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e-CFR data is current as of October 22, 2020

Title 33Chapter ISubchapter OPart 154 → Subpart P


Title 33: Navigation and Navigable Waters
PART 154—FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK


Subpart P—Marine Vapor Control Systems


Contents

General

§154.2000   Applicability.
§154.2001   Definitions.

Certifying Entities

§154.2010   Qualifications for acceptance as a certifying entity.
§154.2011   Application for acceptance as a certifying entity.

Certification, Recertification, and Operational Review

§154.2020   Certification and recertification—owner/operator responsibilities.
§154.2021   Operational review—owner/operator responsibilities.
§154.2022   Certification, recertification, or operational review—certifying entity responsibilities, generally.
§154.2023   Recertification—certifying entity responsibilities, generally.
§154.2024   Operational review—certifying entity responsibilities, generally.
§154.2025   Certification, recertification, or operational review—certifying entity documentation.

Personnel

§154.2030   Transfer facilities.
§154.2031   Tank barge cleaning facilities.

Transfer Facilities—VCS Design and Installation

§154.2100   Vapor control system, general.
§154.2101   Requirements for facility vapor connections.
§154.2102   Facility requirements for vessel liquid overfill protection.
§154.2103   Facility requirements for vessel vapor overpressure and vacuum protection.
§154.2104   Pigging system.
§154.2105   Fire, explosion, and detonation protection.
§154.2106   Detonation arresters installation.
§154.2107   Inerting, enriching, and diluting systems.
§154.2108   Vapor-moving devices.
§154.2109   Vapor recovery and vapor destruction units.
§154.2110   Vapor balancing requirements.
§154.2111   Vapor control system connected to a facility's main vapor control system.
§154.2112   Vapors with potential to polymerize or freeze—Special requirements.
§154.2113   Alkylene oxides—Special requirements.

Transfer Facilities—Operations

§154.2150   General requirements.

Alternative Analyzer and Pressure Sensor Reliability Testing

§154.2180   Alternative testing program—Generally.
§154.2181   Alternative testing program—Test requirements.

Tank Barge Cleaning Facilities—VCS Design and Installation

§154.2200   Applicable transfer facility design and installation requirements.
§154.2201   Vapor control system—general requirements.
§154.2202   Vapor line connections.
§154.2203   Facility requirements for barge vapor overpressure and vacuum protection.
§154.2204   Fire, explosion, and detonation protection.

Tank Barge Cleaning Facilities—Operations

§154.2250   General requirements.

Source: USCG-1999-5150, 78 FR 42618, July 16, 2013, unless otherwise noted.

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General

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§154.2000   Applicability.

(a) Except as specified by paragraphs (b) through (g) of this section, this subpart applies to—

(1) Each facility that controls vapors emitted to or from vessel cargo tanks;

(2) A vessel, other than a tank vessel, that has a vapor processing unit located onboard for recovery, destruction, or dispersion of vapors from a tank vessel's cargo tanks;

(3) Certifying entities that review, inspect, test, and certificate facility vapor control systems (VCSs); or

(4) A facility VCS that receives cargo vapor from a vessel when the VCS is connected to a facility's main VCS that serves plant processing areas, such as tank storage areas or tank truck or railcar loading areas, unrelated to tank vessel operations. The requirements of this subpart apply between the vessel vapor connection and the point where the VCS connects to the facility's main VCS.

(b) Each facility VCS that began operating on or after July 23, 1990, and that is certified as in compliance with 33 CFR part 154, subpart E on August 15, 2013, or each existing tank barge cleaning facility VCS that meets the safety Standards of Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular No. 1-96, must comply with 33 CFR part 154, subpart P by August 15, 2016. Certifications, approvals of alternatives, and grants of exemption in effect on August 15, 2013, remain in effect after that date and as specified in the certification, approval, or grant.

(c) A facility with a Coast Guard-approved VCS operating prior to July 23, 1990, must comply with 33 CFR 154.2150 but otherwise need not comply with this subpart so long as it does not have any design or configuration alterations after its approval and receives cargo vapor only from the specific vessels for which it was originally approved.

(d) A facility that uses a vapor balancing system to transfer vapor from a railcar or a tank truck to a vessel cargo tank while offloading the vessel must obtain approval in writing from the Commandant and make that approval available for Coast Guard inspection upon request.

