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e-CFR data is current as of March 26, 2020

Title 50Chapter VIPart 660 → Subpart H


Title 50: Wildlife and Fisheries
PART 660—FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES


Subpart H—West Coast Salmon Fisheries


Contents
§660.401   Purpose and scope.
§660.402   Definitions.
§660.403   Relation to other laws.
§660.404   Recordkeeping and reporting.
§660.405   Prohibitions.
§660.406   Exempted fishing.
§660.407   Treaty Indian fishing.
§660.408   Annual actions.
§660.409   Inseason actions.
§660.410   Conservation objectives, ACLs, and de minimis control rules.
§660.411   Notification and publication procedures.
§660.412   EFH identifications and descriptions for Pacific salmon.
Table 1 to Subpart H of Part 660—Pacific Salmon EFH Identified by USGS Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC)

§660.401   Purpose and scope.

This subpart implements the Fishery Management Plan for Commercial and Recreational Salmon Fisheries Off the Coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California developed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council. These regulations govern the management of West Coast salmon fisheries in the EEZ.

§660.402   Definitions.

In addition to the definitions in the Magnuson Act and in §600.10 of this chapter, the terms used in this subpart have the following meanings:

Barbless hook means a hook with a single shank and point, with no secondary point or barb curving or projecting in any other direction. Where barbless hooks are specified, hooks manufactured with barbs can be made barbless by forcing the point of the barb flat against the main part of the point.

Commercial fishing means fishing with troll fishing gear as defined annually under §660.408, or fishing for the purpose of sale or barter of the catch.

Council means the Pacific Fishery Management Council.

Dressed, head-off length of salmon means the shortest distance between the midpoint of the clavicle arch and the fork of the tail, measured along the lateral line while the fish is lying on its side, without resort to any force or mutilation of the fish other than removal of the head, gills, and entrails.

Dressed, head-off salmon means salmon that have been beheaded, gilled, and gutted without further separation of vertebrae, and are either being prepared for on-board freezing, or are frozen and will remain frozen until landed.

Fishery management area means the EEZ off the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California, bounded on the north by the Provisional International Boundary between the United States and Canada, and bounded on the south by the International Boundary between the United States and Mexico. The northeastern, northern, and northwestern boundaries of the fishery management area are as follows:

(1) Northeastern boundary—that part of a line connecting the light on Tatoosh Island, WA, with the light on Bonilla Point on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, southerly of the International Boundary between the United States and Canada (at 48°2937 N. lat., 124°4333 W. long.), and northerly of the point where that line intersects with the boundary of the U.S. territorial sea.

(2) Northern and northwestern boundary is a line1 connecting the following coordinates:

1The line joining these coordinates is the provisional international boundary of the U.S. EEZ as shown on NOAA/NOS Charts #18480 and #18002.

N. lat.W. long.
48°2937.19124°4333.19
48°3011124°4713
48°3022124°5021
48°3014124°5252
48°2957124°5914
48°2944125°0006
48°2809125°0547
48°2710125°0825
48°2647125°0912
48°2016125°2248
48°1822125°2958
48°1105125°5348
47°4915126°4057
47°3647127°1158
47°2200127°4123
46°4205128°5156
46°3147129°0739

(3) The southern boundary of the fishery management area is the U.S.-Mexico International Boundary, which is a line connecting the following coordinates:

N. lat.W. long.
32°3522117°2749
32°3737117°4931
31°0758118°3618
30°3231121°5158

(4) The inner boundaries of the fishery management area are subject to change if the Secretary assumes responsibility for the regulation of the salmon fishery within state waters under section 306(b) of the Magnuson Act.

Freezer trolling vessel means a fishing vessel, equipped with troll fishing gear, that has a present capability for:

(1) On board freezing of the catch.

(2) Storage of the fish in a frozen condition until they are landed.

Land or landing means to begin transfer of fish from a fishing vessel. Once transfer begins, all fish onboard the vessel are counted as part of the landing.

Pacific Coast Salmon Plan (PCSP or Salmon FMP) means the Fishery Management Plan, as amended, for commercial and recreational ocean salmon fisheries in the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) (3 to 200 nautical miles offshore) off Washington, Oregon, and California. The Salmon FMP was first developed by the Council and approved by the Secretary in 1978. The Salmon FMP was amended on October 31, 1984, to establish a framework process to develop and implement fishery management actions; the Salmon FMP has been subsequently amended at irregular intervals. Other names commonly used include: Pacific Coast Salmon Fishery Management Plan, West Coast Salmon Plan, West Coast Salmon Fishery Management Plan.

Plugs means artificial fishing lures made of wood or hard plastic with one or more hooks attached. Lures commonly known as “spoons,” “wobblers,” “dodgers,” and flexible plastic lures are not considered plugs, and may not be used where “plugs only” are specified.

Recreational fishing means fishing with recreational fishing gear as defined annually under §660.408 and not for the purpose of sale or barter.

Recreational fishing gear will be defined annually under §660.408.

Regional Administrator means the Director, Northwest Region, NMFS, or a designee. For fisheries occurring primarily or exclusively in the fishery management area seaward of California, Regional Administrator means the Director, Northwest Region, NMFS, acting in consultation with the Director, Southwest Region, NMFS.

Salmon means any anadromous species of the family Salmonidae and genus Oncorhynchus, commonly known as Pacific salmon, including, but not limited to:

Chinook (king) salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

Coho (silver) salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch

Pink (humpback) salmon, Oncorhynchus gorbuscha

Chum (dog) salmon, Oncorhynchus keta

Sockeye (red) salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka

Steelhead (rainbow trout), Oncorhynchus mykiss

Total length of salmon means the shortest distance between the tip of the snout or jaw (whichever extends furthest while the mouth is closed) and the tip of the longest lobe of the tail, without resort to any force or mutilation of the salmon other than fanning or swinging the tail.

Treaty Indian fishing means fishing for salmon and steelhead in the fishery management area by a person authorized by the Makah Tribe to exercise fishing rights under the Treaty with the Makah, or by the Quileute, Hoh, or Quinault Tribes to exercise fishing rights under the Treaty of Olympia.

Troll fishing gear will be defined annually under §660.408.

Whole bait means a hook or hooks baited with whole natural bait with no device to attract fish other than a flasher.

[61 FR 34572, July 2, 1996, as amended at 66 FR 29241, May 30, 2001; 76 FR 81858, Dec. 29, 2011; 78 FR 10559, Feb. 14, 2013]

§660.403   Relation to other laws.

(a) The relation of this part to other laws is set forth in §600.705 of this chapter, §660.2, and paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section.

