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e-CFR data is current as of October 22, 2020

Title 26Chapter ISubchapter APart 1 → §1.271-1


Title 26: Internal Revenue
PART 1—INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED)


§1.271-1   Debts owed by political parties.

(a) General rule. In the case of a taxpayer other than a bank (as defined in section 581 and the regulations thereunder), no deduction shall be allowed under section 166 (relating to bad debts) or section 165(g) (relating to worthlessness of securities) by reason of the worthlessness of any debt, regardless of how it arose, owed by a political party. For example, it is immaterial that the debt may have arisen as a result of services rendered or goods sold or that the taxpayer included the amount of the debt in income. In the case of a bank, no deduction shall be allowed unless, under the facts and circumstances, it appears that the bad debt was incurred to or purchased by, or the worthless security was acquired by, the taxpayer in accordance with its usual commercial practices. Thus, if a bank makes a loan to a political party not in accordance with its usual commercial practices but solely because the president of the bank has been active in the party no bad debt deduction will be allowed with respect to the loan.

(b) Definitions—(1) Political party. For purposes of this section and §1.276-1, the term political party means a political party (as commonly understood), a National, State, or local committee thereof, or any committee, association, or organization, whether incorporated or not, which accepts contributions (as defined in subparagraph (2) of this paragraph) or makes expenditures (as defined in subparagraph (3) of this paragraph) for the purpose of influencing or attempting to influence the election of presidential or vice-presidential electors, or the selection, nomination, or election of any individual to any Federal, State, or local elective public office, whether or not such individual or electors are selected, nominated, or elected. Accordingly, a political party includes a committee or other group which accepts contributions or makes expenditures for the purpose of promoting the nomination of an individual for an elective public office in a primary election, or in any convention, meeting, or caucus of a political party. It is immaterial whether the contributions or expenditures are accepted or made directly or indirectly. Thus, for example, a committee or other group, is considered to be a political party, if, although it does not expend any funds, it turns funds over to another organization, which does expend funds for the purpose of attempting to influence the nomination of an individual for an elective public office. An organization which engages in activities which are truly nonpartisan in nature will not be considered a political party merely because it conducts activities with respect to an election campaign if, under all the facts and circumstances, it is clear that its efforts are not directed to the election of the candidates of any particular party or parties or to the selection, nomination or election of any particular candidate. For example, a committee or group will not be treated as a political party if it is organized merely to inform the electorate as to the identity and experience of all candidates involved, to present on a nonpreferential basis the issues or views of the parties or candidates as described by the parties or candidates, or to provide a forum in which the candidates are freely invited on a nonpreferential basis to discuss or debate the issues.

(2) Contributions. For purposes of this section and §1.276-1, the term contributions includes a gift, subscription, loan, advance, or deposit, of money or anything of value, and includes a contract, promise, or agreement to make a contribution, whether or not legally enforceable.

(3) Expenditures. For purposes of this section and §1.276-1, the term expenditures includes a payment, distribution, loan, advance, deposit, or gift, of money or anything of value, and includes a contract, promise, or agreement to make an expenditure, whether or not legally enforceable.

[T.D. 6996, 34 FR 832, Jan. 18, 1969]

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