(e) A facility that transfers vapor from a facility tank to a cargo tank of a vessel which is not offloading cargo must obtain approval in writing from the Commandant and make that approval available for Coast Guard inspection upon request.

(f) A tank vessel that has a permanent or portable vapor processing unit located onboard must comply with applicable requirements of this subpart and 46 CFR part 39.

(g) This subpart does not apply to the collection of vapors of liquefied flammable gases as defined in 46 CFR 30.10-39.

(h) This subpart does not require a facility or a vessel to control vapor, or a vessel to take away vapor from facilities; however, if a facility operates a VCS to control vapor to or from vessels, the facility must comply with the requirements of this subpart.

(i) In this subpart, regulatory measurements, whether in the metric or English system, are sometimes followed by approximate equivalent measurements in parentheses, which are given solely for the reader's convenience. Regulatory compliance with the regulatory measurement is required.

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§154.2001   Definitions.

As used in this subpart only:

Ambient temperature means the temperature of the environment in which an experiment is conducted or in which any physical or chemical event occurs.

Barge cargo connection means the point in a barge's cargo system where it connects with the hose assembly or loading arm used for cargo transfer.

Barge vapor connection means the point in a barge's piping system where it connects to a vapor collection hose or arm. This may be the same as the barge's cargo connection as it controls vapors during barge cargo tank-cleaning operations.

Base loading means a method of inerting, enriching, or diluting such that sufficient inerting, enriching, or diluting gas, for the worst concentration of vapor coming from the vessel, is injected into the vapor line during the entire loading operation so that the vapor mixture is inerted, enriched, or diluted at the maximum loading rate. For inerting and enriching systems, “worst concentration” means the vapor stream contains no cargo vapor. For a diluting system, “worst concentration” means the vapor stream is saturated with cargo vapor.

Captain of the Port (COTP) means the Coast Guard Captain of the Port as defined in 33 CFR 154.105.

Certifying entity means an individual or organization accepted by the Commandant to review plans, data, and calculations for vapor control system designs and to conduct inspections and observe tests of vapor control system installations.

Cleaning operation means any stripping, gas-freeing, or tank-washing operation of a barge's cargo tanks conducted at a cleaning facility.

Combustible liquid means any liquid that has a flashpoint above 80    °F (as determined from an open-cup tester, as used to test burning oils) and includes Grade D and Grade E combustible liquids defined in 46 CFR 30.10-15.

Commandant means Commandant (CG-ENG), U.S. Coast Guard, 2100 2nd St. SW., Stop 7126, Washington, DC 20593-7126.

Detonation arrester means a device that is acceptable to the Commandant and includes a detonation arrester that is designed, built, and tested in accordance with Appendix A of this part or by another method acceptable to the Commandant for arresting flames and detonations.

Diluting means introducing a non-flammable, non-combustible, and non-reactive gas with the objective of reducing the hydrocarbon content of a vapor mixture to below the lower flammable limit so that it will not burn.

Drip leg means a section of piping that extends below piping grade to collect liquid passing through the vapor line and that has a diameter no more than the diameter of the pipe in which it is installed.

Elevated temperature means the temperature that exceeds 70 percent of the auto-ignition temperature, in degrees Celsius, of the vapors being collected.

Enriching means introducing a flammable gas with the objective of raising the hydrocarbon content of a vapor mixture above the upper flammable limit so that it will not burn.

Existing vapor control system means a vapor control system that satisfies the requirements of 33 CFR part 154, subpart E as certified by a certifying entity, or a tank barge cleaning facility vapor control system that meets the safety Standards of Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular No. 1-96 as certified by a certifying entity or approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, and that began operating prior to August 15, 2013.

Facility main vapor control system means a vapor control system that primarily serves facility processing areas unrelated to tank vessel operations, such as the plant process, tank storage areas, or tank truck or railcar loading areas.

Facility operations manual means the manual required by 33 CFR 154.300, the contents of which are described in 33 CFR 154.310.

Facility vapor connection means the point in a facility's vapor collection system where it connects to a vapor collection hose or the base of a vapor collection arm and is located at the dock as close as possible to the tank vessel to minimize the length of the flexible vapor collection hose, thus reducing the hazards associated with the hose.