(b) Any person fishing subject to this subpart who also engages in fishing for groundfish should consult Federal regulations in subpart C through G for applicable requirements of that subpart, including the requirement that vessels engaged in commercial fishing for groundfish (except commercial passenger vessels) have vessel identification in accordance with §660.20.

(c) Any person fishing subject to this subpart is bound by the international boundaries of the fishery management area described in §660.402, notwithstanding any dispute or negotiation between the United States and any neighboring country regarding their respective jurisdictions, until such time as new boundaries are published by the United States.

[61 FR 34572, July 2, 1996, as amended at 76 FR 81858, Dec. 29, 2011]

§660.404   Recordkeeping and reporting.

(a) This subpart recognizes that catch and effort data necessary for implementation of any applicable fishery management plan are collected by the States and Indian tribes of Washington, Oregon, California, and Idaho under existing data collection requirements. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, no additional catch reports will be required of fishermen or processors so long as the data collection and reporting systems operated by State agencies and Indian tribes continue to provide NMFS with statistical information adequate for management.

(b) Persons engaged in commercial fishing may be required to submit catch reports that are specified annually under §660.408.

[61 FR 34600, July 2, 1996]

§660.405   Prohibitions.

(a) In addition to the general prohibitions specified in §600.725 of this chapter, it is unlawful for any person to do any of the following, except as otherwise authorized under this part:

(1) Take and retain or land salmon caught with a net in the fishery management area, except that a hand-held net may be used to bring hooked salmon on board a vessel.

(2) Fish for, or take and retain, any species of salmon:

(i) During closed seasons or in closed areas;

(ii) While possessing on board any species not allowed to be taken in the area at the time;

(iii) Once any catch limit is attained;

(iv) By means of gear or methods other than recreational fishing gear or troll fishing gear, or gear authorized under §660.408(k) for treaty Indian fishing;

(v) In violation of any action issued under this subpart; or

(vi) In violation of any applicable area, season, species, zone, gear, daily bag limit, or length restriction.

(3) Fish for salmon in an area when salmon of less than the legal minimum length for that area are on board the fishing vessel, except that this provision does not prohibit transit of an area when salmon of less than the legal minimum length for that area are on board, so long as no fishing is being conducted.

(4) Remove the head of any salmon caught in the fishery management area, or possess a salmon with the head removed, if that salmon has been marked by removal of the adipose fin to indicate that a coded wire tag has been implanted in the head of the fish.

(5) Take and retain or possess on board a fishing vessel any species of salmon that is less than the applicable minimum total length, including the applicable minimum length for dressed, head-off salmon.

(6) Possess on board a fishing vessel a salmon, for which a minimum total length is extended or cannot be determined, except that dressed, head-off salmon may be possessed on board a freezer trolling vessel, unless the adipose fin of such salmon has been removed.

(7) Fail to return to the water immediately and with the least possible injury any salmon the retention of which is prohibited by this subpart.

(8) Engage in recreational fishing while aboard a vessel engaged in commercial fishing. This restriction is not intended to prohibit the use of fishing gear otherwise permitted under the definitions of troll and recreational fishing gear, so long as that gear is legal in the fishery for which it is being used.

(9) Take and retain, possess, or land any steelhead taken in the course of commercial fishing in the fishery management area, unless such take and retention qualifies as treaty Indian fishing.

(10) Sell, barter, offer to sell, offer to barter, or purchase any salmon taken in the course of recreational salmon fishing.

(11) Refuse to submit fishing gear or catch subject to such person's control to inspection by an authorized officer, or to interfere with or prevent, by any means, such an inspection.

(12) Take and retain Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) except in accordance with regulations of the International Pacific Halibut Commission at part 300 of this title. Pacific halibut that cannot be retained lawfully must be returned to the water immediately and with the least possible injury.

(13) Violate any other provision of this subpart.

(b) The fishery management area is closed to salmon fishing except as opened by this subpart or superseding regulations or notices. All open fishing periods begin at 0001 hours and end at 2400 hours local time on the dates specified, except that a fishing period may be ended prior to 2400 hours local time through an inseason action taken under §660.409 in order to meet fishery management objectives.

(c) Under the Pacific Coast groundfish regulations at §660.330, fishing with salmon troll gear is prohibited within the Salmon Troll Yelloweye Rockfish Conservation Area (YRCA). It is unlawful for commercial salmon troll vessels to take and retain, possess, or land fish taken with salmon troll gear within the Salmon Troll YRCA. Vessels may transit through the Salmon Troll YRCA with or without fish on board.The Salmon Troll YRCA is an area off the northern Washington coast. The Salmon Troll YRCA is intended to protect yelloweye rockfish. The Salmon Troll YRCA is defined by straight lines connecting specific latitude and longitude coordinates under the Pacific Coast Groundfish regulations at §660.70.

[61 FR 34572, July 2, 1996, as amended at 71 FR 78719, Dec. 29, 2006; 76 FR 81858, Dec. 29, 2011; 80 FR 77275, Dec. 14, 2015]

§660.406   Exempted fishing.

(a) NMFS may allow such exempted fishing in the fishery management area as may be recommended by the Council, the Federal Government, state government, or treaty Indian tribes having usual and accustomed fishing grounds in the fishery management area.

(b) NMFS will not allow any exempted fishery recommended by the Council unless NMFS determines that the purpose, design, and administration of the exempted fishery are consistent with the goals and objectives of the Council's fishery management plan, the national standards (section 301(a) of the Magnuson Act), and other applicable law.

(c) Each vessel participating in any exempted fishery recommended by the Council and allowed by NMFS is subject to all provisions of this subpart, except those portions which relate to the purpose and nature of the exempted fishery. These exceptions will be specified in a permit issued by the Regional Administrator to each vessel participating in the exempted fishery and that permit must be carried aboard each participating vessel.

[61 FR 34572, July 2, 1996, as amended at 78 FR 10559, Feb. 14, 2013]

§660.407   Treaty Indian fishing.

Except as otherwise provided in this subpart, treaty Indian fishing in any part of the fishery management area is subject to the provisions of this subpart, the Magnuson Act, and any other regulations issued under the Magnuson Act.

§660.408   Annual actions.

(a) General. NMFS will annually establish specifications and management measures or, as necessary, adjust specifications and management measures for the commercial, recreational, and treaty Indian fisheries by publishing the action in the Federal Register under §660.411. Management of the Pacific Coast salmon fishery will be conducted consistent with the standards and procedures in the Salmon FMP. The Salmon FMP is available from the Regional Administrator or the Council. Specifications and management measures are described in paragraphs (b) through (o) of this section.

