Home
gpo.gov
govinfo.gov

e-CFR Navigation Aids

Browse

Simple Search

Advanced Search

 — Boolean

 — Proximity

 

Search History

Search Tips

Corrections

Latest Updates

User Info

FAQs

Agency List

Incorporation By Reference

eCFR logo

Related Resources

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

We invite you to try out our new beta eCFR site at https://ecfr.federalregister.gov. We have made big changes to make the eCFR easier to use. Be sure to leave feedback using the Feedback button on the bottom right of each page!

e-CFR data is current as of December 1, 2020

Title 36Chapter IIPart 228 → Subpart C


Title 36: Parks, Forests, and Public Property
PART 228—MINERALS


Subpart C—Disposal of Mineral Materials


Contents
§228.40   Authority.
§228.41   Scope.
§228.42   Definitions.
§228.43   Policy governing disposal.
§228.44   Disposal on existing Federal leased areas.
§228.45   Qualifications of applicants.
§228.46   Application of other laws and regulations.

General Provisions

§228.47   General terms and conditions of contracts and permits.
§228.48   Appraisal and measurement.
§228.49   Reappraisal.
§228.50   Production records.
§228.51   Bonding.
§228.52   Assignments.
§228.53   Term.
§228.54   Single entry sales or permits.
§228.55   Cancellation or suspension.
§228.56   Operating plans.

Types and Methods of Disposal

§228.57   Types of disposal.
§228.58   Competitive sales.
§228.59   Negotiated or noncompetitive sales.
§228.60   Prospecting permits.
§228.61   Preference right negotiated sales.
§228.62   Free use.
§228.63   Removal under terms of a timber sale or other Forest Service contract.
§228.64   Community sites and common-use areas.
§228.65   Payment for sales.
§228.66   Refunds.
§228.67   Information collection requirements.

Source: 49 FR 29784, July 24, 1984, unless otherwise noted.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.40   Authority.

Authority for the disposal of mineral materials is provided by the Materials Act of July 31, 1947 (30 U.S.C. 601 et seq.), as amended by the Acts of August 31, 1950 (30 U.S.C. 603-604), July 23, 1955 (30 U.S.C. 601, 603), and September 25, 1962 (30 U.S.C. 602), and by the following: the Act of June 4, 1897 (16 U.S.C. 477); the Act of March 4, 1917 (16 U.S.C. 520); the Bankhead-Jones Farm Tenant Act of July 22, 1937 (7 U.S.C. 1010); the Act of September 1, 1949 (section 3) (30 U.S.C. 192c); the Act of June 30, 1950 (16 U.S.C. 508b); the Act of June 28, 1952 (section 3) (66 Stat. 285); the Act of September 2, 1958 (16 U.S.C. 521a); the Act of June 11, 1960 (74 Stat. 205); the Federal Highway Act of August 27, 1958 (23 U.S.C. 101 et seq.); and the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of December 2, 1980 (section 502) (16 U.S.C. 539a).

return arrow Back to Top

§228.41   Scope.

(a) Lands to which this subpart applies. This subpart applies to all National Forest System lands reserved from the public domain of the United States, including public domain lands being administered under the Bankhead-Jones Farm Tenant Act of July 22, 1937 (7 U.S.C. 1010); to all National Forest System lands acquired pursuant to the Weeks Act of March 1, 1911 (36 Stat. 961); to all National Forest System lands with Weeks Act status as provided in the Act of September 2, 1958 (16 U.S.C. 521a); and to public lands within the Copper River addition to the Chugach National Forest (16 U.S.C. 539a). For ease of reference and convenience to the reader, these lands are referred to, throughout this subpart, as National Forest lands.

(b) Restrictions. Disposal of mineral materials from the following National Forest lands is subject to certain restrictions as described below:

(1) Segregation or withdrawals in aid of other agencies. Disposal of mineral materials from lands segregated or withdrawn in aid of a function of another Federal agency, State, territory, county, municipality, water district, or other governmental subdivision or agency may be made only with the written consent of the governmental entity.

(2) Segregated or withdrawn National Forest lands. Mineral materials may not be removed from segregated or withdrawn lands where removal is specifically prohibited by statute or by public land order. Where not specifically prohibited, removal of mineral materials may be allowed if the authorized officer determines that the removal is not detrimental to the values for which the segregation or withdrawal was made, except as provided in paragraph (b)(1) of this section. Where operations have been established prior to the effective date of this Subpart and where not prohibited by statute, they may be permitted to continue. Nothing in this subparagraph is intended to prohibit the exercise of valid existing rights.

(3) Unpatented mining claims. Provided that claimants are given prior notice and it has been determined that removal will neither endanger nor materially interfere with prospecting, mining, or processing operations or uses reasonably incident thereto on the claims, disposal of mineral materials may be allowed from:

(i) Unpatented mining claims located after July 23, 1955; and/or

(ii) Unpatented mining claims located before July 23, 1955, and on which the United States has established the right to manage the vegetative and other surface resources in accordance with the Multiple Use Mining Act of July 23, 1955 (30 U.S.C. 601, 603, 611-615).