Fail-safe means a piece of equipment or instrument that is designed such that if any element should fail, it would go to a safe condition.

Fixed stripping line means a pipe extending to the low point of each cargo tank, welded through the deck and terminating above the deck with a valve plugged at the open end.

Flame arrester means a device that is designed, built, and tested in accordance with ASTM F 1273 or UL 525 (both incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106) for use in end-of-line applications for arresting flames.

Flame screen means a fitted single screen of corrosion-resistant wire of at least 30-by-30 mesh, or two fitted screens, both of corrosion-resistant wire, of at least 20-by-20 mesh, spaced apart not fewer than 12.7 millimeters (0.5 inch) or more than 38.1 millimeters (1.5 inches).

Flammable liquid means any liquid that gives off flammable vapors (as determined by flashpoint from an open-cup tester, as used to test burning oils) at or below a temperature of 80 °F, and includes Grades A, B, and C flammable liquids defined in 46 CFR 30.10-22.

Fluid displacement system means a system that removes vapors from a barge's cargo tanks during gas freeing through the addition of an inert gas or other medium into the cargo tank.

Fluid injection connection means the point in a fluid displacement system at which the fixed piping or hose that supplies the inert gas or other medium connects to a barge's cargo tanks or fixed piping system.

Gas freeing means the removal of vapors from a tank barge.

Grade A, B, C, D, or E means any Grade A, B, or C flammable liquid defined in 46 CFR 30.10-22 or any Grade D or E combustible liquid defined in 46 CFR 30.10-15.

High flash point cargoes means Grade E cargoes and cargoes having a closed-cup flash point higher than 60 °C (140 °F), carried at a temperature no higher than 5 °C (9 °F) below their flash points.

Inert condition or inerted means the oxygen content of the vapor space in a tank vessel's cargo tank is reduced to 60 percent or less by volume of the vapor's minimum oxygen concentration for combustion, or to 8 percent by volume or less for the vapor of crude oil, gasoline blends, or benzene, by addition of an inert gas, in accordance with the inert gas requirements of 46 CFR 32.53 or 46 CFR 153.500.

Inerting means introducing an inert gas into a tank and/or piping system to lower the oxygen content of a vapor mixture.

Line clearing means the transfer of residual cargo from a cargo loading line toward a cargo tank by using compressed inert gas.

Liquid knockout vessel means a device, other than a drip leg, used to separate liquid from vapor.

Maximum allowable gas-freeing rate means the maximum volumetric rate at which a barge may be gas-freed during cleaning operations.

Maximum allowable stripping rate means the maximum volumetric rate at which a barge may be stripped during cleaning operations prior to the opening of any hatch and/or fitting in the cargo tank being stripped.

Maximum allowable transfer rate means the maximum volumetric rate at which a vessel may receive cargo or ballast.

Minimum oxygen concentration for combustion or MOCC means the lowest level of oxygen in a vapor or a vapor mixture that will support combustion.

Multi-breasted barge-loading operations are those in which barges load side by side with the outboard barge's vapor collection system connected to a facility vapor connection through the inboard barge, as opposed to single-breasted operations involving a single barge, and may also be known as “two barge, double-up” loading operations.

Multiple facility vapor collection system junction means the point in the vapor collection system where two or more branch lines originating from separate facility vapor connections are connected.

New vapor control system means a vapor control system that is not an existing vapor control system.

Padding means introducing into a tank and associated piping system with an inert gas or liquid which separates the cargo from air, and maintaining the condition.

Partially inerted means the oxygen content of the vapor space in a tank is reduced to below what is normally present in the atmosphere by the addition of an inert gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide, but not to the concentration that meets the definition of “inert condition or inerted” in this section.

Pig means any device designed to maintain a tight seal within a cargo line while being propelled by compressed inert gas towards a cargo tank, for the purpose of transferring residual cargo from the cargo loading line to the cargo tank.

Pigging means the transfer of residual cargo from a cargo loading line by using compressed inert gas to propel a “pig” through the line toward a cargo tank.

Pre-transfer conference means the conference required by 33 CFR 156.120(w).

Purging means introducing an inert gas into a tank and/or piping system to further reduce the existing hydrocarbon and/or oxygen content to a level below which combustion cannot be supported if air is subsequently introduced into the tank or piping system.