(b) Annual catch limits. Annual Specifications will include annual catch limits (ACLs) determined consistent with the standards and procedures in the Salmon FMP.

(c) Allowable ocean harvest levels. Allowable ocean harvest levels must ensure that conservation objectives and ACLs are met, as described in §660.410, except that where the de minimis fishing control rules described in §660.410(c) apply, conservation objectives may not be met, provided ACLs are met. The allowable ocean harvest for commercial, recreational, and treaty Indian fishing may be expressed in terms of season regulations expected to achieve a certain optimum harvest level or in terms of a particular number of fish. Procedures for determining allowable ocean harvest vary by species and fishery complexity, and are documented in the fishery management plan and Council documents.

(d) Allocation of ocean harvest levels—(1) Coho and chinook from the U.S.-Canada border to Cape Falcon—(i) Overall allocation schedule. Initial allocation of coho and chinook salmon north of Cape Falcon, OR, will be based on the following schedule:

Allowable non-treaty ocean harvest (thousands of fish)Percentage1
CommercialRecreational
Coho:
0-3002575
>3006040
Chinook:
0-1005050
>100-1506040
>1507030

1The percentage allocation is tiered and must be calculated in additive steps when the harvest level exceeds the initial tier. For example, for a total allowable ocean harvest of 150,000 chinook, the recreational allocation would be equal to 50 percent of 100,000 chinook plus 40 percent of 50,000 chinook or 50,000 + 20,000 = 70,000 chinook.

(ii) Deviations from allocation schedule. The initial allocation may be modified annually in accordance with paragraphs (d)(1)(iii) through (viii) of this section. These deviations from the allocation schedule provide flexibility to account for the dynamic nature of the fisheries and better achieve the allocation objectives and fishery allocation priorities in paragraphs (d)(1)(ix) and (x) of this section. Total allowable ocean harvest will be maximized to the extent possible consistent with treaty obligations, state fishery needs, conservation objectives, and ACLs. Every effort will be made to establish seasons and gear requirements that provide troll and recreational fleets a reasonable opportunity to catch the available harvest. These may include single-species directed fisheries with landing restrictions for other species.

(iii) Preseason trades. Preseason species trades (chinook and coho) may be made if they are based upon the recommendation of the commercial and recreational Salmon Advisory Subpanel representatives for the area north of Cape Falcon; simultaneously benefit both the commercial and recreational fisheries or benefit one fishery without harming the other; and are supported by a socio-economic analysis that compares the impacts of the recommendation to those of the standard allocation schedule to determine the allocation that best meets the allocation objectives. This analysis will be made available to the public during the preseason process for establishing annual management measures. Preseason trades will use an exchange ratio of four coho to one chinook as a desirable guideline.

(iv) Commercial allocation. The commercial allowable ocean harvest of chinook and coho derived during the preseason allocation process may be varied by major subareas (i.e., north of Leadbetter Point and south of Leadbetter Point) if there is need to do so to decrease impacts on weak stocks. Deviations in each major subarea will generally not exceed 50 percent of the allowable ocean harvest of each species that would have been established without a geographic deviation in the distribution of the allowable ocean harvest. Deviation of more than 50 percent will be based on a conservation need to protect the weak stocks and will provide larger overall harvest for the entire fishery north of Cape Falcon than would have been possible without the deviation.

(v) Recreational allocation. The recreational allowable ocean harvest of chinook and coho derived during the preseason allocation process will be distributed among the four major recreational subareas as described in the coho and chinook distribution sections below. The Council may deviate from subarea quotas to meet recreational season objectives, based on agreement of representatives of the affected ports and/or in accordance with section 6.5.3.2 of the Pacific Coast Salmon Plan, regarding certain selective fisheries. Additionally, based upon the recommendation of the recreational Salmon Advisory Subpanel representatives for the area north of Cape Falcon, the Council will include criteria in its preseason salmon management recommendations to guide any inseason transfer of coho among the recreational subareas to meet recreational season duration objectives.

(A) Coho distribution. The preseason recreational allowable ocean harvest of coho north of Cape Falcon will be distributed to provide 50 percent to the area north of Leadbetter Point and 50 percent to the area south of Leadbetter Point. In years with no fishery in Washington State management area 4B, the distribution of coho north of Leadbetter Point will be divided to provide 74 percent to the subarea between Leadbetter Point and the Queets River (Westport), 5.2 percent to the subarea between Queets River and Cape Flattery (La Push), and 20.8 percent to the area north of the Queets River (Neah Bay). In years when there is an Area 4B (Neah Bay) fishery under state management, 25 percent of the numerical value of that fishery shall be added to the recreational allowable ocean harvest north of Leadbetter Point prior to applying the sharing percentages for Westport and La Push. The increase to Westport and La Push will be subtracted from the Neah Bay ocean share to maintain the same total harvest allocation north of Leadbetter Point. Each of the four recreational port area allocations will be rounded, to the nearest hundred fish, with the largest quotas rounded downward, if necessary, to sum to the preseason recreational allowable ocean harvest of coho north of Cape Falcon.

(B) Chinook distribution. Subarea distributions of Chinook will be managed as guidelines based on calculations of the Salmon Technical Team with the primary objective of achieving all-species fisheries without imposing Chinook restrictions (i.e., area closures or bag limit reductions). Chinook in excess of all-species fisheries needs may be utilized by directed Chinook fisheries north of Cape Falcon or by negotiating a preseason species trade of Chinook and coho between commercial and recreational allocations in accordance with paragraph (d)(1)(iii) of this section.

(vi) Inseason trades and transfers. Inseason transfers, including species trades of Chinook and coho, may be permitted in either direction between commercial and recreational fishery quotas to allow for uncatchable fish in one fishery to be reallocated to the other. Fish will be deemed uncatchable by a respective commercial or recreational fishery only after considering all possible annual management actions to allow for their harvest that are consistent with the harvest management objectives specific in the fishery management plan including consideration of single species fisheries. Implementation of inseason transfers will require consultation with the pertinent commercial and recreational Salmon Advisory Subpanel representatives from the area involved and the Salmon Technical Team, and a clear establishment of available fish and impacts from the transfer. Inseason trades or transfers may vary from the guideline ratio of four coho to one Chinook to meet the allocation objectives in paragraph (d)(1)(ix) of this section.