(4) Acquired Bankhead-Jones lands. Mineral materials on lands which were acquired under the authority of the Bankhead-Jones Farm Tenant Act of July 22, 1937 (7 U.S.C. 1010-1012), and which lie outside the exterior boundaries of National Forests, or on acquired lands which are being administered under the Act and which also lie outside the exterior boundaries of National Forests, may be disposed of under these regulations only to public authorities and agencies, and only on condition that the mineral materials are used for public purposes (7 U.S.C. 1011(c)).

(c) Mineral materials to which this subpart applies. This subpart applies to mineral materials which consist of petrified wood and common varieties of sand, gravel, stone, pumice, pumicite, cinders, clay, and other similar materials. Such mineral materials include deposits which, although they have economic value, are used for agriculture, animal husbandry, building, abrasion, construction, landscaping, and similar uses. This subpart also applies to other materials which may not be minerals but are produced using mining methods, such as peat. The categories of these materials, including representative examples, are:

(1) Agricultural supply and animal husbandry materials. This category includes, but is not limited to, minerals and vegetative materials used as or for: Soil conditioners or amendments applied to physically alter soil properties such as direct applications to the soil of carbonate rocks, soil containing “trace elements” and peat; animal feed supplements; and other animal care products.

(2) Building materials. Except for minerals identified as Uncommon Varieties, this category includes, but is not limited to, minerals used as or for: Paint fillers or extenders; flagstone, ashlar, rubble, mortar, brick, tile, pipe, pottery, earthenware, stoneware, terrazzo, and other nonstructural components in floors, walls, roofs, fireplaces, and the like; and similar building uses.

(3) Abrasive materials. This category includes, but is not limited to, minerals used for: Filing; scouring; polishing; sanding; and sandblasting.

(4) Construction materials. This category includes, but is not limited to, minerals such as sand, gravel, clay, crushed rock and cinders used as or for fill; borrow; rip-rap; ballast (including all ballast for railroad use); road base; road surfacing; concrete aggregate; clay sealants; and similar construction uses.

(5) Landscaping materials: This category includes, but is not limited to minerals and peat used as or for: Chips, granules, sand, pebbles, scoria, cinders, cobbles, boulders, slabs, and other components in retaining walls, walkways, patios, yards, gardens, and the like; and similar landscaping uses.

(d) Minerals not covered by this subpart. Mineral materials do not include any mineral used in manufacturing, industrial processing, or chemical operations for which no other mineral can be substituted due to unique properties giving the particular mineral a distinct and special value; nor do they include block pumice which in nature occurs in pieces having one dimension of two inches or more which is valuable and used for some application that requires such dimensions. Disposal of minerals not covered by this subpart is subject to the terms of the United States Mining Laws, as amended (30 U.S.C. 22 et seq.), on those portions of the National Forest System where those laws apply. Such minerals may include:

(1) Mineral suitable and used as soil amendment because of a constituent element other than calcium or magnesium carbonate that chemically alters the soil;

(2) Limestone suitable and used, without substantial admixtures, for cement manufacture, metallurgy, production of quicklime, sugar refining, whiting, fillers, paper manufacture, and desulfurization of stack gases;

(3) Silica suitable and used for glass manufacture, production of metallic silicon, flux, and rock wool;

(4) Alumino-silicates or clays having exceptional qualities suitable and used for production of aluminum, ceramics, drilling mud, taconite binder, foundry castings, and other purposes for which common clays cannot be used;

(5) Gypsum suitable and used for wallboard, plaster, or cement.

(6) Block pumice which occurs in nature in pieces having one dimension of two inches or more and which is valuable and used for some application that requires such dimensions; and

(7) Stone recognized through marketing factors for its special and distinct properties of strength and durability making it suitable for structural support and used for that purpose.

(e) Limitations on applicability. (1) The provisions of paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section shall not apply to any mining claims for which a Mineral Entry Final Certificate was issued on or before January 16, 1991. Nor shall these provisions apply to any mining claim located on or before July 23, 1955, which has satisfied the marketability test for locatable minerals from on or before July 23, 1955, until the present date.

(2) A use which qualifies a mineral as an uncommon variety under paragraph (d) overrides classification of that mineral as a common variety under paragraph (c) of this section.

[49 FR 29784, July 24, 1984, as amended at 55 FR 51706, Dec. 17, 1990]

return arrow Back to Top

§228.42   Definitions.

For the purposes of this subject, the following terms are defined:

Acquired National Forest lands. National Forest System lands acquired under the Weeks Act of March 1, 1911 (36 Stat. 961), and National Forest System lands with Weeks Act status as provided in the Act of September 2, 1958 (16 U.S.C. 521a).

Authorized officer. Any Forest Service officer to whom authority for disposal of mineral materials has been delegated.

Common-use area. Generally, a broad geographic area from which nonexclusive disposals of mineral materials available on the surface may be made to low volume and/or noncommercial users.

Community site. A site noted on appropriate Forest records and posted on the ground from which nonexclusive disposals of mineral materials may be made to low volume and/or noncommercial users.