Stripping means the removal, to the maximum extent practicable, of cargo residue remaining in the barge's cargo tanks and associated fixed piping system after cargo transfer or during cleaning operations.

Tank barge cleaning facility or TBCF means a facility used or capable of being used to conduct cleaning operations on a tank barge.

Transfer facility means a facility as defined in 33 CFR 154.105, excluding tank barge cleaning or stripping facilities.

Vacuum displacement system means a system that removes vapors from a barge's cargo tanks during gas freeing by sweeping air through the cargo tank hatch openings.

Vapor balancing means the transfer of vapor displaced by incoming cargo from the tank of a vessel or facility receiving cargo into a tank of the vessel or facility delivering cargo via facility vapor collection system.

Vapor collection system means an arrangement of piping and hoses used to collect vapor emitted to or from a vessel's cargo tanks and to transport the vapor to a vapor processing unit or a tank.

Vapor control system or VCS means an arrangement of piping and equipment used to control vapor emissions collected to or from a vessel and includes the vapor collection system and the vapor processing unit or a tank.

Vapor destruction unit means a vapor processing unit that destroys cargo vapor by a thermal destruction method.

Vapor dispersion unit means a vapor processing unit that releases cargo vapor into the atmosphere through a venting system not located on the tank vessel.

Vapor processing unit means the components of a vapor control system that recover, destroy, or disperse vapor collected from a vessel.

Vapor recovery unit means a vapor processing unit that recovers cargo vapor by nondestructive means.

Vessel vapor connection means the point in a vessel's fixed vapor collection system where it connects to a vapor collection hose or arm.

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Certifying Entities

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§154.2010   Qualifications for acceptance as a certifying entity.

To qualify for acceptance as a vapor control system (VCS) certifying entity, the entity must demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Commandant that it possesses the following minimum qualifications:

(a) The ability to review and evaluate design drawings and failure analyses for compliance to this subpart;

(b) The knowledge of the applicable regulations of this subpart, including the standards incorporated by reference;

(c) The ability to monitor and evaluate test procedures and results for compliance with the operational requirements of this subpart;

(d) The ability to perform inspections and observe tests of bulk liquid cargo-handling systems;

(e) The applicant must not be controlled by an owner or operator of a vessel or facility engaged in controlling vapor emissions;

(f) The applicant must not be dependent upon Coast Guard acceptance under this section to remain in business; and

(g) The person in charge of VCS certification must be a licensed professional engineer in a U.S. State or territory. A person in charge of VCS certification who is not a licensed professional engineer on August 15, 2013 must obtain that license from a U.S. State or territory by August 15, 2014.

[USCG-1999-5150, 78 FR 42618, July 16, 2013, as amended by 80 FR 7540, Feb. 11, 2015]

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§154.2011   Application for acceptance as a certifying entity.

(a) An applicant seeking Coast Guard acceptance as a certifying entity of vapor control systems (VCSs) must submit a signed, written application to the Commandant containing the information described in paragraph (b) of this section. The applicant's signature certifies that the information in the application is true and that the applicant is not dependent upon Coast Guard acceptance under this section to remain in business and constitutes consent for the Coast Guard to verify any information contained in the application, through personal examination of persons named in the application, or otherwise. If an applicant knowingly and willfully provides any false statement or misrepresentation, or conceals a material fact in the application, the application may be denied or terminated, and the applicant may be subject to prosecution under the provisions of 18 U.S.C. 1001.

(b) An application must include the following general information:

(1) The name and address of the applicant, including subsidiaries and divisions if applicable;

(2) A description of the experience and qualifications of any person who would review or test systems on behalf of the applicant, showing that the person is familiar with or otherwise qualified to implement Coast Guard VCS regulations; and

(3) A letter from a facility owner or operator stating his or her intent to use the services of the applicant to certify VCS installations.

(c) The Commandant reviews each application and either issues a letter of acceptance as a certifying entity to the applicant, or notifies the applicant that it is not accepted, and maintains a list of currently accepted certifying entities that is available to the public at http://homeport.uscg.mil.

(d) The acceptance of a certifying entity may be terminated by the Commandant for failure to review, inspect, or test a system properly in accordance with this subpart.