(vii) Other inseason provisions. Any increase or decrease in the recreational or commercial allowable ocean harvest resulting from an inseason restructuring of a fishery or other inseason management action does not require reallocation of the overall non-treaty allowable ocean harvest north of Cape Falcon between the recreational and commercial fisheries. Inseason redistribution of subarea quotas within the recreational fishery or the distribution of allowable coho catch transfers from the commercial fishery among subareas may deviate from the preseason distribution. Inseason management actions may be taken by the Regional Administrator to assure meeting the primary objective of achieving all-species fisheries without imposing Chinook restrictions in each of the recreational subareas north of Cape Falcon. Such actions might include, but are not limited to: Closure from 0 to 3, 0 to 6, 3 to 200, or 5 to 200 nm from shore; closure from a point extending due west from Tatoosh Island for 5 nm, then south to a point due west of Umatilla Reef Buoy, then due east to shore; closure from North Head at the Columbia River mouth north to Leadbetter Point; change in species that may be landed; or other actions as prescribed in the annual management measures.

(viii) Selective fisheries. Deviations from the initial gear and port area allocations may be allowed to implement selective fisheries for marked salmon stocks as long as the deviations are within the constraints and process specified in section 6.5.3.2 of the Pacific Coast Salmon Plan.

(ix) Allocation objectives. The goal of allocating ocean harvest north of Cape Falcon is to achieve, to the greatest degree possible, the following objectives for the commercial and recreational fisheries. When deviation from the allocation schedule is being considered, these objectives will serve as criteria to help determine whether a user group will benefit from the deviation.

(A) Provide recreational opportunity by maximizing the duration of the fishing season while minimizing daily and area closures and restrictions on gear and daily limits.

(B) Maximize the value of the commercial harvest while providing fisheries of reasonable duration.

(x) Fishery allocation priorities. The following fishery allocation priorities will provide guidance in the preseason process of establishing final harvest allocations and structuring seasons that best achieve the allocation objectives. To the extent fish are provided to each fishery by the allocation schedule, these priorities do not favor one user group over the other and should be met simultaneously for each fishery. Seasons may be structured that deviate from these priorities consistent with the allocation objectives.

(A) At total allowable harvest levels up to 300,000 coho and 100,000 chinook: For the recreational fishery, provide coho for a late June through early September all-species season; provide chinook to allow access to coho and, if possible, a minimal chinook-only fishery prior to the all-species season; and adjust days per week and/or institute area restrictions to stabilize season duration. For the commercial fishery, provide chinook for a May and early June chinook season and provide coho for hooking mortality and/or access to a pink fishery, and ensure that part of the chinook season will occur after June 1.

(B) At total allowable harvest levels above 300,000 coho and above 100,000 chinook: For the recreational fishery, relax any restrictions in the all-species fishery and/or extend the all-species season beyond Labor Day as coho quota allows; provide chinook for a Memorial Day through late June chinook-only fishery; and adjust days per week to ensure continuity with the all-species season. For the commercial fishery, provide coho for an all-species season in late summer and/or access to a pink fishery; and leave adequate chinook from the May through June season to allow access to coho.

(2) Coho south of Cape Falcon—(i) Allocation schedule. Preseason allocation shares of coho salmon south of Cape Falcon, OR, will be determined by an allocation schedule, which is based on the following formula. The formula will be used to interpolate between allowable harvest levels as shown in the table below.

(A) Up to 350,000 allowable ocean harvest: The first 150,000 fish will be allocated to the recreational fishery. Additional fish will be allocated 66.7 percent to troll and 33.3 percent to recreational. The incidental coho mortality for a commercial all-salmon-except-coho fishery will be deducted from the troll allocation. If the troll allocation is insufficient for this purpose, the remaining number of coho needed for this estimated incidental coho mortality will be deducted from the recreational share.

(B) From 350,000 to 800,000 allowable ocean harvest: The recreational allocation is equal to 14 percent of the allowable harvest above 350,000 fish, plus 217,000 fish. The remainder of the allowable ocean harvest will be allocated to the troll fishery.

(C) Above 800,000 allowable ocean harvest: The recreational allocation is equal to 10 percent of the allowable harvest above 800,000 fish, plus 280,000 fish. The remainder of the allowable ocean harvest will be allocated to the troll fishery.

Allowable ocean harvest (thousands of fish)Commercial Recreational
Number
(thousands)
Percentage Number
(thousands)
Percentage
2,7002,23082.647017.4
2,6002,14082.346017.7
2,5002,05082.045018.0
2,4001,96081.744018.3
2,3001,87081.343018.7
2,2001,78080.942019.1
2,1001,69080.541019.5
2,0001,60080.040020.0
1,9001,51079.539020.5
1,8001,42078.938021.1
1,7001,33078.237021.8
1,6001,24077.536022.5
1,5001,15076.735023.3
1,4001,06075.734024.3
1,30097074.633025.4
1,20088073.332026.7
1,10079071.831028.2
1,00070070.030030.0
90061067.829032.2
80052065.028035.0
70043462.026638.0
60034858.025242.0
50026252.423847.6
40017644.022456.0
35013338.021762.0
30010033.320066.7
200133116.51167183.5
100(1)(1)(1)(1)

1An incidental coho allowance associated with any commercial all-salmon-except-coho fishery will be deducted from the recreational share of coho during periods of low coho abundance when the commercial allocation of coho under the schedule would be insufficient to allow for incidental hooking mortality of coho in the commercial all-salmon-except-coho fishery.

(ii) Geographic distribution. Allowable harvest south of Cape Falcon may be divided and portions assigned to subareas based on considerations including, but not limited to, controlling ocean harvest impacts on depressed, viable natural stocks within acceptable maximum allowable levels; stock abundance; allocation considerations; stock specific impacts; relative abundance of the salmon species in the fishery; escapement goals; and maximizing harvest potential.

(iii) Recreational allocation at 167,000 fish or less. When the recreational allocation is at 167,000 fish or less, the total recreational allowable ocean harvest of coho will be divided between two major subareas with independent impact quotas. The initial allocation will be 70 percent from Cape Falcon to Humbug Mountain and 30 percent south of Humbug Mountain. Coho transfers between the two impact quotas may be permitted on a one-for-one basis, if chinook constraints preclude access to coho. Horse Mountain to Point Arena will be managed for an impact guideline of 3 percent of the south of Cape Falcon recreational allocation. The recreational coho fishery between Humbug Mountain and Point Arena may be closed when it is projected that the harvest impact between Humbug Mountain and Point Arena, combined with the projected harvest impact that will be taken south of Point Arena to the end of the season, equals the impact quota for south of Humbug Mountain. The recreational fishery for coho salmon south of Point Arena will not close upon attainment of the south of Humbug Mountain impact quota.