Contract. A signed legal agreement between the Forest Service and a purchaser of mineral materials, which specifies (among other things) the conditions of a competitive, negotiated, or preference right sale of mineral materials to the purchaser.

Mineral materials. A collective term used throughout this subpart to describe petrified wood and common varieties of sand, gravel, stone, pumice, pumicite, cinders, clay, and other similar materials. Common varieties do not include deposits of those materials which are valuable because of some property giving them distinct and special value, nor do they include “so-called ‘block pumice’” which occurs in nature in pieces having one dimension of two inches or more and which is valuable and used for some application that requires such dimensions.

Permit. A signed legal document between the Forest Service and one who is authorized to remove mineral materials free of charge, which specifies (among other things) the conditions of removal by the permittee.

Preference right negotiated sale. A negotiated sale which may be awarded in response to the finding and demonstration of a suitable deposit of mineral material on acquired National Forest lands as the result of exploratory activity conducted under the authority of a prospecting permit.

Prospecting permit. A written instrument issued by the Forest Service which authorizes prospecting for a mineral material deposit on acquired National Forest lands within specific areas, under stipulated conditions, and for a specified period of time.

Single entry source. A source of mineral materials which is expected to be depleted under a single contract or permit or which is reserved for Forest Service use.

Unpatented mining claim. A lode or placer mining claim or a millsite located under the General Mining Law of 1872, as amended (30 U.S.C. 21-54), for which a patent under 30 U.S.C. 29 and regulations of the Department of the Interior has not been issued.

Withdrawn National Forest lands. National Forest System lands segregated or otherwise withheld from settlement, sale, location, or entry under some or all of all of the general land laws (43 U.S.C. 1714).

[49 FR 29784, July 24, 1984, as amended at 55 FR 51706, Dec. 17, 1990]

return arrow Back to Top

§228.43   Policy governing disposal.

(a) General. Forest Service policy is to make mineral materials on National Forest lands available to the public and to local, State, and Federal government agencies where reasonable protection of, or mitigation of effects on, other resources in assured, and where removal is not prohibited.

(1) A contract or permit limits processing of the mineral material onsite to the first salable product.

(2) Additional onsite processing may be authorized by a separate permit (36 CFR 251.50).

(3) The authorized officer must ensure that an environmental analysis is conducted for all planned disposals of mineral materials.

(4) Decisions to authorize the disposal of mineral materials must conform to approved land and resource management plans (36 CFR 219.22).

(b) Price. Mineral materials may not be sold for less than the appraised value. The authorized officer may assess a fee to cover costs of issuing and administering a contract or permit.

(c) Conservation. Adequate measures must be taken to protect, and minimize damage to the environment. Mineral materials may be disposed of only if the authorized officer determines that the disposal is not detrimental to the public interest.

(d) Ownership. Title to the mineral materials vests in the purchaser or permittee immediately before excavation, subject to the provisions of §§228.47 through 228.56 and other provisions of the contract or permit. Title to excavated material not removed within the time provided revests in the United States.

(e) Decisions. All decisions as to whether or not to grant disposals proposed under this subpart shall be made in writing by the authorized officer. Such decisions must specify their factual and legal basis.

(f) Option for mining claimants. All mining claimants holding mining claims which are located for a mineral classified in accordance with this subpart as a mineral material have the option of maintaining that the mineral is locatable and filing for patent. All mining claimants holding mining claims located in good faith on or before January 16, 1991, for a mineral classified in accordance with this subpart as a mineral material may accept the classification and, if appropriate, receive a sale by negotiated contract for that mineral material under 36 CFR 228.57(b)(2) of this subpart.

[49 FR 29784, July 24, 1984, as amended at 55 FR 51706, Dec. 17, 1990]

return arrow Back to Top

§228.44   Disposal on existing Federal leased areas.

Mineral material contracts or permits may be issued within existing areas leased or under permit under the 1920 Mineral Leasing Act, as amended (30 U.S.C. 181-187); section 402 of Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1946 (5 U.S.C. Appendix); the 1947 Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands, as amended (30 U.S.C. 351 et seq.); and the 1970 Geothermal Steam Act (30 U.S.C. 1001-1025), provided that it has been determined that removal will neither endanger nor unreasonably interfere with lease operations, and provided further that the lease terms do not prohibit disposal.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.45   Qualifications of applicants.

The authorized officer may require applicants for prospecting permits, negotiated contracts, or free-use permits or bidders for the sale of mineral materials to furnish information necessary to determine their ability to perform the obligations of the contract or permit.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.46   Application of other laws and regulations.

All mining operations for removal of mineral materials from National Forest lands must meet or exceed applicable Federal standards for the protection of public safety, health, and the environment, and must also meet or exceed State and local standards for the protection of public safety, health, and the environment, to the extent that such standards are not in conflict with Federal purposes and functions.

return arrow Back to Top

General Provisions

return arrow Back to Top

§228.47   General terms and conditions of contracts and permits.

