Home
gpo.gov
govinfo.gov

e-CFR Navigation Aids

Browse

Simple Search

Advanced Search

 — Boolean

 — Proximity

 

Search History

Search Tips

Corrections

Latest Updates

User Info

FAQs

Agency List

Incorporation By Reference

eCFR logo

Related Resources

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

We invite you to try out our new beta eCFR site at https://ecfr.federalregister.gov. We???ve made big changes to make the eCFR easier to use. Be sure to leave feedback using the Help button on the bottom right of each page!

e-CFR data is current as of August 6, 2020

Title 49Subtitle BChapter ISubchapter DPart 195 → Subpart H


Title 49: Transportation
PART 195—TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE


Subpart H—Corrosion Control


Contents
§195.551   What do the regulations in this subpart cover?
§195.553   What special definitions apply to this subpart?
§195.555   What are the qualifications for supervisors?
§195.557   Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control?
§195.559   What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?
§195.561   When must I inspect pipe coating used for external corrosion control?
§195.563   Which pipelines must have cathodic protection?
§195.565   How do I install cathodic protection on breakout tanks?
§195.567   Which pipelines must have test leads and what must I do to install and maintain the leads?
§195.569   Do I have to examine exposed portions of buried pipelines?
§195.571   What criteria must I use to determine the adequacy of cathodic protection?
§195.573   What must I do to monitor external corrosion control?
§195.575   Which facilities must I electrically isolate and what inspections, tests, and safeguards are required?
§195.577   What must I do to alleviate interference currents?
§195.579   What must I do to mitigate internal corrosion?
§195.581   Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?
§195.583   What must I do to monitor atmospheric corrosion control?
§195.585   What must I do to correct corroded pipe?
§195.587   What methods are available to determine the strength of corroded pipe?
§195.588   What standards apply to direct assessment?
§195.589   What corrosion control information do I have to maintain?
§195.591   In-Line inspection of pipelines.

Source: Amdt. 195-73, 66 FR 67004, Dec. 27, 2001, unless otherwise noted.

return arrow Back to Top

§195.551   What do the regulations in this subpart cover?

This subpart prescribes minimum requirements for protecting steel pipelines against corrosion.

return arrow Back to Top

§195.553   What special definitions apply to this subpart?

As used in this subpart—

Active corrosion means continuing corrosion which, unless controlled, could result in a condition that is detrimental to public safety or the environment.

Buried means covered or in contact with soil.

Direct assessment means an integrity assessment method that utilizes a process to evaluate certain threats (i.e., external corrosion, internal corrosion and stress corrosion cracking) to a pipeline segment's integrity. The process includes the gathering and integration of risk factor data, indirect examination or analysis to identify areas of suspected corrosion, direct examination of the pipeline in these areas, and post assessment evaluation.

Electrical survey means a series of closely spaced pipe-to-soil readings over a pipeline that are subsequently analyzed to identify locations where a corrosive current is leaving the pipeline.

External corrosion direct assessment (ECDA) means a four-step process that combines pre-assessment, indirect inspection, direct examination, and post-assessment to evaluate the threat of external corrosion to the integrity of a pipeline.

Pipeline environment includes soil resistivity (high or low), soil moisture (wet or dry), soil contaminants that may promote corrosive activity, and other known conditions that could affect the probability of active corrosion.

You means operator.

[Amdt. 195-73, 66 FR 67004, Dec. 27, 2001, as amended by Amdt. 195-85, 70 FR 61576, Oct. 25, 2005]

return arrow Back to Top

§195.555   What are the qualifications for supervisors?

You must require and verify that supervisors maintain a thorough knowledge of that portion of the corrosion control procedures established under §195.402(c)(3) for which they are responsible for insuring compliance.

return arrow Back to Top

§195.557   Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control?