(e) A certifying entity may not certify a facility VCS if that certifying entity was involved in the design or installation of the system. “Design or installation” includes, but is not limited to—

(1) Performing system design calculations;

(2) Providing chemical data;

(3) Developing plans, specifications, and drawings;

(4) Conducting failure analysis; and

(5) Installing systems or components.

(f) A certifying entity may not recertify a VCS design, configuration, or operational change if it was involved in that change, and may not conduct an operational review of a VCS if it has been involved in the design, installation, or operation of the VCS.

(g) A certifying entity may not conduct the failure analysis of a facility VCS it is certifying. The certifying entity may only point out shortcomings shown by the failure analysis and may not propose changes to correct the shortcomings.

(h) A certifying entity may not certify the VCS of any vessel or facility owner or operator that owns or has a controlling interest in the certifying entity.

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Certification, Recertification, and Operational Review

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§154.2020   Certification and recertification—owner/operator responsibilities.

(a) Prior to operating, a new vapor control system (VCS) installation must be certified under 33 CFR 154.2023 by a certifying entity as meeting the requirements of this subpart.

(b) A certified VCS or a Coast Guard-approved VCS must be recertified by a certifying entity under 33 CFR 154.2023 before it can—

(1) Control vapors other than those for which it was originally certified;

(2) Receive vapors from vessels other than those for which it was approved, if the VCS was in operation prior to July 23, 1990;

(3) Operate under any changed design or configuration;

(4) Operate as part of multi-breasted barge-loading operations, if the VCS was not originally approved or certified for such operations; or

(5) Be connected to a tank vessel if a pigging system is used to clear cargo in the cargo line back to the tank vessel.

(c) For a transfer facility, prior to operating a VCS to control vapor from a tank vessel during cargo loading line pigging to clear cargo in the cargo loading line back to the tank vessel, the cargo loading line pigging system must be reviewed by a certifying entity as meeting the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2104.

(d) To apply for certification, the owner or operator of a facility VCS must submit plans, calculations, specifications, and other related information, including a qualitative failure analysis, to the certifying entity. Suggested, but not mandatory, guidance for preparing a qualitative failure analysis can be found in the American Institute of Chemical Engineers publication “Guidelines for Hazard Evaluation Procedures,” and in Military Standard MIL-STD-882B for a quantitative failure analysis. For assistance in locating those publications, contact the Commandant (CG-ENG), Attn: Office of Design and Engineering Standards, U.S. Coast Guard Stop 7509, Washington, DC 20593-7509, telephone 202-372-1418 or via email at Hazmatstandards@uscg.mil. The analysis must demonstrate that—

(1) The VCS can operate continuously and safely while controlling cargo vapors to or from tankships or tank barges over the full range of transfer rates expected at the facility;

(2) The VCS has the proper alarms and automatic shutdown systems required by this subpart to prevent an unsafe operation;

(3) The VCS has sufficient automatic or passive devices to minimize damage to personnel, property, and the environment if an accident were to occur;

(4) If a quantitative failure analysis is also conducted, the level of safety attained is at least one order of magnitude greater than that calculated for operating without a VCS; and

(5) If a facility uses a cargo line pigging system to clear cargo in the cargo line back to the tank vessel with the VCS connected, the qualitative failure analysis must demonstrate that the cargo line pigging system has at least the same levels of safety required by paragraphs (d)(1), (2), and (3) of this section to prevent overpressure of the vessel's cargo tanks and account for the probability that the pig is destroyed during line-pigging operations.

(e) The VCS owner or operator must maintain at the facility—

(1) A copy of VCS design documentation, including plans, drawings, calculations, and specifications for the VCS;

(2) The facility operations manual, including the list of cargoes that the facility is approved to vapor control;

(3) Any certification or recertification letter issued under 33 CFR 154.2023; and

(4) Other records as required by 33 CFR 154.740.

[USCG-1999-5150, 78 FR 42618, July 16, 2013, as amended by USCG-2014-0410, 79 FR 38436, July 7, 2014; 80 FR 7540, Feb. 11, 2015]

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§154.2021   Operational review—owner/operator responsibilities.

(a) Each facility vapor control system (VCS) must undergo an operational review by a certifying entity within five years of its initial certification or last operational review, to ensure its proper operation and maintenance.