(a) Disposal of designated mineral materials. Only those specified mineral materials found within the area designated in the contract or permit may be extracted and removed.

(b) Unauthorized removal (trespass) of mineral materials. The removal of mineral materials from National Forest lands, except when authorized in accordance with applicable law and regulations of the Department of Agriculture, is prohibited (36 CFR 261.9).

(c) Conservation. Mineral material contracts and permits must contain provisions to ensure the efficient removal and conservation of the mineral material.

(d) Improvements. Contracts and permits must contain provisions for removal or Government retention of improvements.

(e) Use of existing National Forest development roads. The authorized officer may require purchasers and permittees to obtain appropriate road-use permits, make deposits for or perform their commensurate share of road maintenance, and comply with road-use rules contained in 36 CFR part 212, depending upon their planned extent of road use.

(f) Reclamation. Requirements for reclamation of areas disturbed by mineral material operations must be included in contracts and permits, except for disposals from community sites and common-use areas.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.48   Appraisal and measurement.

(a) Appraisal. All mineral materials for sale must be appraised to determine fair market value. Appraisals must be based on knowledge of the extent of the deposit, quality of material, and economic value. A sale must not be made at less than the appraised value which may be expressed as either price per cubic yard or weight equivalent. In all cases the units of measurement must correspond to the units used in the appraisal. The authorized officer must estimate and record the amount and value of minerals to be disposed of by free-use permit.

(b) Measurement. The amount of mineral material actually removed may be measured by volume, weight, truck tally, by combination of these methods, or by such other form of measurement as the authorized officer determines to be appropriate and in the public interest.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.49   Reappraisal.

If an extension of time is granted as provided in §228.53(b), the authorized officer must reappraise or reestimate the mineral materials covered by the contract or permit and which remain unexcavated at the time of extension. The recalculated unit value becomes the new unit value for the remaining unexcavated material; excavated and stockpiled material is not subject to reappraisal.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.50   Production records.

At least annually, the purchaser or permittee must furnish a record of the volume extracted, in cubic yards or weight equivalent, to the authorized officer. The units of measurement must correspond to the units used in the appraisal or estimate.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.51   Bonding.

(a) Bond requirements. Before operations may begin under any contract or permit, a bond must be furnished to the authorized officer to ensure performance of payment (as necessary), reclamation, and other conditions of the contract or permit, except as noted in paragraphs (a) (1) and (3) of this section, where the authorized officer may waive such bonding. If an extension of time is granted as provided in §228.53(b), the bond requirements must be recalculated and changed accordingly.

(1) For advance payment contracts for 10,000 cubic yards or more in volume (or weight equivalent), a bond of not less than 10 percent of the total contract price or the value of the estimated annual production (whichever is less), plus the reclamation cost for the area covered by annual mining, is required. When the total volume is less than 10,000 cubic yards, bond requirements, if any, are at the discretion of the authorized officer.

(2) For any deferred payment contract, a bond equaling the value of the estimated annual production plus the reclamation cost for the area covered by annual mining is required.

(3) For free use, the authorized officer may require a reclamation bond which must be sufficient to cover the cost of reclamation of the anticipated annual work.

(b) Types of bonding. A bond must be one of the following:

(1) A bond of a corporate surety shown on the latest approved list issued by the U.S. Treasury Department and executed on an approved standard form;

(2) A cash bond;

(3) Negotiable securities of the United States;

(4) An irrevocable letter of credit acceptable to the Forest Service;

(5) A performance bond required by other Forest Service contracts or permits, provided the bond covers the performance and reclamation requirements related to the removal of mineral material from a designated pit or area for use in the performance of the contract or permit; or

(6) Any other types of bond specified in the Forest Service Manual.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.52   Assignments.

(a) Limitations. A purchaser or permittee may not assign the contract or permit, or any interest therein, without the written approval of the authorized officer.

(b) Requirements of assignee. The authorized officer will not approve any proposed assignment involving contract or permit performance unless the assignee:

(1) Submits information necessary to assure the authorized officer of the assignee's ability to meet the same requirements as the original purchaser or permittee (assignor); and

(2) Furnishes a bond or obtains a commitment from the previous surety to be bound by the assignment when approved.

(c) Rights and obligations. Once the authorized officer approves an assignment, the assignee is entitled to all the rights and is subject to all of the obligations under the contract or permit, and the original purchaser or permittee may be released from any further responsiblity under the contract or permit.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.53   Term.

(a) Time allowed. Except as provided in §228.61(f), §228.62(b), and elsewhere in this paragraph, a contract or permit may not exceed 1 year from the effective date of the contract or permit unless a written extension is obtained. For those mineral materials sold under a duration of production contract or under a contract for the sale of all mineral material within a specified area, or under a construction contract where removal cannot reasonably take place before completion of other work under the same contract, the authorized officer will establish a reasonable time period for removal.

