during any 3-year period.

(4) Utility deposits. ESG funds may pay for a standard utility deposit required by the utility company for all customers for the utilities listed in paragraph (5) of this section.

(5) Utility payments. ESG funds may pay for up to 24 months of utility payments per program participant, per service, including up to 6 months of utility payments in arrears, per service. A partial payment of a utility bill counts as one month. This assistance may only be provided if the program participant or a member of the same household has an account in his or her name with a utility company or proof of responsibility to make utility payments. Eligible utility services are gas, electric, water, and sewage. No program participant shall receive more than 24 months of utility assistance within any 3-year period.

(6) Moving costs. ESG funds may pay for moving costs, such as truck rental or hiring a moving company. This assistance may include payment of temporary storage fees for up to 3 months, provided that the fees are accrued after the date the program participant begins receiving assistance under paragraph (b) of this section and before the program participant moves into permanent housing. Payment of temporary storage fees in arrears is not eligible.

(7) If a program participant receiving short- or medium-term rental assistance under §576.106 meets the conditions for an emergency transfer under 24 CFR 5.2005(e), ESG funds may be used to pay amounts owed for breaking a lease to effect an emergency transfer. These costs are not subject to the 24-month limit on rental assistance under §576.106.

(b) Services costs. Subject to the general restrictions under §576.103 and §576.104, ESG funds may be used to pay the costs of providing the following services:

(1) Housing search and placement. Services or activities necessary to assist program participants in locating, obtaining, and retaining suitable permanent housing, include the following:

(i) Assessment of housing barriers, needs, and preferences;

(ii) Development of an action plan for locating housing;

(iii) Housing search;

(iv) Outreach to and negotiation with owners;

(v) Assistance with submitting rental applications and understanding leases;

(vi) Assessment of housing for compliance with Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) requirements for habitability, lead-based paint, and rent reasonableness;

(vii) Assistance with obtaining utilities and making moving arrangements; and

(viii) Tenant counseling.

(2) Housing stability case management. ESG funds may be used to pay cost of assessing, arranging, coordinating, and monitoring the delivery of individualized services to facilitate housing stability for a program participant who resides in permanent housing or to assist a program participant in overcoming immediate barriers to obtaining housing. This assistance cannot exceed 30 days during the period the program participant is seeking permanent housing and cannot exceed 24 months during the period the program participant is living in permanent housing. Component services and activities consist of:

(A) Using the centralized or coordinated assessment system as required under §576.400(d), to evaluate individuals and families applying for or receiving homelessness prevention or rapid re-housing assistance;

(B) Conducting the initial evaluation required under §576.401(a), including verifying and documenting eligibility, for individuals and families applying for homelessness prevention or rapid re-housing assistance;

(C) Counseling;

(D) Developing, securing, and coordinating services and obtaining Federal, State, and local benefits;

(E) Monitoring and evaluating program participant progress;

(F) Providing information and referrals to other providers;

(G) Developing an individualized housing and service plan, including planning a path to permanent housing stability; and

(H) Conducting re-evaluations required under §576.401(b).

(3) Mediation. ESG funds may pay for mediation between the program participant and the owner or person(s) with whom the program participant is living, provided that the mediation is necessary to prevent the program participant from losing permanent housing in which the program participant currently resides.

(4) Legal services. ESG funds may pay for legal services, as set forth in §576.102(a)(1)(vi), except that the eligible subject matters also include landlord/tenant matters, and the services must be necessary to resolve a legal problem that prohibits the program participant from obtaining permanent housing or will likely result in the program participant losing the permanent housing in which the program participant currently resides.

(5) Credit repair. ESG funds may pay for credit counseling and other services necessary to assist program participants with critical skills related to household budgeting, managing money, accessing a free personal credit report, and resolving personal credit problems. This assistance does not include the payment or modification of a debt.

(c) Maximum amounts and periods of assistance. The recipient may set a maximum dollar amount that a program participant may receive for each type of financial assistance under paragraph (a) of this section. The recipient may also set a maximum period for which a program participant may receive any of the types of assistance or services under this section. However, except for housing stability case management, the total period for which any program participant may receive the services under paragraph (b) of this section must not exceed 24 months during any 3-year period. The limits on the assistance under this section apply to the total assistance an individual receives, either as an individual or as part of a family.

(d) Use with other subsidies. Financial assistance under paragraph (a) of this section cannot be provided to a program participant who is receiving the same type of assistance through other public sources or to a program participant who has been provided with replacement housing payments under the URA, during the period of time covered by the URA payments.