(b) The VCS owner or operator must coordinate with the certifying entity and provide the entity with all necessary documentation and records to conduct the operational review.

(c) The VCS owner or operator must notify the Captain of the Port (COTP) of a scheduled operational review. The COTP, at his or her discretion, may observe the operational review.

(d) The VCS owner or operator must maintain, at the facility, the latest operational review letter issued under 33 CFR 154.2023.

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§154.2022   Certification, recertification, or operational review—certifying entity responsibilities, generally.

Before the initial certification of a facility vapor control system (VCS), the certifying entity must perform each of the tasks specified in this section.

(a) Review all VCS design documentation, including plans, drawings, calculations, specifications, and failure analysis, to ensure that the VCS design meets the requirements of this subpart.

(b) Conduct an initial onsite inspection to ensure that the VCS installation conforms to the VCS plans, drawings, and specifications reviewed.

(c) Conduct onsite reviews and observe tests to ensure the VCS's proper operation in accordance with its design and compliance with applicable regulations and the facility's operations manual and to ensure that—

(1) Each alarm and shutdown shown on the piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&IDs) and reviewed in the hazard analysis as part of the system responds properly, through simulation of emergency conditions to activate the alarm or shutdown;

(2) Maximum vacuum cannot be exceeded at the maximum operating conditions of any vapor-moving device, through testing of the vacuum breaker;

(3) VCS shutdown occurs correctly, through the startup of the VCS and tripping of each shutdown loop while the VCS is not connected to a vessel;

(4) VCS startup, normal operation, and shutdown occur properly, through observing the relevant portions of a test loading or unloading of one vessel, or a test cleaning of one tank barge at a tank barge cleaning facility; and that

(5) The automatic liquid block valve successfully stops flow of liquid to the vessel during a system shutdown, through observing the relevant portions of a test loading or test cargo tank cleaning.

(d) Review, for each cargo vapor the VCS will control, the cargo's chemical data and the VCS design to ensure that—

(1) Each vapor-controlled chemical is either specified in writing by the Commandant or listed in 46 CFR 30.25-1, 46 CFR 151.05, or Table 1 or Table 2 of 46 CFR 153;

(2) Each chemical's maximum experimental safe gap, minimum oxygen concentration for combustion (MOCC), and upper and lower limits of flammability have been correctly determined (this may but need not be in compliance with Coast Guard guidance available at http://homeport.uscg.mil);

(3) Vapor properties and characteristics are addressed, including freezing point, polymerization potential, solubility, and cargo compatibility;

(4) The flash point for any cargo with a closed-cup flash point of 60 °C (140 °F) or higher is properly determined;

(5) The cargo's vapor growth rate has been correctly determined and the VCS complies with 33 CFR 154.2103(a) and (b) or 33 CFR 154.2203(a) or (b);

(6) Each detonation arrester used in the VCS is correct for each chemical's maximum experimental safe gap;

(7) Setpoints for each oxygen analyzer used in the VCS are correct for each chemical's MOCC;

(8) Setpoints for each oxygen or hydrocarbon analyzer used in the VCS are correct for each chemical's upper or lower flammability limit;

(9) The inerting, enriching, or dilution system used is adequate;

(10) Each vapor-controlled chemical is compatible with all VCS components and with other chemicals and with inerting, enriching, or diluting gases added to the VCS per 46 CFR part 150, Table I and Table II;

(11) The VCS's mechanical equipment and system are suitable;

(12) The VCS's vapor recovery or destruction unit has adequate capacity and is safe for each chemical;

(13) Any calculation to determine the duration of purging required by 33 CFR 154.2150(p) is correct; and that

(14) The VCS's failure analysis addresses any hazards presented with each chemical.

(e) Review the VCS prior to certifying it to control vapors from barge cargo tanks during multi-breasted barge loading operations, to confirm that—

(1) The overfill control system required by 33 CFR 154.2102 will process a liquid overfill condition within any one cargo tank on each barge;

(2) If multi-breasted loading is conducted using more than one liquid transfer hose from the shore facility, the facility is capable of activating the emergency shutdown system required by 33 CFR 154.550, and can automatically stop the cargo flow to each transfer hose simultaneously, in the event an upset condition occurs that closes the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a);

(3) The facility operations manual has been modified to include the procedures for multi-breasted barge-loading operations; and

(4) The facility operations manual describes how to make proper connections, on the facility side, between the alarm and shutdown systems of the VCS and of each barge being loaded.

