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e-CFR data is current as of October 21, 2020

Title 33Chapter ISubchapter OPart 155 → Subpart B


Title 33: Navigation and Navigable Waters
PART 155—OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS


Subpart B—Vessel Equipment


Contents
§155.200   Definitions.
§155.205   Discharge removal equipment for vessels 400 feet or greater in length.
§155.210   Discharge removal equipment for vessels less than 400 feet in length.
§155.215   Discharge removal equipment for inland oil barges.
§155.220   Discharge removal equipment for vessels carrying oil as secondary cargo.
§155.225   Internal cargo transfer capability.
§155.230   Emergency control systems for tank barges.
§155.235   Emergency towing capability for oil tankers.
§155.240   Damage stability information for oil tankers and offshore oil barges.
§155.245   Damage stability information for inland oil barges.
§155.250   Oil fuel tank protection.
§155.310   Containment of oil and hazardous material cargo discharges.
§155.320   Fuel oil and bulk lubricating oil discharge containment.
§155.330   Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on U.S. non-oceangoing ships.
§155.350   Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of less than 400 gross tons.
§155.360   Oily mixture (bilge slops) discharges on oceangoing ships of 400 gross tons and above but less than 10,000 gross tons, excluding ships that carry ballast water in their fuel oil tanks.
§155.370   Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of 10,000 gross tons and above and oceangoing ships of 400 gross tons and above that carry ballast water in their fuel oil tanks.
§155.380   Oily water separating equipment and bilge alarm approval standards.
§155.400   Platform machinery space drainage on oceangoing fixed and floating drilling rigs and other platforms.
§155.410   Pumping, piping and discharge requirements for non-oceangoing ships of 100 gross tons and above.
§155.420   Pumping, piping and discharge requirements for oceangoing ships of 100 gross tons and above but less than 400 gross tons.
§155.430   Standard discharge connections for oceangoing ships of 400 gross tons and above.
§155.440   Segregation of fuel oil and ballast water on new oceangoing ships of 4,000 gross tons and above, other than oil tankers, and on new oceangoing oil tankers of 150 gross tons and above.
§155.450   Placard.
§155.470   Prohibited spaces.
§155.480   Overfill devices.
§155.490   [Reserved]

Source: CGD 75-124a, 48 FR 45715, Oct. 6, 1983, unless otherwise noted.

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§155.200   Definitions.

As used in this subpart:

Inland oil barge means a tank barge carrying oil in bulk as cargo certificated by the Coast Guard under 46 CFR chapter I, subchapter D for river or canal service or lakes, bays, and sounds service.

On-deck spill means a discharge of oil on the deck of a vessel during loading, unloading, transfer, or other shipboard operations. An on-deck spill could result from a leaking fitting, an overfill, a bad connection, or similar operational mishap. The term on-deck spill is used to differentiate these operational discharges from those caused by collision or grounding where the hull is punctured and a tank is ruptured, resulting in an uncontrolled discharge of oil into the marine environment.

Offshore oil barge means a tank barge carrying oil in bulk as cargo, including dual-mode integrated tug-barges, certificated by the Coast Guard under 46 CFR chapter I, subchapter D, for navigation in waters outside the Boundary Lines, as defined in 46 CFR part 7, in any ocean or the Gulf of Mexico; any tank barge in Great Lakes service; or any foreign flag tank barge.

Oil tanker means a self-propelled vessel carrying oil in bulk as cargo, including integrated tug-barges designed for push-mode operation.

Vessel carrying oil as secondary cargo means a vessel carrying oil pursuant to a permit issued under 46 CFR 30.01-5, 46 CFR 70.05-30, or 46 CFR 90.05-35 or pursuant to an International Oil Pollution Prevention (IOPP) or Noxious Liquid Substance (NLS) certificate required by §151.33 or §151.35 of this chapter; or any uninspected vessel that carries oil in bulk as cargo.

[CGD 90-068, 58 FR 67996, Dec. 22, 1993, as amended by USCG-2001-9046, 67 FR 58524, Sept. 17, 2002; 73 FR 79316, Dec. 29, 2008]

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§155.205   Discharge removal equipment for vessels 400 feet or greater in length.

(a) Oil tankers and offshore oil barges with an overall length of 400 feet or more must carry appropriate equipment and supplies for the containment and removal of on-deck oil cargo spills of at least 12 barrels.

(b) The equipment and supplies must include—

(1) Sorbents;

(2) Non-sparking hand scoops, shovels, and buckets;

(3) Containers suitable for holding recovered waste;

(4) Emulsifiers for deck cleaning;

(5) Protective clothing;

(6) A minimum of one non-sparking portable pump with hoses; and

(7) Scupper plugs.

(c) During cargo transfer operations, the equipment and supplies must remain ready for immediate use.

[CGD 90-068, 58 FR 67996, Dec. 22, 1993, as amended by USCG-1998-3799, 63 FR 35531, June 30, 1998]

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§155.210   Discharge removal equipment for vessels less than 400 feet in length.

(a) Oil tankers and offshore oil barges with an overall length of less than 400 feet must carry appropriate equipment and supplies for the containment and removal of on-deck oil spills of at least 7 barrels.

(b) The equipment and supplies must include—

(1) Sorbents;

(2) Non-sparking hand scoops, shovels, and buckets;

(3) Containers suitable for holding recovered waste;

(4) Emulsifiers for deck cleaning;

(5) Protective clothing;

(6) A minimum of one non-sparking portable pump with hoses; and

(7) Scupper plugs.