(iv) Oregon coastal natural coho. The allocation provisions in paragraph (d)(2) of this section provide guidance only when coho abundance permits a directed coho harvest, not when the allowable harvest impacts are insufficient to allow coho retention south of Cape Falcon. At such low levels, allowable harvest impacts will be allocated during the Council's preseason process.

(v) Inseason reallocation. No later than August 15 each year, the Salmon Technical Team will estimate the number of coho salmon needed to complete the recreational seasons. Any coho salmon allocated to the recreational fishery that are not needed to complete the recreational seasons will be reallocated to the commercial fishery. Once reallocation has taken place, the remaining recreational quota will change to a harvest guideline. If the harvest guideline for the recreational fishery is projected to be reached on or before Labor Day, the Regional Administrator may allow the recreational fishery to continue through the Labor Day weekend only if there is no significant danger of impacting the allocation of another fishery or of failing to meet an escapement goal.

(e) Management boundaries and zones. Management boundaries and zones will be established or adjusted to achieve a conservation purpose or management objective. A conservation purpose or management objective protects a fish stock, simplifies management of a fishery, or promotes wise use of fishery resources by, for example, separating fish stocks, facilitating enforcement, separating conflicting fishing activities, or facilitating harvest opportunities. Management boundaries and zones will be described by geographical references, coordinates (latitude and longitude), depth contours, distance from shore, or similar criteria.

(f) Minimum harvest lengths. The minimum harvest lengths for commercial, recreational, and treaty Indian fishing may be changed upon demonstration that a useful purpose will be served. For example, an increase in minimum size for commercially caught salmon may be necessary for conservation or may provide a greater poundage and monetary yield from the fishery while not substantially increasing hooking mortality. The removal of a minimum size for the recreational fishery may prevent wastage of fish and outweigh the detrimental impacts of harvesting immature fish.

(g) Recreational daily bag limits. Recreational daily bag limits for each fishing area will specify number and species of salmon that may be retained. The recreational daily bag limits for each fishing area will be set to maximize the length of the fishing season consistent with the allowable level of harvest in the area.

(h) Fishing gear restrictions. Gear restrictions for commercial, recreational, and treaty Indian fishing may be established or modified upon demonstration that a useful purpose will be served. For example, gear restrictions may be imposed or modified to facilitate enforcement, reduce hooking mortality, or reduce gear expenses for fishermen.

(i) Seasons—(1) In general. Seasons for commercial and recreational fishing will be established or modified taking into account allowable ocean harvest levels and quotas, allocations between the commercial and recreational fisheries, and the estimated amount of effort required to catch the available fish based on past seasons.

(2) Commercial seasons. Commercial seasons will be established or modified taking into account wastage of fish that cannot legally be retained, size and poundage of fish caught, effort shifts between fishing areas, and protection of depressed stocks present in the fishing areas. All-species seasons will be established to allow the maximum allowable harvest of pink salmon, when and where available, without exceeding allowable Chinook or coho harvest levels and within conservation and allocation constraints of the pink stocks.

(3) Recreational seasons. If feasible, recreational seasons will be established or modified to encompass Memorial Day and Labor Day weekends, and to avoid the need for inseason closures.

(j) Quotas (by species, including fish caught 0-3 nm seaward of Washington, Oregon, and California). Quotas for commercial, recreational, and treaty Indian fishing may be established or modified to ensure that allowable ocean harvests are not exceeded. Quotas may be fixed or adjustable and used in conjunction with seasons. Any quota established does not represent a guaranteed ocean harvest, but a maximum ceiling on catch.

(k) Selective fisheries—(1) In general. In addition to the all-species seasons and the all-species-except-coho seasons established for the commercial and recreational fisheries, species selective fisheries and mark selective fisheries may be established.

(2) Species selective fisheries. Selective coho-only, Chinook-only, pink-only, all salmon except Chinook, and all salmon except coho fisheries may be established if harvestable fish of the target species are available; harvest of incidental species will not exceed allowable levels; proven, documented selective gear exists; significant wastage of incidental species will not occur; and the selective fishery will occur in an acceptable time and area where wastage can be minimized and target stocks are primarily available.

(3) Mark selective fisheries. Fisheries that select for salmon marked with a healed adipose fin clip may be established in the annual management measures as long as they are consistent with guidelines in section 6.5.3.1 of the Pacific Coast Salmon Plan.

(l) Treaty Indian fishing. (1) NMFS will establish or modify treaty Indian fishing seasons and/or fixed or adjustable quotas, size limits, gear restrictions, and/or area restrictions taking into account recommendations of the Council, proposals from affected tribes, and relevant Federal court proceedings.

(2) The combined treaty Indian fishing seasons will not be longer than necessary to harvest the allowable treaty Indian catch, which is the total treaty harvest that would occur if the tribes chose to take their total entitlement of the weakest stock in the fishery management area, assuming this level of harvest did not create conservation or allocation problems for other stocks.

(3) Any fixed or adjustable quotas established will be consistent with established treaty rights and will not exceed the harvest that would occur if the entire treaty entitlement to the weakest run were taken by treaty Indian fisheries in the fishery management area.

(4) If adjustable quotas are established for treaty Indian fishing, they may be subject to inseason adjustment because of unanticipated Chinook or coho hooking mortality occurring during the season, catches in treaty Indian fisheries inconsistent with those unanticipated under Federal regulations, or a need to redistribute quotas to ensure attainment of an overall quota.

(m) Yurok and Hoopa Valley tribal fishing rights. For purposes of section 303 of the Magnuson Act, the federally reserved fishing rights of the Yurok and Hoopa Valley Indian Tribes as set out in a legal opinion2 dated October 4, 1993, by the Office of the Solicitor, Department of the Interior, are applicable law. Under section 303 of the Magnuson Act, allowable ocean harvest must be consistent with all applicable laws.

2Copies of the Solicitor's Opinion are available from the Director, Southwest Region, NMFS.

(n) Inseason notice procedures. Telephone hotlines and USCG broadcasts will provide actual notice of inseason actions for commercial, recreational, and treaty Indian fishing.

(o) Reporting requirements. Reporting requirements for commercial fishing may be imposed to ensure timely and accurate assessment of catches in regulatory areas subject to quota management. Such reports are subject to the limitations described herein. Persons engaged in commercial fishing in a regulatory area subject to quota management and landing their catch in another regulatory area open to fishing may be required to transmit a brief report prior to leaving the first regulatory area. The regulatory areas subject to these reporting requirements, the contents of the reports, and the entities receiving the reports will be specified annually.

