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e-CFR data is current as of March 26, 2020

Title 24Subtitle BChapter IISubchapter B → Part 248


Title 24: Housing and Urban Development


PART 248—PREPAYMENT OF LOW INCOME HOUSING MORTGAGES


Contents

Subpart A—General

§248.1   Purpose.
§248.3   Applicability.
§248.5   Election to proceed under subpart B or subpart C of this part.

Subpart B—Prepayments and Plans of Action Under the Low Income Housing Preservation and Resident Homeownership Act of 1990

§248.101   Definitions.
§248.103   General prepayment limitation.
§248.105   Notice of intent.
§248.111   Appraisal and preservation value of eligible low income housing.
§248.121   Annual authorized return and aggregate preservation rents.
§248.123   Determination of Federal cost limit.
§248.127   Limitations on action pursuant to Federal cost limit.
§248.131   Information from the Commissioner.
§248.133   Second notice of intent.
§248.135   Plans of action.
§248.141   Criteria for approval of a plan of action involving prepayment and voluntary termination.
§248.145   Criteria for approval of a plan of action involving incentives.
§248.147   Housing standards.
§248.149   Timetable for approval of a plan of action.
§248.153   Incentives to extend low income use.
§248.157   Voluntary sale of housing not in excess of Federal cost limit.
§248.161   Mandatory sale of housing in excess of the Federal cost limit.
§248.165   Assistance for displaced tenants.
§248.169   Permissible prepayment or voluntary termination and modification of commitments.
§248.173   Resident homeownership program.
§248.175   Resident homeownership program—limited equity cooperative.
§248.177   Delegated responsibility to State agencies.
§248.179   Consultation with other interested parties.
§248.181   Notice to tenants.
§248.183   Preemption of State and local laws.

Subpart C—Prepayment and Plans of Action Under the Emergency Low Income Preservation Act of 1987

§248.201   Definitions.
§248.203   General prepayment limitation.
§248.211   Notice of intent to prepay.
§248.213   Plan of action.
§248.215   Notification of deficiencies.
§248.217   Revisions to plan of action.
§248.218   Tenant notice and opportunity to comment.
§248.219   Notification of approval.
§248.221   Approval of a plan of action that involves termination of low income affordability restrictions.
§248.223   Alternative State strategy.
§248.231   Incentives to extend low income use.
§248.233   Approval of a plan of action that includes incentives.
§248.234   Section 8 rental assistance.
§248.241   Modification of existing regulatory agreements.
§248.251   Consultation with other interested parties.
§248.261   Agreements implementing plans of action and State strategies.

Subpart D—State Preservation Project Assistance

§248.300   General.
§248.301   Initial application.
§248.303   Approval of a State agency's initial application.
§248.305   Applicability of subpart B of this part.
§248.307   Authority to process and approve notices of intent and plans of action.
§248.311   Notice of intent.
§248.315   Preservation agreements.
§248.319   Application for assistance.

Subpart E—Technical Assistance and Capacity Building

§248.401   Purposes.
§248.405   Grants for building resident capacity and funding predevelopment costs.
§248.410   Grants for other purposes.
§248.415   Delivery of assistance through intermediaries.
§248.420   Definitions.

Authority: 12 U.S.C. 17151 note, 4101 note, and 4101-4124; 42 U.S.C. 3535(d).

Subpart A—General

Source: 57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, unless otherwise noted.

§248.1   Purpose.

The purpose of this part is to—

(a) Preserve and retain to the maximum extent practicable as housing affordable to low income families or persons those privately owned dwelling units that were produced for such purpose with Federal assistance, without unduly restricting the owners' prepayment rights;

(b) Minimize the involuntary displacement of tenants currently residing in such housing;

(c) Work in partnership with State and local government and the private sector in the provision and operation of housing that is affordable to very low, low and moderate income families; and

(d) Facilitate the sale of housing to residents under a resident homeownership program.

§248.3   Applicability.

The requirements of subparts B and C of this part apply to any project that is eligible low income housing, as defined in subparts B and C of this part respectively, on or after November 1, 1987, except that such requirements shall not apply to a project which receives assistance under title IV, subtitle B of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act in connection with a homeownership program approved by the Commissioner thereunder.

§248.5   Election to proceed under subpart B or subpart C of this part.

(a) Any owner who has not submitted a notice of intent prior to January 1, 1991, pursuant to either §248.211 or §248.105, shall proceed under subpart B of this part.

(b) Any owner who has filed a plan of action with the Commissioner on or before October 11, 1990 pursuant to subpart C of this part, regardless of whether or not the Commissioner has approved such plan of action or whether the owner has received incentives thereunder, may proceed under subpart B of this part by submitting a notice of intent to the Commissioner in accordance with §248.105 within 30 days after publication of revised Appraisal Guidelines or within thirty days after the Commissioner notifies the owner of HUD's final approval of the plan of action, whichever is later. The notice of intent shall state that the owner is exercising its conversion right pursuant to this section. If the owner fails to file a notice of intent within that period, the owner forfeits its right of conversion. In awarding incentives to an owner who elects to proceed under subpart B of this part in accordance with this section, the Commissioner shall take into consideration any incentives which the owner has already received under subpart C of this part.

(c) Any owner of housing that becomes eligible low income housing, as defined in subpart B of this part, before January 1, 1991, and who before such date, filed a notice of intent under §248.211 of subpart C of this part, may, unless a plan of action was submitted after October 11, 1990, elect to proceed under subpart B or under subpart C of this part. An owner must indicate its election by submitting to the Commissioner, within 30 days of the effective date of this part, a notice of election to proceed indicating whether it wishes to proceed under subpart B or subpart C of this part, or proceed under subpart B of this part until completion of the appraisals and then elect either subpart B or subpart C of this part. An owner who chooses to retain its option until after the completion of the appraisals under §248.111 must submit a new notice of intent to the Commissioner within 30 days after receipt of the information provided by the Commissioner under §248.131. The notice of intent shall be submitted in accordance with either §248.105 (for owners electing to proceed under subpart B of this part) or §248.211 (for owners electing to proceed under subpart C of this part). Any owner who fails to file a notice of intent within the 30-day period may not proceed under subpart C of this part, but may proceed under subpart B of this part by filing a new notice of intent thereafter. If an owner who has filed a notice of intent before January 1, 1991 elects under this paragraph to proceed under subpart C of this part, it may change its election within 30 days after receipt of the information provided by the Commissioner under §248.131 by filing a new notice of intent under §248.211. For purposes of calculating any time periods or deadlines under this part for actions following the filing of the notice of intent, the date on which the owner submits the new notice of intent under this paragraph shall be deemed the date of the filing of the notice of intent. Any owner who, exercising its option under paragraph (c) of this section, submits a notice of intent under §248.211 after the Commissioner has incurred the cost of having an appraisal, or appraisals, performed pursuant to §248.111 of subpart A of this part, shall reimburse the Commissioner for these expenses within 30 days of receipt of a bill covering these expenses.

(d) For an owner who has elected under paragraph (c) of this section to proceed under subpart C of this part, the Commissioner shall provide sufficient assistance to enable a nonprofit organization that has purchased, or will purchase, eligible low income housing to meet project oversight costs, as that term is defined in §248.201.

(e) The Commissioner shall not refuse to offer incentives under §248.231 to any owner who filed a notice of intent under §248.211 before October 15, 1991, based solely on the date of filing of the plan action.

(f) An owner who has filed a plan of action after October 11, 1990, pursuant to §248.213, may not elect to proceed under subpart B of this part.

[57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, as amended at 58 FR 37814, July 13, 1993]

Subpart B—Prepayments and Plans of Action Under the Low Income Housing Preservation and Resident Homeownership Act of 1990

Source: 57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, unless otherwise noted.

§248.101   Definitions.

Acquisition Loan. A loan or advance of credit made to a qualified purchaser of eligible low income housing and insured by the Commissioner under part 241, subpart E of this chapter.

Adjusted Income. Annual income, as specified in part 5 of this title, less allowances specified in the definition of “Adjusted Income” in part 5 of this title.

Aggregate Preservation Rent. The extension preservation rent or transfer preservation rent, as defined under this section.

Annual Authorized Return. That amount an owner of an eligible low income housing project may receive in distributions from the project each year, plus debt service payments payable each year attributable to the equity take-out portion of any loan approved under the plan of action, expressed as a percentage of the project's extension preservation equity.

Bona Fide Offer. A certain and unambiguous offer to purchase an eligible low income housing project pursuant to subpart B of this part made in good faith by a qualified purchaser with the intent that such offer result in the execution of an enforceable, valid and binding contract. A bona fide offer shall include, for purposes of subpart B of this part, a contract of sale and an earnest money deposit, as set forth in §248.157(g). For mandatory sales under §248.161, the offer must include a contract of sale, an earnest money deposit and also be for a purchase price which equals the transfer preservation value.

Capital Improvement Loan. A direct loan originated by the Commissioner under part 219, subpart C of this chapter.

Community-Based Nonprofit Organization. A private nonprofit organization that—

(1) Is organized under State or local laws;

(2) Has no part of its net earnings inuring to the benefit of any member, founder, contributor, or individual;

(3) Is neither controlled by, nor under the direction of, individuals or entities seeking to derive profit or gain from the organization.

(4) Has applied for, or has a tax exemption ruling from the Internal Revenue Service under section 501(c) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986;

(5) Does not include a public body (including the participating jurisdiction) or an instrumentality of a public body. An organization that is State or locally chartered may qualify as a community-based nonprofit organization; however, the State or local government may not have the right to appoint more than one-third of the membership of the organization's governing body and no more than one-third of the board members can be public officials;

(6) Has standards of financial accountability that conform to 2 CFR 200.302 and 200.303;

(7) Has among its purposes the provision of decent housing that is affordable to low-income and moderate-income persons, as evidenced in its charter, articles of incorporation, resolutions or by-laws;

(8) Maintains accountability to low income community residents by—

(i) Maintaining at least one-third of its governing board's membership for low-income neighborhood residents, other low-income community residents, or elected representatives of low-income neighborhood organizations. For urban areas, “community” may be a neighborhood or neighborhoods, city, county, or metropolitan area; for rural areas, “community” may be a neighborhood or neighborhoods, town, village, county, or multi-county area (but not the entire State); and

(ii) Providing a formal process for low-income, program beneficiaries to advise the organization on its decisions regarding the acquisition, rehabilitation and management of affordable housing.

Default. For purposes of §248.105(a), the failure of the owner to make any payment due under the mortgage (including the full amount of the debt if the mortgagee has accelerated the debt on the basis of a non-monetary default) within 30 days after such payment becomes due.

Eligible Low Income Housing. Any project that is not subject to a use restriction imposed by the Commissioner that restricts the project to low and moderate income use for a period at least equal to the remaining term of the mortgage, and that is financed by a loan or mortgage—

(1) That is—

(i) Insured or held by the Commissioner under section 221(d)(3) of the National Housing Act and assisted under part 886, subpart A of this title because of a conversion from assistance under 215 of this chapter;

(ii) Insured or held by the Commissioner under part 221 of this chapter and bearing a below market interest rate as provided under §221.518(b) of this chapter;

(iii) Insured, assisted, or held by the Commissioner or a State or State agency under part 236 of this chapter; or

(iv) A purchase money mortgage held by the Commissioner with respect to a project which, immediately prior to HUD's acquisition, would have been classified under paragraphs (1)(i), (ii), or (iii) of this definition; and

(2) That, under regulation or contract in effect before February 5, 1988, is or will within 24 months become eligible for prepayment without prior approval of the Commissioner.

Equity Loan. A loan or advance of credit to the owner of eligible low income housing and insured by the Commissioner under part 241, subpart E of this chapter.

Extension Preservation Equity. The extension preservation equity of a project is:

(1) The extension preservation value of the project determined under §248.111; less

(2) The outstanding balance of any debt secured by the property.

Extension Preservation Rent. The extension preservation rent is the gross potential income for the project that would be required to support:

(1) The annual authorized return;

(2) Debt service on any rehabilitation loan for the project;

(3) Debt service on the federally-assisted mortgage(s) for the project;

(4) Project operating expenses; and

(5) Adequate reserves.

Extension Preservation Value. The fair market value of the project based on the highest and best use of the project as multifamily market-rate rental housing.

Fair market rent. The section 8 existing fair market rent published for effect and as defined under §982.4 of this title, applicable to the jurisdiction in which the project is located, with adjustments, where appropriate, for projects in which tenants pay their own utilities. (No utility adjustments will be made to the fair market rent for purposes of determining the Federal cost limit.)

Federal Cost Limit. The greater of 120 percent of the section 8 existing fair market rent for the market area in which the project is located or 120 percent of the prevailing rents in the relevant local market area in which the project is located.

Federally-assisted Mortgage. Any mortgage as defined in this section, any insured operating loss loan secured by the project and any loan insured by the Commissioner under part 241 of this chapter.

Good Cause. With respect to displacement, the temporary or permanent uninhabitability of the project justifying relocation of all or some of the project's tenants (except where such uninhabitability is caused by the actions or inaction of the owner), or actions of the tenant that, under the terms of the tenant's lease and applicable regulations, constitute a basis for eviction.

HOME Investment Trust Fund. A public fund established in the general local or State government in which a project is located pursuant to title II of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act.

Homeownership Program. A program developed by a resident council for the sale of an eligible low income housing project to the tenants in accordance with the standards in §248.173 or §248.175.

Interest Reduction Payments. Payments made by the Commissioner pursuant to a contract to reduce the interest costs on a mortgage insured under part 236 of this chapter, as provided under subpart C of part 236 of this chapter.

Limited Equity Cooperative. A tenant cooperative corporation which, in a manner acceptable to the Secretary, restricts the initial and resale price of the shares of stock in the cooperative corporation so that the shares remain affordable to low income families and moderate income families.

Low Income Affordability Restrictions. Limits imposed by regulation or regulatory agreement on tenant rents, rent contributions, or income eligibility with respect to eligible low income housing.

Low Income Families. Families or persons whose incomes do not exceed the levels established for low income families under part 5 of this title.

Low Vacancy Area. A market area in which the current supply of decent, safe and sanitary, vacant, available rental units, as a proportion of the total overall rental inventory in the area is not sufficient to allow for normal growth and mobility, taking into account the need for vacancies resulting from turnover and to meet growth in renter households. The determination of a low vacancy area, as set forth in §248.165(h), will be made by the Commissioner, utilizing the most recent available data for the market area on the rental inventory, renter households, rental vacancy rates and other factors as appropriate.

Moderate Income Families. Families or persons whose incomes are between 80 percent and 95 percent of median area income, as determined by the Commissioner, with adjustments for smaller and larger families.

Mortgage. The mortgage or deed of trust insured or held by the Commissioner or a State or State agency under parts 221 or 236 of this title or the purchase money mortgage taken back by the Commissioner in connection with the sale of a HUD-owned project and held by the Commissioner, where such mortgage, deed or trust or purchase money mortgage is secured by eligible low income housing.

Nonprofit Organization. Any private, nonprofit organization or association that—

(1) Is incorporated under State or local law;

(2) Has no part of its net earnings inuring to the benefit of any member, founder, contributor, or individual;

(3) Complies with standards of financial accountability acceptable to the Commissioner; and

(4) Has among its principal purposes significant activities related to the provision of decent housing that is affordable to very low, low, and moderate income families.

Notice of Intent. An owner's notification to the Commissioner of its intention to terminate the low income affordability restrictions on the project through prepayment of the mortgage or voluntary termination of the insurance contract, to extend the low income affordability restrictions on the project, or to transfer the project to a qualified purchaser.

Owner. The mortgagor or trustor under the mortgage secured by eligible low income housing.

Participating Jurisdiction. For purposes of the resident homeownership program established in §248.173, any State or unit of general local government that has been so designated in accordance with section 216 of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12746).

Plan of Action. A plan providing for the termination of the low income affordability restrictions on the project through prepayment of the mortgage or voluntary termination of the insurance contract, for extension of the low income affordability restrictions on the project, or for the transfer of the project to a qualified purchaser. A homeownership program constitutes a plan of action for purposes of subpart B of this part.

Prepayment. Prepayment in full of a mortgage, or a partial prepayment or series of partial prepayments that reduces the mortgage term by a least six months, except where the prepayment in full or partial prepayment results from the application of condemnation proceeds.

Preservation Equity. The extension preservation equity or transfer preservation equity, as defined under this section.

Preservation Value. The extension preservation value or transfer preservation value, as defined under this section.

Priority Purchaser. Any entity that is not a related party to the owner and that is either—

(1) A resident council organized to acquire the project in accordance with a resident homeownership program that meets the requirements of subpart B of this part; or

(2) Any nonprofit organization or State or local agency that agrees to maintain low income affordability restrictions for the remaining useful life of the project. A nonprofit organization or State or local agency that is affiliated with a for-profit entity for purposes of purchasing a project under subpart B of this part shall not be considered a priority purchaser.

Project oversight costs. Reasonable expenses incurred by a priority purchaser in carrying out its ongoing ownership responsibilities under an approved plan of action. Project oversight costs must be directly related to educating the priority purchaser's board of directors or otherwise supporting the board in its decision making. Project oversight costs may include staff, overhead, or third-party contract costs for:

(1) Ensuring adequate and responsible participation by the board of directors and the membership of the priority purchaser in ownership decisions, including ensuring resident input in these decisions;

(2) Facilitating long-range planning by the board of directors to ensure the physical, financial and social viability of the project for the entire time the project is maintained as low income housing; and

(3) Assisting the ownership in complying with regulatory, use, loan and grant agreements.

Proprietary information. That information which cannot be released to the public because it consists of trade secrets, confidential financial information, audits, personal financial information about partners in the ownership entity, or income data on project tenants. Where proprietary information cannot be separated from the rest of a document, the entire document shall be deemed “proprietary information” and shall not be releasable to the public. Where proprietary information can be reasonably segregated from the rest of the document, the proprietary information shall be deleted and the remainder of the document shall be releasable to the public.

Public Housing Agency. A public housing agency, as defined in section 3(b) of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437a(b)).

Qualified Purchaser. Any entity that is not a related party to the owner and that agrees to maintain low income affordability restrictions for the remaining useful life of the project, and includes for-profit entities and priority purchasers.

Regulatory Agreement. The agreement executed by the owner and the Commissioner or a State agency providing for the regulation of the operation of the project.