(c) During cargo transfer operations, the equipment and supplies must remain ready for immediate use.

[CGD 90-068, 58 FR 67996, Dec. 22, 1993, as amended by USCG-1998-3799, 63 FR 35531, June 30, 1998]

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§155.215   Discharge removal equipment for inland oil barges.

(a) During cargo transfer operations, inland oil barges must have appropriate equipment and supplies ready for immediate use to control and remove on-deck oil cargo spills of at least one barrel.

(b) The equipment and supplies must include—

(1) Sorbents;

(2) Non-sparking hand scoops, shovels, and buckets;

(3) Containers suitable for holding recovered waste;

(4) Emulsifiers for deck cleaning; and

(5) Protective clothing.

(c) The oil barge owner or operator may rely on equipment available at the transfer facility receiving from or discharging to the barge, provided the barge owner or operator has prearranged for the use of the equipment by contract or other means approved by the Coast Guard.

[CGD 90-068, 58 FR 67996, Dec. 22, 1993, as amended by USCG-1998-3799, 63 FR 35531, June 30, 1998]

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§155.220   Discharge removal equipment for vessels carrying oil as secondary cargo.

(a) Vessels carrying oil as secondary cargo must carry appropriate equipment and supplies for the containment and removal of on-deck oil cargo spills of at least one-half barrel.

(b) The equipment and supplies must include—

(1) Sorbents;

(2) Non-sparking hand scoops, shovels, and buckets;

(3) Containers suitable for holding recovered waste;

(4) Emulsifiers for deck cleaning; and

(5) Protective clothing

(c) The equipment and supplies must be ready for immediate use during cargo transfer operations.

[CGD 90-068, 58 FR 67996, Dec. 22, 1993, as amended by USCG-1998-3799, 63 FR 35531, June 30, 1998]

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§155.225   Internal cargo transfer capability.

Oil tankers and offshore oil barges must carry suitable hoses and reducers for internal transfer of cargo to tanks or other spaces within the cargo block, unless the vessel's installed cargo piping system is capable of performing this function.

[CGD 90-068, 58 FR 67996, Dec. 22, 1993, as amended by USCG-1998-3799, 63 FR 35531, June 30, 1998]

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§155.230   Emergency control systems for tank barges.

(a) Application. This section does not apply to foreign vessels engaged in innocent passage (that is, neither entering nor leaving a U.S. port); it applies to tank barges and vessels towing them on the following waters:

(1) On the territorial sea of the U.S. [as defined in Presidential Proclamation 5928 of December 27, 1988, it is the belt of waters 12 nautical miles wide with its shoreward boundary the baseline of the territorial sea], unless—

(i) The barge is being pushed ahead of, or towed alongside, the towing vessel; and

(ii) The barge's coastwise route is restricted, on its certificate of inspection (COI), so the barge may operate “in fair weather only, within 20 miles of shore,” or with words to that effect. The Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, may define “fair weather” on the COI.

(2) In Great Lakes service unless—

(i) The barge is being pushed ahead of, or towed alongside, the towing vessel; and

(ii) The barge's route is restricted, on its certificate of inspection (COI), so the barge may operate “in fair weather only, within 5 miles of a harbor,” or with words to that effect. The Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection, may define “fair weather” on the COI.

(3) On Long Island Sound. For the purposes of this section, Long Island Sound comprises the waters between the baseline of the territorial sea on the eastern end (from Watch Hill Point, Rhode Island, to Montauk Point, Long Island) and a line drawn north and south from Premium Point, New York (about 40°54.5 N, 73°45.5 W), to Hewlett Point, Long Island (about 40°50.5 N, 73°45.3 W), on the western end.

(4) In the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

(5) On the waters of Admiralty Inlet north of Marrowstone Point (approximately 48°06 N, 122°41 W).

(b) Safety program. If you are the owner or operator of a single-hull tank barge or of a vessel towing it, you must adequately man and equip either the barge or the vessel towing it so the crew can arrest the barge by employing Measure 1, described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section. Moreover, the crew must be able to arrest or retrieve the barge by employing either Measure 2 or Measure 3, described in paragraphs (b)(2) and (3) of this section, respectively. If you are the owner or operator of a double-hull tank barge, you must adequately equip it and train its crew or, if it is unmanned, train the crew of the vessel towing it, so the crew can retrieve the barge by employing Measure 2 described in paragraph (b)(2) of this section.

(1) Measure 1. Each single-hull tank barge, whether manned or unmanned, must be equipped with an operable anchoring system that conforms to 46 CFR 32.15-15; except that, for barges operating only on the West Coast of the U.S., a system comprising heavy surge gear and bridle legs may serve instead of the anchoring system. Because these systems will also serve as emergency control systems, the owner or operator must ensure that they meet the following criteria:

(i) Operation and performance. When the barge is underway—

(A) The system is ready for immediate use;

(B) No more than two crewmembers are needed to operate the system and anchor the barge or arrest its movement;

(C) While preparing to anchor the barge or arrest its movement, the operator of the system should confer with the master or mate of the towing vessel regarding appropriate length of cable or chain to use; and

(D) Each operator of the system should wear a safety belt or harness secured by a lanyard to a lifeline, drop line, or fixed structure such as a welded padeye, if the sea or the weather warrants this precaution. Each safety belt, harness, lanyard, lifeline, and drop line must meet the specifications of ANSI A10.14 (incorporated by reference, see §155.140).