[61 FR 34601, July 2, 1996, as amended at 64 FR 26328, May 14, 1999; 66 FR 29241, May 30, 2001; 76 FR 81859, Dec. 29, 2011; 78 FR 10559, Feb. 14, 2013]

§660.409   Inseason actions.

(a) Fixed inseason management provisions. NMFS is authorized to take the following inseason management actions annually, as appropriate.

(1) Automatic season closures based on quotas. When a quota for the commercial or the recreational fishery, or both, for any salmon species in any portion of the fishery management area is projected by the Regional Administrator to be reached on or by a certain date, NMFS will, by an inseason action issued under §660.411, close the commercial or recreational fishery, or both, for all salmon species in the portion of the fishery management area to which the quota applies as of the date the quota is projected to be reached.

(2) Rescission of automatic closure. If a fishery is closed under a quota before the end of a scheduled season based on overestimate of actual catch, NMFS will reopen that fishery in as timely a manner as possible for all or part of the remaining original season provided NMFS finds that a reopening of the fishery is consistent with the management objectives for the affected species and the additional open period is no less than 24 hours. The season will be reopened by an inseason action issued under §660.411.

(3) Adjustment for error in preseason estimates. NMFS may, by an inseason action issued under §660.411, make appropriate changes in relevant seasons or quotas if a significant computational error or errors made in calculating preseason estimates of salmon abundance are identified, provided that such correction can be made in a timely manner to affect the involved fishery without disrupting the capacity to meet the objectives of the fishery management plan.

(b) Flexible inseason management provisions. (1) The Regional Administrator will consult with the Chairman of the Council and the appropriate State Directors prior to taking any of the following flexible inseason management provisions, which include, but are not limited to, the following:

(i) Modification of quotas and/or fishing seasons.

(ii) Modification of the species that may be caught and landed during specific seasons and the establishment or modification of limited retention regulations.

(iii) Modification of recreational bag limits and recreational fishing days per calendar week.

(iv) Establishment or modification of gear restrictions.

(v) Modification of boundaries, including landing boundaries, and establishment of closed areas.

(2) Fishery managers must determine that any inseason adjustment in management measures is consistent with fishery regimes established by the U.S.-Canada Pacific Salmon Commission, conservation objectives and ACLs, conservation of the salmon resource, any adjudicated Indian fishing rights, and the ocean allocation scheme in the fishery management plan. All inseason adjustments will be based on consideration of the following factors:

(i) Predicted sizes of salmon runs.

(ii) Harvest quotas and hooking mortality limits for the area and total allowable impact limitations, if applicable.

(iii) Amount of commercial, recreational, and treaty Indian catch for each species in the area to date.

(iv) Amount of commercial, recreational, and treaty Indian fishing effort in the area to date.

(v) Estimated average daily catch per fisherman.

(vi) Predicted fishing effort for the area to the end of the scheduled season.

(vii) Other factors, as appropriate.

[61 FR 34572, July 2, 1996, as amended at 76 FR 81860, Dec. 29, 2011]

§660.410   Conservation objectives, ACLs, and de minimis control rules.

(a) Conservation objectives. Annual management measures will be consistent with conservation objectives described in Table 3-1 of the Salmon FMP or as modified through the processes described below, except where the ACL escapement level for a stock is higher than the conservation objective, in which case annual management measures will be designed to ensure that the ACL for that stock is met, or where the de minimis control rules described in paragraph (c) of this section apply.

(1) Modification of conservation objectives. NMFS is authorized, through an action issued under §660.411, to modify a conservation objective if—

(i) A comprehensive technical review of the best scientific information available provides conclusive evidence that, in the view of the Council, the Scientific and Statistical Committee, and the Salmon Technical Team, justifies modification of a conservation objective or

(ii) Action by a Federal court indicates that modification of a conservation objective is appropriate.

(2) ESA-listed species. The annual specifications and management measures will be consistent with NMFS consultation standards or NMFS recovery plans for species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Where these standards differ from those described in FMP Table 3-1, NMFS will describe the ESA-related standards for the upcoming annual specifications and management measures in a letter to the Council prior to the first Council meeting at which the development of those annual management measures occurs.

(b) Annual Catch Limits. Annual management measures will be designed to ensure escapement levels at or higher than ACLs determined through the procedures set forth in the FMP.

(c) De minimis control rules. Klamath River fall Chinook and Sacramento River fall Chinook salmon have the same form of de minimis control rule described in the FMP, which allows for limited fishing impacts when abundance falls below SMSY. The control rule describes maximum allowable exploitation rates at any given level of abundance. The annual management measures may provide for lower exploitation rates as needed to address uncertainties or other year-specific circumstances. The de minimis exploitation rate in a given year must also be determined in consideration of the following factors:

(1) The potential for critically low natural spawner abundance, including considerations for substocks that may fall below crucial genetic thresholds;

(2) Spawner abundance levels in recent years;

(3) The status of co-mingled stocks;

(4) Indicators of marine and freshwater environmental conditions;

(5) Minimal needs for tribal fisheries;

(6) Whether the stock is currently in an approaching overfished condition;

(7) Whether the stock is currently overfished;

(8) Other considerations as appropriate.

(9) Exploitation rates, including de minimis exploitation rates, must not jeopardize the long-term capacity of the stock to produce maximum sustained yield on a continuing basis. NMFS expects that the control rule and associated criteria will result in decreasing harvest opportunity as abundance declines and little or no opportunity for harvest at abundance levels less than half of MSST.

[76 FR 81860, Dec. 29, 2011]

§660.411   Notification and publication procedures.

(a) Notification and effective dates. (1) Annual and certain other actions taken under §§660.408 and 660.410 will be implemented by an action published in the Federal Register, and will be effective upon filing, unless a later time is specified in the action.

(2) Inseason actions taken under §660.409 will be by actual notice available from telephone hotlines and USCG broadcasts, as specified annually. Inseason actions will also be published in the Federal Register as soon as practicable. Inseason actions will be effective from the time specified in the actual notice of the action (telephone hotlines and USCG broadcasts), or at the time the inseason action published in the Federal Register is effective, whichever comes first.

(3) Any action issued under this section will remain in effect until the expiration date stated in the action or until rescinded, modified, or superseded. However, no inseason action has any effect beyond the end of the calendar year in which it is issued.

(b) Public comment. If time allows, NMFS will invite public comment prior to the effective date of any action published in the Federal Register.

(c) Availability of data. The Regional Administrator will compile in aggregate form all data and other information relevant to the action being taken and will make them available for public review upon request, contact information will be published annually in the Federal Register and announced on the telephone hotline. For actions affecting fisheries occurring primarily or exclusively in the fishery management area seaward of California, information relevant to the action also will be made available upon request by the Southwest Region, NMFS.