Except bottoms of aboveground breakout tanks, each buried or submerged pipeline must have an external coating for external corrosion control if the pipeline is—

(a) Constructed, relocated, replaced, or otherwise changed after the applicable date in §195.401(c), not including the movement of pipe covered by §195.424; or

(b) Converted under §195.5 and—

(1) Has an external coating that substantially meets §195.559 before the pipeline is placed in service; or

(2) Is a segment that is relocated, replaced, or substantially altered.

return arrow Back to Top

§195.559   What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

Coating material for external corrosion control under §195.557 must—

(a) Be designed to mitigate corrosion of the buried or submerged pipeline;

(b) Have sufficient adhesion to the metal surface to prevent under film migration of moisture;

(c) Be sufficiently ductile to resist cracking;

(d) Have enough strength to resist damage due to handling and soil stress;

(e) Support any supplemental cathodic protection; and

(f) If the coating is an insulating type, have low moisture absorption and provide high electrical resistance.

return arrow Back to Top

§195.561   When must I inspect pipe coating used for external corrosion control?

(a) You must inspect all external pipe coating required by §195.557 just prior to lowering the pipe into the ditch or submerging the pipe.

(b) You must repair any coating damage discovered.

return arrow Back to Top

§195.563   Which pipelines must have cathodic protection?

(a) Each buried or submerged pipeline that is constructed, relocated, replaced, or otherwise changed after the applicable date in §195.401(c) must have cathodic protection. The cathodic protection must be in operation not later than 1 year after the pipeline is constructed, relocated, replaced, or otherwise changed, as applicable.

(b) Each buried or submerged pipeline converted under §195.5 must have cathodic protection if the pipeline—

(1) Has cathodic protection that substantially meets §195.571 before the pipeline is placed in service; or

(2) Is a segment that is relocated, replaced, or substantially altered.

(c) All other buried or submerged pipelines that have an effective external coating must have cathodic protection.1 Except as provided by paragraph (d) of this section, this requirement does not apply to breakout tanks and does not apply to buried piping in breakout tank areas and pumping stations until December 29, 2003.

1A pipeline does not have an effective external coating material if the current required to cathodically protect the pipeline is substantially the same as if the pipeline were bare.

(d) Bare pipelines, breakout tank areas, and buried pumping station piping must have cathodic protection in places where regulations in effect before January 28, 2002 required cathodic protection as a result of electrical inspections. See previous editions of this part in 49 CFR, parts 186 to 199.

(e) Unprotected pipe must have cathodic protection if required by §195.573(b).

return arrow Back to Top

§195.565   How do I install cathodic protection on breakout tanks?

After October 2, 2000, when you install cathodic protection under §195.563(a) to protect the bottom of an aboveground breakout tank of more than 500 barrels 79.49m3 capacity built to API Spec 12F (incorporated by reference, see §195.3), API Std 620 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3), API Std 650 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3), or API Std 650's predecessor, Standard 12C, you must install the system in accordance with ANSI/API RP 651 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3). However, you don't need to comply with ANSI/API RP 651 when installing any tank for which you note in the corrosion control procedures established under §195.402(c)(3) why complying with all or certain provisions of ANSI/API RP 651 is not necessary for the safety of the tank.

[Amdt. 195-99, 80 FR 188, Jan. 5, 2015]

return arrow Back to Top

§195.567   Which pipelines must have test leads and what must I do to install and maintain the leads?

(a) General. Except for offshore pipelines, each buried or submerged pipeline or segment of pipeline under cathodic protection required by this subpart must have electrical test leads for external corrosion control. However, this requirement does not apply until December 27, 2004 to pipelines or pipeline segments on which test leads were not required by regulations in effect before January 28, 2002.

(b) Installation. You must install test leads as follows:

(1) Locate the leads at intervals frequent enough to obtain electrical measurements indicating the adequacy of cathodic protection.

(2) Provide enough looping or slack so backfilling will not unduly stress or break the lead and the lead will otherwise remain mechanically secure and electrically conductive.

(3) Prevent lead attachments from causing stress concentrations on pipe.

(4) For leads installed in conduits, suitably insulate the lead from the conduit.