(f) Review a cargo line pigging system that will be used to clear cargo in the cargo line back to a tank vessel for compliance with 33 CFR 154.2104.

(g) Review the facility operations manual for compliance with 33 CFR 154.310(b).

(h) Review any test program used for instrument testing and calibration for compliance with 33 CFR 154.2180 and 33 CFR 154.2181.

(i) Review the facility's VCS training program for compliance with 33 CFR 154.2030 and 154.2031.

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§154.2023   Recertification—certifying entity responsibilities, generally.

(a) Before the recertification of a facility vapor control system (VCS) the certifying entity must perform the reviews specified in 33 CFR 154.2022, except paragraphs (a) through (c).

(b) The certifying entity must review, inspect, and observe tests of a facility VCS's design or configuration alteration before recertifying a VCS that was certified or approved for operation prior to July 23, 1990, to ensure that the altered system complies with applicable regulations. In general, the certifying entity should perform the review, inspection, and observe tests as specified in 33 CFR 154.2022(a) through (c). However, depending on the extent of the alteration, the review, inspection, or test observing may not need to be as comprehensive as those for an initial certification.

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§154.2024   Operational review—certifying entity responsibilities, generally.

In conducting an operational review the certifying entity must ensure that the vapor control system (VCS) is properly operating and maintained by performing the tasks specified in this section.

(a) Ensure the completeness, currency, and accuracy of the facility operations manual, training plans, and VCS test procedures.

(b) Confirm through training records that the current listed available facility persons in charge have been trained in compliance with 33 CFR 154.2030 or 154.2031.

(c) Confirm that recordkeeping and testing and inspection comply with 33 CFR 154.740 and 156.170.

(d) Verify that there has been no change to the VCS equipment or instrumentation since the last certification, recertification, or operational review to ensure that the certification letter is current.

(e) Verify proper marking, labeling, maintenance, and operation of VCS components, through visual inspection.

(f) Confirm that the originally certified liquid cargo transfer rate can still be attained in compliance with 33 CFR 154.2103 and 154.2107.

(g) Ensure that cargo transfer or tank-cleaning barge operational procedures are properly followed and the VCS operates properly, through observation of the initial stages of transfer or cleaning, including 24-hour pre-transfer tests required by 33 CFR 154.2150(b) or 33 CFR 154.2250(b), the pre-transfer conference, and initial system startup procedures.

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§154.2025   Certification, recertification, or operational review—certifying entity documentation.

(a) If the certifying entity is satisfied that the facility's vapor control system (VCS) has successfully undergone the reviews, inspections, and tests required by 33 CFR 154.2022(a) for certification or recertification, and that the VCS will operate properly and safely, the certifying entity must certify or recertify the VCS by issuing a certification letter to the facility owner or operator, and by sending copies of the letter to the Captain of the Port (COTP) and the Commandant. The certification letter must refer by date to the certifying entity's letter of acceptance issued under 33 CFR 154.2011(c), and must—

(1) State that the facility complies with applicable regulations and with its operations manual, and list any exemptions to the applicable regulations that have been approved by the Coast Guard;

(2) Report on all reviews, inspections, and tests undergone by the VCS in accordance with 33 CFR 154.2022(a);

(3) List all plans and drawings that were reviewed by the certifying entity;

(4) State if the VCS may control vapors from tank barges that are required to have a shore-side, explosion-proof receptacle or an overfill control system required by 33 CFR 154.2102(a) and (b); and

(5) List all cargoes that the certifying entity approves for control by the VCS.

(b) If the certifying entity is satisfied that the facility's VCS has successfully undergone the operational review required by 33 CFR 154.2022(b), the certifying entity must issue an operational review letter to the facility owner or operator, and send copies of the letter to the COTP and the Commandant. The operational review letter must—

(1) List each item reviewed and inspected;

(2) Describe the transfer or cleaning operation observed; and

(3) Summarize the review's results.

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Personnel

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§154.2030   Transfer facilities.