Related Party. An entity that, either directly or indirectly, is wholly or partially owned or controlled by the owner of the project being transferred under subpart B of this part, is under whole or partial common control with such owner, or has any financial interest in such owner or in which such owner has any financial interest. However, this shall not prohibit a nonprofit organization from buying out the interest of its limited dividend or for-profit partners in connection with the sale of eligible low income housing under subpart B of this part, as long as the sale is made on an arm's length basis and the partners who sell their interest completely divest themselves of any input in the continued operation of the project. The purchaser and the owner shall not be deemed related parties on the basis that financing is provided to the purchaser by the seller, or a management company affiliated with the seller, as long as:

(1) Only a loan, and not a grant, is provided;

(2) The financing is provided for the acquisition of the project, the rehabilitation of the project, or both;

(3) In the case of financing for the acquisition of the project, the sum of the principal amount of the loan, plus the amount of the acquisition loan under section 241(f) of the National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1715z-6(f)), and any Federal grant to cover acquisition of the project, does not exceed the sum of the sales price and the expenses associated with the acquisition, loan closing and implementation of the plan of action; and in the case of financing for the rehabilitation of the project, the principal amount of the loan does not exceed the equity requirements applicable to the rehabilitation loan or capital improvement loan obtained by the purchaser under part 241 or part 219 of this chapter;

(4) The loan is not a condition of accepting a bona fide offer or entering into a sales contract;

(5) The seller has no input in the continued operation of the project as a result of the loan; and

(6) In the case of a loan provided by a management company that is affiliated with the seller, the execution of a management contract between the purchaser and the management company is not a condition of the loan. This rule does not bar an owner, or former owner, from membership on a nonprofit organization's board of directors, as long as the owner, or former owner, participates only in his or her personal capacity, without compensation, and holds a nonvoting membership. The purchaser and the owner shall not be deemed related parties solely by reason of the purchaser's retention of a property management entity of a company that is owned or controlled by the owner or a principal thereof, if retention of the management company is neither a condition of sale nor part of consideration paid for the project and the property management contract is negotiated by the qualified purchaser on an arm's length basis.

Relevant Local Market. An area geographically smaller than the market area established by the Commissioner for purposes of determining the section 8 existing fair market rent, that is identifiable as a distinct rental market area in which similar projects and units would effectively compete with the subject project, for potential tenants.

Relocation Expenses. Relocation expenses shall consist of payment for—

(1) Advisory services, including timely information, counseling (including the provision of information on a resident's rights under the Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 3601-3619)), and referrals to suitable, affordable, decent, safe and sanitary alternative housing; and

(2) Payment for actual, reasonable moving expenses.

Remaining Useful Life. With respect to eligible low income housing, the period during which the physical characteristics of the project remain in a condition suitable for occupancy, assuming normal maintenance and repairs are made and major systems and capital components are replaced as becomes necessary.

Reserve for Replacements. The escrow fund established under the regulatory agreement for the purpose of ensuring the availability of funds for needed repair and replacement costs.

Resident Council. Any incorporated nonprofit organization or association in which membership is available to all the tenants, and only the tenants, of a particular project and—

(1) Is representative of the residents of the project;

(2) Adopts written procedures providing for the election of officers on a regular basis; and

(3) Has a democratically elected governing board, elected by the residents of the project.

Residual Receipt Fund. The fund established under the regulatory agreement for holding cash remaining after deducting from the surplus cash, as defined by the regulatory agreement, the amount of all allowable distributions.

Return on Investment. The amount of allowable distributions that a purchaser of a project may receive under a plan of action under §248.157 or §248.161.

Section 8 Assistance. Assistance provided under parts 880 through 887 and 982 and 983 of this title.

Special Needs Tenants. Those “elderly persons,” 62 years of age or older, “elderly families,” or families that include “disabled persons,” as such terms are defined in part 5 of this title, or large families of five or more persons and requiring units with three or more bedrooms.

State assisted or subsidized mortgage. A mortgage which is assisted or subsidized by an agency of a State government without any Federal mortgage subsidy.

Tenant Representative. A designated officer of an organization of the project's tenants, a tenant who has been elected to represent the tenants of the project with respect to subpart B of this part, or a person or organization that has been formally designated or retained by an organization of the project's tenants to represent the tenants with respect to subpart B of this part.

Termination of Low Income Affordability Restrictions. The elimination of low income affordability restrictions under the regulatory agreement through termination of mortgage insurance or prepayment of the mortgage.

Transfer Preservation Equity. The transfer preservation equity of a project is:

(1) The transfer preservation value of the project determined under §248.111; less

(2) The outstanding balance of the federally-assisted mortgage(s) for the project.

Transfer Preservation Rent. For purposes of receiving incentives pursuant to a sale of the project, transfer preservation rent shall be the gross income for the project that would be required to support:

(1) Debt service on the loan for acquisition of the project;

(2) Debt service on any rehabilitation loan for the project;

(3) Debt service on the federally-assisted mortgage(s) for the housing;

(4) Project operating expenses; and

(5) Adequate reserves.

Transfer Preservation Value. The fair market value of the project based on its highest and best use.

Very Low Income Families. Families or persons whose incomes do not exceed the level established for very low income families under part 5 of this title.

Voluntary Termination of Mortgage Insurance. The termination of all rights under the mortgage insurance contract and of all obligations to pay future insurance premiums.

[57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, as amended at 57 FR 57314, Dec. 3, 1992; 58 FR 37814, July 13, 1993; 59 FR 14369, Mar. 28, 1994; 64 FR 26639, May 14, 1999; 80 FR 75936, Dec. 7, 2015]

§248.103   General prepayment limitation.

(a) Prepayment. An owner of eligible low income housing may prepay, and a mortgagee may accept prepayment of, a mortgage on such project only in accordance with a plan of action approved by the Commissioner.

(b) Termination. A mortgage insurance contract with respect to eligible low income housing may be terminated pursuant to §207.253 of this chapter only in accordance with a plan of action approved by the Commissioner.

(c) Foreclosure. A mortgagee of a mortgage insured by the Commissioner may foreclose the mortgage on, or acquire by deed in lieu of foreclosure, any eligible low income housing only if the mortgagee also conveys title to the project to the Commissioner in connection with a claim for insurance benefits.

(d) Effect of unauthorized prepayment. A mortgagee's acceptance of a prepayment in violation of paragraph (a) of this section, or the voluntary termination of a mortgage insurance contract in violation of paragraph (b) of this section, shall be null and void and any low income affordability restrictions on the project shall continue to apply to the project.

(e) Remedies for unauthorized prepayment. A mortgagee's acceptance of a prepayment in violation of paragraph (a) of this section, or attempt to obtain voluntary termination of a mortgage insurance contract in violation of paragraph (b) of this section, is grounds for administrative action under parts 24 and 25 of this title, in addition to any other remedies available by law, including rescission of the prepayment or reinstatement of the insurance contract.

§248.105   Notice of intent.

(a) Eligibility for filing. An owner of eligible low income housing intending to prepay the mortgage or voluntarily terminate the mortgage insurance contract pursuant to §248.141, extend the low income affordability restrictions of the housing in accordance with §248.153, or transfer the housing to a qualified purchaser under §248.157, may file a notice of intent unless the mortgage covering the project—

(1) Continued in default or fell into default on or after the November 28, 1990, and the mortgage has been assigned to the Commissioner as a result of such default;

(2) Continued in default or fell into default on or after November 28, 1990, while the mortgage was held by the Commissioner;

(3) Fell into default prior to November 28, 1990, if the owner entered into a workout agreement prior to that date, and on or after that date, the owner has defaulted under the workout agreement (and, if the agreement was with an insured mortgagee, the mortgage has been assigned to the Commissioner as a result of the default under the workout agreement); or

(4) Fell into default prior to November 28, 1990, but has been current since that date and the owner has not agreed to recompense the appropriate insurance fund for losses sustained by the fund as a result of any work-out or other arrangement agreed to by the Commissioner and the owner with respect to the defaulted mortgage.

(b) Filing with the Commissioner. The notice of intent shall be filed with the HUD Field Office in whose jurisdiction the project is located. The notice of intent shall identify the project by name, project number and location. It shall contain a statement indicating whether the owner intends to extend the affordability restrictions on the project by retaining ownership of the project or transferring it to a qualified purchaser, or whether the owner intends to terminate the affordability restrictions on the project through prepayment of the mortgage or termination of the mortgage insurance contract. The notice of intent shall also request the tenants to notify the owner, the Commissioner, and the State or local officer identified in the notice of intent of any individual or organization that has been designated or retained by the tenants to represent the tenants with respect to the actions to be taken under subpart B of this part.

(c) Filing with the State or local government and tenants. The owner simultaneously shall file the notice of intent with the chief executive officer of the appropriate State or local government in which the project is located, or any officer designated by executive order or State or local law to receive such information, and with the mortgagee. In addition, the owner shall deliver a copy of the notice of intent to each occupied unit in the project and to any tenant representative, if any, known to the owner, and shall post a copy of the notice of intent in readily accessible locations within each affected building of the project. The copies of the notice of intent delivered to the tenants and the tenant representative shall include a summary of possible outcomes of the filing which shall be furnished by the Commissioner. Upon the request of any non-English speaking tenants residing in the affected project, the owner shall tabulate the number and type of translations needed by the tenants and request the local HUD field office to provide the appropriate translations. The owner shall deliver a copy of the translated notice of intent to all of the tenants who requested such translation. The failure of an owner to comply with any non-federal notice requirements shall not invalidate the notice of intent.

§248.111   Appraisal and preservation value of eligible low income housing.

(a) Appraisal. Upon receiving a notice of intent indicating an intent to extend the low income affordability restrictions under §248.153 or transfer the project under §248.157, the Commissioner shall provide for determination of the preservation values of the project pursuant to this section.

(b) Notice. Within 30 days after the filing of a notice of intent to extend the income restrictions or to transfer the project, the Commissioner shall provide the owner with written notice of—

(1) The need for, and the rules and guidelines governing, an appraisal of the project;

(2) The filing deadline for submission of the appraisal;

(3) The need for an appraiser retained by the Commissioner to inspect the project and the project's financial records; and

(4) Any delegation to an appropriate State agency, if any, by the Commissioner of responsibilities regarding the performance of an appraisal pursuant to this section.

(c) Appraisers. The Commissioner and the owner shall each select and compensate an appraiser who shall:

(1) Neither be an employee of the Federal Government nor an employee or officer of any entity that is affiliated with the owner or the mortgagee of record;

(2) Be certified by the appropriate State agency under the standards established by the Federal Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act of 1989 (12 U.S.C. 1451-1459); and

(3) Have six years of experience in the appraisal profession and at least three years experience in the practice of appraising multifamily residential properties;

(4) Is not the subject of a charge issued following a reasonable cause determination under the Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 3601-3619).

(d) Guidelines. The Commissioner shall provide to the owner and the appraiser retained by the Commissioner guidelines for conducting the appraisal. The guidelines established by the Commissioner shall be consistent with customary appraisal standards. The guidelines shall assume repayment of the existing federally-assisted mortgage(s), termination of the existing Federal low income affordability restrictions, simultaneous termination of any Federal rental assistance, and costs of compliance with any State or local laws of general applicability. The guidelines may permit reliance upon assessments of rehabilitation needs and other conversion costs determined by an appropriate State agency, as determined by the Commissioner.

(e) Operating expenses. For the purpose of determining preservation values, the guidelines shall instruct the appraiser to use the greater of actual project operating expenses at the time of the appraisal, based on the average of the actual project operating expenses during the preceding three years, or projected operating expenses after conversion, as determined by the Commissioner. However, if the current year operating expenses are higher than those of the preceding three years and the Commissioner has made a determination that these costs are unlikely to decrease in the future, the appraiser shall use current year operating expenses rather than operating expenses for the preceding three years for purposes of comparison with projected operating expenses after conversion. Likewise, if the current year operating expenses are lower than those of the preceding years and the Commissioner has made a determination that these costs are unlikely to increase in the future, the appraiser shall use current year operating expenses rather than operating expenses for the preceding three years for purposes of comparison with projected expenses after conversion. Where the highest and best use of a project is not as rental housing, the appraiser shall use projected operating expenses assuming conversion of the project to its highest and best use.

(f) Preservation values. The preservation values will be determined on the basis of the appraisals conducted by the owner's and the Commissioner's independent appraisers. Each appraiser will determine both the extension preservation value and the transfer preservation value, regardless of the owner's intentions as indicated in the notice of intent.

(g) Highest and best use as residential property. In determining the extension preservation value of the project, the appraiser shall assume conversion of the project to market-rate rental housing. The appraiser shall, in accordance with the guidelines established by the Commissioner, determine the amount of rehabilitation expenditures, if any, that would be necessary to bring the project up to quality standards required to attract and sustain a market-rate tenancy upon conversion and assess other costs that the owner could reasonably be expected to incur if the owner converted the property to market-rate multifamily rental housing.

(h) Highest and best use. In determining the transfer preservation value for the project, the appraiser shall assume conversion of the project to highest and best use for the property, and shall, in accordance with the guidelines established by the Commissioner, determine the amount of any rehabilitation expenditures, including demolition, that would be necessary to convert the project to such use and assess other costs that the owner could reasonably be expected to incur if the owner converted the property to its highest and best use.

(i) Submission of appraisal. Within four months after the filing of the notice of intent:

(1) The owner shall submit to the HUD Field Office in whose jurisdiction the project is located, the appraisal made by the owner's selected appraiser; and

(2) The Commissioner's selected appraiser shall conduct and submit an appraisal to the Commissioner.

(j) Joint determination of preservation values. No later than one month after the owner and the Commissioner exchange appraisals, the owner and the Commissioner shall, on the basis of the appraisals delivered to them, agree on the preservation values of the project. If no agreement as to preservation values can be reached, the owner and the Commissioner shall jointly select a third appraiser meeting the qualifications set forth in paragraph (c) of this section by the end of six months from the date that the notice of intent was filed. The cost of this third appraisal shall be borne equally by both parties. The third appraiser must comply with the guidelines set forth in paragraph (d) of this section and must conduct the appraisal and submit an appraisal within two months after accepting the assignment. The determination by the third appraiser of the project's preservation values shall be binding on both the owner and the Commissioner.

(k) Timeliness of appraisals. The Commissioner may approve a plan of action to receive incentives under §§248.153, 248.157 or 248.161 only based upon an appraisal conducted in accordance with this section that is not more than 30 months old, unless the failure of the Commissioner to approve the plan of action within the 30-month period was due to circumstances beyond the control of the owner.

[57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, as amended at 58 FR 4871, Jan. 15, 1993]

§248.121   Annual authorized return and aggregate preservation rents.

(a) Annual authorized return. For each eligible low income housing project appraised under §248.111, the Commissioner shall set an annual authorized return on the project equal to 8 percent of the extension preservation equity.

(b) Aggregate preservation rents. For each eligible low income housing project appraised under §248.111, the Commissioner shall also determine the aggregate preservation rents. The aggregate preservation rents shall be used solely for the purposes of comparison with the Federal cost limit under §248.123. Actual rents received by the owner (or a qualified purchaser) shall be determined pursuant to §§248.153, 248.157, and 248.161.

(c) Extension preservation rent. The extension preservation rent shall be the gross potential income for the project, as determined by the Commissioner, that would be required to support—

(1) The annual authorized return determined under paragraph (a) of this section;

(2) Debt service on any rehabilitation loan for the project, assuming a market rate of interest and customary terms;

(3) Debt service on the federally-assisted mortgage(s) for the project;

(4) Project operating expenses as determined by the Commissioner; and

(5) Adequate reserves.

(d) Transfer preservation rent. The transfer preservation rent shall be the gross potential income for the project, as determined by the Commissioner, that would be required to support—

(1) Debt service on the loan for acquisition of the project;

(2) Debt service on any rehabilitation loan for the project, assuming a market rate of interest and customary terms;

(3) Debt service on the federally-assisted mortgage(s) for the project;

(4) Project operating expenses as determined by the Commissioner; and

(5) Adequate reserves.

(e) Adequate reserves and operating expenses. For purposes of this section—

(1) Adequate reserves are the amount of funds which, when added to existing reserves, are sufficient to maintain the project, including needed deferred maintenance, at a level that meets the standards set forth in §248.147; and

(2) Project operating expenses shall be based on operating expenses for the preceding 3 years, adjusted for reasonable reductions in operating costs due to rehabilitation and energy improvements. For purposes of comparison to the gross rents used in determining the Federal cost limit, project operating expenses shall include the cost of utilities paid by the residents.

(f) Debt service. For purposes of this section, the amount of debt service for an acquisition loan will be estimated based on the maximum loan to which the purchaser is entitled under §241.1067 of this chapter. The debt service on any rehabilitation loan will be estimated using costs derived from the appraisals conducted under §248.111, taking into account any funds provided for rehabilitation by State or local governments and assuming market rate interest rates.

§248.123   Determination of Federal cost limit.

(a) Initial determination. For each eligible low income housing project appraised under §248.111, the Commissioner shall determine whether the aggregate preservation rents for the project exceed the amount determined by multiplying the number of dwelling units in the project, according to appropriate unit sizes, by 120 percent of the section 8 existing fair market rent for the appropriate unit sizes.

(b) Relevant local markets. If either the extension or transfer preservation rent for a project exceeds the amount determined under paragraph (a) of this section, the Commissioner shall determine whether such extension or transfer preservation rent exceeds the amount determined by multiplying the number of units in the project, according to the appropriate unit sizes, by 120 percent of the prevailing rents in the local market area. The relevant local market, and the prevailing rents in such relevant local market, shall be determined on the basis of the appraisal conducted by the appraiser selected by the Commissioner pursuant to §248.111 and any other information that the Commissioner determines is appropriate. If there are no comparables in the relevant local market and it is not otherwise possible to determine prevailing rents in that area, the section 8 existing fair market rent shall be the sole measure for determining the Federal cost limit.

(c) Effect. The extension or transfer preservation rent for an eligible low income housing project appraised under §248.111 shall be considered to exceed the Federal cost limit only if the extension or transfer preservation rent exceeds the amount determined under paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section.

§248.127   Limitations on action pursuant to Federal cost limit.

(a) Retention of the project. With respect to owners who seek to retain the project, the owner may file a plan of action to receive incentives under §248.153, except that if the extension preservation rent exceeds the Federal cost limit, the amount of the incentives may not exceed an amount that can be supported by a projected income stream equal to the Federal cost limit.

(b) Transfer of the project. With respect to owners who seek to transfer the project—

(1) If the transfer preservation rent does not exceed the Federal cost limit, or if the transfer preservation rent exceeds the Federal cost limit and the owner is willing to transfer the project at a price which will result in project rents that, on an aggregate level, do not exceed the Federal cost limit, the owner may file a second notice of intent indicating an intention to transfer the project under §248.157; or

(2) If the transfer preservation rent exceeds the Federal cost limit, the owner may file a second notice of intent to transfer the project under §248.161 or, if no bona fide offers are received, to prepay the mortgage or terminate the mortgage insurance.

§248.131   Information from the Commissioner.

(a) Information to owners terminating affordability restrictions. Within six months after receipt of a notice of intent to terminate the low income affordability restrictions under §248.141, the Commissioner shall provide the owner with a description of the criteria for such termination and with information that the owner needs to prepare a plan of action. This shall include information concerning the standards under §248.141 regarding the approval of a plan of action and a list of the Federal incentives authorized under §248.153 and available to those projects for which a plan of action involving termination of low income affordability restrictions, through prepayment of the mortgage or termination of the mortgage insurance contract, would not be approvable. The Commissioner shall also provide the owner with any other relevant information which the Commissioner may possess.