(b) Extension of time. If it is shown that a delay in removal was due to causes beyond the control of the purchaser or permittee, the authorized officer may grant an extension, not to exceed 1 year, upon written request. Written requests for extensions of contracts must be received between 30 and 90 days before the expiration date of the contract. Written requests for extensions of permits must be received between 15 and 90 days before the permit expiration date. The authorized officer may grant a total of two extensions for contracts and permits.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.54   Single entry sales or permits.

The purchaser or permittee is required to reclaim a single entry source in accordance with an approved operating plan which describes operating procedures and reclamation measures, unless the requirement is waived by the authorized officer.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.55   Cancellation or suspension.

The authorized officer may cancel or suspend a contract, permit, or prospecting permit if the purchaser or permittee fails to comply with its terms and conditions. If the noncompliance is unnecessarily or unreasonably causing injury, loss, or damage to surface resources, the authorized officer may cancel or suspend the contract, permit, or prospecting permit immediately. In cases where noncompliance is of a less serious nature, the authorized officer may cancel or suspend a contract, permit, or prospecting permit if such noncompliance continues for 30 days after service of written notice by the authorized officer. If the noncompliance is not corrected, the authorized officer may attach the bond to ensure compliance with the provisions of the contract, permit, or prospecting permit.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.56   Operating plans.

Any surface-disturbing operation under a contract, permit, or prospecting permit is subject to prior approval by the authorized officer of an operating plan and to reasonable conditions as may be required to ensure proper protection of the environment and improvements, including timely reclamation of disturbed lands. Significant changes to operations require prior approval of an amended operating plan. The operating plan must include, as a minimum, a map and explanation of the nature of the access, anticipated activity, surface disturbance, and intended reclamation including removal or retention of structures and facilities. Operating plans must be submitted by the purchaser, permittee, or prospecting permittee, except as noted in §228.64(b).

return arrow Back to Top

Types and Methods of Disposal

return arrow Back to Top

§228.57   Types of disposal.

Except as provided in §228.41(b), disposal of mineral materials may be made by:

(a) Competitive sale to the highest qualified bidder after formal advertising and other appropriate public notice;

(b) Sale by negotiated contract. (1) For removal of materials to be used in connection with a public works improvement program on behalf of a Federal, State, or local government agency if the public exigency will not permit delays incident to advertising, or

(2) For the removal of mineral materials for which it is impracticable to obtain competition;

(c) Preference right negotiated sale to the holder of a Forest Service-issued prospecting permit under which a suitable mineral material deposit has been demonstrated on acquired National Forest lands;

(d) Free use when a permit is issued to any nonprofit association, corporation, individual, or others listed in §228.62(d), for other than commercial purposes, resale, or barter, or to any Federal, State, county, local unit, subdivision, municipality, or county road district for use in public projects; or

(e) Forest Service force account or by contract where the material is to be used to carry out various Forest Service programs involving construction and maintenance of physical improvements.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.58   Competitive sales.

(a) Invitation for bid. Sales must be conducted as described below after inviting competitive bids through publication and posting. The authorized officer may not offer a competitive sale unless there is a right-of-way or other access to the sale area which is available to anyone qualified to bid.

(b) Advertising—(1) Sales over 25,000 cubic yards. Mineral material sales offered by competitive bidding and which exceed 25,000 cubic yards must be advertised on the same day once a week for two consecutive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation in the area where the material is located, and in a trade or industrial newspaper when considered appropriate. Notice of the sale must be posted in a conspicuous place in the office where bids are to be submitted. In addition, the authorized officer may send the advertisement directly to known interested persons. Bids may be received but not evaluated before the end of the advertising period, which may be extended at the discretion of the authorized officer.

(2) Content of advertising. The advertisement of sale must specify the location by legal description of the tract or tracts or by any other means identify the location of the mineral material deposit being offered, the kind of material, estimated quantities, the unit of measurement, appraised price (which sets the minimum acceptable bid), time and place for receiving and opening of bids, minimum deposit required, major special constraints due to environmental considerations, available access, maintenance required over haul routes, traffic controls, required use permits, required qualifications of bidders, the method of bidding, bonding requirement, notice of the right to reject any or all bids, the office where a copy of the contract and additional information may be obtained, and additional information the authorized officer deems necessary.

(3) Advertising smaller sales. Advertisement of mineral materials amounting to 25,000 cubic yards in volume (or weight equivalent) or less must be published and/or posted. The methods of advertisement are at the discretion of the authorized officer.

(c) Conduct of sales. (1) Bidding at competitive sales may be conducted by the submission of written sealed bids, oral bids, or a combination of both as directed by the authorized officer. In the event of a tie in high sealed bids, the highest bidder will be determined by oral auction among those tied bidders; when no oral bid is higher that the sealed bids, the selected bidder will be determined by lot, the purchase price being the amount of the tied bid. For all oral auctions, including those used to break sealed-bid ties, the high bidder must confirm the bid in writing immediately upon being declared the high bidder. The authorized officer must mail notification of the bidding results to all bidders within 10 days.

(2) The authorized officer may require bidders to furnish evidence of qualification at the time of award or, if such evidence has already been furnished and is still valid, make appropriate reference to the record containing it.

(3) When it is in the interest of the United States to do so, the authorized officer may reject any or all bids.