(e) Housing counseling. Housing counseling, as defined in §5.100, that is funded with or provided in connection with ESG funds must be carried out in accordance with §5.111. When recipients or subrecipients provide housing services to eligible persons that are incidental to a larger set of holistic case management services, these services do not meet the definition of housing counseling, as defined in §5.100, and therefore are not required to be carried out in accordance with the certification requirements of §5.111

[76 FR 75974, Dec. 5, 2011,, as amended at 81 FR 80808, Nov. 16, 2016; 81 FR 90659, Dec. 14, 2016]

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§576.106   Short-term and medium-term rental assistance.

(a) General provisions. Subject to the general conditions under §576.103 and §576.104, the recipient or subrecipient may provide a program participant with up to 24 months of rental assistance during any 3-year period. This assistance may be short-term rental assistance, medium-term rental assistance, payment of rental arrears, or any combination of this assistance.

(1) Short-term rental assistance is assistance for up to 3 months of rent.

(2) Medium-term rental assistance is assistance for more than 3 months but not more than 24 months of rent.

(3) Payment of rental arrears consists of a one-time payment for up to 6 months of rent in arrears, including any late fees on those arrears.

(4) Rental assistance may be tenant-based or project-based, as set forth in paragraphs (h) and (i) of this section.

(b) Discretion to set caps and conditions. Subject to the requirements of this section, the recipient may set a maximum amount or percentage of rental assistance that a program participant may receive, a maximum number of months that a program participant may receive rental assistance, or a maximum number of times that a program participant may receive rental assistance. The recipient may also require program participants to share in the costs of rent.

(c) Use with other subsidies. Except for a one-time payment of rental arrears on the tenant's portion of the rental payment, rental assistance cannot be provided to a program participant who is receiving tenant-based rental assistance, or living in a housing unit receiving project-based rental assistance or operating assistance, through other public sources. Rental assistance may not be provided to a program participant who has been provided with replacement housing payments under the URA during the period of time covered by the URA payments.

(d) Rent restrictions. (1) Rental assistance cannot be provided unless the rent does not exceed the Fair Market Rent established by HUD, as provided under 24 CFR part 888, and complies with HUD's standard of rent reasonableness, as established under 24 CFR 982.507.

(2) For purposes of calculating rent under this section, the rent shall equal the sum of the total monthly rent for the unit, any fees required for occupancy under the lease (other than late fees and pet fees) and, if the tenant pays separately for utilities, the monthly allowance for utilities (excluding telephone) established by the public housing authority for the area in which the housing is located.

(e) Rental assistance agreement. The recipient or subrecipient may make rental assistance payments only to an owner with whom the recipient or subrecipient has entered into a rental assistance agreement. The rental assistance agreement must set forth the terms under which rental assistance will be provided, including the requirements that apply under this section. The rental assistance agreement must provide that, during the term of the agreement, the owner must give the recipient or subrecipient a copy of any notice to the program participant to vacate the housing unit or any complaint used under State or local law to commence an eviction action against the program participant. Each rental assistance agreement that is executed or renewed on or after December 16, 2016 must include all protections that apply to tenants and applicants under 24 CFR part 5, subpart L, as supplemented by §576.409, except for the emergency transfer plan requirements under 24 CFR 5.2005(e) and 576.409(d). If the housing is not assisted under another “covered housing program”, as defined in 24 CFR 5.2003, the agreement may provide that the owner's obligations under 24 CFR part 5, subpart L (Protection for Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Assault, or Stalking), expire at the end of the rental assistance period.

(f) Late payments. The recipient or subrecipient must make timely payments to each owner in accordance with the rental assistance agreement. The rental assistance agreement must contain the same payment due date, grace period, and late payment penalty requirements as the program participant's lease. The recipient or subrecipient is solely responsible for paying late payment penalties that it incurs with non-ESG funds.

(g) Lease. Each program participant receiving rental assistance must have a legally binding, written lease for the rental unit, unless the assistance is solely for rental arrears. The lease must be between the owner and the program participant. Where the assistance is solely for rental arrears, an oral agreement may be accepted in place of a written lease, if the agreement gives the program participant an enforceable leasehold interest under state law and the agreement and rent owed are sufficiently documented by the owner's financial records, rent ledgers, or canceled checks. For program participants living in housing with project-based rental assistance under paragraph (i) of this section, the lease must have an initial term of 1 year. Each lease executed on or after December 16, 2016 must include a lease provision or incorporate a lease addendum that includes all requirements that apply to tenants, the owner or lease under 24 CFR part 5, subpart L (Protection for Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Assault, or Stalking), as supplemented by 24 CFR 576.409, including the prohibited bases for eviction and restrictions on construing lease terms under 24 CFR 5.2005(b) and (c). If the housing is not assisted under another “covered housing program,” as defined in 24 CFR 5.2003, the lease provision or lease addendum may be written to expire at the end of the rental assistance period.