(ii) Maintenance and inspections. The owner or operator of the system shall inspect it annually. The inspection must verify that the system is ready for immediate use, and must include a visual inspection of the equipment that comprises the system in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. The inspection must also verify that the system is being maintained in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. The inspection need not include actual demonstration of the operation of the equipment or system.

(iii) Training. On each manned barge, every crewmember must be thoroughly familiar with the operation of the system. On each vessel towing an unmanned barge, every deck crewmember must be thoroughly familiar with the operation of the system installed on the barge. If during the last 12 months the system was not used to anchor or arrest the movement of the barge, then a drill on the use of the system must be conducted within the next month. The drill need not involve actual deployment of the system. However, it must allow every participant to demonstrate the competencies (that is, the knowledge, skills, and abilities) needed to ensure that everyone assigned a duty in anchoring or arresting the movement of the barge is ready to do his or her duty.

(2) Measure 2. If you are the owner or operator of a tank barge or a vessel towing it and this section applies to you by virtue of paragraph (a) of this section, you must have installed an emergency retrieval system or some other measure acceptable to the Coast Guard, as provided in paragraph (b)(3) of this section. Any such system must meet the following criteria:

(i) Design. The system must use an emergency towline with at least the same pulling strength as required of the primary towline. The emergency towline must be readily available on either the barge or the vessel towing it. The towing vessel must have on board equipment to regain control of the barge and continue towing (using the emergency towline), without having to place personnel on board the barge.

(ii) Operation and performance. The system must use a stowage arrangement that ensures the readiness of the emergency towline and the availability of all retrieval equipment for immediate use in an emergency whenever the barge is being towed astern.

(iii) Maintenance and inspection. The owner or operator of the system shall inspect it annually. The inspection must verify that the emergency retrieval system is ready for immediate use, and must include a visual inspection of the equipment that comprises the system in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. The inspection must also verify that the system is being maintained in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. The inspection need not include actual demonstration of the operation of the equipment or system. Details concerning maintenance of towlines appear in 33 CFR 164.74(a)(3) and Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular (NVIC) No. 5-92. Our NVICs are available online at http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-m/nvic/index.htm.

(iv) Training. Barge-retrieval drills must take place annually, and not more than one month after a master or mate responsible for supervising barge retrieval begins employment on a vessel that tows tank barges.

(A) Each drill must allow every participant to demonstrate the competencies (that is, the knowledge, skills, and abilities) needed to ensure that everyone assigned a duty in barge retrieval is ready to do his or her part to regain control of a drifting barge.

(B) If the drill includes actual operation of a retrieval system, it must be conducted under the supervision of the master or mate responsible for retrieval, and preferably in open waters free from navigational hazards so as to minimize risk to personnel and the environment.

(3) Measure 3. If you are the owner or operator of a tank barge or a vessel towing it and this section applies to you by virtue of paragraph (a) of this section, you may use an alternative measure or system fit for retrieving a barge or arresting its movement as a substitute for Measure 2, described in paragraph (b)(2) of this section. Before you use such a measure or system, however, it must receive the approval of the Commandant (CG-ENG). It will receive this approval if it provides protection against grounding of the tank vessel comparable to that provided by one of the other two measures described in this section.

[USCG-1998-4443, 65 FR 31811, May 19, 2000, as amended by USCG-2001-8661, 74 FR 45026, Aug. 31, 2009; USCG-2010-0351, 75 FR 36285, June 25, 2010; USCG-2014-0410, 79 FR 38436, July 7, 2014]

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§155.235   Emergency towing capability for oil tankers.

An emergency towing arrangement shall be fitted at both ends on board all oil tankers of not less than 20,000 deadweight tons (dwt), constructed on or after September 30, 1997. For oil tankers constructed before September 30, 1997, such an arrangement shall be fitted at the first scheduled dry-docking, but not later than January 1, 1999. The design and construction of the towing arrangement shall be in accordance with IMO resolution MSC.35(63) (incorporated by reference; see §155.140).

[USCG-2001-8661, 74 FR 45026, Aug. 31, 2009]

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§155.240   Damage stability information for oil tankers and offshore oil barges.

(a) Owners or operators of oil tankers and offshore oil barges shall ensure that their vessels have prearranged, prompt access to computerized, shore-based damage stability and residual structural strength calculation programs.

(b) Vessel baseline strength and stability characteristics must be pre-entered into such programs and be consistent with the vessel's existing configuration.

(c) Access to the shore-based calculation program must be available 24 hours a day.

(d) At a minimum, the program must facilitate calculation of the following:

(1) Residual hull girder strength based on the reported extent of damage.

(2) Residual stability when the vessel's compartments are breached.

(3) The most favorable off-loading, ballasting, or cargo transfer sequences to improve residual stability, reduce hull girder stresses, and reduce ground-force reaction.

(4) The bending and shear stresses caused by pinnacle loads from grounding or stranding.

[CGD 90-068, 58 FR 67996, Dec. 22, 1993, as amended by USCG-1998-3799, 63 FR 35531, June 30, 1998]

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§155.245   Damage stability information for inland oil barges.

(a) Owners or operators of inland oil barges shall ensure that the vessel plans necessary to perform salvage, stability, and residual hull strength assessments are maintained at a shore-based location.

(b) Access to the plans must be available 24 hours a day.

[CGD 90-068, 58 FR 67997, Dec. 22, 1993, as amended by USCG-1998-3799, 63 FR 35531, June 30, 1998]

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§155.250   Oil fuel tank protection.