(d) Bid deposits and award of contract. Sealed bids must be accompanied by a deposit. For mineral materials offered at oral auction, bidders must make the deposit before opening of the bidding.

(1) Bid deposits must be equal to 10 percent of the appraised value but not less than $100.00.

(2) Bid deposits must be in the form of cash, money order, bank drafts, cashier's or certified checks made payable to the Forest Service, or bonds acceptable to the Forest Service (§228.51(b)).

(3) Upon conclusion of the bidding, the authorized officer will return the deposits of all unsuccessful bidders. The successful bidder's deposit will be applied toward the purchase price. If the contract is not awarded to the high bidder due to an inability to perform the obligations of the contract, the deposit, less expenses and damages incurred by the United States, may be returned. The return of a deposit does not prejudice any other rights or remedies of the United States. The contract may be offered and awarded to the next successive qualified high bidder, or, at the discretion of the authorized officer, the sale may be either readvertised or negotiated if it is determined that a competitive sale is impracticable.

(4) Within 30 days after receipt of the contract, the successful bidder must sign and return the contract, together with any required bond, unless the authorized officer has granted an extension for an additional 30 days. The bidder must apply for the extension in writing within the first 30-day period. If the successful bidder fails to return the contract within the first 30-day period or within an approved extension, the bid deposit, less the costs of readvertising and damages, may be returned without prejudice to any other rights or remedies of the United States.

(5) All sales must be processed on Forest Service-approved contract forms. The authorized officer may add provisions to the contract to cover conditions peculiar to the sale area. Such additional provisions must be made available for inspection by prospective bidders during the advertising period.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.59   Negotiated or noncompetitive sales.

(a) Volume limitations. When it is determined by the authorized officer to be in the public interest and when it is impracticable to obtain competition, mineral materials not exceeding 100,000 cubic yards in volume (or weight equivalent) may be sold in any one sale at not less than the appraised value, without advertising or calling for bids, except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section. The authorized officer may not approve noncompetitive sales that exceed the total of 200,000 cubic yards (or weight equivalent) made in any one State for the benefit of any applicant in any period of 12 consecutive months.

(b) Government programs. In connection with a public works improvement project on behalf of a Federal, State, or local governmental agency, the authorized officer may sell to an applicant, at not less than the appraised value, without advertising or calling for bids, a volume of mineral materials not to exceed 200,000 cubic yards (or weight equivalent) when the public exigency will not permit delays incident to advertising (30 U.S.C. 602).

(c) Appropriation for highway purposes. For interstate and/or Federal aid highways, the Secretary of Transportation may appropriate any volume in accordance with 23 U.S.C. 107 and 317.

(d) Use in development of Federal mineral leases. When it is determined to be impracticable to obtain competition and the mineral materials are to be used in connection with the development of mineral leases issued by the United States (§228.44), the authorized officer may sell to a leaseholder a volume of mineral material not to exceed 200,000 cubic yards (or weight equivalent) in one State in any period of 12 consecutive months. No charge will be made for materials which must be moved in the process of extracting the mineral under lease, as long as the materials remain stockpiled within the boundaries of the leased area.

(e) Exceptions. (1) The Chief of the Forest Service may authorize the noncompetitive sale of mineral materials in excess of the volume limitations in paragraphs (a), (b), and (d) of this section when necessary to:

(i) Respond to an emergency affecting public health, safety or property;

(ii) Prevent the curtailment of operations conducted under the United States mining laws of May 10, 1872, as amended (30 U.S.C. 22 et seq.) which generate large volumes of mineral materials as a by-product; or

(iii) Respond to a critical public need for the prompt development of a mineral lease issued by the United States or a mining claim located under the United States mining laws of May 10, 1872, as amended (30 U.S.C. 22 et seq.).

(2) Any noncompetitive sale of mineral materials in excess of the volume limitations in paragraphs (a), (b), and (d) shall be subject to such restrictions as the Chief of the Forest Service determines to be in the public interest.

(3) Nothing in this paragraph shall otherwise alter the requirements of paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section.

[49 FR 29784, July 24, 1984, as amended at 52 FR 10565, Apr. 2, 1987; 53 FR 43691, Oct. 28, 1988]

return arrow Back to Top

§228.60   Prospecting permits.

(a) Right conferred. On acquired National Forest lands, prospecting permits may be issued which grant the permittee the exclusive right to explore for and to demonstrate the existence of a suitable mineral material deposit when existing information is insufficient. After the demonstration of a suitable deposit and confirmation of this by the authorized officer, the permittee will have a preference right to apply for a negotiated sale.

(b) Limitations. Mineral material may be removed from lands under a prospecting permit only to the extent necessary for testing and analysis or for the demonstration of the existence of a suitable deposit.

(c) Environmental analysis. Prospecting permits will be issued only after submission by applicant and approval by the authorized officer of a detailed operating plan. The authorized officer may require a bond in accordance with §228.51. The authorized officer must ensure compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.).