(b) Information to owners extending affordability restrictions. Within nine months of receipt of a notice of intent to extend the low income affordability restrictions under §248.153 or to transfer the project under §248.157, the Commissioner shall provide the owner who submitted the notice with—

(1) A statement of the preservation values of the project as determined under §248.111;

(2) A statement of the aggregate preservation rents for the project as calculated under §248.121;

(3) A statement of the applicable Federal cost limit for the market area (or relevant local market, if applicable) in which the project is located, and an explanation of the limitations under §248.127 on the amount of assistance the Commissioner may provide based on such cost limits;

(4) A statement of whether either of the aggregate preservation rents exceeds the Federal cost limit; and

(5) A direction to file a plan of action and the information necessary to file a plan of action; or

(6) A direction to submit a second notice of intent under §248.133.

(c) Information to tenants and State or local governments. The Commissioner shall provide any information provided to the owner under paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section to the tenant representative, if any, known to the Commissioner, and shall post a notice in each affected building informing tenants of the name(s), address(es), and telephone number(s) of the tenant representative(s) and appropriate personnel in the local HUD field office, from whom they may obtain this information. The Commissioner shall also provide this information to that officer of State or local government to whom the owner submitted a notice of intent pursuant to §248.105(c). The Commissioner shall include in the information packet made available to the tenants any other information relating to their rights and opportunities, including—

(1) The potential opportunity of the tenants to become priority purchasers under §§248.157 and 248.161; and

(2) The potential opportunity of resident homeownership under §§248.173 or 248.175.

§248.133   Second notice of intent.

(a) Filing. A second notice of intent must be filed by all owners who, after receiving the information provided by the Commissioner in §248.131, elect to transfer the project under §§248.157 or 248.161.

(b) Timeliness. A second notice of intent must be submitted not later than 30 days after receipt of the information provided by the Commissioner under §248.131. If an owner who is required to submit a second notice of intent fails to do so within this time period, the original notice of intent submitted under §248.105 shall be void and ineffective for purposes of subpart B of this part.

(c) Filing with the State or local government and tenants. The owner simultaneously shall file the second notice of intent with that officer of State and local government to whom the owner submitted a notice of intent under §248.105(c) and with the mortgagee. In addition, the owner shall deliver a copy of the second notice of intent to each tenant representative known to the owner, and if none is known, then to each occupied unit in the project.

§248.135   Plans of action.

(a) Submission. An owner seeking to terminate the low income affordability restrictions through prepayment of the mortgage or voluntary termination under §248.141, or to extend the low income affordability restrictions on the project under §248.153, shall submit a plan of action to the Commissioner in the form and manner prescribed in paragraph (d) or (e) of this section respectively, within 6 months after receipt of the information from the Commissioner under §248.131.

(b) Joint Submission. An owner and purchaser seeking a transfer of the project under §§248.157 or 248.161 shall jointly submit a plan of action to the Commissioner in the form and manner prescribed in paragraph (e) of this section within six months after the owner's acceptance of a bona fide offer under §248.157 or the purchaser's making of a bona fide offer under §248.161.

(c) Filing with the State or local government and tenants. The owner shall notify the tenants of the plan of action by posting in each occupied building a summary of the plan of action and by delivery of a copy of the plan of action to the tenant representative, if any. In addition, the summary must indicate that a copy of the plan of action shall be available from the tenant representatives, whose names, addresses and telephone numbers are indicated on the summary, the local HUD field office, and the on-site office for the project, or if one is not available, in the location where rents are collected, for inspection and copying, at a reasonable cost, during normal business hours. Simultaneously with the submission to the Commissioner, the owner shall submit the plan of action to that officer of State or local government to whom the owner submitted a notice of intent under §248.105(c). The Commissioner shall submit a copy of the plan of action to the chief executive officer of the appropriate agency of such State or local government which shall review the plan of action and advise the tenants of the project of any programs that are available to assist the tenants in carrying out the purposes of this subpart. The summary of the plan of action posted by the owner and the copies of the plan of action submitted to the tenant representative, the officer of State or local government to whom the owner submitted a notice of intent under §248.105(c) and the chief executive officer of the appropriate State or local government, shall all state that, upon request, the tenants and the State or local government, may obtain from the owner or from the local HUD field office a copy of all documentation supporting the plan of action except for that documentation deemed “proprietary information” under §248.101.

(d) Termination of affordability restrictions. If the plan of action proposes to terminate the low income affordability restrictions through prepayment or voluntary termination in accordance with §248.141, it shall include:

(1) A description of any proposed changes in the status or terms of the mortgage or regulatory agreement;

(2) A description of any proposed changes in the low income affordability restrictions;

(3) A description of any change in ownership that is related to prepayment or voluntary termination;

(4) An assessment of the effect of the proposed changes on existing tenants;

(5) An analysis of the effect of the proposed changes on the supply of housing affordable to low and very low income families or persons in the community within which the project is located and in the area that the housing could reasonably be expected to serve;

(6) A list of any waivers requested by the owner pursuant to §248.7; and

(7) Any other information that the Commissioner determines is necessary to achieve the purposes of subpart B of this part.

(e) Extension of affordability restrictions. If the plan of action proposes to extend the low income affordability restrictions of the project in accordance with §248.153 or transfer the project to a qualified purchaser in accordance with §§248.157 or 248.161, the plan of action shall include:

(1) A description of any proposed changes in the status or terms of the mortgage or regulatory agreement;

(2) A description of the Federal incentives requested, including cash flow projections and analyses of how the owner will address any physical or financial deficiencies and maintain the low income affordability restrictions of the project;

(3) A description of any assistance from State or local government agencies, including low income housing tax credits that have been offered to the owner or purchaser or for which the owner or purchaser has applied or intends to apply;

(4) A description of any transfer of the property, including the identity of the transferee and a copy of any documents of sale;

(5) An income profile of the tenants as of the date of submission of the plan of action and as of January 1, 1987 (based on the area median income limits established by the Commissioner in February 1987), or if the January 1, 1987 profile is unavailable, a certification from the owner stating its unavailability and a profile as of January 1, 1988, or, if that is also unavailable, a profile as of January 1, 1989;

(6) A transfer of physical assets package, if a transfer is proposed;

(7) A list of any waivers requested by the owner pursuant to §248.7; and

(8) Any other information that the Commissioner determines is necessary to achieve the purposes of subpart B of this part.

(f) Revisions. The owner or owner and purchaser may from time to time revise and amend the plan of action as may be necessary to obtain approval under subpart B of this part and must amend the plan of action no later than 30 days after a change in any of the information required in paragraphs (d) or (e) of this section. The owner shall submit any revision to the Commissioner, and provide a copy of the revision and all documentation supporting the revision except for that documentation deemed “proprietary information” under §248.101, to the parties, and in the manner, specified in paragraph (c) of this section.

(g) Failure to Submit. If the owner fails to submit a plan of action to the Commissioner, when prepayment or termination is sought, within the 6 month period set forth in paragraph (a) of this section or, when a transfer is sought, if the owner and purchaser fail to submit a plan of action within the 6 month time period set forth in paragraph (b) of this section, the notice of intent filed by the owner under §248.105 shall be ineffective for the purposes of subpart B of this part and the owner shall be barred from submitting another notice of intent under §248.105 until 6 months after expiration of such period.

(h) Comment Period for tenants and State or local governments. Upon submission of the plan of action by the owner, the tenants of the affected project and the State or local government shall have 60 days in which to provide comments on the plan of action to the Commissioner or to the owner, who will then submit the comments to the Commissioner. The Commissioner shall not approve a plan of action under subpart B of this part before the end of this 60-day period and all comments received during this period will be considered by the Commissioner in making its determination to approve or disapprove a plan of action.

(i) Notification to tenants and the State or local government of plan of action approval. Upon the Commissioner's approval of the plan of action, the owner shall notify tenants of the terms thereof by posting in each occupied building a summary of the plan of action and by delivery of a copy of the plan of action to the tenant representative, if any. In addition, the summary must indicate that a copy of the plan of action shall be available for inspection and copying during reasonable hours in a location convenient to the tenants.

[57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, as amended at 58 FR 37814, July 13, 1993]

§248.141   Criteria for approval of a plan of action involving prepayment and voluntary termination.

(a) Approval. The Commissioner may approve a plan of action that provides for the termination of the low income affordability restrictions through prepayment of the mortgage or voluntary termination of the mortgage insurance contract only upon a written finding that—

(1) Implementation of the plan of action will not—

(i) Materially increase economic hardship for current tenants, and will not in any event result in a monthly rental payment by any current tenant that exceeds 30 percent of the monthly adjusted income of the tenant or an increase in the monthly rental payment in any year that exceeds 10 percent (whichever is lower); or in the case of a current tenant who already pays more than such percentage, an increase in the monthly rental payment in any year that exceeds the increase in the Consumer Price Index or 10 percent (whichever is lower); or

(ii) Involuntarily displace current tenants (except for good cause) where comparable and affordable housing is not readily available, determined without regard to the availability of Federal housing assistance that would address any such hardship or involuntary displacement; and

(2) The supply of vacant, comparable housing is sufficient to ensure that such prepayment will not materially affect—

(i) The availability of decent, safe, and sanitary housing affordable to low income and very low income families or persons in the area that the housing could reasonably be expected to serve;

(ii) The ability of low income and very low income families or persons to find affordable, decent, safe, and sanitary housing near employment opportunities; or

(iii) The housing opportunities of minorities in the community within which the housing is located.

(3) There are no open audit findings, open findings of noncompliance with title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000d); the Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 3601-3619); Executive Order 11063 (3 CFR 1959-1963 comp., p. 652); the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42 U.S.C. 6101-6107); section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794); and all regulations promulgated under such statutes and authorities (including, but not limited to 24 CFR part 100), or outstanding violations of the regulatory agreement.

(b) For purposes of approving a plan of action under this section, the Commissioner shall find that the requirements of paragraph (a)(1) of this section have been met if the owner agrees to execute a use agreement which provides that rents for all tenants residing at the project at the time of plan of action approval will not exceed the limit established in paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section and that no tenant residing in the project at the time of plan of action approval will be involuntarily displaced without good cause.

(c) For purposes of approving a plan of action under this section, the Commissioner shall find that the requirements of paragraph (a)(2) of this section have been met if the project is located in a housing market area which has been determined to have an adequate supply of decent, safe and sanitary rental housing; and it has been determined, based on the specific characteristics of the project, that the prepayment would not materially affect the housing opportunities of low and very-low income families.

(1) For purposes of this section, a “housing market area” is defined as an area where rental housing units of similar characteristics are in relative competition with each other. If a project is in a non-metropolitan area, the housing market area is the county in which the project is located. If the project is located in a metropolitan area the housing market area is the primary metropolitan statistical area (PMSA), or in the case of very large metropolitan areas, the housing market area may be a portion of the PMSA.

(2) For purposes of this section, a housing market area may be determined to have an adequate supply of decent, safe, and sanitary rental housing if the housing market area has a soft rental market. A soft rental market is a housing market area in which the supply of vacant available rental housing significantly exceeds the demand. A soft rental market exists if:

(i) There is currently a surplus of rental housing such that the current excess supply of vacant available housing, plus units currently under construction, is expected to exceed demand for at lest the next 24 months; or

(ii) Within the next 12 months, based on the housing production (units currently under construction or with firm planning commitments), in combination with the current supply of available vacant units, supply is expected to exceed demand for at least 24 months.

(3) In order to determine whether the housing market area has a soft rental market, the Commissioner shall consider data from the 1990 Decennial Census and the most recent available local data concerning changes in population, households, employment, the housing inventory, residential construction activity, and the current and anticipated supply/demand conditions within the overall rental market, as well as the occupancy and vacancy situation in assisted housing projects in the area, including information on waiting lists and the experience of voucher holders in finding units.

(4) A determination must also be made on whether the prepayment would materially affect the housing opportunities of low and very-low income families in the area, based on the specific characteristics of the project including unit sizes, the type of tenants, e.g., elderly, handicapped, large families, minorities, the location of the project with respect to its proximity to employment opportunities; and the availability of other assisted housing within the immediate area. The prepayment would be determined to materially affect housing opportunities if:

(i) The project is needed to assist in preserving low income housing in a neighborhood which is being revitalized;

(ii) The project represents a rare source or the only source of low-and moderate-income rental housing in the immediate area;

(iii) There is a shortage of the particular type of rental housing provided by the project such as units suitable for the disabled, single room occupancy, or units for large families;

(iv) The preservation of the housing would be necessary to avoid adversely affecting the housing opportunities of low and very-low income families to find housing near employment opportunities; or

(v) The preservation of the housing would be necessary to avoid adversely affecting the housing opportunities of minorities in the community within which the housing is located.

(d) Once the Commissioner has compiled the necessary data and conducted the analysis under paragraph (c) of this section the Commissioner shall issue a written finding to the owner stating whether the plan of action to terminate the low income affordability restrictions is approved or disapproved. The written finding shall contain a specific determination of whether the market area is a soft rental market and prepayment would materially affect housing opportunities. The written finding shall include:

(1) A statement as to whether the owner has agreed to execute a use agreement to protect current tenants, in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section;

(2) A description of the geographic boundaries of the housing market area in which the project is located;

(3) An analysis of current and anticipated supply/demand conditions in both the overall rental market and the assisted housing inventory; and

(4) A discussion of whether the prepayment would materially affect the housing opportunities, given the specific characteristics of the project.

(e) Disapproval. If the Commissioner determines a plan of action to prepay a mortgage or terminate an insurance contract fails to meet the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section, the Commissioner shall disapprove the plan and within a reasonable time, shall inform the owner of the reasons for disapproval and suggest alternatives. In the case of disapproval of the plan of action, except for the failure to meet the requirement of paragraph (a)(3) of this section, the notice of intent filed under §248.105 shall be rendered ineffective for the purposes of this subtitle, and the owner, in order to receive incentives, must file a new notice of intent under such section. If the plan of action is disapproved because of an outstanding civil rights or audit finding, the finding must be closed before the Commissioner will approve a plan of action under this section.

[57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, as amended at 58 FR 37815, July 13, 1993; 64 FR 26639, May 14, 1999]

§248.145   Criteria for approval of a plan of action involving incentives.

(a) Approval. The Commissioner may approve a plan of action for extension of the low income affordability restrictions on an eligible low income housing project or for transfer of the housing to a qualified purchaser, other than a resident council acquiring the project under a resident homeownership plan, only upon a finding that—

(1) Due diligence has been given to ensuring that the package of incentives set forth in the plan of action is, for the Federal Government, the least costly alternative that is consistent with the full achievement of the purposes of this subpart.

(2) The project will be retained as housing affordable for very low, low and moderate income families and persons, as determined under paragraph (a)(8) of this section, for the remaining useful life of the project;

(3) Throughout the remaining useful life of the project, adequate expenditures will be made for maintenance and operation of the project and the project meets the housing standards established in §248.147 as determined by inspections conducted by the Commissioner;

(4) Current tenants will not be involuntarily displaced, except for good cause;

(5) Any increase in rent contributions for current tenants will be to a level that does not exceed 30 percent of the adjusted income of the tenant or the fair market rent, whichever is lower. However, the rent contributions of any tenants occupying the project at the time of any increase may not be reduced by reason of this paragraph, except with respect to tenants receiving section 8 assistance in accordance with paragraph (a)(7) of this section;

(6) Any resulting increase in rents for current tenants (except for increases made necessary by increased operating costs) shall be phased in as follows:

(i) If such increase is 30 percent or more, the increase shall be phased in equally over a period of not less than three years, with the first increase occurring upon the effective date of the plan of action, and the subsequent two increases occurring annually thereafter;

(ii) If such increase is more than 10 percent but less than 30 percent, it shall be limited to not more than 10 percent per year;

(7) Section 8 assistance shall be provided, to the extent appropriations are available, if necessary to mitigate any adverse effect on current very low and low income tenants;

(8) Rents for units becoming available to new tenants shall be at levels approved by the Commissioner, taking into account any incentives provided under subpart B of this part, that will ensure, to the extent practicable, that the units will be available and affordable to the same proportions of very low, low and moderate income families and persons, including families and persons whose incomes are 95 percent or more of area median income, as based on the area median income limits established by the Commissioner in February 1987, as resided in the project as of the date of the tenant income profile submitted under §248.135(e)(5), or the date the plan of action is approved, whichever date results in the highest proportion of very low income families. This limitation shall not prohibit a higher proportion of very low income families and persons from occupying the project;

(9) Future rent adjustments shall be—

(i) Made by applying an annual factor, to be determined by the Commissioner, to the portion of rent attributable to operating expenses for the project, and, where the owner is a priority purchaser, to the portion of rent attributable to project oversight costs, as that term is defined in §248.101; and

(ii) Subject to a procedure, established by the Commissioner, for owners to apply for rent increases not adequately compensated by annual adjustment under paragraph (a)(9)(i) of this section, under which the Commissioner may increase rents in excess of the amount determined under paragraph (a)(9)(i) of this section only if the Commissioner determines such increases are necessary to reflect extraordinary necessary expenses of owning and maintaining the project;

(10) Any savings from reductions in operating expenses due to management efficiencies shall be deposited in project reserves for replacement and the owner shall have periodic access to such reserves, to the extent the Commissioner determines that the level of the reserves is adequate and that the project is maintained in accordance with the standards established in §248.147;

(11) The mortgage on the project is current; and

(12) There are no open audit findings, open findings of noncompliance with title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000d); the Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 3601-3619); Executive Order 11063 (3 CFR 1959-1963 comp., p. 652); the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42 U.S.C. 6101-6107); section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794); and all regulations promulgated under such statutes and authorities (including, but not limited to, 24 CFR part 100), or outstanding violations of the regulatory agreement.

(b) Compliance with housing standards. No incentives under §248.153 may be provided, other than to qualified purchasers under §§248.157 and 245.161, and no distributions may be taken by the owner or purchaser, until the Commissioner determines that the project meets the housing standards set forth in §248.147, except that incentives designed to correct deficiencies in the project may be provided.

(c) Implementation. Any agreement to maintain the low income affordability restrictions for the remaining useful life of the project may be made through execution of a new regulatory agreement, modifications to the existing regulatory agreement or mortgage, or in the case of prepayment of a mortgage or voluntary termination of mortgage insurance, a recorded instrument.