(5) At the connection to the pipeline, coat each bared test lead wire and bared metallic area with an electrical insulating material compatible with the pipe coating and the insulation on the wire.

(c) Maintenance. You must maintain the test lead wires in a condition that enables you to obtain electrical measurements to determine whether cathodic protection complies with §195.571.

return arrow Back to Top

§195.569   Do I have to examine exposed portions of buried pipelines?

Whenever you have knowledge that any portion of a buried pipeline is exposed, you must examine the exposed portion for evidence of external corrosion if the pipe is bare, or if the coating is deteriorated. If you find external corrosion requiring corrective action under §195.585, you must investigate circumferentially and longitudinally beyond the exposed portion (by visual examination, indirect method, or both) to determine whether additional corrosion requiring remedial action exists in the vicinity of the exposed portion.

return arrow Back to Top

§195.571   What criteria must I use to determine the adequacy of cathodic protection?

Cathodic protection required by this subpart must comply with one or more of the applicable criteria and other considerations for cathodic protection contained paragraphs 6.2.2, 6.2.3, 6.2.4, 6.2.5 and 6.3 in NACE SP 0169 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3).

[Amdt. 195-100, 80 FR 12781, Mar. 11, 2015]

return arrow Back to Top

§195.573   What must I do to monitor external corrosion control?

(a) Protected pipelines. You must do the following to determine whether cathodic protection required by this subpart complies with §195.571:

(1) Conduct tests on the protected pipeline at least once each calendar year, but with intervals not exceeding 15 months. However, if tests at those intervals are impractical for separately protected short sections of bare or ineffectively coated pipelines, testing may be done at least once every 3 calendar years, but with intervals not exceeding 39 months.

(2) Identify not more than 2 years after cathodic protection is installed, the circumstances in which a close-interval survey or comparable technology is practicable and necessary to accomplish the objectives of paragraph 10.1.1.3 of NACE SP 0169 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3).

(b) Unprotected pipe. You must reevaluate your unprotected buried or submerged pipe and cathodically protect the pipe in areas in which active corrosion is found, as follows:

(1) Determine the areas of active corrosion by electrical survey, or where an electrical survey is impractical, by other means that include review and analysis of leak repair and inspection records, corrosion monitoring records, exposed pipe inspection records, and the pipeline environment.

(2) For the period in the first column, the second column prescribes the frequency of evaluation.

Period Evaluation frequency
Before December 29, 2003At least once every 5 calendar years, but with intervals not exceeding 63 months.
Beginning December 29, 2003At least once every 3 calendar years, but with intervals not exceeding 39 months.

(c) Rectifiers and other devices. You must electrically check for proper performance each device in the first column at the frequency stated in the second column.

Device Check frequency
RectifierAt least six times each calendar year, but with intervals not exceeding 212 months.
Reverse current switch
Diode
Interference bond whose failure would jeopardize structural protection
Other interference bondAt least once each calendar year, but with intervals not exceeding 15 months.

(d) Breakout tanks. You must inspect each cathodic protection system used to control corrosion on the bottom of an aboveground breakout tank to ensure that operation and maintenance of the system are in accordance with API RP 651 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3). However, this inspection is not required if you note in the corrosion control procedures established under §195.402(c)(3) why complying with all or certain operation and maintenance provisions of API RP 651 is not necessary for the safety of the tank.

(e) Corrective action. You must correct any identified deficiency in corrosion control as required by §195.401(b). However, if the deficiency involves a pipeline in an integrity management program under §195.452, you must correct the deficiency as required by §195.452(h).

[Amdt. 195-73, 66 FR 67004, Dec. 27, 2001; 67 FR 70118, Nov. 20, 2002, as amended by Amdt. 195-86, 71 FR 33411, June 9, 2006; Amdt. 195-94, 75 FR 48607, Aug. 11, 2010; Amdt. 195-99, 80 FR 188, Jan. 5, 2015]

return arrow Back to Top

§195.575   Which facilities must I electrically isolate and what inspections, tests, and safeguards are required?