[61 FR 34572, July 2, 1996, as amended at 78 FR 10559, Feb. 14, 2013]

§660.412   EFH identifications and descriptions for Pacific salmon.

Essential fish habitat (EFH) is identified for anadromous Pacific salmon stocks managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) under the Pacific Coast Salmon Fishery Management Plan (FMP). These managed salmon include most of the Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) stocks and all of the coho salmon (O. kisutch) stocks from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and California; as well as pink salmon (O. gorbuscha) stocks originating from watersheds within Puget Sound east of, and including, the Elwha River. The geographic extent of freshwater EFH is specifically identified in the FMP as all water bodies currently or historically occupied by PFMC-managed salmon in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and California; including aquatic areas above all artificial barriers that are not specifically excluded. Freshwater EFH, identified in Table 1 of this subpart H, is described using fourth field hydrologic unit codes developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (defined in U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service: Federal guidelines, requirements, and procedures for the national Watershed Boundary Dataset: U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods 11-A3, 2009). Table 1 also identifies the dams that represent the upstream extent of EFH in each hydrologic unit.

(a) Chinook salmon EFH includes all water bodies currently or historically occupied by PFMC-managed Chinook salmon in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and California as identified in Table 1 of this subpart. Chinook salmon EFH also includes the estuarine and marine areas extending from the extreme high tide line in nearshore and tidal submerged environments within state territorial waters out to the full extent of the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) (200 nautical miles) offshore of Washington, Oregon, and California north of Point Conception; and the marine areas of Alaska that are designated as Chinook salmon EFH by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council (NPFMC), for stocks that are also managed by the PFMC.

(b) Coho salmon EFH includes all water bodies currently or historically occupied by PFMC-managed coho salmon in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and California as identified in Table 1 of this subpart. Coho salmon EFH also includes the estuarine and marine areas extending from the extreme high tide line in nearshore and tidal submerged environments within state territorial waters out to the full extent of the EEZ (200 nautical miles) offshore of Washington, Oregon, and California north of Point Conception; and the marine areas of Alaska that are designated as coho salmon EFH by the NPFMC, for stocks that are also managed by the PFMC.

(c) Puget Sound pink salmon EFH includes all water bodies currently or historically occupied by PFMC-managed Puget Sound pink salmon in Washington State as identified in Table 1 of this subpart. Puget Sound pink salmon EFH also includes the estuarine and marine areas extending from the extreme high tide line in nearshore and tidal submerged environments within state territorial waters north and east of Cape Flattery, Washington, including Puget Sound, the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Strait of Georgia; the waters of the U.S. EEZ north of 48° N latitude to the U.S.-Canada border; and marine areas of Alaska that are designated as pink salmon EFH by the NPFMC, for stocks that are also managed by the PFMC.

[79 FR 75450, Dec. 18, 2014]

Table 1 to Subpart H of Part 660—Pacific Salmon EFH Identified by USGS Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC)