(d) Acreage and permit limitations. A prospecting permit may not cover more than 640 acres. No individual or group may have an interest at any one time in more than three prospecting permits on Forest Service lands administered by one Forest Supervisor.

(e) Duration and extension of permits. Prospecting permits may be issued for a period not to exceed 24 months, but they may be extended once for up to an additional 24 months if necessary to complete prospecting. Any application for extension must be submitted no later than 30 days before the expiration of the permit. The application for extension must provide evidence of diligence and state the reasons why additional time is considered necessary to complete prospecting work.

(f) Refusal to extend permits. The authorized officer may reject applications for extension of prospecting permits for the following reasons:

(1) Failure to perform. Failure of the permittee to perform prospecting or exploration work without adequate justification may result in the denial of an extension; or

(2) Failure to apply. If an application for extension is not submitted within the specified period, the permit may expire without notice to the permittee.

(3) Public interest. If the authorized officer determines that an extension may not be in the public interest, the application may be rejected.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.61   Preference right negotiated sales.

(a) Qualification for sale. When applying for a preference right negotiated sale, the permittee must demonstrate to the satisfaction of the authorized officer that a suitable deposit of mineral material has been discovered within the area covered by the prospecting permit. Information concerning trade secrets and financial matters submitted by the permittee and identified as confidential will not be available for public examination except as otherwise agreed upon by the permittee.

(b) Application for sale. The application must be submitted to the District Ranger's office on or before the expiration date of the prospecting permit or its extension. The authorized officer may grant 30 additional days for submitting the application if requested in writing by the permittee before expiration of the prospecting permit or its extension.

(c) Terms and conditions of contract. The terms and conditions will be evaluated on an individual case basis. Only those mineral materials specified in the contract may be removed by the purchaser. Before a preference right negotiated contract is awarded, the authorized officer must ensure that an environmental analysis is conducted. All contracts are subject to the conditions under §§228.47 through 228.56.

(d) Acreage limitations. The authorized officer will determine the amount of acreage in the preference right negotiated sale based on a presentation of the permittee's needs. The maximum acreage allowable to any individual or group must not exceed 320 acres on National Forest lands administered by one Forest Supervisor. The allowable acreage may be in one or more units which are not necessarily contiguous.

(e) Volume limitations. Preference right negotiated sales are exempt from volume limitations.

(f) Contract time allowable. A contract or a renewal must not exceed 5 years; however, the purchaser may have renewal options at the end of each contract or renewal period. The authorized officer may renew a contract if it is determined that the renewal is not detrimental to the public interest and that the purchaser has demonstrated diligence in conducting operations. The authorized officer may cancel the contract, or the purchaser may forfeit the contract, if no substantial commercial production occurs during any continuous 2-year period after the award of the contract or if the contract terms and conditions are breached. However, if a delay is caused by conditions beyond the purchaser's control, the authorized officer may grant an extension equal to the lost time.

(g) Contract renewal reappraisal. At the time of contract renewal, the authorized officer will reappraise the mineral material deposit in accordance with §228.49.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.62   Free use.

(a) Application. An application for a free-use permit must be made with the appropriate District Ranger's office.

(b) Term. Permits may be issued for periods not to exceed 1 year and will terminate on the expiration date unless extended by the authorized officer as in §228.53(b). However, the authorized officer may issue permits to any local, State, Federal, or Territorial agency, unit or subdivision, including municipalities and county road districts, for periods up to 10 years.

(c) Removal by agent. A free-use permittee may extract the mineral materials through a designated agent provided that the conditions of the permit are not violated. No part of the material may be used as payment for the services of an agent in obtaining or processing the material. A permit may be issued in the name of a designated agent for those entities listed in §228.62(d)(1), at the discretion of the authorized officer, provided there is binding agreement in which the entity retains responsibility for ensuring compliance with the conditions of the permit.

(d) Conditions. Free-use permits may be issued for mineral materials to settlers, miners, residents, and prospectors for uses other than commercial purposes, resale, or barter (16 U.S.C. 477). Free-use permits may be issued to local, State, Federal, or Territorial agencies, units, or subdivisions, including municipalities, or any association or corporation not organized for profit, for other than commercial or industrial purposes or resale (30 U.S.C. 601). Free-use permits may not be issued when, in the judgment of the authorized officer, the applicant owns or controls an adequate supply of mineral material in the area of demand. The free-use permit, issued on a Forest Service-approved form, must include the basis for the free-use as well as the provisions governing the selection, removal, and use of the mineral materials. No mineral material may be removed until the permit is issued. The permittee must notify the authorized officer upon completion of mineral material removal. The permittee must complete the reclamation prescribed in the operating plan (§228.56).

(1) A free-use permit may be issued to any local, State, Federal, or Territorial agency, unit, or subdivision, including municipalities and county road districts, without limitation on the number of permits or on the value of the mineral materials to be extracted or removed.

(2) A free-use permit issued to a nonprofit association, corporation, or individual may not provide for the removal of mineral materials having a volume exceeding 5,000 cubic yards (or weight equivalent) during any period of 12 consecutive months.