(d) Determination of remaining useful life. The Commissioner shall make determinations, on the record and after opportunity for a hearing, as to when the useful life of an eligible low income housing project has expired. Under procedures and standards to be established by the Commissioner, owners of eligible low income housing may petition the Commissioner for a determination that the useful life of such project has expired. Such petition may not be filed before the expiration of the 50-year period beginning upon the approval of a plan of action under subpart B of this part with respect to such project. In making a determination pursuant to a petition under paragraph (d) of this section, the Commissioner shall presume that the useful life of the project has not expired, and the owner shall have the burden of proof in establishing such expiration. The Commissioner may not determine that the useful life of any project has expired if such determination results primarily from failure to make regular and reasonable repairs and replacement, as became necessary. In making a determination regarding the useful life of any project pursuant to a petition submitted under paragraph (d) of this section, the Commissioner shall provide for comment by tenants of the project and interested persons and organizations with respect to the petition. The Commissioner shall also provide the tenants and interested persons and organizations with an opportunity to appeal a determination under paragraph (d) of this section.

(e) In the case of any plans of action involving incentives the owner must agree to comply with title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000d); the Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 3601-3619); Executive Order 11063 (3 CFR 1959-1963 comp., p. 652); the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42 U.S.C. 6101-6107); section 504 of the Rehabilitiation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794) (including the Department's Accessibility Guidelines (24 CFR chapter I, subchapter A, appendix II) and all regulations issued pursuant to these authorities.

[57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, as amended at 57 FR 57314, Dec. 3, 1992; 58 FR 37815, July 13, 1993]

§248.147   Housing standards.

(a) Standards. As a condition to receiving incentives under subpart B of this part, the owner shall agree to maintain the project in accordance with local housing codes and the housing quality standards set forth in §886.307 of this title. Where a housing quality standard conflicts with local housing codes, the owner shall maintain the project in compliance with the standard that is stricter.

(b) Annual inspections. The Commissioner shall inspect each project at least annually in order to determine compliance with the housing quality standards. At least 30 days prior to the inspection, the Commissioner shall notify any tenant representatives, or if none exist, the Commissioner shall provide the owner with a notice to be posted in each affected building, stating the time and date of the inspection and advising any interested tenants that they may accompany HUD personnel on the inspection and/or submit any comments they may have on the physical condition of the project. The Commissioner shall notify the owner of any deficiencies within 30 days following the inspection. The owner shall have 90 days from the date of such notification to correct any deficiencies cited by the Commissioner and shall promptly notify the Commissioner when such deficiencies have been corrected. The Commissioner shall reinspect the project upon such notification or, if the owner does not notify the Commissioner, upon the expiration of the 90-day period.

(c) Sanctions for noncompliance. If the Commissioner determines, upon reinspection of the project, that the project is still not in compliance with the standards set forth in paragraph (a) of this section, the Commissioner shall take any action appropriate to bring the project into compliance, including—

(1) Directing the mortgagee, with respect to an equity take-out loan provided under part 241 of this chapter, to withhold the disbursement to the owner of any escrowed loan proceeds and requiring that such proceeds be used for repair of the project; and

(2) Reduce the amount of the allowable distributions to 4 percent of extension preservation equity or (in the case of a purchaser 4 percent of cash invested, as appropriate, for the period ending upon a determination by the Commissioner that the project is in compliance with the standards and requiring that such amounts be used for repair.

(d) Continued compliance. To ensure continued compliance with the standards set forth in paragraph (a) of this section for a project subject to any action under paragraph (c) of this section, the Commissioner may limit access of and use by the owner of such amounts set forth in paragraph (c) of this section, for not more than the 2-year period beginning upon the determination that the project is in compliance with the housing standards.

(e) Sanctions for continuous noncompliance. If, upon inspection, the Commissioner determines that any eligible low income housing project has failed to comply with the standards established under this section for two consecutive years, the Commissioner may, upon notification to the owner of the noncompliance, take one or more of the following actions;

(1) Subject to the availability of appropriations, provide assistance, other than project-based assistance attached to the project, under part 982 of this title for any tenant eligible for such assistance who desires to terminate occupancy in the project. For each unit in the project vacated pursuant to the provision of assistance under this paragraph, the Commissioner may, notwithstanding any other law or contract for assistance, cancel the provision of project-based assistance attached to the project for one dwelling unit, if the project is receiving such assistance, or convert the project-based assistance allocation for that unit to assistance under part 982 of this title;

(2) In the case of projects for which an equity take-out loan has been made under part 241 of this chapter, direct the mortgagee to declare such a loan to be in default and accelerate the maturity date of the loan;

(3) Declare, or direct the insured mortgagee to declare, any rehabilitation loan insured or provided by the Commissioner with respect to the project, including loans provided under part 219 of this chapter, to be in default and accelerate the maturity date of the loan; and

(4) Suspend payments under or terminate any contract for project-based rental assistance under section 8 of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437f).

(f) Sanctions not exclusive. The Commissioner may take any other action authorized by law or the project regulatory agreement to ensure that the project will be brought into compliance with the standards established under this section or with other requirements pertaining to the condition of the project.

[57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, as amended at 64 FR 26639, May 14, 1999]

§248.149   Timetable for approval of a plan of action.

(a) Notification of deficiencies. Not later than 60 days after receipt of a plan of action, the Commissioner shall notify the owner in writing of any deficiencies that prevent the plan of action from being approved. Such notice shall describe alternative ways in which the plan may be revised to meet the criteria for approval set forth in §248.145.

(b) Notification of approval. Not later than 180 days after receipt of a plan of action, or such longer period as the owner requests, but not more than 365 days, the Commissioner shall notify the owner in writing whether the plan of action, including any revisions, is approved. If approval is withheld, the notice shall describe—

(1) The reasons for withholding approval; and

(2) Suggestions to the owner for meeting the criteria for approval.

(c) Opportunity to revise. The Commissioner shall give the owner a reasonable opportunity of not more than 60 days to revise the plan of action when approval is denied. If the owner fails to comply with this time period, it shall not be eligible for relief under paragraph (d) of this section.

(d) Delayed approval. If the Commissioner fails to approve a plan of action within the time set forth in paragraph (b) of this section, the Commissioner shall provide incentives and assistance under subpart B of this part, to an owner who is entitled to receive such incentives and assistance, in the amount that the owner would have received if the Commissioner had complied with such time limitations. Paragraph (d) of this section does not apply to plans of action that are not approved because of deficiencies.

§248.153   Incentives to extend low income use.

(a) Agreements by the Commissioner. After approving a plan of action filed pursuant to §248.145, from an owner of eligible low income housing that includes the owner's plan to extend the low income affordability restrictions of the project, the Commissioner shall, subject to the availability of appropriations for such purpose, enter into such agreements as are necessary to enable the owner to—

(1) Receive the annual authorized return for the project as determined under §248.121 for each year after the approval of the plan of action;

(2) Pay debt service on the federally-assisted mortgage(s) covering the project;

(3) Pay debt service on any loan for rehabilitation of the project;

(4) Meet project operating expenses; and

(5) Establish adequate reserves.

(b) Permissible incentives. Such agreements may include one or more of the following incentives, as determined necessary by the Commissioner:

(1) Increased access to residual receipts accounts as necessary to enable the owner to realize the annual authorized return;

(2) An increase in the rents permitted under an existing project-based section 8 contract;

(3) Additional project-based section 8 assistance or an extension of any project-based assistance attached to the housing;

(4) An increase in the rents on non-section 8 units occupied by current tenants up to the maximum allowable rents;

(5) Financing of capital improvements under part 219 of this chapter;

(6) Financing of rehabilitation through provision of insurance for a second mortgage under part 241 of this chapter;

(7) Redirection of the Interest Reduction Payment subsidies to a second mortgage for projects which are insured, assisted, or held by the Commissioner or a State or State agency under part 236 of this chapter;

(8) Access by the owner to a portion of the preservation equity in the project through provision of insurance for an acquisition or equity loan insured under part 241, subpart E of this chapter or through a non-insured mortgage loan approved by the Commissioner and the mortgagee;

(9) An increase in the amount of allowable distributions up to the annual authorized return; and

(10) Other incentives authorized in law.

(c) Limitation on the provision of permissible incentives. (1) The total amount of incentives provided to a project under paragraphs (b)(2), (3), and (4) of this section shall not result in a projected rental income stream which exceeds the Federal cost limit.

(2) The debt service on the loan obtained by the owner under paragraph (b)(8) of this section, when added to the allowable distributions under paragraph (b)(9) of this section, shall not exceed the annual authorized return.

(d) Rent phase-in period. To the extent necessary to ensure that owners receive the annual authorized return during the tenant rent phase-in period established in §248.145(a)(6), the Commissioner shall permit owners to receive the following additional incentives:

(1) Access to residual receipts accounts;

(2) Deferred remittance of excess rent payments; and

(3) Increases in rents, as permitted under an existing Section 8 contract.

These incentives shall be provided to owners in the order listed. An owner will not be eligible to receive these additional incentives unless it can demonstrate that it is not receiving the annual authorized return. Once an owner has adequately demonstrated that it is not receiving the annual authorized return, the Commissioner will provide the owner with each incentive in turn during the rent phase-in period, until it has been determined that the owner is receiving the annual authorized return.

(e) Interest reduction subsidies. Where Interest Reduction Payment subsidies are sought to be redirected, pursuant to paragraph (b)(7) of this section, the lender may not unreasonably withhold its consent to such redirection.

(f) Recalculation of section 236 basic rent and market rent. With respect to any project with a mortgage insured or otherwise assisted pursuant to part 236 of this chapter, the basic rent and market rent, as defined in §236.2 of this chapter, for each unit in such project may be increased to take into account the allowable distributions permitted under this section and the debt service on any equity loan, rehabilitation loan or acquisition loan approved under a plan of action under subpart B of this part.

[57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, as amended at 58 FR 37815, July 13, 1993]

§248.157   Voluntary sale of housing not in excess of Federal cost limit.

(a) Offer to sell. Where an owner has submitted a second notice of intent under §248.133 for the purpose of transferring the project to a qualified purchaser, and the transfer preservation rent does not exceed the Federal cost limit, the owner shall offer the housing for transfer as provided in this section. The owner shall not be obligated to accept any offer made under this section, but may instead elect to retain the project and receive incentives under §248.145.

(b) Notification of qualified purchasers. Upon receipt of a second notice of intent to transfer the project to a qualified purchaser, the Commissioner shall notify potential qualified purchasers of the availability of the project for sale, and of the names and addresses of the owner, or of a person representing the owner in the sale of the project, by—

(1) Mailing notices to non-profit organizations;

(2) Placing notices in the major local newspaper(s) in the jurisdiction in which the project is located;

(3) Mailing notices to clearinghouse networks; and

(4) Using any other means of notification which the Commissioner determines would be effective to notify potential qualified purchasers of the sale of the project.

(c) Right of first offer to priority purchasers. (1) For the 6-month period beginning on the date of receipt by the Commissioner of a second notice of intent under §248.133, the owner may accept a bona fide offer only from:

(i) A resident council intending to purchase the project under §§248.173 or 248.175, which has met the requirements for tenant support, pursuant to those sections;

(ii) A resident council intending to purchase the project and retain it as rental housing, which has the support of a majority of the tenants; or

(iii) A community-based nonprofit organization which has the support of a majority of the tenants.

(2) If no bona fide offer to purchase the project is made and accepted during or at the end of the 6-month period specified in paragraph (c)(1) of this section, the owner may offer to sell the project during the next 6 months to any priority purchasers.

(3) If no bona fide offer to purchase the project is made and accepted during or at the end of the 6-month period specified in paragraph (c)(2) of this section, the owner may offer to sell the project during the 3 months immediately following that period only to qualified purchasers.

(d) Purchase price. The sale price, including assumption of the debt on the federally-assisted mortgage(s), or the amount of the debt on the federally-assisted mortgage(s) that the project is taken subject to, may not exceed the transfer preservation value of the project.

(e) Expression of interest. Any priority purchaser seeking to make an offer during the 6-month periods specified in paragraph (c) of this section shall, and other qualified purchasers may, submit written notice thereof to the Commissioner. Such notice, if made by a priority purchaser seeking to make an offer during either 6-month priority purchaser marketing period, shall contain the following:

(1) A statement identifying the priority purchaser as a State or local government agency, a nonprofit organization, or a resident council;

(2) A copy of its articles of incorporation, charter and list of officers and directors, if the purchaser is a nonprofit organization or a resident council and in the case of a nonprofit organization, proof that the organization is, or has applied to be, a tax exempt organization in accordance with 26 U.S.C. 501(c); and

(3) A statement as to whether the purchaser is affiliated with any other entity for purposes of purchasing the project and whether any Low Income Housing Tax Credits may be awarded in connection with the purchase of the project.

(f) Information from the Commissioner. Within 30 days of receipt of an expression of interest by a priority purchaser, the Commissioner shall determine the status of the priority purchaser with respect to the categories listed in paragraph (h) of this section, and provide such purchaser with:

(1) A list of all possible assistance available from the Federal Government to facilitate a transfer of the project;

(2) The appraisal reports for the project as submitted under §248.111;

(3) The Commissioner's determination as to the priority status of the purchaser and as to whether the purchaser qualifies as a resident council, community-based nonprofit organization or State or local government entity;

(4) A worksheet indicating the level of the earnest money deposit required upon the submission of a bona fide offer;

(5) An acknowledgment of the purchaser's right to inspect the project; and

(6) Any other relevant financial information that the Commissioner possesses concerning the project, including the information determined under §248.121.

Within the same 30-day period, the Commissioner shall also notify the owner of the purchaser's expression of interest and instruct the owner to provide to the purchaser any information concerning the project that the Commissioner deems relevant to the transfer of the project.

(g) Bona fide offer. A bona fide offer is an offer to purchase eligible low-income housing at a sales price which does not exceed the transfer preservation value of the project.

(1) A bona fide offer must include the following:

(i) A contract of sale signed by the purchaser, which states that acceptance of the contract is contingent upon approval by the Commissioner;

(ii) An earnest money deposit from every qualified purchaser equal to the lesser of one percent of the transfer preservation value, $50,000 or $500 per unit, unless the purchaser is a resident council purchasing the project under a resident homeownership plan under §248.173 or §248.175, in which case the earnest money deposit shall be equal to $200 per unit from 75% of the occupied units; and

(iii) If the purchaser is a resident council intending to purchase the project pursuant to a resident homeownership plan, the information required under §248.173(b); or

(iv) If the purchaser is a resident council intending to retain the project as rental housing, or a community-based nonprofit and the offer is submitted within the marketing period established in paragraph (c)(1) of this section, a resolution of the resident council, or a petition signed by tenants representing a majority of the units indicating their support of the offer.

(2) An owner may waive the requirement of an earnest money deposit or agree to accept a smaller deposit for all qualified purchasers, except resident councils who intend to purchase the project pursuant to a resident homeownership plan under §248.173 or §248.175. In order to be effective:

(i) The waiver must be indicated in the second notice of intent submitted under §248.133 and the waiver must apply equally to all qualified purchasers, except resident councils who intend to purchase the project pursuant to a resident homeownership plan under §248.173 or §248.175; or

(ii) If the second notice of intent has already been submitted, the owner must submit to the Commissioner, in writing, its decision to waive the earnest money deposit. The Commissioner shall notify all qualified purchasers who have submitted an expression of interest under paragraph (e) of this section that the owner has waived the earnest money deposit requirement.

(h) Retention and acceptance of offers. The owner shall accept or reject any bona fide offer within 30 days of receipt of such offer. For an offer to be bona fide, it must meet the requirements of paragraph (g) of this section, as well as be submitted to the owner within the appropriate marketing period under paragraph (c) of this section. If an owner rejects any offer, it must return the earnest money deposit to the offeror at the time of rejection. A bona fide offer which is rejected by the owner will still be considered a bona fide offer for purposes of this section, even after the earnest money deposit has been returned. If an owner decides to accept the offer at a later date, the purchaser may renew the offer by resubmitting the earnest money deposit, if a deposit had originally been required, within 30 days of notification of the owner's acceptance of the offer.

(i) Submission of offer to HUD. The purchaser shall submit the offer to the Commissioner. The Commissioner shall review the offer which is preliminarily accepted by the owner to determine whether it meets the requirements of a bona fide offer. The Commissioner shall notify the owner and purchaser, within 30 days after acceptance, whether the offer meets such requirements. The owner's preliminary acceptance of any offer pursuant to this section shall be conditional upon the Commissioner's certification that the offer is bona fide. If the Commissioner determines that the offer is not a bona fide offer, the offer will be considered invalid for the purposes of subpart B of this part.

(j) Submission of plan of action. Upon a determination by the Commissioner that the offer is bona fide and final acceptance of such an offer, the owner and purchaser shall jointly submit a plan of action to the Commissioner pursuant to §248.135. The plan of action shall include any request for assistance from the Commissioner for purposes of transferring the project.

(k) Requirements for plan of action approval. If the qualified purchaser of the project is a resident council seeking to purchase the project under a resident homeownership program, the Commissioner may approve a plan of action only if the resident council's proposed resident homeownership program meets the requirements under §248.173 or §248.175. For all other qualified purchasers, the Commissioner may approve a plan of action submitted pursuant to this section only if the plan of action meets the criteria listed in §248.145.

(l) Failure to consummate sales transaction. (1) If the owner accepts an offer from a priority purchaser during either of the two 6-month periods specified in paragraph (c) of this section, and before the expiration of the period specified in paragraph (c) of this section, the sales transaction either falls through or does not close within 90 days after the Commissioner's approval of the plan of action, the owner shall:

(i) Immediately notify the Commissioner that the sale has fallen through;

(ii) Notify any other purchaser that had submitted an offer to purchase the project; and

(iii) Resume holding the project open for sale for the remainder of the time periods specified in paragraph (c) of this section.

(2) If the owner accepts an offer from a purchaser, and during the 3-month period specified in paragraph (c) of this section, or thereafter, the sales transaction either falls through or does not close within 90 days after the Commissioner's approval of the plan of action, the owner shall take the following steps:

(i) Immediately notify the Commissioner that the sale has fallen through;

(ii) Contact any other purchaser that had submitted an offer to purchase the project and give such purchaser and any other qualified purchaser 60 days from the date of notification to the Commissioner in which to resubmit an offer to purchase the project.

(3) At any time during the 60-day period the owner may accept an offer submitted under paragraph (l)(2) of this section.

(4) If an offer submitted during the 60-day period specified in paragraph (l)(2) of this section is made and accepted, but the sale is not consummated within 90 days of the Commissioner's approval of the plan of action for reasons not attributable in whole or in part to the owner, the owner may terminate the low-income affordability restrictions through prepayment or voluntary termination, subject to compliance with the provisions of §248.165.