Each ship with an aggregate oil fuel capacity of 600 cubic meters or more that is delivered on or after August 1, 2010, must meet the minimum standard of oil fuel tank protection required by Annex I, Regulation 12A (incorporated by reference, see §155.140).

[USCG-2010-0194, 80 FR 5934, Feb. 4, 2015]

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§155.310   Containment of oil and hazardous material cargo discharges.

(a) A tank vessel with a capacity of 250 or more barrels that is carrying oil or hazardous material as cargo must have—

(1) Under or around each loading manifold and each transfer connection point, a fixed container or enclosed deck area that, in all conditions of ship list or trim encountered during the loading operation, has a capacity of at least:

(i) One half barrel if it serves one or more hoses with an inside diameter of 2 inches or less, or one or more loading arms with a nominal pipe size diameter of 2 inches or less;

(ii) One barrel if it serves one or more hoses with an inside diameter of more than 2 inches but less than 4 inches, or one or more loading arms with a nominal pipe size diameter of more than 2 inches but less than 4 inches;

(iii) Two barrels if it serves one or more hoses with an inside diameter of 4 inches or more, but less than 6 inches, or one or more loading arms with a nominal pipe size diameter of 4 inches or more, but less than 6 inches;

(iv) Three barrels if it serves one or more hoses with an inside diameter of 6 inches or more, but less than 12 inches, or one or more loading arms with a nominal pipe size diameter of 6 inches or more, but less than 12 inches; or

(v) Four barrels if it serves one or more hoses with an inside diameter of 12 inches or more, or one or more loading arms with a nominal pipe size diameter of 12 inches or more;

(2) A means of draining or removing discharged oil or hazardous material from each container or enclosed deck area without discharging the oil or hazardous material into the water; and

(3) A mechanical means of closing each drain and scupper in the container or enclosed deck area required by this section.

(b) An offshore tank barge with a cargo capacity of 250 or more barrels that is carrying hazardous material as cargo and an inland tank barge with the capacity of 250 or more barrels that is carrying oil or a hazardous material as cargo must meet paragraph (a) of this section or be equipped with—

(1) A coaming, at least 4 inches high but not more than 8 inches high, enclosing the immediate area of the cargo hatches, loading manifolds, and transfer connections, that has a capacity, in all conditions of vessel list and trim to be encountered during the loading operation, of at least one-half barrel per hatch, manifold, and connection within the enclosed area;

(2) A fixed or portable container under each loading manifold and each transfer connection within the coaming, that holds at least one-half barrel;

(3) A mechanical means of closing each drain and scupper within the coaming; and

(4) A means of draining or removing discharged oil or hazardous material from the fixed or portable container and from within the coamings without discharging the oil or hazardous material into the water.

(c) All oil tankers and offshore oil barges with a cargo capacity of 250 or more barrels must have peripheral coamings, including port and starboard coamings and forward and aft athwartships coamings, completely enclosing the cargo deck area, cargo hatches, manifolds, transfer connections, and any other openings where cargo may overflow or leak.

(1) Coamings must be at least 4 inches high except in the aft corners.

(2) In the aft corners (port and starboard) of a vessel, the coamings must be at least 8 inches high and extend—

(i) Forward at least 14 feet from each corner; and

(ii) Inboard at least 8 feet from each corner.

(3) Each area enclosed by the coaming required under this paragraph must have—

(i) A means of draining or removing oil from the enclosed deck area without discharging oil into the water; and

(ii) A mechanical means of closing each drain and scupper in the enclosed deck-area.

(4) For a tankship, as defined in 46 CFR 30.10-67, the coaming or other barrier required in 46 CFR 32.56-15 may serve as the aft athwartships coaming if the tankship is otherwise in compliance with the requirements of this section.

(d) In addition to the requirements of paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, an offshore oil barge with a cargo capacity of 250 or more barrels must have—

(1) A fixed or portable container that holds at least one-half barrel under each oil loading manifold and each oil transfer connection within the coaming;

(2) A mechanical means of closing each drain and scupper within the coaming; and

(3) A means of draining or removing discharged oil from the fixed or portable container and from within the coaming without discharging the oil into the water.

[CGD 75-124a, 48 FR 45715, Oct. 6, 1983, as amended by CGD 86-034, 55 FR 36254, Sept. 4, 1990; CGD 90-068, 58 FR 67997, Dec. 22, 1993; USCG-1998-3799, 63 FR 35531, June 30, 1998]

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§155.320   Fuel oil and bulk lubricating oil discharge containment.

(a) A ship of 300 gross tons or more constructed after June 30, 1974 must have a fixed container or enclosed deck area under or around each fuel oil or bulk lubricating oil tank vent, overflow, and fill pipe, that:

(1) For a ship of 300 or more but less than 1600 gross tons has a capacity of at least one-half barrel; and

(2) For a ship of 1600 or more gross tons has a capacity of one barrel.

(b) A ship of 100 gross tons or more constructed before July 1, 1974, and a ship of 100 or more but less than 300 gross tons constructed after June 30, 1974 must:

(1) Meet paragraph (a)(1) of this section; or

(2) Equip each fuel oil or bulk lubricating oil tank vent, overflow, and fill pipe during oil transfer operations with a portable container of at least a 5 U.S. gallon capacity; or

(3) If the ship has a fill fitting for which containment is impractical, use an automatic back pressure shut-off nozzle.

(c) This section does not apply to a fixed or floating drilling rig or other platform.

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§155.330   Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on U.S. non-oceangoing ships.