4th Field
hydrologic unit code
Hydrologic unit nameState(s)Chinook
salmon
Coho salmonPuget Sound pink salmonImpassable dam(s)
17020005Chief JosephWAXXChief Joseph Dam.
17020006OkanoganWAXn/a.
17020007SimilkameenWAXn/a.
17020008MethowWAXXn/a.
17020009Lake ChelanWAXn/a.
17020010Upper Columbia-EntiatWAXXn/a.
17020011WenatcheeWAXXn/a.
17020012Moses CouleeWAXXn/a.
17020015Lower CrabWAXn/a.
17020016Upper Columbia-Priest RapidsWAXXn/a.
17030001Upper YakimaWAXXKeechelus Dam Kachess Dam (Kachess River).
17030002NachesWAXXRimrock Dam (Tieton River).
17030003Lower YakimaWAXXn/a.
17060101Hells CanyonOR/IDXHells Canyon Dam.
17060102Imnaha RiverOR/IDXn/a.
17060103Lower Snake-AsotinOR/WA/IDXXn/a.
17060104Upper Grande Ronde RiverORXXn/a.
17060105Wallowa RiverORXXn/a.
17060106Lower Grande RondeOR/WAXXn/a.
17060107Lower Snake-TucannonWAXXn/a.
17060108Palouse RiverWAXn/a.
17060110Lower Snake RiverWAXXn/a.
17060201Upper SalmonIDXn/a.
17060202PahsimeroiIDXn/a.
17060203Middle Salmon-PantherIDXn/a.
17060204LemhiIDXn/a.
17060205Upper Middle Fork SalmonIDXn/a.
17060206Lower Middle Fork SalmonIDXn/a.
17060207Middle Salmon-ChamberlainIDXn/a.
17060208South Fork SalmonIDXn/a.
17060209Lower SalmonIDXn/a.
17060210Little SalmonIDXn/a.
17060301Upper SelwayIDXXn/a.
17060302Lower SelwayIDXXn/a.
17060303LochsaIDXn/a.
17060304Middle Fork ClearwaterIDXXn/a.
17060305South Fork ClearwaterIDXXn/a.
17060306ClearwaterWA/IDXXn/a.
17060308Lower North Fork ClearwaterIDXDworshak Dam.
17070101Middle Columbia-Lake WallulaOR/WAXXn/a.
17070103UmatillaORXXMcKay Dam (McKay Creek).
17070105Middle Columbia-HoodOR/WAXXn/a.
17070106KlickitatWAXXn/a.
17070306Lower DeschutesORXXn/a.
17080001Lower Columbia-SandyOR/WAXXBull Run Dam #2.
17080002LewisWAXXn/a.
17080003Lower Columbia-ClatskanieOR/WAXXn/a.
17080004Upper CowlitzWAXXn/a.
17080005CowlitzWAXXn/a.
17080006Lower ColumbiaOR/WAXXn/a.
17090001Middle Fork WillametteORXn/a.
17090002Coast Fork WillametteORXDorena Dam.
17090003Upper WillametteORXXn/a.
17090004McKenzieORXXCougar Dam.1
17090005North SantiamORXXBig Cliff Dam.2
17090006South SantiamORXXn/a.
17090007Middle WillametteORXXn/a.
17090008YamhillORXXn/a.
17090009Molalla-PuddingORXXn/a.
17090010TualatinORXXn/a.
17090011ClackamasORXXn/a.
17090012Lower WillametteORXXn/a.
17100101Hoh-QuillayuteWAXXn/a.
17100102Queets-QuinaultWAXXn/a.
17100103Upper ChehalisWAXXn/a.
17100104Lower ChehalisWAXXn/a.
17100105Grays HarborWAXXn/a.
17100106WillapaWAXXn/a.
17100201NecanicumORXXn/a.
17100202NehalemORXXn/a.
17100203Wilson-Trask-NestuccaORXXn/a.
17100204Siletz-YaquinaORXXn/a.
17100205AlseaORXXn/a.
17100206SiuslawORXXn/a.
17100207SiltcoosORXn/a.
17100301North UmpquaORXXn/a.
17100302South UmpquaORXXn/a.
17100303UmpquaORXXn/a.
17100304CoosORXXn/a.
17100305CoquilleORXXn/a.
17100306SixesORXXn/a.
17100307Upper RogueORXXLost Creek Dam.
17100308Middle RogueORXXEmigrant Dam.
17100309ApplegateCA/ORXXApplegate Dam.
17100310Lower RogueORXXn/a.
17100311IllinoisCA/ORXXn/a.
17100312ChetcoCA/ORXXn/a.
17110001FraserWAXXn/a.
17110002Strait Of GeorgiaWAXXXn/a.
17110003San Juan IslandsWAXn/a.
17110004NooksackWAXXXn/a.
17110005Upper SkagitWAXXXGorge Lake Dam.
17110006SaukWAXXXn/a.
17110007Lower SkagitWAXXXn/a.
17110008StillaguamishWAXXXn/a.
17110009SkykomishWAXXXn/a.
17110010SnoqualmieWAXXXTolt Dam (S. Fork Tolt River).
17110011SnohomishWAXXXn/a.
17110012Lake WashingtonWAXXCedar Falls (Masonry) Dam (Cedar River).
17110013DuwamishWAXXXn/a.
17110014PuyallupWAXXXn/a.
17110015NisquallyWAXXXn/a.
17110016DeschutesWAXXn/a.
17110017SkokomishWAXXXn/a.
17110018Hood CanalWAXXXn/a.
17110019Puget SoundWAXXXn/a.
17110020Dungeness-ElwhaWAXXXn/a.
17110021Crescent-HokoWAXXn/a.
18010101Smith RiverCA/ORXXn/a.
18010102Mad-RedwoodCAXXRobert W. Matthews Dam.
18010103Upper EelCAXXScott Dam.
18010104Middle Fork EelCAXXn/a.
18010105Lower EelCAXXn/a.
18010106South Fork EelCAXXn/a.
18010107MattoleCAXXn/a.
18010108Big-Navarro-GarciaCAXXn/a.
18010109Gualala-SalmonCAXXn/a.
18010110RussianCAXXCoyote Valley Dam (E. Fork Russian R.) Warm Springs Dam (Dry Cr.).
18010206Upper KlamathCA/ORXXKeno Dam.
18010207ShastaCAXXDwinnell Dam.
18010208ScottCAXXn/a.
18010209Lower KlamathCA/ORXXn/a.
18010210SalmonCAXXn/a.
18010211TrinityCAXXLewiston Dam.
18010212South Fork TrinityCAXXn/a.
18020104Sacramento-Stone CorralCAXn/a.
18020111Lower AmericanCAXNimbus Dam.
18020115Upper StonyCAXBlack Butte Dam.
18020116Upper CacheCAXCapay Dam.3
18020125Upper YubaCAXn/a.
18020126Upper BearCAXCamp Far West Dam.
18020151Cow CreekCAXn/a.
18020152Cottonwood CreekCAXn/a.
18020153Battle CreekCAXn/a.
18020154Clear Creek-Sacramento RiverCAXKeswick Dam (Sacramento R.), Whiskeytown Dam (Clear Creek).
18020155Paynes Creek-Sacramento RiverCAXn/a.
18020156Thomes Creek-Sacramento RiverCAXn/a.
18020157Big Chico Creek-Sacramento RiverCAXn/a.
18020158Butte CreekCAXn/a.
18020159Honcut Headwaters-Lower FeatherCAXFeather River Fish Barrier Dam.
18020161Upper Coon-Upper Auburn4CAXn/a.
18020162Upper PutahCAXMonticello Dam.
18020163Lower SacramentoCAXn/a.
18040001Middle San Joaquin-Lower Chowchilla5CAXBuchanan Dam (Chowchilla River), Bear Dam (Bear Creek), Owens Dam (Owens Creek) Mariposa Dam.
18040002Lower San Joaquin River5CAXn/a.
18040003San Joaquin DeltaCAXn/a.
18040007Fresno RiverCAXHidden Dam.
18040008Upper MercedCAXCrocker-Huffman Diversion Dam.
18040009Upper TuolumneCAXLa Grange Dam (Tuolumne R.).
18040010Upper StanislausCAXGoodwin Dam.
18040011Upper CalaverasCAXNew Hogan Dam.
18040012Upper MokelumneCAXCamanche Dam.
18040013Upper CosumnesCAXn/a.
18050001Suisun BayCAXn/a.
18050002San Pablo BayCAXXSan Pablo Dam (San Pablo Cr.).
18050003CoyoteCAXXLeRoy Anderson Dam.
18050004San Francisco BayCAXXn/a.
18050005Tomales-Drake BaysCAXXNicasio Dam (Nicasio Cr.) Peters Dam (Lagunitas Cr.).
18050006San Francisco Coastal SouthCAXn/a.
18060015Monterey Bay6CAXNewell Dam (Newell Cr.)

1Cougar Dam is a barrier to coho salmon only. Chinook salmon are trapped and hauled above the dam.

2Big Cliff Dam is a barrier to coho salmon only. Chinook salmon are trapped and hauled above the dam.

3Capay Dam was selected as the upstream extent of EFH because it was identified as a complete barrier by NMFS biologists and is located in the vicinity of the historical upstream extent of Chinook salmon distribution.

4Natural “lower falls” are downstream of any artificial barriers that would meet the criteria for designating them as the upstream extent of EFH; therefore, the upstream extent of EFH within this HU is at the “lower falls”.

5EFH for Chinook salmon in the Middle San Joaquin-Lower Chowchilla HU (18040001) and Lower San Joaquin River HU (18040002) includes the San Joaquin River, its eastern tributaries, and the lower reaches of the western tributaries. Although there is no evidence of current or historical Chinook salmon distribution in the western tributaries (Yoshiyama et al. 2001), the lower reaches of these tributaries could provide juvenile rearing habitat or refugia from high flows during floods as salmon migrate along the mainstem in this area.

6EFH for coho salmon in the Monterey Bay HU does not include the sections south of the Pajaro HU (18060002).

[79 FR 75450, Dec. 18, 2014]

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