(m) Assistance. Subject to the availability of amounts approved in appropriation acts, the Commissioner shall, for approvable plans of action, provide assistance sufficient to enable qualified purchasers to:

(1) Acquire the eligible low income housing project from the current owner for a purchase price not greater than the transfer preservation value of the project;

(2) Pay the debt service on the federally-assisted mortgage(s) covering the project;

(3) Pay the debt service on any loan for the rehabilitation of the project;

(4) Meet project operating expenses and establish adequate reserves for the housing, and in the case of a priority purchaser, meet project oversight costs;

(5) Receive a distribution equal to an 8 percent annual return on any actual cash investment made to acquire or rehabilitate the project;

(6) In the case of a priority purchaser, receive reimbursement for all reasonable transaction expenses associated with the acquisition, loan closing and implementation of an approved plan of action; and

(7) In the case of an approved resident homeownership program, cover the costs of training for the resident council, homeownership counseling and training, the fees for the nonprofit entity or public agency working with the resident council, if such entity or agency is approved by the Commissioner, and costs related to relocation of tenants who elect to move. Assistance for such costs, exclusive of relocation expenses, shall not exceed $500 per unit or $200,000 for the project, whichever is less.

(n) Incentives. The Commissioner may provide assistance for all qualified purchasers under this subpart in the form of one or more of the incentives authorized under §248.153. The incentives provided by the Commissioner to any qualified purchaser may include an acquisition loan under subpart E of part 241 of this chapter.

(o) Grants to priority purchasers. The Commissioner may provide assistance for priority purchasers under subpart B of this part in the form of a grant for each unit in the project in an amount, as determined by the Commissioner, that does not exceed the present value of the total of the projected fair market rent for the next ten years, or such longer period if additional assistance is necessary to cover the costs set forth in paragraph (m) of this section.

(p) Reimbursement of assistance. The Commissioner reserves the right to seek reimbursement from a priority purchaser who, within ten years of approval of a plan of action, becomes affiliated with or transfers the project to any non-priority purchaser. The Commissioner shall be entitled to receive reimbursement for the difference between the assistance provided to the priority purchaser and the assistance that would have been provided in the same circumstances to a non-priority purchaser.

(q) Seller financing. In order to finance the acquisition or rehabilitation of a project under this section, a qualified purchaser may receive take-back financing from the owner of the project. If the purpose of the seller financing is to aid acquisition of the project, the principal amount of such financing, together with an acquisition loan provided under part 241 of this chapter, may not exceed the transfer preservation equity of the project, plus, in the case of priority purchasers, any expenses associated with the acquisition, loan closing, and implementation of the plan of action. If the purpose of the seller financing is to fund rehabilitation of the project, the principal amount of such financing may not exceed the equity requirements for a rehabilitation loan under §241.70 or §219.305 of this chapter. The seller may not charge interest on any seller financing at a rate in excess of that of the Federal acquisition or rehabilitation loan.

[57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, as amended at 58 FR 37816, July 13, 1993]

§248.161   Mandatory sale of housing in excess of the Federal cost limit.

(a) In general. With respect to any eligible low income housing for which the transfer preservation rent determined under §248.121 exceeds the Federal cost limit, the owner shall offer the housing for transfer to qualified purchasers as provided in this section.

(b) Applicability of voluntary sale provisions. The provisions of §248.157, other than paragraphs (a) and (p) of this section thereof, shall be applicable to any sale conducted under this section. If the owner receives an offer to purchase the project for a sale price equal to the transfer preservation value of the project, as determined under §248.111, the owner shall be obligated to accept the offer upon its receipt and sell the project to the purchaser. If the owner receives an offer to purchase the project for a sale price less than the transfer preservation value of the project, the owner may accept the offer, but is not obligated to do so. Any offer to purchase a project under this section for less than the transfer preservation value must comply with the requirements of a bona fide offer in §248.101, except for the requirement that the sale price equal the transfer preservation value. At the time of submission of the offer, the potential purchaser must also submit the documentation required in §248.157(g).

(c) Section 8 assistance. Subject to the availability of amounts approved in appropriation acts, the Commissioner shall, for approvable plans of action, provide assistance to qualified purchasers under part 886, subpart A of this title sufficient to produce a gross potential income equal to the amount determined by multiplying 120 percent of the prevailing rents in the relevant local market in which the project is located by the number of units in the project, according to appropriate unit size, and any other incentives authorized under §248.153 that would have been provided to a qualified purchaser under §248.157.

(d) Grants to qualified purchasers. From amounts made available by Congress, the Commissioner may make grants to assist in the completion of transfers under this section to any qualified purchasers. Any grant made pursuant to paragraph (d) of this section shall be in an amount not exceeding the difference between the amount of assistance provided under paragraph (c) of this section and the amount of assistance specified in §248.157(m).

(e) Securing State and local funding. The Commissioner shall assist any qualified purchaser of a project pursuant to this section in securing funding and other assistance, including tax and assessment reductions from State and local governments to facilitate a transfer under this section.

§248.165   Assistance for displaced tenants.

(a) Section 8 assistance. Each low income family that is displaced as a result of the prepayment of the mortgage, or voluntary termination of an insurance contract, on eligible low income housing shall, subject to the availability of funds, be offered the opportunity to receive tenant-based assistance under the Housing Choice Voucher Program in accordance with part 982 of this title.

(b) Notification of Commissioner. The owner of any eligible low income housing project who prepays the mortgage or voluntarily terminates the mortgage insurance contract pursuant to subpart B of this part, shall notify the Commissioner of:

(1) The names and addresses of all of the tenants in the project who will be displaced;

(2) The size of the unit in which each of the displaced tenants is currently dwelling; and

(3) The names of all of the displaced tenants who are special needs tenants, as that term is defined in §248.101, as well as a statement as to the nature of their special need.

The owner shall provide the Commissioner with this information within 30 days of identifying such tenants for displacement, but in no event less than 30 days prior to the date when the tenants must vacate the premises.

(c) Relocation of displaced tenants. The Commissioner shall coordinate with public housing agencies to ensure that any very low or low income family displaced from eligible low income housing as the result of prepayment of the mortgage or termination of the mortgage insurance contract on such project is able to acquire a suitable, affordable dwelling unit in the area where the project from which the displaced family is located. The Commissioner, upon receiving information from the owner under paragraph (b) of this section stating that certain tenants will be displaced, shall request from the public housing agencies located in the same area as the affected project, notices of vacancies in other affordable projects which would be suitable for the displaced tenants. The Commissioner shall convey the notices of vacancies to the tenants who will be displaced along with the addresses of the local public housing agencies.

(d) Relocation expenses. The Commissioner shall require the owner of eligible low income housing who prepays or terminates the insurance contract resulting in the displacement of tenants to pay 50 percent of the relocation expenses of each family which is relocated, except that the Commissioner shall increase such percentage to the extent that State or local law of general applicability requires a higher payment by the owner.

(e) Continued occupancy. Each owner who prepays the mortgage or terminates the mortgage insurance contract on eligible low income housing shall, as provided in paragraph (g) of this section, allow the tenants occupying units in such project on the date of submission of a notice of intent under §248.105 to remain in the project for a period of three years, commencing on the date of prepayment or contract termination, at rent levels existing at the time of prepayment or termination, except for rent increases made necessary due to increased operating costs.

(f) Replacement unit. In any case in which the Commissioner requires an owner to allow tenants to occupy units under paragraph (e) of this section, an owner may fulfill the requirements of such paragraph by providing such assistance necessary for the tenant to rent a decent, safe, and sanitary unit in another project for the same 3-year period and at a rental cost to the tenant not in excess of the rental amount the tenant would have been required to pay to the owner in the owner's project, except that the tenant must freely agree to waive the right to occupy the unit in the owner's project. The provisions of paragraph (d) of this section requiring an owner who prepays or terminates an insurance contract to pay a portion of the relocation expenses incurred by displaced tenants shall also be applicable to tenants who relocate pursuant to this paragraph.

(g) Applicability. The provisions of paragraphs (e) and (f) of this section shall apply only to:

(1) All tenants in eligible low income housing projects located in a low-vacancy area; and

(2) Special needs tenants.

(h) Low Vacancy Areas. The Commissioner shall notify the owner, within 30 days of the owner's request to prepay under §248.169, whether the project is located in a low vacancy area for purposes of paragraph (g) of this section.

(i) Required acceptance of section 8 assistance. Any owner who prepays the mortgage or terminates the mortgage insurance contract on eligible low income housing and maintains the project for residential rental occupancy may not refuse to rent, refuse to negotiate for the rental of, or otherwise make unavailable or deny the rental of a dwelling unit in such project to any person, or discriminate against any person in the terms, conditions, or privileges or rental of a unit, or in the provision of services or facilities in connection therewith, because the person receives tenant-based assistance under the Housing Choice Voucher Program.

(j) Regional pools. In providing assistance under this section, the Commissioner shall allocate the assistance on a regional basis through the regional offices of the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The Commissioner shall allocate assistance under this section in a manner so that the total number of assisted units in each such region available for occupancy by, and affordable to, low income families and persons does not decrease because of the prepayment of a mortgage on eligible low income housing or the termination of an insurance contract on such project.

(k) This section shall only apply to prepayments and terminations occurring pursuant to §§248.157(l) and 248.169.

[57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, as amended at 64 FR 26639, May 14, 1999]

§248.169   Permissible prepayment or voluntary termination and modification of commitments.

(a) In general. Notwithstanding any limitations on prepayment or voluntary termination under subpart B of this part, an owner may terminate the low income affordability restrictions through prepayment or voluntary termination, subject to compliance with the provisions of §248.165, under one of the following circumstances:

(1) The Commissioner approves a plan of action under §248.153(a), but does not provide the assistance approved in such plan and contained in an executed use agreement between the Commissioner and the owner, including section 8 assistance or a loan provided under part 219 of this chapter, but not including insurance of a rehabilitation or equity take-out loan under part 241 of this chapter, during the 15-month period beginning on the date of final approval of the plan of action;

(2) After the date that the project would have been eligible for prepayment pursuant to the terms of the mortgage, notwithstanding this part, the Commissioner approves a plan of action under §248.157 or §248.161, but does not provide the assistance approved in such plan, including section 8 assistance, a loan provided under part 219 of this chapter, a grant provided under §248.157(o), or a grant under §248.161(d), before the earlier of:

(i) The expiration of the 2-month period beginning on the commencement of the first fiscal year beginning after such final approval; or

(ii) The expiration of the 6-month period beginning on the date of final approval.

(3) The Commissioner approves a plan of action under §§248.157 or 248.161 for any eligible low income housing not covered by paragraph (a)(2) of this section, but does not provide the assistance approved in such plan before the earlier of:

(i) The expiration of the 2-month period beginning on the commencement of the first fiscal year beginning after such final approval; or

(ii) The expiration of the 9-month period beginning on the date of final approval.

(4) An owner who intended to transfer the project to a qualified purchaser under §248.157 or §248.161, and fully complied with the provisions of such section,

(i) Did not receive any bona fide offers from any qualified purchasers within the applicable time periods; or

(ii) Received and accepted a bona fide offer from a qualified purchaser, but the sales transaction fell through for reasons not attributable in whole or in part to the owner, and the owner then complied with the requirements of §248.157(l) and did not receive another bona fide offer from any qualified purchasers.

(b) Section 8 assistance. When providing section 8 assistance, the Commissioner may enter into a contract with an owner, contingent upon the future availability of appropriations, for the purpose of renewing expiring contracts for rental assistance as provided in appropriations acts, to extend the term of such rental assistance for such additional period or periods necessary to carry out an approved plan of action. The contract and approved plan of action shall provide that, if the Commissioner is unable to extend the term of such rental assistance or is unable to develop a revised package of incentives providing benefits to the owner comparable to those received under the original approved plan of action, the Commissioner, upon the request of the owner, shall take the following actions, subject to the limitations under the following paragraphs:

(1) Modify the binding commitments made pursuant to §248.145(a)(2)-(10) that are dependent upon such rental assistance; or

(2) If the Commissioner determines that such modification is infeasible, permit the owner to prepay the mortgage and terminate the plan of action and any implementing use agreements or restrictions, but only if the owner agrees in writing to comply with the provisions of §248.165.

(c) Failure to provide section 8 assistance. With regard to paragraph (b) of this section, the Commissioner shall notify the owner of an inability to either extend the term of section 8 rental assistance or to develop a revised package of incentives providing benefits comparable to those received under the original plan of action as soon as practicable upon discovering that fact. The owner shall inform the Commissioner in writing, within 30 days of receipt of the notice that, since the Commissioner is unable to fulfill the terms of the original plan of action, the owner intends to request that the Commissioner take action under paragraphs (b)(1) or (2) of this section. The Commissioner shall, no later than 90 days from receiving the owner's notice, take action to extend the rental assistance contract and to continue the binding commitments under §248.145(a)(2)-(10).

§248.173   Resident homeownership program.

(a) Formation of resident council. Tenants seeking to purchase eligible low income housing in accordance with §§248.157 and 248.161 shall organize a resident council for the purpose of developing a resident homeownership program in accordance with standards established by the Commissioner. In order to fulfill the purposes of this section, the resident council shall work with a public or private nonprofit organization or a public body, including an agency or instrumentality thereof. Such organization shall have sufficient experience to enable it to help the tenants to consider their options and to develop the capacity necessary to own and manage the project, where appropriate, and shall be approved by the Commissioner.

(b) Submission of expression of interest. A resident council shall identify itself as such in an expression of interest submitted pursuant to §248.157 or §248.161 and shall state that, it is interested in purchasing the project pursuant to a homeownership program.

(c) Bona fide offer. When submitting an offer to purchase the project pursuant to this section, the resident council must simultaneously submit a certified list of project tenants representing at least 75 percent of the occupied units in the project, and representing at least 50 percent of all of the units in the project, who have expressed an interest in participating in the homeownership program developed by the resident council. An offer made without this certified list will not be considered a bona fide offer for the purposes of subpart B of this part.

(d) Submission of a homeownership program. (1) The resident council shall prepare a homeownership program acceptable to the Commissioner for giving all residents of the project an opportunity to become homeowners. The plan shall describe the major elements of, and schedules for, the homeownership program and demonstrate how the program complies with all applicable requirements of this section. The plan shall also describe the resident council's current abilities and proposed capacity-building activities to successfully carry out the homeownership program in compliance with this section. The homeownership program shall include, at a minimum, the following information:

(i) The amount of grant funds requested from the Commissioner, and the expected amounts and sources of other funding;

(ii) The proposed use of the grant funds to be received from HUD and of all other funds, including proceeds from the sale of units to initial purchasers, consistent with paragraph (h) of this section;

(iii) A summary of major rehabilitation activities to be carried out, including repairs, replacements and improvements;

(iv) The price at which the resident council intends to transfer ownership interests in, or shares representing, units in the project, broken down by unit size and/or type; the factors that will influence the establishment of such price, including, but not limited to, the resident council's acquisition cost, estimated rehabilitation costs, capitalization of reserves and organizational costs; how the price arrived at by the resident council compares to the estimated appraised value of the ownership interests or shares; and the underwriting standard that the resident council plans to use, or reasonably expects a public or private lender to use, for potential tenant purchasers, consistent with paragraph (g)(2) of this section;

(v) The expected number of very low, low and moderate income tenants that will be initial owners under the program, consistent with paragraph (g)(1) of this section;

(vi) A pro forma analysis which demonstrates the financial feasibility and viability of the homeownership program, based on the required conditions specified in paragraph (g) of this section;

(vii) The financing arrangements that the tenants are expected to pursue or to be provided, including financing available through the resident council or a State or local governmental entity, and criteria for acceptability of conventional financing;

(viii) A description of the estimated costs expected to be paid by the homeowner at closing;

(ix) The type of homeownership contemplated, consistent with paragraph (f) of this section;

(x) How the marketing of currently vacant units and units occupied by nonpurchasing tenants that become vacant will affect the sales price and occupancy charges to purchasers;

(xi) A workable schedule of sale, subject to the limitations of paragraph (o) of this section, based on estimated tenant incomes;

(xii) Any restrictions on resale by homeowners over and above those specified in paragraph (i) of this section, and any restrictions on homeowners' equity, over and above those specified in paragraph (k) of this section;

(xiii) The qualifications of the resident council or the proposed management entity to manage the project, in compliance with paragraph (n) of this section;

(xiv) The expected number of non-purchasing tenants and their eligibility for section 8 rental assistance under paragraph (m)(2) of this section;

(xv) Expected scope and expenses of relocation activities, both for any temporary relocation due to rehabilitation as well as relocation assistance for nonpurchasing tenants, consistent with paragraph (m)(4) of this section;

(xvi) Expected scope and costs of technical assistance, training and counseling for the resident council, purchasers and non-purchasing tenants; and

(xvii) A certification that the resident council shall comply with the provisions of the Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 3601-3619); title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000d); Executive Order 11063 (3 CFR 1959-1963 comp., p. 652); section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794); the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42 U.S.C. 6101-6107); and all regulations issued pursuant to these statutes and authorities.

(2) The Commissioner shall give the resident council a reasonable opportunity to revise the homeownership program if approval is denied.

(e) Approval of a homeownership program; assistance provided. (1) When the Commissioner determines that the homeownership program submitted by the resident council meets the requirements of this section, is financially feasible, and is the least costly alternative that is consistent with establishing a viable homeownership program, the Commissioner shall approve the program.

(2) In connection with an approved homeownership program the Commissioner shall provide assistance sufficient to pay the following costs:

(i) The debt service on the federally-assisted mortgage(s) covering the project, when such mortgage is assumed by the resident council;

(ii) The purchase price, which shall not exceed the transfer preservation value;

(iii) Transaction costs, as provided in §248.157(m)(6);

(iv) Other costs, as provided in §248.157(m)(7);

(v) The costs of rehabilitation;

(vi) The establishment of an adequate reserve for replacements; and

(vii) If necessary, the establishment of operating reserve escrows including contingencies against unexpected increases in expenses or shortfalls in homeowners' payments.

(3) Upon approval of the homeownership program, the Commissioner and the resident council shall enter into an agreement, which shall include, among other matters, procedures governing the drawdown of funds and remedies for noncompliance with the requirements of this section.

(f) Method of conversion. The Commissioner shall approve the method for converting the project to homeownership, which may involve acquisition of ownership interests in, or shares representing, the units in a project under any arrangement determined by the Commissioner to be appropriate, such as cooperative ownership, and fee simple ownership, including condominium ownership.

(g) Required conditions. The Commissioner shall require that the form of homeownership impose appropriate conditions, including conditions to assure that:

(1) To the extent practicable, the number of initial owners that are very low, low, and moderate income persons at initial occupancy are of the same proportion of very low, low, and moderate income tenants (including families and persons whose incomes are 95 percent or more of area median income) as resided in the project on January 1, 1987 (or if the January 1, 1987 profile is unavailable, a certification from the owner stating its unavailability and a profile as of January 1, 1988, or, if that is also unavailable, a profile as of January 1, 1989) or as of the date of approval of the plan of action, whichever date results in the higher proportion of very low income families, except that the resident council may, at its option, increase the proportions of very low income and low income initial owners, however, no current tenant may be denied homeownership as a result of this paragraph;

(2) Projected debt service payments, occupancy charges and utilities payable by the owners shall not exceed 35 percent of the monthly adjusted gross income of the owners;

(3) The aggregate incomes of initial owners and other sources of funds for the project are sufficient to permit occupancy charges to cover the full operating costs of the project and any debt service; and

(4) Each initial owner occupies the unit it acquires for at least the initial 15 years of ownership, unless the resident council determines that the initial owner is required to move outside the market area due to a change in employment or an emergency situation.