(a) No person may operate a U.S. non-oceangoing ship in the navigable waters of the United States, unless it has the capacity to retain on board all oily mixtures and is equipped to discharge these oily mixtures to a reception facility.

(b) A U.S. non-oceangoing ship may retain all oily mixtures on board in the ship's bilges. An oil residue (sludge) tank is not required.

(c) This section does not apply to a fixed or floating drilling rig or other platform.

[CGD 75-124a, 48 FR 45715, Oct. 6, 1983, as amended by USCG-2000-7641, 66 FR 55571, Nov. 2, 2001]

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§155.350   Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of less than 400 gross tons.

(a) No person may operate an oceangoing ship of less than 400 gross tons, unless it either:

(1) Has the capacity to retain on board all oily mixtures and is equipped to discharge these oily mixtures to a reception facility; or

(2) Has approved oily-water separating equipment for processing oily mixtures from bilges or fuel oil tank ballast and discharges into the sea according to §151.10 of this chapter.

(3) For equipment installed after 2004 to be approved under paragraph (a)(2) of this section, it must meet current standards in 46 CFR part 162, subpart 162.050 by the date set forth in paragraphs (a)(3)(i) and (a)(3)(ii) of this section, unless the equipment is installed on a ship constructed before 2005 and it would be unreasonable or impracticable to meet those current standards.

(i) A ship entering international service for the first time since 2004, must comply with the requirements of paragraph (a)(3) of this section by the date of its initial survey prior to receiving its International Oil Pollution Prevention (IOPP) certificate.

(ii) Any ship, other than a ship described in paragraph (a)(3)(i) of this section, must comply with the requirements of paragraph (a)(3) of this section by the date of the ship's first drydock after October 13, 2009.

(b) An oceangoing ship of less than 400 gross tons may retain all oily mixtures on board in the ship's bilges. An oil residue (sludge) tank is not required.

(c) This section does not apply to a barge that is not equipped with an installed bilge pumping system for discharge into the sea.

(d) This section does not apply to a fixed or floating drilling rig or other platform.

[CGD 75-124a, 48 FR 45715, Oct. 6, 1983, as amended by CGD 88-002, 54 FR 18407, Apr. 28, 1989; CGD 97-023, 62 FR 33364, June 19, 1997; USCG-1998-3799, 63 FR 35531, June 30, 1998; USCG-2000-7641, 66 FR 55571, Nov. 2, 2001; USCG-2004-18939, 74 FR 3377, Jan. 16, 2009; 74 FR 52418, Oct. 13, 2009]

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§155.360   Oily mixture (bilge slops) discharges on oceangoing ships of 400 gross tons and above but less than 10,000 gross tons, excluding ships that carry ballast water in their fuel oil tanks.

(a)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(3) of this section, no person may operate an oceangoing ship of 400 gross tons and above but less than 10,000 gross tons, excluding a ship that carries ballast water in its fuel oil tanks, unless it is fitted with approved 15 parts per million (ppm) oily-water separating equipment for the processing of oily mixtures from bilges or fuel oil tank ballast.

(2) For equipment installed after 2004 to be approved under paragraph (a)(1) of this section, it must meet current standards in 46 CFR part 162, subpart 162.050 by the date set forth in paragraphs (a)(2)(i) and (a)(2)(ii) of this section, unless the equipment is installed on a ship constructed before 2005 and it would be unreasonable or impracticable to meet those current standards.

(i) A ship entering international service for the first time since 2004, must comply with the requirements of paragraph (a)(2) of this section by the date of its initial survey prior to receiving its International Oil Pollution Prevention (IOPP) certificate.

(ii) Any ship, other than a ship described in paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this section, must comply with the requirements of paragraph (a)(2) of this section by the date of the ship's first drydock after October 13, 2009.

(3) Any ship certified under the International Code of Safety for High-Speed Craft engaged on a scheduled service with a turn-around time not exceeding 24 hours and covering also non-passenger/cargo-carrying relocation voyages for these ships need not be provided with oil filtering equipment. These ships must be fitted with an oily bilge water holding tank having a volume adequate for the total retention onboard of the oily bilge water. All oily bilge water must be retained onboard for subsequent discharge to reception facilities.

(b) No person may operate a ship under this section unless it is fitted with an oil residue (sludge) tank or tanks of adequate capacity to receive the oil residue that cannot be dealt with otherwise.

(1) In new ships such tanks shall be designed and constructed to facilitate cleaning and the discharge of the oily residues to reception facilities. Existing ships shall comply with this requirement as far as reasonable and practicable.

(2) Tanks used for oily mixtures on ships certificated under 46 CFR Chapter I shall meet the requirements of 46 CFR 56.50-50(h) for isolation between oil and bilge systems.

(3) Ships subject to this section must—

(i) Be provided with a designated pump for disposal that is capable of taking suction from the oil residue (sludge) tank(s); and

(ii) Have no discharge connections to the bilge system, oily bilge water holding tank(s), tank top or oily water separators except that the tank(s) may be fitted with drains, with manually operated self-closing valves and arrangements for subsequent visual monitoring of the settled water, that lead to an oily bilge water holding tank or bilge well, or an alternative arrangement, provided such arrangement does not connect directly to the bilge piping system.

(c) No person may operate a ship unless it is equipped with a pipeline to discharge oily mixtures to a reception facility.

(d) This section does not apply to a barge that is not equipped with an installed bilge pumping system for discharge into the sea.