(a) You must electrically isolate each buried or submerged pipeline from other metallic structures, unless you electrically interconnect and cathodically protect the pipeline and the other structures as a single unit.

(b) You must install one or more insulating devices where electrical isolation of a portion of a pipeline is necessary to facilitate the application of corrosion control.

(c) You must inspect and electrically test each electrical isolation to assure the isolation is adequate.

(d) If you install an insulating device in an area where a combustible atmosphere is reasonable to foresee, you must take precautions to prevent arcing.

(e) If a pipeline is in close proximity to electrical transmission tower footings, ground cables, or counterpoise, or in other areas where it is reasonable to foresee fault currents or an unusual risk of lightning, you must protect the pipeline against damage from fault currents or lightning and take protective measures at insulating devices.

return arrow Back to Top

§195.577   What must I do to alleviate interference currents?

(a) For pipelines exposed to stray currents, you must have a program to identify, test for, and minimize the detrimental effects of such currents.

(b) You must design and install each impressed current or galvanic anode system to minimize any adverse effects on existing adjacent metallic structures.

return arrow Back to Top

§195.579   What must I do to mitigate internal corrosion?

(a) General. If you transport any hazardous liquid or carbon dioxide that would corrode the pipeline, you must investigate the corrosive effect of the hazardous liquid or carbon dioxide on the pipeline and take adequate steps to mitigate internal corrosion.

(b) Inhibitors. If you use corrosion inhibitors to mitigate internal corrosion, you must—

(1) Use inhibitors in sufficient quantity to protect the entire part of the pipeline system that the inhibitors are designed to protect;

(2) Use coupons or other monitoring equipment to determine the effectiveness of the inhibitors in mitigating internal corrosion; and

(3) Examine the coupons or other monitoring equipment at least twice each calendar year, but with intervals not exceeding 712 months.

(c) Removing pipe. Whenever you remove pipe from a pipeline, you must inspect the internal surface of the pipe for evidence of corrosion. If you find internal corrosion requiring corrective action under §195.585, you must investigate circumferentially and longitudinally beyond the removed pipe (by visual examination, indirect method, or both) to determine whether additional corrosion requiring remedial action exists in the vicinity of the removed pipe.

(d) Breakout tanks. After October 2, 2000, when you install a tank bottom lining in an aboveground breakout tank built to API Spec 12F (incorporated by reference, see §195.3), API Std 620 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3), API Std 650 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3), or API Std 650's predecessor, Standard 12C, you must install the lining in accordance with API RP 652 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3). However, you don't need to comply with API RP 652 when installing any tank for which you note in the corrosion control procedures established under §195.402(c)(3) why compliance with all or certain provisions of API RP 652 is not necessary for the safety of the tank.

[Amdt. 195-73, 66 FR 67004, Dec. 27, 2001, as amended by Amdt. 195-99, 80 FR 188, Jan. 5, 2015]

return arrow Back to Top

§195.581   Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

(a) You must clean and coat each pipeline or portion of pipeline that is exposed to the atmosphere, except pipelines under paragraph (c) of this section.

(b) Coating material must be suitable for the prevention of atmospheric corrosion.

(c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones or soil-to-air interfaces, you need not protect against atmospheric corrosion any pipeline for which you demonstrate by test, investigation, or experience appropriate to the environment of the pipeline that corrosion will—

(1) Only be a light surface oxide; or

(2) Not affect the safe operation of the pipeline before the next scheduled inspection.

return arrow Back to Top

§195.583   What must I do to monitor atmospheric corrosion control?

(a) You must inspect each pipeline or portion of pipeline that is exposed to the atmosphere for evidence of atmospheric corrosion, as follows:

If the pipeline is
located:
Then the frequency of inspection is:
OnshoreAt least once every 3 calendar years, but with intervals not exceeding 39 months.
OffshoreAt least once each calendar year, but with intervals not exceeding 15 months.