(5) All units which remain as rental units, from the date of approval of the resident homeownership program, until they are purchased by an initial owner under the resident homeownership program, shall be maintained in accordance with §248.145 (a)(5), (a)(6), (a)(7), (a)(8), and (a)(9).

(h) Use of proceeds from sales to eligible families. The entity that transfers ownership interests in, or shares representing, units to eligible families, or another entity specified in the approved application, may use 50 percent of the proceeds, if any, from the initial sale for costs of the homeownership program, including improvements to the project, operating and replacement reserves for the project, additional homeownership opportunities in the project, and other project-related activities approved by the Commissioner. The remaining 50 percent of such proceeds shall be returned to the Commissioner for use under §§248.157 and 248.161, subject to the availability of appropriations. Such entity shall keep, and make available to the Commissioner, all records necessary to calculate accurately payments due the Commissioner under paragraph (h) of this section.

(i) Restrictions on resale by homeowners. Resale of a homeowner's interest in a project with an approved homeownership program may occur subject to any reasonable restrictions placed on such a transfer by the resident council and approved by the Commissioner.

(1) Transfer permitted. A homeowner may transfer the homeowner's ownership interest in the unit, subject to the right to purchase under paragraph (i)(2) of this section, the requirement for the purchaser to execute a promissory note, if required under paragraph (i)(3) of this section and the restrictions on retention of sales proceeds in paragraph (k) of this section. An applicant may propose in its application, and HUD may approve, reasonable restrictions on the resale of units under the program.

(2) Right to purchase. Where a resident management corporation, resident council, or cooperative has jurisdiction over the unit, it shall have the right to purchase the ownership interest in the unit from the initial homeowner for the amount specified in a firm contract between the homeowner and a prospective buyer. Where a resident management corporation, resident council, or a cooperative exercises a right to purchase, it shall resell the unit to an eligible family within a reasonable period of time.

(3) Promissory note required. At closing, the initial homeowner shall execute a nonrecourse promissory note for a term of twenty years, in a form acceptable to HUD, equal to the difference between the fair market value of the unit and the purchase price, payable to the Commissioner, together with a mortgage securing the obligation of the note.

(i) With respect to a sale by an initial homeowner, the note shall require payment upon sale by the initial homeowner, to the extent proceeds of the sale remain after paying off other outstanding debt incurred in connection with the purchase of the property, paying any other amounts due in connection with the sale, including closing costs and transfer taxes, and paying the family the amount of its equity in the property, computed in accordance with paragraph (k) of this section.

(ii) With respect to a sale by an initial homeowner during the first six years after acquisition, the family may retain only the amount computed under paragraph (k) of this section. Any excess is distributed as provided in paragraph (1) of this section.

(iii) With respect to a sale by an initial homeowner six to twenty years after acquisition, the amount payable under the note shall be reduced by 1/168th of the original principal amount of the note for each full month of ownership by the family after the end of the sixth year. The homeowner may retain all other proceeds of the sale.

(j) Execution of promissory note by subsequent purchaser. Where a subsequent purchaser during the 20-year period, measured by the term of the initial promissory note, purchases the property for less than the then current fair market value, the purchaser shall also execute at closing such a promissory note and mortgage, for the amount of the discount. The term of the promissory note shall be the period remaining of the original 20-year period. The note shall require payment upon sale by the subsequent homeowner, to the extent proceeds of the sale remain after paying off other outstanding debt incurred in connection with the purchase of the property, and paying any other amounts due in connection with the sale (such as closing costs and transfer taxes). The amount payable on the note shall be reduced by a percentage of the original principal amount of the note for each full month of ownership by the subsequent homeowner. The percentage shall be computed by determining the percentage of the term of the promissory note that the homeowner has owned the property. The remainder may be retained by the subsequent homeowner selling the property.

(k) Homeowners' equity. The amount of equity an initial homeowner has in the property is determined by computing the sum of the following:

(1) The contribution to equity paid by the family, if any, including any down payment and any amount paid towards principal on a mortgage loan during the period of ownership;

(2) The value of any improvements installed at the expense of the family during the family's tenure as owner, as determined by the resident council based on evidence of amounts spent on the improvements, including the cost of material and labor; and

(3) The appreciated value, determined by applying the Consumer Price Index (urban consumers) against the contribution to equity under paragraphs (k) (1) and (2) of this section, excluding the value of any sweat equity or volunteer labor used to make improvements to the unit. The resident council may, at the time of initial sale, enter into an agreement with the family to set a maximum amount which this appreciation may not exceed.

(l) Use of recaptured funds. Any net sales proceeds that may not be retained by the homeowner under the homeownership program approved under this section shall be paid to the HOME Investment Trust Fund for the unit of general local government in which the project is located. If the project is located in a unit of general local government that is not a participating jurisdiction, as such term is defined in §248.101, any such net sales proceeds shall be paid to the HOME Investment Trust Fund for the State in which the project is located. With respect to any proceeds transferred to a HOME Investment Trust Fund under paragraph (1) of this section, the Commissioner shall take such actions as are necessary to ensure that the proceeds shall be immediately available for eligible activities to expand the supply of affordable housing under section 212 of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12742). The Commissioner shall monitor the HOME Investment Trust Fund for each State and unit of local government and shall require maintenance of any records necessary to calculate accurately payments due under this paragraph (1) of this section.

(m) Protection of nonpurchasing families. Nonpurchasing families who continue to reside in a project subject to a homeownership program approved under this section shall be protected as follows:

(1) Eviction. No tenant residing in an eligible property on the date the Commissioner approves a plan of action may be evicted by reason of a homeownership program approved under this section. This does not preclude evictions for material violation of the terms of occupancy of the unit.

(2) Section 8 assistance. If a tenant decides not to purchase a unit, or is not qualified to do so, the Commissioner shall ensure that tenant-based assistance under the Housing Choice Voucher Program in accordance with part 982 of this title is available for use in that or another property by each tenant that meets the eligibility requirements thereunder.

(3) Rent increases for ineligible tenants. Rents for tenants who do not purchase a unit but are ineligible for assistance under paragraph (m)(2) of this section may be increased to a level that does not exceed 30 percent of the tenant's adjusted income or the section 8 existing fair market rent, whichever is lower. Rent increases shall be phased in in accordance with §248.145(a)(6).

(4) Relocation assistance. The resident council shall also inform each tenant that if the tenant chooses to move, the resident council, as owner of the project, will pay relocation expenses in accordance with the approved homeownership program. The provisions of §248.165 shall not apply to resident councils who are project owners pursuant to an approved homeownership program under this section.

(n) Qualified management. As a condition of approval of a homeownership program under subpart B of this section, the resident council shall have demonstrated its abilities to manage eligible properties by having done so effectively and efficiently for a period of not less than three years or by entering into a contract with a qualified management entity that meets such standards as the Commissioner may prescribe to ensure that the project will be maintained in a decent, safe and sanitary condition.

(o) Timely homeownership. The resident council shall acquire ownership of the project no later than 90 days after final approval of a plan of action pursuant to this section. The resident council shall transfer ownership of units in the project (other than units occupied by nonpurchasing tenants) to the tenants within a reasonable time thereafter, but in no event more than 4 years from the date of transfer of the project to the resident council. The Commissioner may seek contractual remedies against any resident council which fails to transfer ownership of all units within the 4-year period. During the interim period when the project continues to be operated and managed as rental housing, the resident council shall utilize written tenant selection policies and criteria that are approved by the Commissioner as consistent with the purpose of providing housing for very low income families. The resident council shall promptly notify in writing any rejected applicant of the grounds for any rejection.

(p) Housing standards; inspections. (1) Until the resident council has transferred all units in the project (other than those occupied by nonpurchasing tenants) to the initial purchasers, the project shall be maintained in accordance with the housing standards set forth in §248.147.

(2) The Commissioner shall inspect the project at least annually in order to determine compliance with paragraph (p)(1) of this section.

(q) Audits. Each resident council shall be subject to the audit requirements in 2 CFR part 200, subpart F, and shall submit an annual audit to the Commissioner in such form as the Commissioner may prescribe. The resident council shall keep such records as may be reasonably necessary to fully disclose the amount and the disposition by such resident council of the proceeds of assistance received under subpart B of this part, including any proceeds from sales under paragraphs (h) and (l) of this section, the total cost of the homeownership program in connection with which such assistance is given or used, and the amount and nature of that portion of the program supplied by other sources, and such other sources as will facilitate an effective audit.

The Commissioner or his or her duly authorized representative shall have access for the purpose of audit and examination to any books, documents, papers, and records of the resident council that are pertinent to assistance received under subpart B of this part. The Comptroller General of the United States, or any of the duly authorized representatives of the Comptroller General, shall also have access, for the purpose of audit and examination, to any books, documents, papers, and records of the resident council that are pertinent to assistance received under subpart B of this part.

(r) Reports. The resident council shall submit reports, as required by the Commissioner, in order to demonstrate continued compliance with the requirements of this section.

(s) Assumption of the federally assisted mortgage(s). In connection with a resident homeownership plan, the resident council may assume a mortgage insured, held or assisted by the Commissioner under part 236 of this chapter or under part 221 of this chapter and bearing a below market interest rate as provided under §221.518(b) of this chapter or may choose to pay off the mortgage. If the resident council decides to assume the mortgage, the project must be sold pursuant to §248.175 and the project must be operated as a limited equity cooperative.

[57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, as amended at 58 FR 37816, July 13, 1993; 64 FR 26639, May 14, 1999; 80 FR 75936, Dec. 7, 2015]

§248.175   Resident homeownership program—limited equity cooperative.

(a) Tenants may carry out a resident homeownership program through the purchase of eligible low income housing by a limited equity cooperative and the operation of the project as a limited equity cooperative.

(b) The purchase of a project by a limited equity cooperative and the operation of the project by the limited equity cooperative shall be carried out in accordance with the provisions of §248.173 (a), (b), (c), (d), (except that paragraph (d)(1)(i) of this section shall include a statement of the amount and type of incentives requested, rather than only the amount of grant funds requested), (e), (g)(3), (i) (except paragraphs (i)(1) and (3)), (m) and (n).

(c) The purchase and operation of eligible low income housing by a limited equity cooperative under this section shall be carried out in accordance with all provisions of subpart B of this part otherwise, applicable to the transfer and operation of a project with continued low income affordability restrictions, except as provided in this section.

[57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, as amended at 58 FR 37816, July 13, 1993]

§248.177   Delegated responsibility to State agencies.

(a) In general. The Commissioner shall delegate some or all responsibility for implementing subpart B of this part to a State housing agency if such agency submits a preservation plan acceptable to the Commissioner.

(b) Approval. State preservation plans shall be submitted in such a form and in accordance with such procedures as the Commissioner shall establish. The Commissioner may approve plans that contain:

(1) An inventory of low income housing located within the State that is or will be eligible low income housing under subpart B of this part within five years;

(2) A description of the agency's experience in the area of multifamily financing and restructuring;

(3) A description of the administrative resources that the agency will commit to the processing of plans of action in accordance with subpart B of this part;

(4) A description of the administrative resources that the agency will commit to the monitoring of approved plans of action in accordance with subpart B of this part;

(5) An independent analysis of the performance of the multifamily housing inventory financed or otherwise monitored by the agency;

(6) A certification by the public official responsible for submitting the consolidated plan under 24 CFR part 91 that the proposed activities are consistent with the approved consolidated plan of the State within which the eligible low income housing is located; and

(7) Such other certifications or information that the Commissioner determines to be necessary to implement an approved State preservation plan, which may include incentives that are authorized under other provisions of subpart B of this part.

(c) Implementation agreements. The Commissioner may enter into any agreements necessary to implement an approved State preservation plan, which may include incentives that are authorized under other provisions of subpart B of this part.

(d) Fees. Any State agency with responsibility so delegated under subpart B of this part may not charge any owner of eligible low income housing any fee for accepting notices of intent, processing plans of action or any other process pursuant to approval of a plan of action under subpart B of this part. This prohibition shall not preclude:

(1) An owner paying for its appraisal or share of a joint appraisal under the provisions of §248.111; or

(2) A State agency from collecting fees normally associated with providing and processing financing insured under part 241 of this chapter.

[57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1994, as amended at 60 FR 16379, Mar. 30, 1995]

§248.179   Consultation with other interested parties.

The Commissioner shall confer with any appropriate State or local government agency to confirm any State or local assistance that is available to achieve the purposes of subpart B of this part and shall give consideration to the views of any such agency when making determinations under subpart B of this part. The Commissioner shall also confer with appropriate interested parties that the Commissioner believes could assist in the development of a plan of action that best achieves the purposes of subpart B of this part.

§248.181   Notice to tenants.

Except as provided in §§248.105 and 248.133, with respect to the first and second notices of intent, with regard to all provisions of subpart B of this part which mandate that information or material be given to the tenants, by the Commissioner, the owner, or a qualified purchaser, or other party, this requirement shall be satisfied where the notifying entity:

(a) Posts a copy of the information or material in readily accessible locations within each affected building, or posts notices in each location describing the information or material and specifying a location, as convenient to the tenants as is reasonably practical, where a copy may be examined and copied during reasonable hours; and

(b) Supplies a copy of the information or material to a tenant representative, if any.

§248.183   Preemption of State and local laws.

(a) In general. No State or political subdivision of a State may establish, continue in effect, or enforce any law or regulation that:

(1) Restricts or inhibits the prepayment of any mortgage described in §248.101 or the voluntary termination of any insurance contract pursuant to §207.253 of this chapter on eligible low income housing projects;

(2) Restricts or inhibits an owner of such projects from receiving the authorized annual return provided under §248.121;

(3) Is inconsistent with any provision of subpart B of this part, including any law, regulation, or other restriction that limits or impairs the ability of any owner of eligible low income housing to receive incentives authorized under subpart B of this part, including authorization to increase rental rates, transfer the project, obtain secondary financing, or use the proceeds of any such incentives; or

(4) In its applicability to low income housing is limited only to eligible low income housing for which the owner has prepaid the mortgage or terminated the insurance contract.

(b) Effect. Any law, regulation or restriction described in paragraph (a) of this section shall be ineffective and any eligible low income housing exempt from the law, regulation, or restriction, only to the extent that it violates the provisions of this section.

(c) Laws of general applicability: contractual restrictions. This section shall not prevent the establishment, continuing in effect, or enforcement of any law or regulation of any State or political subdivision of a State not inconsistent with the provision of this subpart, such as any law or regulation relating to building standards, zoning limitations, health, safety, or habitability standards for housing, rent control, or conversion of rental housing to condominium or cooperative ownership, to the extent such law or regulation is of general applicability to both projects receiving Federal assistance and nonassisted projects. This section shall not preempt, annul or alter any contractual restrictions or obligations existing before November 28, 1990 or voluntarily entered into by an owner of eligible low income housing on or after that date, and that limit or prevent that owner from prepaying the mortgage on the project or terminating the mortgage insurance contract.

[57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, as amended at 57 FR 57314, Dec. 3, 1992]

Subpart C—Prepayment and Plans of Action Under the Emergency Low Income Preservation Act of 1987

Source: 55 FR 38952, Sept. 21, 1990, unless otherwise noted. Redesignated at 57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992.

§248.201   Definitions.

The terms Fair Market Rent (FMR) and Section 8 are defined in 24 CFR part 5.

Adjusted Income. Annual income, as specified in §251.21 of this chapter, less allowances specified in the definition of Adjusted Income in §215.1 of this chapter.

Allowable Distributions. The amount of cash or other assets that the owner may withdraw from the project under the terms of the regulatory agreement, applicable regulations, and administrative instructions, including the segregation of cash or assets for subsequent withdrawal, and excluding repayment of advances made for reasonable and necessary expenses incident to the operation and maintenance of the project.

Capital Improvement Loan. A direct loan originated by the Commissioner under part 219, subpart C of this chapter.

Eligible Low Income Housing. Any housing financed by a mortgage—

(a) That is—

(1) Insured or held by the Commissioner under section 221(d)(3) of the National Housing Act and assisted under part 886, subpart A of this title because of a conversion from assistance under part 215 of this chapter;

(2) Insured or held by the Commissioner under part 221 of this chapter and bearing a below market interest rate as provided under §221.518(b) of this chapter;

(3) Insured, assisted, or held by the Commissioner or a State or State agency under part 236 of this chapter; or

(4) A purchase money mortgage held by the Commissioner with respect to a project which, immediately prior to HUD's acquisition, would have been classified under paragraph (a) (1), (2), or (3) of this definition; and

(b) That, under regulation or contract in effect before November 1, 1987, is, or within one year from the date of the notice of intent would become, eligible for prepayment without the prior approval of the Commissioner.

Equity. The Owner's investment in the housing project, as approved or determined by the Commissioner.

Equity Loan. A loan insured by the Commissioner under part 241, subpart E of this chapter.

Flexible Subsidy Assistance. Assistance provided by the Commissioner under part 219 of this chapter, other than a capital improvement loan.

Good Cause. Temporary or permanent uninhabitability of the project justifying relocation of all or some of the project's tenants (except where such uninhabitability is caused by the actions or inaction of the owner), or actions of the tenant that, under the terms of the tenant's lease and applicable regulations, constitute a basis for eviction.

Limited Equity Cooperative. A cooperative housing corporation in which income eligibility of purchasers or appreciation upon resale of membership shares, or both, are restricted in order to maintain the housing as available to and affordable by low and moderate income families and persons.

Low Income Affordability Restrictions. Limits imposed by regulation or regulatory agreement on tenant rents, rent contributions, or income eligibility with respect to eligible low income housing.

Low-Income Families. Families or persons whose incomes do not exceed the levels established for low-income families under part 5 of this title.

Moderate Income Families. Families or persons whose incomes are between 80 percent and 95 percent of median area income, as determined by the Commissioner with adjustments for smaller and larger families.

Mortgage. The mortgage or deed of trust insured or held by the Commissioner or a State or State agency under parts 221 or 236 of this chapter, or the purchase money mortgage taken back by the Commissioner in connection with the sale of a HUD-owned project and held by the Commissioner, where such mortgage, deed of trust or purchase money mortgage is secured by eligible low income housing.

Notice of Intent. An owner's notification of its intent to seek prepayment of its mortgage, termination of the mortgage insurance contract or amendment of the mortgage or regulatory agreement pursuant to this part.

Owner. The mortgagor or trustor under the mortgage secured by eligible low income housing.

Plan of Action. A plan providing for prepayment of the mortgage, termination of the mortgage insurance contract, or continuation of the mortgage in place, and providing for either the termination of low income affordability restrictions, or the continuation of the project's use as low-income housing under modified terms and conditions.