(e) This section does not apply to a fixed or floating drilling rig or other platform, except as specified in §155.400(a)(2).

[CGD 75-124a, 48 FR 45715, Oct. 6, 1983, as amended by USCG-1998-3799, 63 FR 35531, June 30, 1998; USCG-2000-7641, 66 FR 55571, Nov. 2, 2001; USCG-2004-18939, 74 FR 3377, Jan. 16, 2009; 74 FR 52418, Oct. 13, 2009; USCG-2010-0194, 80 FR 5934, Feb. 4, 2015]

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§155.370   Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of 10,000 gross tons and above and oceangoing ships of 400 gross tons and above that carry ballast water in their fuel oil tanks.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(5) of this section, no person may operate an oceangoing ship of 10,000 gross tons and above, or any oceangoing ship of 400 gross tons and above, that carries ballast water in its fuel oil tanks, unless it has—

(1) Approved 15 ppm oily-water separating equipment for the processing of oily mixtures from bilges or fuel oil tank ballast;

(2) A bilge alarm; and

(3) A means for automatically stopping any discharge of oily mixture when the oil content in the effluent exceeds 15 ppm.

(4) For equipment installed after 2004 to be approved under paragraph (a) of this section, it must meet current standards in 46 CFR part 162, subpart 162.050 by the date set forth in paragraphs (a)(4)(i) and (a)(4)(ii) of this section, unless the equipment is installed on a ship constructed before 2005 and it would be unreasonable or impracticable to meet those current standards.

(i) A ship entering international service for the first time since 2004, must comply with the requirements of paragraph (a)(4) of this section by the date of its initial survey prior to receiving its International Oil Pollution Prevention (IOPP) certificate.

(ii) Any ship, other than a ship described in paragraph (a)(4)(i) of this section, must comply with the requirements of paragraph (4) of this section by the date of the ship's first drydock after October 13, 2009.

(5) Any ship certified under the International Code of Safety for High-Speed Craft engaged on a scheduled service with a turn-around time not exceeding 24 hours and covering also non-passenger/cargo-carrying relocation voyages for these ships need not be provided with oil filtering equipment. These ships must be fitted with an oily bilge water holding tank having a volume adequate for the total retention onboard of the oily bilge water. All oily bilge water must be retained onboard for subsequent discharge to reception facilities.

(b) No person may operate a ship under this section unless it is fitted with an oil residue (sludge) tank or tanks of adequate capacity to receive the oil residue that cannot be dealt with otherwise.

(1) In new ships such tanks shall be designed and constructed to facilitate cleaning and the discharge of the oil residue to reception facilities. Existing ships shall comply with this requirement as far as reasonable and practicable.

(2) Tanks used for oily mixtures on ships certificated under 46 CFR Chapter I shall meet the requirements of 46 CFR 56.50-50(h) for isolation between oil and bilge systems.

(3) Ships subject to this section must—

(i) Be provided with a designated pump for disposal that is capable of taking suction from the oil residue (sludge) tank(s); and

(ii) Have no discharge connections to the bilge system, oily bilge water holding tank(s), tank top or oily water separators except that the tank(s) may be fitted with drains, with manually operated self-closing valves and arrangements for subsequent visual monitoring of the settled water, that lead to an oily bilge water holding tank or bilge well, or an alternative arrangement, provided such arrangement does not connect directly to the bilge piping system.

(c) No person may operate a ship under this section unless it is equipped with a pipeline to discharge oily mixtures to a reception facility.

(d) This section does not apply to a barge that is not equipped with an installed bilge pumping system for discharge into the sea.

(e) This section does not apply to a fixed or floating drilling rig or other platform, except as specified in §155.400(a)(2).

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 1625-0009)

[CGD 75-124a, 48 FR 45715, Oct. 6, 1983, as amended by USCG-1998-3799, 63 FR 35531, June 30, 1998; USCG-2000-7641, 66 FR 55571, Nov. 2, 2001; USCG-2006-25150, 71 FR 39210, July 12, 2006; USCG-2004-18939, 74 FR 3377, Jan. 16, 2009; 74 FR 52418, Oct. 13, 2009; USCG-2010-0194, 80 FR 5934, Feb. 4, 2015]

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§155.380   Oily water separating equipment and bilge alarm approval standards.

(a) On U.S. inspected ships, oily water separating equipment and bilge alarms must be approved under 46 CFR 162.050.

(b) On U.S. uninspected ships and foreign ships, oily water separating equipment and bilge alarms must be approved under either 46 CFR 162.050 or MARPOL 73/78 Annex I.

Note to §155.380(b): A copy of Annex I to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973 as modified by the Protocol of 1978 relating thereto, as amended (MARPOL 73/78) may be purchased from the International Maritime Organization, Publications Section, 4 Albert Embankment, London SE1 75R, United Kingdom, Telex 23588; see also http://www.imo.org.

(c) A ship that is required to have a bilge alarm may defer installment and use a previously installed bilge monitor provided the bilge monitor met Coast Guard approval requirements at the time of its installation and it does not allow more than a 15 ppm oil content in water discharge.

(d) The accuracy of the bilge alarms must be checked at IOPP Certificate renewal surveys according to the manufacturer's instructions. Alternatively, the unit may be replaced by a calibrated bilge alarm. The calibration certificate for the bilge alarm, which certifies the date of the last calibration check, should be retained onboard for inspection purposes. The accuracy checks can only be done by the manufacturer or persons authorized by the manufacturer.

(e) Ship staff training must include familiarization in the operation and maintenance of the equipment.