(h) Tenant-based rental assistance. (1) A program participant who receives tenant-based rental assistance may select a housing unit in which to live and may move to another unit or building and continue to receive rental assistance, as long as the program participant continues to meet the program requirements.

(2) The recipient may require that all program participants live within a particular area for the period in which the rental assistance is provided.

(3) The rental assistance agreement with the owner must terminate and no further rental assistance payments under that agreement may be made if:

(i) The program participant moves out of the housing unit for which the program participant has a lease;

(ii) The lease terminates and is not renewed; or

(iii) The program participant becomes ineligible to receive ESG rental assistance.

(i) Project-based rental assistance. If the recipient or subrecipient identifies a permanent housing unit that meets ESG requirements and becomes available before a program participant is identified to lease the unit, the recipient or subrecipient may enter into a rental assistance agreement with the owner to reserve the unit and subsidize its rent in accordance with the following requirements:

(1) The rental assistance agreement may cover one or more permanent housing units in the same building. Each unit covered by the rental assistance agreement (“assisted unit”) may only be occupied by program participants, except as provided under paragraph (i)(4) of this section.

(2) The recipient or subrecipient may pay up to 100 percent of the first month's rent, provided that a program participant signs a lease and moves into the unit before the end of the month for which the first month's rent is paid. The rent paid before a program participant moves into the unit must not exceed the rent to be charged under the program participant's lease and must be included when determining that program participant's total rental assistance.

(3) The recipient or subrecipient may make monthly rental assistance payments only for each whole or partial month an assisted unit is leased to a program participant. When a program participant moves out of an assisted unit, the recipient or subrecipient may pay the next month's rent, i.e., the first month's rent for a new program participant, as provided in paragraph (i)(2) of this section.

(4) The program participant's lease must not condition the term of occupancy to the provision of rental assistance payments. If the program participant is determined ineligible or reaches the maximum number of months over which rental assistance can be provided, the recipient or subrecipient must suspend or terminate the rental assistance payments for the unit. If the payments are suspended, the individual or family may remain in the assisted unit as permitted under the lease, and the recipient or subrecipient may resume payments if the individual or family again becomes eligible and needs further rental assistance. If the payments are terminated, the rental assistance may be transferred to another available unit in the same building, provided that the other unit meets all ESG requirements.

(5) The rental assistance agreement must have an initial term of one year. When a new program participant moves into an assisted unit, the term of the rental assistance agreement may be extended to cover the initial term of the program participant's lease. If the program participant's lease is renewed, the rental assistance agreement may be renewed or extended, as needed, up to the maximum number of months for which the program participant remains eligible. However, under no circumstances may the recipient or subrecipient commit ESG funds to be expended beyond the expenditure deadline in §576.203 or commit funds for a future ESG grant before the grant is awarded.

(j) Changes in household composition. The limits on the assistance under this section apply to the total assistance an individual receives, either as an individual or as part of a family.

[76 FR 75974, Dec. 5, 2011,, as amended at 81 FR 80808, Nov. 16, 2016]

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§576.107   HMIS component.

(a) Eligible costs. (1) The recipient or subrecipient may use ESG funds to pay the costs of contributing data to the HMIS designated by the Continuum of Care for the area, including the costs of:

(i) Purchasing or leasing computer hardware;

(ii) Purchasing software or software licenses;

(iii) Purchasing or leasing equipment, including telephones, fax machines, and furniture;

(iv) Obtaining technical support;

(v) Leasing office space;

(vi) Paying charges for electricity, gas, water, phone service, and high-speed data transmission necessary to operate or contribute data to the HMIS;

(vii) Paying salaries for operating HMIS, including:

(A) Completing data entry;

(B) Monitoring and reviewing data quality;

(C) Completing data analysis;

(D) Reporting to the HMIS Lead;

(F) Training staff on using the HMIS or comparable database; and

(G) Implementing and complying with HMIS requirements;

(viii) Paying costs of staff to travel to and attend HUD-sponsored and HUD-approved training on HMIS and programs authorized by Title IV of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act;

(ix) Paying staff travel costs to conduct intake; and

(x) Paying participation fees charged by the HMIS Lead, if the recipient or subrecipient is not the HMIS Lead. The HMIS Lead is the entity designated by the Continuum of Care to operate the area's HMIS.