(b) During inspections you must give particular attention to pipe at soil-to-air interfaces, under thermal insulation, under disbonded coatings, at pipe supports, in splash zones, at deck penetrations, and in spans over water.

(c) If you find atmospheric corrosion during an inspection, you must provide protection against the corrosion as required by §195.581.

return arrow Back to Top

§195.585   What must I do to correct corroded pipe?

(a) General corrosion. If you find pipe so generally corroded that the remaining wall thickness is less than that required for the maximum operating pressure of the pipeline, you must replace the pipe. However, you need not replace the pipe if you—

(1) Reduce the maximum operating pressure commensurate with the strength of the pipe needed for serviceability based on actual remaining wall thickness; or

(2) Repair the pipe by a method that reliable engineering tests and analyses show can permanently restore the serviceability of the pipe.

(b) Localized corrosion pitting. If you find pipe that has localized corrosion pitting to a degree that leakage might result, you must replace or repair the pipe, unless you reduce the maximum operating pressure commensurate with the strength of the pipe based on actual remaining wall thickness in the pits.

return arrow Back to Top

§195.587   What methods are available to determine the strength of corroded pipe?

Under §195.585, you may use the procedure in ASME/ANSI B31G (incorporated by reference, see §195.3) or in PRCI PR-3-805 (R-STRENG) (incorporated by reference, see §195.3) to determine the strength of corroded pipe based on actual remaining wall thickness. These procedures apply to corroded regions that do not penetrate the pipe wall, subject to the limitations set out in the respective procedures.

[Amdt. 195-99, 80 FR 188, Jan. 5, 2015]

return arrow Back to Top

§195.588   What standards apply to direct assessment?

(a) If you use direct assessment on an onshore pipeline to evaluate the effects of external corrosion or stress corrosion cracking, you must follow the requirements of this section. This section does not apply to methods associated with direct assessment, such as close interval surveys, voltage gradient surveys, or examination of exposed pipelines, when used separately from the direct assessment process.

(b) The requirements for performing external corrosion direct assessment are as follows:

(1) General. You must follow the requirements of NACE SP0502 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3). Also, you must develop and implement a External Corrosion Direct Assessment (ECDA) plan that includes procedures addressing pre-assessment, indirect examination, direct examination, and post-assessment.

(2) Pre-assessment. In addition to the requirements in Section 3 of NACE SP0502 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3), the ECDA plan procedures for pre-assessment must include—

(i) Provisions for applying more restrictive criteria when conducting ECDA for the first time on a pipeline segment;

(ii) The basis on which you select at least two different, but complementary, indirect assessment tools to assess each ECDA region; and

(iii) If you utilize an indirect inspection method not described in Appendix A of NACE SP0502 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3), you must demonstrate the applicability, validation basis, equipment used, application procedure, and utilization of data for the inspection method.

(3) Indirect examination. In addition to the requirements in Section 4 of NACE SP0502 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3), the procedures for indirect examination of the ECDA regions must include—

(i) Provisions for applying more restrictive criteria when conducting ECDA for the first time on a pipeline segment;

(ii) Criteria for identifying and documenting those indications that must be considered for excavation and direct examination, including at least the following:

(A) The known sensitivities of assessment tools;

(B) The procedures for using each tool; and

(C) The approach to be used for decreasing the physical spacing of indirect assessment tool readings when the presence of a defect is suspected;

(iii) For each indication identified during the indirect examination, criteria for—

(A) Defining the urgency of excavation and direct examination of the indication; and

(B) Defining the excavation urgency as immediate, scheduled, or monitored; and

(iv) Criteria for scheduling excavations of indications in each urgency level.