(f) The routine maintenance of the oily water separating equipment and the bilge alarm must be clearly defined by the manufacturer in the associated operating and maintenance manuals. All routine and repair maintenance must be recorded.

[USCG-2004-18939, 74 FR 3377, Jan. 16, 2009]

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§155.400   Platform machinery space drainage on oceangoing fixed and floating drilling rigs and other platforms.

(a) No person may operate an oceangoing fixed or floating drilling rig or other platform unless it either—

(1) Complies with the oily-water separating equipment requirements of a valid National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued in accordance with section 402 of the Clean Water Act and 40 CFR Chapter I;

(2) Complies with the oily-water separating equipment requirements for oceangoing ships of 400 gross tons and above as set forth in either §155.360 or §155.370; or

(3) Is not equipped with an installed bilge pumping system for discharge of oily mixtures from platform machinery spaces into the sea and has the capacity to retain on board all of these oily mixtures and is equipped to discharge these mixtures for transport to a reception facility.

(b) When an oceangoing fixed or floating drilling rig or other platform is in a special area, is not proceeding en route, or is within 12 nautical miles of the nearest land; it must either—

(1) Have the capacity to retain on board all machinery space oily mixtures from platform machinery space drainage and be equipped to discharge these mixtures for transport to a reception facility; or

(2) Discharge in accordance with §151.10 (b)(3), (b)(4), and (b)(5) of this chapter, provided the drilling rig or platform is not within a special area.

(c) Paragraph (b) of this section does not apply to a fixed or floating drilling rig or other platform that is operating under an NPDES permit.

[CGD 75-124a, 48 FR 45715, Oct. 6, 1983, as amended by CGD 88-002, 54 FR 18407, Apr. 28, 1989; CGD 94-056, 60 FR 43378, Aug. 21, 1995; USCG-1998-3799, 63 FR 35531, June 30, 1998]

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§155.410   Pumping, piping and discharge requirements for non-oceangoing ships of 100 gross tons and above.

(a) No person may operate a non-oceangoing ship of 100 gross tons and above that is fitted with main or auxiliary machinery spaces in the navigable waters of the United States unless:

(1) The ship has at least one pump installed to discharge oily mixtures through a fixed piping system to a reception facility;

(2) The piping system required by this section has at least one outlet that is accessible from the weather deck;

(3) Each outlet required by this section has a shore connection that is compatible with reception facilities in the ship's area of operation; and

(4) The ship has a stop valve for each outlet required by this section.

(b) Paragraph (a) of this section does not apply to a ship that has approved oily-water separating equipment for the processing of oily mixtures from bilges or fuel oil tank ballast.

(c) This section does not apply to a fixed or floating drilling rig or other platform.

[CGD 75-124a, 48 FR 45715, Oct. 6, 1983, as amended by USCG-2000-7641, 66 FR 55572, Nov. 2, 2001]

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§155.420   Pumping, piping and discharge requirements for oceangoing ships of 100 gross tons and above but less than 400 gross tons.

(a) No person may operate an oceangoing ship of 100 gross tons and above but less than 400 gross tons that is fitted with main or auxiliary machinery spaces unless:

(1) The ship has at least one pump installed to discharge oily mixtures through a fixed piping system to a reception facility;

(2) The piping system required by this section has at least one outlet accessible from the weather deck;

(3) For a ship on an international voyage, the outlet required by this section has a shore connection that meets the specifications in §155.430, or the ship has at least one adapter that meets the specifications in §155.430 and fits the required outlets;

(4) For a ship not on an international voyage, the outlet required by this section has a shore connection that is compatible with reception facilities in the ship's area of operation;

(5) The ship has a means on the weather deck near the discharge outlet to stop each pump that is used to discharge oily mixtures; and

(6) The ship has a stop valve installed for each outlet required by this section.

(b) Paragraph (a) of this section does not apply to a ship that has approved oily-water separating equipment for the processing of oily mixtures from bilges or fuel oil tank ballast.

(c) This section does not apply to a fixed or floating drilling rig or other platform.

[CGD 75-124a, 48 FR 45715, Oct. 6, 1983, as amended by USCG-2000-7641, 66 FR 55572, Nov. 2, 2001]

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§155.430   Standard discharge connections for oceangoing ships of 400 gross tons and above.

(a) All oceangoing ships of 400 gross tons and above must have a standard shore connection for reception facilities to discharge oily mixtures from machinery space bilges or ballast water containing an oily mixture from fuel oil tanks. The discharge connection must have the following dimensions:

(1) Outside diameter = 215 millimeters (mm).

(2) Inner diameter = according to pipe outside diameter.

(3) Bolt circle diameter = 183 mm.

(4) Slots in flange = 6 holes 22 mm in diameter equidistantly placed on a bolt circle of the above diameter, slotted to the flange periphery. The slot width to be 22 mm.

(5) Flange thickness = 20 mm.

(6) Bolts and nuts, quantity and number = 6 each of 20 mm in diameter and of suitable length.

(b) A portable adapter that meets the specifications of paragraph (a) of this section and that fits the discharge shore connection, for the discharge of oily wastes from machinery space bilges may be substituted for the standard discharge connection requirement of paragraph (a) of this section.

(c) The flange must be designed to accept pipes up to a maximum internal diameter of 125 mm and shall be of steel or other equivalent material having a flat face. This flange, together with a gasket of oilproof material, must be suitable for a service pressure of 6 kilograms/square centimeters (kg/cm2).