Prepayment. Prepayment in full of a mortgage, or a partial prepayment or series of partial prepayments that reduce the mortgage term by at least six months, except where the prepayment in full or partial prepayment results from the application of condemnation proceeds.

Project oversight costs. Reasonable expenses incurred by a nonprofit purchaser in carrying out its ongoing ownership responsibilities under an approved plan of action. Project oversight costs must be directly related to educating the nonprofit purchaser's board of directors or otherwise supporting the board in its decision making. Project oversight costs may include staff, overhead, or third-party contract costs for:

(1) Ensuring adequate and responsible participation by the board of directors and the membership of the nonprofit purchaser in ownership decisions, including ensuring resident input in these decisions;

(2) Facilitating long-range planning by the board of directors to ensure the physical, financial and social viability of the project for the entire time the project is maintained as low income housing; and

(3) Assisting the ownership in complying with regulatory, use, loan and grant agreements.

Regulatory Agreement. The agreement executed by the owner and the Commissioner or a State agency providing for the Commissioner's regulation of the operation of the project.

Reserve for Replacements. The escrow fund established under the regulatory agreement for the purpose of ensuring the availability of funds for needed repair and replacement costs.

Residual Receipt Fund. The fund established under the regulatory agreement for holding cash remaining after deducting from the surplus cash, as defined by the regulatory agreement, the amount of all allowable distributions.

Return on Investment. The amount of allowable distributions, tax benefits, and other income or benefits received by the owner, as a percentage of the equity.

Termination of Low Income Affordability Restrictions. The elimination of low income affordability restrictions under the regulatory agreement through termination of mortgage insurance or prepayment of the mortgage.

Use Agreement. An agreement or covenant which is executed and recorded in the appropriate land records in connection with an approved plan of action, has lien priority over other mortgages and liens, is binding upon the owner and its successors and assigns, is enforceable by the Commissioner and by tenants, contains appropriate reporting requirements, and restricts or governs the use and operation of the project with respect to rent levels and increases, relocation, and, where appropriate, tenant eligibility, civil rights and other requirements. All tenants in occupancy at the time that the plan of action is approved will receive a copy of the use agreement.

Very Low Income Families. Families or persons whose incomes do not exceed the level established for very low income families under section 3(b) of the 1937 Act (42 U.S.C. 1437a(b)).

[55 FR 38952, Sept. 21, 1990. Redesignated at 57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, and amended at 57 FR 57314, Dec. 3, 1992; 58 FR 37816, July 13, 1993; 61 FR 5207, Feb. 9, 1996; 64 FR 26639, May 14, 1999]

§248.203   General prepayment limitation.

(a) An owner of eligible low income housing may prepay, and a mortgagee may accept prepayment of, a mortgage on such housing only in accordance with a plan of action approved by the Commissioner.

(b) A mortgage insurance contract with respect to eligible low income housing may be terminated pursuant to section 229 of the National Housing Act only in accordance with a plan of action approved by the Commissioner.

(c) A mortgagee's acceptance of a prepayment in violation of paragraph (a) or termination of a mortgage insurance contract in violation of paragraph (b) of this section is grounds for administrative action under parts 24 and 25 of this title, in addition to any other remedies available by law, including rescission of the prepayment or reinstatement on the insurance contract.

§248.211   Notice of intent to prepay.

(a) An owner of eligible low-income housing seeking to prepay its mortgage or to negotiate changes in the terms of the mortgage or regulatory agreement in accordance with this part, including termination of the insurance contract pursuant to section 229 of the National Housing Act, shall file a notice of intent with the HUD field office in whose jurisdiction the project is located, and shall file a duplicate copy with the HUD Headquarters Office of Multifamily Housing Management, 451-7th Street, SW., Washington, DC 20410. The notice of intent shall identify the project by name, project number and location, briefly describe the owner's plans for the project, including any timetables or deadlines for actions to be taken, and the reason the owner seeks to prepay the mortgage or change the terms of the mortgage or regulatory agreement, and briefly describe any contacts that the owner has made or is making with other governmental agencies or other interested parties in connection with the notice of intent.

(b) An owner simultaneously shall file the notice of intent with:

(1) The chief executive officer of the appropriate State or local government in which the project is located, or any officer designated by executive order or State or local law to receive such information;

(2) Each tenant in the project; and

(3) The mortgagee.

In addition, the owner shall post a copy of the notice of intent in each occupied building in the project.

(c) Upon receipt of a notice of intent, the Commissioner will provide the owner with information that the owner needs to prepare a plan of action. This information shall include information regarding the Commissioner's standards under §248.221 of this part regarding the approval of a plan of action involving termination of low income affordability restrictions, and any relevant market area and demographic information that the Secretary has custody of and that the owner may use in preparing the plan of action; in addition, it shall include at a minimum a list of the Federal incentives authorized under §248.231 of this part for those projects for which a plan of action involving termination of low income affordability restrictions would not be approvable.

(d) Filing a notice of intent with the Commissioner will lead to one of the following results:

(1) Where the project meets the requirements of §248.221 of this part—

(i) The Commissioner will approve the prepayment or the termination of mortgage insurance pursuant to §248.221 of this part, and all low income affordability restrictions will be terminated with respect to some or all of the units; however, the owner would be responsible for ensuring that displaced current tenants are relocated to affordable housing, if necessary.

(ii) The Commissioner will approve the prepayment or termination of mortgage insurance pursuant to §248.221 of this part, and all low income affordability restrictions will be terminated, except (where necessary because the project is located in a housing market where there is insufficient comparable, decent, safe and sanitary affordable housing to meet the needs of all current tenants) with regard to protection of current very low income, low income and moderate income tenants;

(2) Where the plan of action would not be approvable under §248.221 of this part—

(i) The Commissioner will approve prepayment or the termination of mortgage insurance, but the owner will receive assistance under a State, local or other Federal government housing program, and will receive incentives pursuant to §248.231 of this part from the Federal government in return for agreeing to conditions related to the continued use of the project as low income housing in accordance with §248.233 of this part.

(ii) The Commissioner will not approve prepayment or the termination of mortgage insurance, but will provide incentives to the owner pursuant to §248.231 of this part in accordance with a plan of action meeting the standards of §248.233 of this part;

(iii) The Commissioner will not approve prepayment or the termination of mortgage insurance, but, after failing to reach agreement on a negotiated plan of action, the owner and the Commissioner will agree to a package of incentives and restrictions prescribed by §248.241 of this part; or

(iv) The Commissioner will not approve prepayment or the termination of mortgage insurance, and will not offer incentives of any kind.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2502-0378)

[55 FR 38952, Sept. 21, 1990. Redesignated at 57 FR 12041, Apr. 8, 1992, and amended at 58 FR 37816, July 13, 1993]

§248.213   Plan of action.

(a) Preparation and submission. The owner shall submit the plan of action to the Commissioner in such form and manner as the Commissioner shall prescribe. The owner may submit the plan of action simultaneously to any appropriate State or local government agency, which shall, in reviewing the plan, consult with representatives of the tenants of the housing. An owner shall submit the plan of action to the Commissioner in such form and manner as the Commissioner shall prescribe. The owner shall notify the tenants of the plan of action by posting in each occupied building a summary of the plan of action and by delivery of a copy of the plan of action to the tenant representative, if any. In addition, the summary must indicate that a copy of the plan of action shall be available from the tenant representatives, whose names, addresses and telephone numbers are indicated on the summary, the local HUD field office, and the on-site office for the project, or if one is not available, in the location where rents are collected, for inspection and copying, at a reasonable cost, during normal business hours. Simultaneously with the submission to the Commissioner, the owner shall submit the plan of action to that officer of State or local government to whom the owner submitted a notice of intent under §248.211(b). The summary of the plan of action posted by the owner and the copies of the plan of action submitted to the tenant representative and the officer of State or local government shall all state that, upon request, the tenants and the State or local government, may obtain from the owner or from the local HUD field office a copy of all documentation supporting the plan of action except for that documentation deemed “proprietary information” under §248.101.

(b) Contents. The plan of action shall include:

(1) A description of any proposed changes in the status or terms of the mortgage or regulatory agreement, which may include a request for incentives to extend the low income use of the housing, as authorized under §248.231 of this part; or may include a request to terminate the insurance contract.

(2) A description of any assistance that could be provided by State or local government agencies, as determined by prior consultation between the owner and the agencies;

(3) A description of any proposed changes in the low income affordability restrictions;

(4) A description of any proposed changes in ownership related to the plan of action, prepayment or termination of mortgage insurance;

(5) An assessment of the effect of the proposed changes on existing tenants.

(6) In the case of a plan of action involving incentives, an appraisal using the residential income approach;

(7) In the case of a plan of action involving the termination of low income affordability restrictions, a statement of the effect, if any, of the proposed changes on the supply of housing affordable to low and very low income families in the community within which the housing is located and in the area that the housing could reasonably be expected to serve; and

(8) A market study which demonstrates that the project is located in a market area that would enable the Commissioner to make the findings set forth at §248.221(b)(1); and

(9) A list of any waivers requested by the owner pursuant to §248.7 of this part; and

(10) Any other information which the owner may choose to submit which would enable the owner to meet the criteria for approval of the proposed plan of action.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2502-0378)

[55 FR 38952, Sept. 21, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 57 FR 12041, 12060, Apr. 8, 1992; 58 FR 37816, July 13, 1993]

§248.215   Notification of deficiencies.

Not later than 60 days after receipt of a plan of action, the Commissioner will notify the owner in writing of any deficiencies that prevent the plan of action from being approved. If deficiencies are found, the notice shall describe ways, if any, in which the plan of action could be revised to meet the criteria for approval.

§248.217   Revisions to plan of action.

The owner may from time to time revise the plan of action before its approval as may be necessary to obtain the commissioner's approval thereof. An owner shall submit any revision to the Commissioner, and provide a copy of the revision and all documentation supporting the revision except for that documentation deemed “proprietary information” under §248.101, to the parties, and in the manner, specified in §248.213(a).

[58 FR 37817, July 13, 1993]

§248.218   Tenant notice and opportunity to comment.

When the owner and the Commissioner have reached preliminary agreement on the terms of a plan of action, the Commissioner shall prepare a summary of such terms and the anticipated impact of the plan of action on the current tenants. The owner shall send a copy of the summary to each tenant in the project, and shall post a copy of the summary in each occupied building in the project. The summary shall notify tenants that they have sixty calendar days in which to submit any comments to the Commissioner, who shall take any such comments into account before giving final approval to the plan of action.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2502-0378)

§248.219   Notification of approval.

(a) Not later than 180 days after initial receipt of a plan of action, or within such longer period as the owner requests, the Commissioner shall notify the owner in writing whether the plan of action, including any revisions, is approved.

(b) If approval is withheld, the notice will—

(1) Describe the reasons for withholding approval, including prolonged delay by the owner in submitting a revised plan of action;

(2) Describe the actions that could be taken to meet the criteria for approval; and

(3) Afford the owner a reasonable opportunity to revise the plan of action and seek approval.

§248.221   Approval of a plan of action that involves termination of low income affordability restrictions.

The Commissioner may approve a plan of action that involves termination of the low income affordability restrictions only upon a written finding that—

(a) Implementation of the plan of action will not materially increase economic hardship for current tenants (and will not in any event result in: (1) A monthly rental payment by a current tenant that exceeds 30 percent of the monthly adjusted income of the tenant or an increase in the monthly rental payment in any year that exceeds 10 percent, whichever is lower, or (2) in the case of a current tenant who already pays more than such percentage, an increase in the monthly rental payment in any year that exceeds the increase in the Consumer Price Index or 10 percent, whichever is lower) or involuntarily displace current tenants (except for good cause) where comparable and affordable housing is not readily available, determined without regard to the availability of Federal housing assistance that would address any such hardship or involuntary displacement. Notwithstanding this limitation, the Commissioner may provide housing assistance to tenants if such assistance is not essential to the Commissioner's determination that the requirements of this paragraph have been met. The owner will agree to execute and allow the recordation of use agreements, where such agreements are necessary to safeguard current tenants against such adverse effects. Such use agreements will include a requirement that the owner comply with those provisions of part 247 of this chapter which relate to evictions; and

(b)(1) The supply of vacant, comparable housing is sufficient to ensure that the prepayment will not materially affect—

(i) The availability of decent, safe and sanitary housing affordable to low-income and very low income families in the area that the housing could reasonably be expected to serve;

(ii) The ability of low-income and very low income families to find decent, safe and sanitary housing near employment opportunities; or

(iii) The housing opportunities of minorities in the community within which the housing is located; or

(2) The plan of action has been approved by the appropriate State agency and any appropriate local government agency for the jurisdiction in which the housing is located as being in accordance with a State strategy approved by the Commissioner under §248.223 of this part.

(c) There are no open audit findings, open findings of noncompliance with title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000d); the Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 3601-3619); Executive Order 11063 (3 CFR 1959-1963 comp., p. 652); the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42 U.S.C. 6101-6107); section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794); and all regulations promulgated under such statutes and authorities (including, but not limited to, 24 CFR part 100), or outstanding violations of the regulatory agreement.

(d) Any plan of action approved under this section shall specify actions that the Commissioner and the owner shall take to ensure that tenants displaced as a result of the termination of low income affordability restrictions are relocated to affordable housing.

[55 FR 38952, Sept. 21, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 57 FR 12041, 12060, Apr. 8, 1992]

§248.223   Alternative State strategy.

(a) The Commissioner may approve a State strategy providing for State approval of plans of action that involve termination of low income affordability restrictions only upon finding that it is a practicable statewide strategy that ensures at a minimum that—

(1) Current tenants will not be involuntarily displaced (except for good cause);

(2) Housing opportunities for minorities will not be adversely affected in the communities in which the housing is located;

(3) Any increase in rent for current tenants will be to a level that does not exceed 30 percent of the adjusted income of the tenants or fair market rent, whichever is lower, and any increase not necessitated by increased operating costs shall be phased in equally over not less than 3 years if the increase exceeds 10 percent;

(4) Housing approved under the State strategy will remain affordable to very low income, low income and moderate income families for not less than the remaining term of the mortgage, if the housing is to be made available for rental use, or for not less than 40 years, if the housing is to be made available for homeownership;

(5)(i) Not less than 80 percent of all units in eligible low income housing approved under the State strategy will be retained as affordable to families or persons meeting the income eligibility standards for initial occupancy that applied to housing on January 1, 1987; and

(ii) Not less than 60 percent of the units in any one project will remain available to and affordable by such families or persons, within which not less than 20 percent of the units will remain available to and affordable by very low income families;

(6) Expenditures for rehabilitation, maintenance and operation will be at a level necessary to maintain the housing as decent, safe and sanitary and for the period specified in paragraph (a)(4) of this section;

(7) Not less than 25 percent of new assistance required to maintain the housing as available to and affordable by low income families in accordance with this section shall be provided through State and local actions, such as tax exempt financing, low income tax credits, State or local tax concessions, the provision of funds from housing finance agency reserves or housing trust funds, taxable bonds, and other incentives provided by the State or local governments; and

(8) For each unit of eligible low income housing approved under the State strategy that is not retained as affordable housing to families or persons meeting the income eligibility standards for initial occupancy on January 1, 1987, the State will provide, with State funds, one additional unit of comparable housing in the same market area that is available to and affordable by such families and persons. Such units will be provided by conversion of existing units or construction of new units. These units or funds will be made available before the Commissioner approves the State strategy.

(b) Additional requirements. (1) The State must enter into all agreements necessary to carry out the State strategy before receiving the Commissioner's approval.

(2) Each State strategy shall include any other provision that the Commissioner determines to be necessary to implement the approved State strategy.

§248.231   Incentives to extend low income use.

The Commissioner may agree to provide one or more of the following incentives to induce the project owner to extend the low income use of the project, if the Commissioner determines that such incentives are warranted under the standards in §248.233 of this part:

(a) An increase in the allowable distribution, or other measures to increase the rate of return;

(b) Revisions to the method of calculating equity;

(c) Increased access to residual receipts funds or excess reserve for replacements funds;

(d) Provision of insurance for an equity loan;

(e) An increase in the rents permitted under an existing section 8 contract, within statutory and regulatory limits otherwise applicable, or (subject to the availability of amounts provided in appropriations Acts) additional assistance under section 8 or an extension of any project-based assistance attached to the housing;

(f) Provision of a capital improvement loan;

(g) Other actions to facilitate a transfer or sale of the housing to a qualified nonprofit organization, limited equity tenant cooperative, public agency, or other entity acceptable to the Commissioner, such as expedited review of a request for approval of a transfer of physical assets;

(h) Provision of flexible subsidy assistance;

(i) Termination of HUD's limitations on distributions, and release of residual receipts and reserve for replacements funds, through prepayment of the mortgage; and

(j) Any other incentives for which the owner is eligible.

§248.233   Approval of a plan of action that includes incentives.

The Commissioner may approve a plan of action that includes incentives, whether or not the plan of action allows for the prepayment of the mortgage, only upon a finding that—

(a) After taking into account local market conditions, the incentives are necessary to achieve the purposes of this part;

(b) The incentives are necessary to provide a fair rate of return to the owner. Incentives will only be provided in cases where the project's current use does not represent its highest and best use;

(c) The incentives are the least costly alternative for the Federal government to achieve the purposes of this part with respect to the housing;

(d) Binding commitments have been made to ensure that—

(1) The housing will be retained as housing affordable for very low income families, low-income families, and moderate income families for the remaining term of the mortgage;

(2) Throughout the remaining term of the mortgage, adequate expenditures will be made for the proper maintenance and operation of the housing;

(3) Current tenants will not be involuntarily displaced (except for good cause);

(4) Any increase in rent contributions for current tenants will be to a level that does not exceed 30 percent of the adjusted income of the tenant or the fair market rent, whichever is lower;

(5) Any resulting increase in rents for current tenants (except for increases made necessary by increased operating costs) will be phased in equally over a period of not less than 3 years, if the increase is 30 percent or more, and will be limited to not more than 10 percent per year, if the increase is more than 10 percent but less than 30 percent;

(6) Subject to the availability of funds, the Commissioner shall provide, and the owner shall accept, assistance under section 8 if the Commissioner determines that such assistance is necessary to mitigate any adverse effect of the rent increases on current tenants eligible for section 8 assistance; and

(7) Rents for units becoming available to new tenants will be at levels approved by the Commissioner that will ensure, to the extent practicable, that the units will be available to and affordable, with 30 percent of adjusted income, by the same proportion of very low income families, low-income families, and moderate income families as resided in the housing as of January 1, 1987 (based on the area median income limits established by the Commissioner in February 1987), or the date the plan of action is approved, whichever date results in the highest proportion of very low income families.