(4) Direct examination. In addition to the requirements in Section 5 of NACE SP0502 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3), the procedures for direct examination of indications from the indirect examination must include—

(i) Provisions for applying more restrictive criteria when conducting ECDA for the first time on a pipeline segment;

(ii) Criteria for deciding what action should be taken if either:

(A) Corrosion defects are discovered that exceed allowable limits (Section 5.5.2.2 of NACE SP0502 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3) provides guidance for criteria); or

(B) Root cause analysis reveals conditions for which ECDA is not suitable (Section 5.6.2 of NACE SP0502 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3) provides guidance for criteria);

(iii) Criteria and notification procedures for any changes in the ECDA plan, including changes that affect the severity classification, the priority of direct examination, and the time frame for direct examination of indications; and

(iv) Criteria that describe how and on what basis you will reclassify and re-prioritize any of the provisions specified in Section 5.9 of NACE SP0502 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3).

(5) Post assessment and continuing evaluation. In addition to the requirements in Section 6 of NACE SP 0502 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3), the procedures for post assessment of the effectiveness of the ECDA process must include—

(i) Measures for evaluating the long-term effectiveness of ECDA in addressing external corrosion in pipeline segments; and

(ii) Criteria for evaluating whether conditions discovered by direct examination of indications in each ECDA region indicate a need for reassessment of the pipeline segment at an interval less than that specified in Sections 6.2 and 6.3 of NACE SP0502 (see appendix D of NACE SP0502) (incorporated by reference, see §195.3).

(c) If you use direct assessment on an onshore pipeline to evaluate the effects of stress corrosion cracking, you must develop and follow a Stress Corrosion Cracking Direct Assessment plan that meets all requirements and recommendations of NACE SP0204-2008 (incorporated by reference, see §195.3) and that implements all four steps of the Stress Corrosion Cracking Direct Assessment process including pre-assessment, indirect inspection, detailed examination and post-assessment. As specified in NACE SP0204-2008, Section 1.1.7, Stress Corrosion Cracking Direct Assessment is complementary with other inspection methods such as in-line inspection or hydrostatic testing and is not necessarily an alternative or replacement for these methods in all instances. In addition, the plan must provide for—

(1) Data gathering and integration. An operator's plan must provide for a systematic process to collect and evaluate data to identify whether the conditions for stress corrosion cracking are present and to prioritize the segments for assessment in accordance with NACE SP0204-2008, Sections 3 and 4, and Table 1. This process must also include gathering and evaluating data related to SCC at all sites an operator excavates during the conduct of its pipeline operations (both within and outside covered segments) where the criteria in NACE SP0204-2008 indicate the potential for Stress Corrosion Cracking Direct Assessment. This data gathering process must be conducted in accordance with NACE SP0204-2008, Section 5.3, and must include, at a minimum, all data listed in NACE SP0204-2008, Table 2. Further, an operator must analyze the following factors as part of this evaluation:

(i) The effects of a carbonate-bicarbonate environment, including the implications of any factors that promote the production of a carbonate-bicarbonate environment such as soil temperature, moisture, factors that affect the rate of carbon dioxide generation, and/or cathodic protection.

(ii) The effects of cyclic loading conditions on the susceptibility and propagation of SCC in both high-pH and near-neutral-pH environments.

(iii) The effects of variations in applied cathodic protection such as overprotection, cathodic protection loss for extended periods, and high negative potentials.

(iv) The effects of coatings that shield cathodic protection when disbonded from the pipe.

(v) Other factors that affect the mechanistic properties associated with SCC including but not limited to operating pressures, high tensile residual stresses, and the presence of sulfides.

(2) Indirect inspection. In addition to the requirements and recommendations of NACE SP0204-2008, Section 4, the plan's procedures for indirect inspection must include provisions for conducting at least two different, but complementary, indirect assessment electrical surveys, and the basis on the selections as the most appropriate for the pipeline segment based on the data gathering and integration step.

(3) Direct examination. In addition to the requirements and recommendations of NACE SP0204-2008, Section 5, the plan's procedures for direct examination must provide for conducting a minimum of four direct examinations within the SCC segment at locations determined to be the most likely for SCC to occur.