(2) If the recipient is the HMIS lead agency, as designated by the Continuum of Care in the most recent fiscal year Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grants Competition, it may also use ESG funds to pay the costs of:

(i) Hosting and maintaining HMIS software or data;

(ii) Backing up, recovering, or repairing HMIS software or data;

(iii) Upgrading, customizing, and enhancing the HMIS;

(iv) Integrating and warehousing data, including development of a data warehouse for use in aggregating data from subrecipients using multiple software systems;

(v) Administering the system;

(vi) Reporting to providers, the Continuum of Care, and HUD; and

(vii) Conducting training on using the system or a comparable database, including traveling to the training.

(3) If the subrecipient is a victim services provider or a legal services provider, it may use ESG funds to establish and operate a comparable database that collects client-level data over time (i.e., longitudinal data) and generates unduplicated aggregate reports based on the data. Information entered into a comparable database must not be entered directly into or provided to an HMIS.

(b) General restrictions. Activities funded under this section must comply with HUD's standards on participation, data collection, and reporting under a local HMIS.

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§576.108   Administrative activities.

(a) Eligible costs. The recipient may use up to 7.5 percent of its ESG grant for the payment of administrative costs related to the planning and execution of ESG activities. This does not include staff and overhead costs directly related to carrying out activities eligible under §576.101 through §576.107, because those costs are eligible as part of those activities. Eligible administrative costs include:

(1) General management, oversight and coordination. Costs of overall program management, coordination, monitoring, and evaluation. These costs include, but are not limited to, necessary expenditures for the following:

(i) Salaries, wages, and related costs of the recipient's staff, the staff of subrecipients, or other staff engaged in program administration. In charging costs to this category, the recipient may either include the entire salary, wages, and related costs allocable to the program of each person whose primary responsibilities with regard to the program involve program administration assignments, or the pro rata share of the salary, wages, and related costs of each person whose job includes any program administration assignments. The recipient may use only one of these methods for each fiscal year grant. Program administration assignments include the following:

(A) Preparing program budgets and schedules, and amendments to those budgets and schedules;

(B) Developing systems for assuring compliance with program requirements;

(C) Developing interagency agreements and agreements with subrecipients and contractors to carry out program activities;

(D) Monitoring program activities for progress and compliance with program requirements;

(E) Preparing reports and other documents directly related to the program for submission to HUD;

(F) Coordinating the resolution of audit and monitoring findings;

(G) Evaluating program results against stated objectives; and

(H) Managing or supervising persons whose primary responsibilities with regard to the program include such assignments as those described in paragraph (a)(1)(i)(A) through (G) of this section.

(ii) Travel costs incurred for monitoring of subrecipients;

(iii) Administrative services performed under third-party contracts or agreements, including general legal services, accounting services, and audit services; and

(iv) Other costs for goods and services required for administration of the program, including rental or purchase of equipment, insurance, utilities, office supplies, and rental and maintenance (but not purchase) of office space.

(2) Training on ESG requirements. Costs of providing training on ESG requirements and attending HUD-sponsored ESG trainings.

(3) Consolidated plan. Costs of preparing and amending the ESG and homelessness-related sections of the consolidated plan in accordance with ESG requirements and 24 CFR part 91.

(4) Environmental review. Costs of carrying out the environmental review responsibilities under §576.407.

(b) Sharing requirement. (1) States. If the recipient is a State, the recipient must share its funds for administrative costs with its subrecipients that are units of general purpose local government. The amount shared must be reasonable under the circumstances. The recipient may share its funds for administrative costs with its subrecipients that are private nonprofit organizations.

(2) Territories, metropolitan cities, and urban counties. If the recipient is a territory, metropolitan city, or urban county, the recipient may share its funds for administrative costs with its subrecipients.

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§576.109   Indirect costs.

(a) In general. ESG grant funds may be used to pay indirect costs in accordance with 2 CFR part 200, subpart E.

(b) Allocation. Indirect costs may be allocated to each eligible activity under §576.101 through §576.108, so long as that allocation is consistent with 2 CFR part 200, subpart E.

(c) Expenditure limits. The indirect costs charged to an activity subject to an expenditure limit under §576.100 must be added to the direct costs charged for that activity when determining the total costs subject to the expenditure limit.

[76 FR 75974, Dec. 5, 2011, as amended at 80 FR 75939, Dec. 7, 2015]

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