(i) For purposes of paragraph (d)(7) of this section—

(A) The percentage of moderate income families in occupancy as of January 1, 1987 shall include families who were admitted to the project as very low income, low income, or moderate income families but whose incomes had increased beyond the limit for moderate income families by January 1, 1987; and

(B) The proportions established shall not prohibit a higher proportion of very low income families from occupying the housing.

(ii) In approving rents under paragraph (d)(7) of this section, the Commissioner will take into account any additional incentives provided under this part and will make provision for annual rent adjustments necessary as a result of future reasonable increases in operating costs.

(e) In cases where the owner agrees to maintain only a portion of the project as low income housing, the incentives provided under §248.231 of this part and the standards imposed under this section shall be adjusted accordingly.

(f) The Commissioner shall not approve a plan of action under this section if there are open findings of noncompliance with title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000d); the Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 3601-3619); Executive Order 11063 (3 CFR 1959-1963 comp., p. 652); the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42 U.S.C. 6101-6107); section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794); and all regulations promulgated under such statutes and authorities, or if there are open audit findings with respect to violations of the regulatory agreement.

[55 FR 38952, Sept. 21, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 57 FR 12041, 12060, Apr. 8, 1992]

§248.234   Section 8 rental assistance.

(a) When providing rental assistance under section 8, the Commissioner may enter into a contract with an owner, contingent upon the future availability of appropriations for the purpose of renewing expiring contracts for rental assistance as provided in appropriations Acts, to extend the term of such rental assistance for such additional period or periods as is necessary to carry out an approved plan of action.

(b) The contract and the approved plan of action shall provide that, if the Commissioner is unable to develop a revised package of incentives providing benefits to the owner comparable to those received under the original approved plan of action, the Commissioner, upon the request of the owner, shall take the following actions (subject to the limitations under the following paragraphs):

(1) Modification of the binding commitments made pursuant to §248.233(d) that are dependent on such rental assistance.

(2) If action under paragraph (b)(1) is not feasible, release of an owner from the binding commitments made pursuant to §248.233(d) that are dependent on such rental assistance.

(3) If actions under paragraphs (b)(1) and (2) would, in the determination of the Commissioner, result in the default of the insured loan, approveal of the revised plan of action, notwithstanding §248.221, that involves the termination of low-income affordability restrictions.

(c) The approved plan of action shall specify actions that the Commissioner and the owner shall take to ensure that any tenants displaced as a result of actions taken under paragraph (b) of this section are relocated to affordable housing.

(d) At least 30 days prior to making a request under the preceding sentence, an owner shall notify the Commissioner of the owner's intention to submit the request. The Commissioner shall have a period of 90 days following receipt of such notice to take action to extend the rental assistance contract and to continue the binding commitments under paragraph (b).

[55 FR 38952, Sept. 21, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 57 FR 12041, 12060, Apr. 8, 1992]

§248.241   Modification of existing regulatory agreements.

(a) If a plan of action is not approved within 300 days after initial submission, the Commissioner may, upon request of the owner and upon making a determination that the project's current use does not represent its highest and best use, modify existing regulatory agreements to—

(1) Prevent involuntary displacement of current tenants (except for good cause);

(2) Ensure that adequate expenditures will be made for maintenance and operation of the housing;

(3) Extend (subject to the availability of funds) any expiring project-based assistance on the housing for the term of the agreement;

(4) Permit an increase in the allowable distribution that could be accommodated by an increase in the rents on occupied units to a level no higher than 30 percent of the adjusted income of the tenants, as determined by the Commissioner, except that rents shall not exceed the fair market rent, and any resulting increase in rents for current tenants shall be phased in equally over a period of no less than 3 years, unless such increase is less than 10 percent; and

(5) Ensure that units becoming vacant during the term of the agreement are made available in accordance with §248.233(d)(7) of this part.

(b) Expiration. Agreements entered into under this section shall expire on February 5, 1992, unless earlier superseded by an agreement implementing a HUD-approved plan of action. Upon such expiration of the agreement on February 5, 1992, the housing covered by the agreement shall be subject to any law then affecting low income affordability restrictions.

§248.251   Consultation with other interested parties.

The Commissioner will confer with any appropriate State or local government agency to confirm any State or local assistance that is available to achieve the purposes of this part and will give consideration to the views of the State or local agency when making the determinations under §§248.221 and 248.233 of this part. The Commissioner also will confer with other interested parties that the Commissioner believes could assist in the development of a plan of action that best achieves the purposes of this part.

§248.261   Agreements implementing plans of action and State strategies.

The Commissioner is authorized to enter into agreements, including those for the provision of incentives, necessary to implement any plan of action or State strategy approved by the Commissioner under this part.

Subpart D—State Preservation Project Assistance

Source: 57 FR 12060, Apr. 8, 1992, unless otherwise noted.

§248.300   General.

Upon application by a State agency or a local public housing agency, the Commissioner may make available assistance for use in preventing the loss of housing affordable for low and moderate income families that is assisted under a State program under the terms of which the owner may prepay a State assisted or subsidized mortgage on such housing.

§248.301   Initial application.

A State agency shall make an initial application to the Commissioner which:

(a) Describes the manner by which the State housing program provides mortgage assistance or subsidy to private mortgagors to provide housing opportunities for low and moderate income families;

(b) Includes copies of the authorizing legislation, any implementing regulations and any administrative guidance provided to owners;

(c) Includes a comprehensive description of the terms and conditions under which a private owner may prepay the assisted or subsidized mortgage without the prior consent of the State agency;

(d) Includes a complete set of pro forma mortgage and/or regulatory documents which evidence an owner's ability to prepay the assisted or subsidized mortgage without the consent of the State agency;

(e) Includes a list of all properties assisted under the State or local housing program whose owners are eligible to prepay the assisted or subsidized mortgages without the consent of the State agency.

§248.303   Approval of a State agency's initial application.

(a) The Commissioner will evaluate the State agency's application and will notify the State agency within 90 days of receipt that the program and properties qualify under subpart D of this part or that the program and properties do not qualify under subpart D of this part.

(b) If the Commissioner determines that the program and projects do not qualify under subpart D of this part, it will state the reasons why the program and properties do not qualify and will give the State agency an opportunity to provide additional information, as the Commissioner determines, which would assist the Commissioner in qualifying the program and properties.

§248.305   Applicability of subpart B of this part.

The provisions of subpart B of this part shall be applicable to any application of a State agency or local housing authority for assistance under subpart D of this part, except the following provisions:

Sec.

248.103   General prepayment limitation.

248.105   Notice of intent.

248.131   Information from the Commissioner: Only paragraph (a).

248.141   Criteria for approval of a plan of action involving prepayment and voluntary termination.

248.153   Incentives to extend low income use: Only paragraphs (a)(7), (d) and (e).

248.165   Assistance for displaced tenants.

248.169   Permissible prepayment or voluntary termination and modification of commitments.

248.173   Resident homeownership program: Only paragraph (s).

248.177   Delegated responsibility to State agencies.

§248.307   Authority to process and approve notices of intent and plans of action.

(a) Delegation of authority. State agencies which regulate or otherwise supervise owners of projects with State assisted or subsidized mortgages shall have the authority, reserved to the Commissioner under subpart B of this part, to process and approve all notices of intent and plans of action submitted to the State agency or local housing authority under subpart D of this part. State agencies may redelegate such authority to local housing authorities at their discretion.

(b) Designation of processing agency. The Executive Director of the State agency whose State assisted or subsidized mortgage program has been approved under §248.303 shall inform all owners of projects with State assisted or subsidized mortgages that the State agency or a designated local housing authority shall accept and process notices of intent and plans of action.

§248.311   Notice of intent.

(a) Eligibility for filing. An owner of a project with a State assisted or subsidized mortgage intending to extend the low income affordability restrictions of the housing in accordance with §248.153 or transfer the housing to a qualified purchaser under §248.157 may file a notice of intent.

(b) Filing with the State agency. The notice of intent shall be filed with the agency specified in §248.307(b) or the agency which regulates or otherwise supervises the State assisted or subsidized mortgage. The notice of intent shall also request the tenants to notify the owner and the State agency of any individual or organization that has been designated or retained by the tenants to represent the tenants with respect to the actions to be taken under subpart B and subpart D of this part.

(c) Filing with HUD, mortgagee and tenants. The owner simultaneously shall file the notice of intent with the local HUD field office having jurisdiction over the area in which the project is located and with the mortgagee, if any. In addition, the owner shall deliver a copy of the notice of intent to each tenant in the project and to any tenant representative, if any, known to the owner, and shall post a copy of the notice of intent in readily accessible locations within each affected building of the project. The copies of the notice of intent delivered to the tenants and the tenant representative shall include a summary of possible outcomes of the filing which shall be furnished by the State agency. Upon the request of any non-English speaking tenants residing in the affected project, the owner shall tabulate the number and type of translations needed by the tenants and request the State agency to provide the appropriate translations. The owner shall deliver a copy of the translated notice of intent to all of the tenants who requested such a translation. The failure of an owner to comply with any non-federal notice requirements shall not invalidate the notice of intent.

§248.315   Preservation agreements.

(a) Agreements required. Owners of projects with State assisted or subsidized mortgages whose plans of action have been approved under §248.307 shall enter into agreements, contracts and/or mortgage modifications with the State agency or local housing authority to maintain the housing as affordable to tenants in accordance with §248.145. Such agreements may provide for the renewal of any assistance made available under §248.319(c).

(b) Term of agreement. Preservation agreements shall be coterminous with the expiration of any assistance provided under §248.153 and made available in accordance with §248.319(c).

§248.319   Application for assistance.

(a) Application for assistance. State agencies or local housing authorities shall submit an application for assistance in a form prescribed by the Commissioner with the local HUD field office having jurisdiction over the project. The application shall include:

(1) A copy of the approved plan of action, including all applicable notices of intent;

(2) A copy of any worksheet or other document which demonstrates the extension and transfer preservation values of the project, the Federal cost limits (including the determination of relevant local market rents if applicable), and the preservation rents;

(3) A request for each incentive required as part of the approved plan of action and the amount thereof;

(4) A demonstration and certification by the Executive Director of the State agency or local housing authority that the assistance and incentives requested as part of the approved plan of action do not exceed the level of incentives required for a similarly situated project which is eligible low income housing as defined in subpart B of this part;

(5) Copies of proposed agreements, contracts and mortgage modifications proposed pursuant to §248.315.

(b) Notification of approval. Not later than 90 days after receipt of the application for assistance, the local HUD field office shall notify the Executive Director of the State agency or local housing authority of the approval or disapproval of the application. If the application is disapproved, the notification shall state the reasons therefor and afford the State agency or local housing authority the opportunity to revise the application to make it approvable.

(c) Funding. After approving the State agency's or local housing authority's application for assistance, the HUD field office shall make the assistance in the approved application available to the State agency or local housing authority within the time frames specified in §248.169.

(d) Agreements. The State agency or local housing authority shall provide the local HUD field office with a copy of all agreements entered into with the owner pursuant to §248.315.

(e) Section 8 contract administration. Any contract for Section 8 assistance made pursuant to the approved plan of action, the State agency's or local housing authority's application for assistance and the regulations at 24 CFR 886, subpart A shall be administered by the State agency or local housing authority pursuant to §886.120 of this title.

Subpart E—Technical Assistance and Capacity Building

Source: 58 FR 37817, July 13, 1993, unless otherwise noted.

§248.401   Purposes.

The purposes of this subpart are:

(a) To promote the ability of residents of eligible low income housing to participate meaningfully in the preservation process established by this part and affect decisions about the future of their housing;

(b) To promote the ability of community-based nonprofit organizations and resident councils to acquire, rehabilitate, and competently own and manage eligible housing as rental or cooperative housing for low and moderate income people; and

(c) To assist the Commissioner in discharging the obligation under §248.157(b) to notify potential qualified purchasers of the availability of projects for sale and to otherwise facilitate the coordination and oversight of the preservation program established under this part.

§248.405   Grants for building resident capacity and funding predevelopment costs.

(a) General. Assistance made available under this subpart shall be used for direct assistance grants to resident organizations and community-based nonprofit housing developers and resident councils to assist the acquisition of specific projects (including payment of reasonable administrative expense to participating intermediaries.) Assistance made available under subpart E of this part will be distributed on a noncompetitive basis. HUD will publish a Notice in the Federal Register announcing the availability of assistance, as well as the application requirements and procedures and selection criteria that HUD will use in making the assistance available.

(b) Allocation. Thirty percent of the assistance made available under this subpart shall be used for resident capacity grants in accordance with paragraph (d) of this section. The remainder shall be used for predevelopment grants in connection with specific projects in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section.

(c) Limitation on grant amounts. A resident capacity grant under paragraph (d) of this section may not exceed $30,000 per project and a grant under paragraph (e) of this section for predevelopment costs may not exceed $200,000 per project, exclusive of any fees paid to a participating intermediary by the Commissioner for administering grants under this subpart.

(d) Resident Capacity grants—(1) Use. Resident capacity grants under paragraph (d) of this section shall be available to eligible applicants to cover expenses for resident outreach, incorporation of a resident organization or council, conducting democratic elections, training, leadership development, legal and other technical assistance to the board of directors, staff and members of the resident organization or council.

(2) Eligible housing. Grants under this paragraph (d) of this section may be provided with respect to eligible low income housing for which the owner has filed a notice of intent under subpart B or subpart C of this part.

(e) Predevelopment grants—(1) Use. Predevelopment grants under paragraph (e) of this section shall be made available to community-based nonprofit housing developers and resident councils to cover the cost of organizing a purchasing entity and pursuing an acquisition, including third party costs for training, development consulting, legal, appraisal, accounting, environmental, architectural and engineering, application fees, and sponsor's staff and overhead costs.

(2) Eligible housing. These grants may only be made available with respect to any eligible low income housing project for which the owner has filed a notice of intent to transfer the housing to a qualified purchaser in accordance with §248.105 or §248.211, or has filed a notice of intent and entered into a binding agreement to sell the housing to a resident organization or nonprofit organization.

(3) Phase-in of grant payments. Grant payments under paragraph (e) of this section shall be made in phases, based on performance benchmarks established by the Commissioner in consultation with intermediaries selected under §248,415.

(f) Grant applications. Grant applications for assistance under paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section shall be received monthly on a rolling basis and approved or rejected on at least a quarterly basis by intermediaries selected under §248.415(b).

(g) Appeal. If an application for assistance under paragraphs (d) or (e) of this section is denied, the applicant shall have the right to appeal the denial to the Commissioner and receive a binding determination within 30 days of the appeal.

§248.410   Grants for other purposes.

The Commissioner may provide grants under this subpart E:

(a) To resident-controlled or community-based nonprofit organizations with experience in resident education and organizing for the purpose of conducting community, city or countywide outreach and training programs to identify and organize residents of eligible low income housing; and

(b) To State and local government agencies and nonprofit intermediaries for the purpose of carrying out such activities as the Commissioner deems appropriate to further the purposes of this part.

§248.415   Delivery of assistance through intermediaries.

(a) General. The Commissioner shall approve and disburse assistance under §248.405 and §248.410 through eligible intermediaries selected by the Commissioner under paragraph (b) of this section. If the Commissioner does not receive an acceptable proposal from an intermediary offering to administer assistance under this section in a given State, the Commissioner shall administer the program in such State directly.

(b) Selection of eligible intermediaries—(1) In General. The Commission shall invite applications from and shall select eligible intermediaries to administer assistance under subpart E of this part through Notices of Funding Availability published in the Federal Register. The process shall include provision for a reasonable administrative fee.

(2) Priority. With respect to all forms of grants available under §248.405, the criteria for selecting eligible intermediaries shall give priority to applications from eligible intermediaries with demonstrated expertise under subpart B or subpart C of this part.

(3) Criteria. The criteria developed under this section shall:

(i) Not assign any preference or priority to applications from eligible intermediaries based on their previous participation in administering or receiving Federal grants or loans (but may exclude applicants who have failed to perform under prior contracts of a similar nature);

(ii) Require an applicant to prepare a proposal that demonstrates adequate staffing, qualifications, prior experience, and a plan for participation; and

(iii) Permit an applicant to serve as the administrator of assistance made available under §248.405(d) and (e), based on the applicant's suitability and interest.

(4) Geographic coverage. The Commissioner may select more than one State or regional intermediary for a single State or region. The number of intermediaries chosen for each State or region may be based on the number of eligible low income housing projects in the State or region, provided there is no duplication of geographic coverage by intermediaries in the administration of the direct assistance grant program.

(5) National nonprofit intermediaries. National nonprofit intermediaries shall be selected to administer the assistance made available under §248.405 only with respect to State or regions for which no other eligible intermediary, acceptable to the Commissioner, has submitted a proposal to participate.

(6) Preference. With respect to assistance made available under §248.410, preference shall be given to eligible regional, State and local intermediaries, over national nonprofit organizations.

(c) Conflicts of interest. Eligible intermediaries selected under paragraph (b) of this section to disburse assistance under §248.405 shall certify that they will serve only as delegated program administrators, charged with the resposibility for reviewing and approving grant applications on behalf of the Commissioner. Selected intermediaries shall:

(1) Establish appropriate procedures for grant administration and fiscal management, pursuant to standards established by the Commissioner; and

(2) Receive a reasonable administrative fee, except that they may not provide other services to grant recipients with respect to projects that are the subject of the grant application and may not receive payment, directly or indirectly, from the proceeds of grants they have approved.

§248.420   Definitions.

Community-based nonprofit housing developer means a nonprofit community development corporation that:

(1) Has been classified by the Internal Revenue Service as an exempt organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986;

(2) Has been in existence for at least two years prior to the date of the grant application;

(3) Has a record of service to low and moderate income people in the community in which the project is located;

(4) Is organized at the neighborhood, city, county, or multi-county level; and

(5) In the case of a corporation acquiring eligible low income housing under subpart B of this part, agrees to form a purchaser entity that conforms to the definition of a community-based nonprofit organization under such subpart and agrees to use its best efforts to secure majority tenant consent to the acquisition of the project for which grant assistance is requested.

Eligible intermediaries. For purposes of this subpart, the term “eligible intermediary” means a State, regional, or national nonprofit organization (including a quasi-public organization) or a State or local housing agency that:

(1) Has as a central purpose the preservation of existing affordable housing and the prevention of displacement;

(2) Does not receive direct Federal appropriations for operating support;

(3) In the case of a national nonprofit organization, has been in existence for at least five years prior to the date of application and has been classified by the Internal Revenue Service as an exempt organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986;

(4) In the case of a regional or State nonprofit organization, has been in existence for at least three years prior to the date of application and has been classified by the Internal Revenue Service as an exempt organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 or is otherwise a tax-exempt entity;

(5) Has a record of service to low income individuals or community-based nonprofit housing development in multiple communities and, with respect to intermediaries administering assistance under §248.405, has experience with the allocation or administration of grant or loan funds; and

(6) Meets standards of fiscal responsibility established by the Commissioner.

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