(4) Remediation and mitigation. If any indication of SCC is discovered in a segment, an operator must mitigate the threat in accordance with one of the following applicable methods:

(i) Non-significant SCC, as defined by NACE SP0204-2008, may be mitigated by either hydrostatic testing in accordance with paragraph (b)(4)(ii) of this section, or by grinding out with verification by Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) methods that the SCC defect is removed and repairing the pipe. If grinding is used for repair, the remaining strength of the pipe at the repair location must be determined using ASME/ANSI B31G or RSTRENG (incorporated by reference, see §195.3) and must be sufficient to meet the design requirements of subpart C of this part.

(ii) Significant SCC must be mitigated using a hydrostatic testing program with a minimum test pressure between 100% up to 110% of the specified minimum yield strength for a 30-minute spike test immediately followed by a pressure test in accordance with subpart E of this part. The test pressure for the entire sequence must be continuously maintained for at least 8 hours, in accordance with subpart E of this part. Any test failures due to SCC must be repaired by replacement of the pipe segment, and the segment retested until the pipe passes the complete test without leakage. Pipe segments that have SCC present, but that pass the pressure test, may be repaired by grinding in accordance with paragraph (c)(4)(i) of this section.

(5) Post assessment. In addition to the requirements and recommendations of NACE SP0204-2008, sections 6.3, periodic reassessment, and 6.4, effectiveness of Stress Corrosion Cracking Direct Assessment, the plan's procedures for post assessment must include development of a reassessment plan based on the susceptibility of the operator's pipe to Stress Corrosion Cracking as well as on the behavior mechanism of identified cracking. Factors to be considered include, but are not limited to:

(i) Evaluation of discovered crack clusters during the direct examination step in accordance with NACE SP0204-2008, sections 5.3.5.7, 5.4, and 5.5;

(ii) Conditions conducive to creation of the carbonate-bicarbonate environment;

(iii) Conditions in the application (or loss) of cathodic protection that can create or exacerbate SCC;

(iv) Operating temperature and pressure conditions;

(v) Cyclic loading conditions;

(vi) Conditions that influence crack initiation and growth rates;

(vii) The effects of interacting crack clusters;

(viii) The presence of sulfides; and

(ix) Disbonded coatings that shield CP from the pipe.

[Amdt. 195-85, 70 FR 61576, Oct. 25, 2005, as amended by Amdt. 195-94, 75 FR 48607, Aug. 11, 2010; Amdt. 195-101, 82 FR 8000, Jan. 23, 2017]

return arrow Back to Top

§195.589   What corrosion control information do I have to maintain?

(a) You must maintain current records or maps to show the location of—

(1) Cathodically protected pipelines;

(2) Cathodic protection facilities, including galvanic anodes, installed after January 28, 2002; and

(3) Neighboring structures bonded to cathodic protection systems.

(b) Records or maps showing a stated number of anodes, installed in a stated manner or spacing, need not show specific distances to each buried anode.

(c) You must maintain a record of each analysis, check, demonstration, examination, inspection, investigation, review, survey, and test required by this subpart in sufficient detail to demonstrate the adequacy of corrosion control measures or that corrosion requiring control measures does not exist. You must retain these records for at least 5 years, except that records related to §§195.569, 195.573(a) and (b), and 195.579(b)(3) and (c) must be retained for as long as the pipeline remains in service.

return arrow Back to Top

§195.591   In-Line inspection of pipelines.

When conducting in-line inspection of pipelines required by this part, each operator must comply with the requirements and recommendations of API Std 1163, Inline Inspection Systems Qualification Standard; ANSI/ASNT ILI-PQ, Inline Inspection Personnel Qualification and Certification; and NACE SP0102-2010, Inline Inspection of Pipelines (incorporated by reference, see §195.3). An in-line inspection may also be conducted using tethered or remote control tools provided they generally comply with those sections of NACE SP0102-2010 that are applicable.

[Amdt. 195-101, 82 FR 8000, Jan. 23, 2017]

return arrow Back to Top

Need assistance?