(e) Petrified wood. A free-use permit may be issued to amateur collectors and scientists to take limited quantities of petrified wood for personal use. The material taken may not be bartered or sold. Free-use areas may be designated within which a permit may not be required. Removal of material from such areas must be in accord with rules issued by the authorized officer and posted on the area. Such rules must also be posted in the District Ranger's and Forest Supervisor's offices and be available upon request. The rules may vary by area depending on the quantity, quality, and accessibility of the material and the demand for it.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.63   Removal under terms of a timber sale or other Forest Service contract.

In carrying out programs such as timber sales that involve construction and maintenance of various physical improvements, the Forest Service may specify that mineral materials be mined, manufactured, and/or processed for incorporation into the improvement. Where the mineral material is located on National Forest lands and is designated in the contract calling for its use, no permit is required as long as an operating plan as described in §228.56 is required by the contract provisions. Title to any excavated material in excess of that needed to fulfill contract requirements revests in the United States without reimbursement to the contract holder or to agents or representatives of the contract holder. Such excess material may be disposed of under §§228.58, 228.59, or 228.62.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.64   Community sites and common-use areas.

(a) Designation. Nonexclusive disposals may be made from the same deposit or areas designated by the authorized officer; the designation of such an area and any reclamation requirements must be based on an environmental analysis.

(b) Pit plans. The Forest Service must prepare operating plans (§228.56) for the efficient removal of the material and for appropriate reclamation of community sites and common-use areas.

(c) Reclamation. The Forest Service is responsible for reclamation of community sites and common-use areas.

return arrow Back to Top

§228.65   Payment for sales.

(a) Conditions. Mineral materials may not be removed from the sale area until all conditions of payment in the contract have been met.

(b) Advance payment. (1) For negotiated and competitive sales the full amount may be paid before removal is begun under the contract or by installment at the discretion of the authorized officer. Installment payments must be based on the estimated removal rate specified in the operating plan and must be, as a minimum, the value of 1 month's removal. The first installment must be paid before removal operations are begun; remaining installments must be paid in advance of removal of the remaining materials as billed by the authorized officer. The total amount of the purchase price must be paid at least 60 days before the expiration date of the contract.

(2) All advance payment contracts must provide for reappraisal of the mineral material at the time of contract renewal or extension.

(3) Minimum annual production must be sufficient to return a payment to the United States equal to the first installment. In lieu of minimum production, there must be an annual payment in the amount of the first installment which will not be credited to future years' production. Payments for or in lieu of minimum annual production must be received by the authorized officer on or before the anniversary of the effective date of the contract.

(4) If the purchaser fails to make payments when due, the contract will be considered breached, the authorized officer will cancel the contract, and all previous payments will be forfeited without prejudice to any other rights and remedies of the United States.

(5) In order to determine payment amount, the purchaser must make a report of operations. The report must include the amount of mineral material removed, which must be verified by the authorized officer.

(c) Deferred payments. The authorized officer may approve deferred payments for sales.

(1) The purchaser may make payments monthly or quarterly which must be based on the in-place value (volume or weight equivalent) of material removed during the contract period. The units of measurement must correspond to the units used in the appraisal. The purchaser must make all payments before contract renewal.

(2) The purchaser must deliver a bond which conforms to the provisions of §228.51(a)(2) to the authorized officer before operations are begun under the contract.

[49 FR 29784, July 24, 1984, as amended at 78 FR 33724, June 5, 2013]

return arrow Back to Top

§228.66   Refunds.

Upon termination of any contract, payments in excess of $10 may be refunded, less the costs incurred by the United States, under any of the following conditions:

(a) Payment in excess of value. If the total payment exceeds the value of the mineral material removed, unless it is the minimum annual payment in lieu of production;

(b) Insufficiency of material. If insufficient mineral material existed in the sale area to provide the quantity of material estimated to have been available;

(c) Cancellation. (1) If the contract is cancelled by the authorized officer for reasons which are beyond the purchaser's control; or

(2) If the contract is cancelled by mutual agreement. This refund provision is not a warranty that a specific quantity of material exists in the sale area.

[49 FR 29784, July 24, 1984, as amended at 78 FR 33724, June 5, 2013]

return arrow Back to Top

§228.67   Information collection requirements.

(a) The following sections of this subpart contain information collection requirements as defined in the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 (5 CFR part 1320): §228.45, Qualifications of applicants; §228.51, Bonding; §228.52(b)(1), Requirements of assignee; §228.53(b), Extension of time; §228.56, Operating plans; §228.57(c), Conduct of sales; §228.60, Prospecting permits; §228.61, Preference right negotiated sales; and §228.62, Free use. These requirements have been approved by the Office of Management and Budget and assigned clearance number 0596-0081.

(b) The public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to vary from a few minutes to many hours per individual response, with an average of 2 hours per individual response, including time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding the burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Chief (2800), Forest Service, USDA, P.O. Box 96090, Washington, DC 20090-6090 and to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503.

[55 FR 51706, Dec. 17, 1990]

return arrow Back to Top

Need assistance?