[CGD 75-124a, 48 FR 45715, Oct. 6, 1983, as amended by USCG-2000-7641, 66 FR 55572, Nov. 2, 2001]

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§155.440   Segregation of fuel oil and ballast water on new oceangoing ships of 4,000 gross tons and above, other than oil tankers, and on new oceangoing oil tankers of 150 gross tons and above.

(a) Except as provided for in paragraph (b) of this section, in new oceangoing ships of 4,000 gross tons and above other than oil tankers, and in new oceangoing oil tankers of 150 gross tons and above, ballast water must not be carried in any fuel oil tank.

(b) Where abnormal conditions or the need to carry large quantities of fuel oil render it necessary to carry ballast water that is not a clean ballast in any fuel oil tank, that ballast water must be discharged to reception facilities or into the sea in compliance with part 151 of this chapter using the equipment specified in §155.370, and an entry shall be made in the Oil Record Book to this effect.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 1625-0009)

[CGD 75-124a, 48 FR 45715, Oct. 6, 1983, as amended by USCG-2006-25150, 71 FR 39210, July 12, 2006]

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§155.450   Placard.

(a) A ship, except a ship of less than 26 feet in length, must have a placard of at least 5 by 8 inches, made of durable material fixed in a conspicuous place in each machinery space, or at the bilge and ballast pump control station, stating the following:

Discharge of Oil Prohibited

The Federal Water Pollution Control Act prohibits the discharge of oil or oily waste into or upon the navigable waters of the United States, or the waters of the contiguous zone, or which may affect natural resources belonging to, appertaining to, or under the exclusive management authority of the United States, if such discharge causes a film or discoloration of the surface of the water or causes a sludge or emulsion beneath the surface of the water. Violators are subject to substantial civil penalties and/or criminal sanctions including fines and imprisonment.

(b) Existing stocks of placards may be used for the life of the placard.

(c) The placard required by paragraph (a) or (b) of this section must be printed in the language or languages understood by the crew.

[CGD 75-124a, 48 FR 45715, Oct. 6, 1983, as amended by CGD 93-054, 58 FR 62262, Nov. 26, 1993]

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§155.470   Prohibited spaces.

(a) In a ship of 400 gross tons and above, for which the building contract is placed after January 1, 1982 or, in the absence of a building contract, the keel of which is laid or which is at a similar stage of construction after July 1, 1982, oil or hazardous material must not be carried in a forepeak tank or a tank forward of the collision bulkhead.

(b) A self-propelled ship of 300 gross tons and above, to which paragraph (a) of this section does not apply, may not carry bulk oil or hazardous material in any space forward of a collision bulkhead except:

(1) For a ship constructed after June 30, 1974, fuel oil for use on the ship may be carried in tanks forward of a collision bulkhead, if such tanks are at least 24 inches inboard of the hull structure; or

(2) For a ship constructed before July 1, 1974, fuel oil for use on the ship may be carried in tanks forward of a collision bulkhead, if such tanks were designated, installed, or constructed for fuel oil carriage before July 1, 1974.

[CGD 75-124a, 48 FR 45715, Oct. 6, 1983, as amended by CGD 86-034, 55 FR 36254, Sept. 4, 1990]

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§155.480   Overfill devices.

(a) For the purposes of this section, “oil” has the same definition as provided in §151.05 of this chapter.

(b) Each tank vessel with a cargo capacity of 1,000 or more cubic meters (approximately 6,290 barrels), loading oil or oil residue as cargo, must have one overfill device that is permanently installed on each cargo tank and meets the requirements of this section.

(1) On a tankship, each cargo tank must be equipped with an overfill device (including an independent audible alarm or visible indicator for that tank) that meets the requirements for tank overfill alarms under 46 CFR 39.20-7(b)(2) and (3), and (d)(1) through (d)(4).

(2) On a tank barge, each cargo tank must be equipped with an overfill device that—

(i) Meets the requirements of 46 CFR 39.2007(b)(2) through (b)(4), (d)(1) through (d)(4), and 46 CFR 39.2009(a)(1) ;

(ii) Is an installed automatic shutdown system that meets the requirements of 46 CFR 39.2009(a)(2); or

(iii) Is an installed high-level indicating device that meets the requirements of 46 CFR 39.2003(b)(1), (2), and (3).

(c) Each cargo tank of a U.S. flag tank vessel must have installed on it an overfill device meeting the requirements of this section at the next scheduled cargo tank internal examination performed on the vessel under 46 CFR 31.10-21.

(d) Each cargo tank of a foreign flag tank vessel must have installed on it an overfill device—

(1) At the first survey that includes dry docking, as required by the vessel's flag administration, to meet the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974, as amended, or the International Load Line Convention of 1966; or

(2) At the first cargo tank internal examination performed on the tank vessel under 46 CFR 31.10-21.

(e) This section does not apply to a tank vessel that does not meet the double hull requirements of §157.10d of this chapter and, under 46 U.S.C. 3703a(c), may not operate in the navigable waters or Exclusive Economic Zone of the United States after January 1, 2000.

(f) This section does not apply to tank vessels that carry asphalt, animal fat, or vegetable oil as their only cargo.

[CGD 90-071a, 59 FR 53290, Oct. 21, 1994, as amended by CGD 90-071a, 62 FR 48773, Sept. 17, 1997; USCG-2015-0433, 80 FR 44282, July 27, 2015; USCG-2016-0498, 82 FR 35082, July 28, 2017]

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§155.490   [Reserved]

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