(a) Personnel in charge of a transfer operation using a vapor control system (VCS) must have completed a training program covering the particular VCS installed at the facility. As part of the training program, personnel must be able to demonstrate, through drills and display of practical knowledge, the proper VCS operational procedures for normal and emergency conditions. The training program must cover the following subjects:

(1) Purpose of the VCS;

(2) Principles of the VCS;

(3) Components of the VCS;

(4) Hazards associated with the VCS;

(5) Coast Guard regulations in this subpart;

(6) Operating procedures, including:

(i) Transfer, testing, and inspection requirements;

(ii) Pre-transfer procedures;

(iii) Chemicals approved for collection;

(iv) Material safety data sheet review;

(v) Connection procedures;

(vi) Startup procedures;

(vii) Normal operating conditions and how to handle deviations from normal conditions;

(viii) Normal shutdown procedures; and

(ix) Operating procedures for cargo line clearing if a cargo line clearance system is installed in accordance with 33 CFR 154.2104; and

(7) Emergency procedures.

(b) Personnel overseeing VCS maintenance must be familiar with—

(1) Inspection of detonation arresters; and

(2) Procedures for equipment and instrumentation testing required by 33 CFR 156.170(g).

(c) Facility personnel in charge of a transfer operation using a VCS must be designated and qualified in compliance with 33 CFR 154.710 and the facility must maintain the training documentation required by 33 CFR 154.740(b).

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§154.2031   Tank barge cleaning facilities.

(a) In addition to complying with 33 CFR 154.2030, a tank barge cleaning facility (TBCF) person-in-charge (PIC) of a barge cargo tank-cleaning operation that uses a vapor control system (VCS) must complete a training program covering the particular systems installed at the facility and on the barge. As part of the training program, personnel must be able to demonstrate, through drills and practical knowledge, the proper VCS operation procedures for normal and emergency conditions. The training program must—

(1) Satisfy the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2030(a)(1) through (7), except (a)(6)(i), (ii), and (ix), and 33 CFR 154.2030(b) and cover—

(i) Purpose, principles, components, and hazards associated with stripping and gas-freeing;

(ii) Special hazards associated with the accumulation and discharge of static electricity; and

(iii) Operating procedures, including cleaning, testing, and inspection requirements; pre-cleaning procedures; and safeguards to prevent static electricity discharge.

(b) In addition to the requirements contained in 33 CFR 154.710, no person may serve, and the facility operator may not use the services of anyone, as a facility PIC of a cleaning operation unless the person has been properly trained and certified by the facility with a minimum of 60 hours of experience in cleaning operations.

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Transfer Facilities—VCS Design and Installation

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§154.2100   Vapor control system, general.

(a) Vapor control system (VCS) design and installation must eliminate potential overpressure and vacuum hazards, overfill hazards, sources of ignition, and mechanical damage to the maximum practicable extent. Each remaining hazard source that is not eliminated must be specifically addressed in the protection system design and system operational requirements.

(b) Vapor collection system pipe and fitting components must be in accordance with ANSI B31.3 (incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106) with a maximum allowable working pressure (MAWP) of at least 150 pounds per square inch gauge (psig). Valves must be in accordance with ASME B16.34, 150 pound class (incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106). Flanges must be in accordance with ANSI B16.5 or ANSI B16.24, 150 pound class (both incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106). The following components and their associated equipment do not have a minimum specified MAWP, but must be constructed to acceptable engineering standards and have the appropriate mechanical strength to serve the intended purpose: knockout drums, liquid seals, blowers/compressors, flare stacks/incinerators, and other vapor processing units.

(c) All VCS electrical equipment must comply with NFPA 70 (2011) (incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106).

(d) Any pressure, flow, or concentration indication required by this part must provide a remote indicator on the facility where the cargo transfer system and VCS are controlled, unless the local indicator is clearly visible and readable from the operator's normal position at the control stations.

(e) Any condition requiring an alarm as specified in this part must activate an audible and visible alarm where the cargo transfer and VCSs are controlled.

(f) For a VCS installed after August 15, 2013, an alarm or shutdown must be activated if electrical continuity of an alarm or shutdown sensor required by this subpart is lost.

(g) The VCS piping surface temperature must not exceed 177 °C (350    °F) or 70 percent of the auto-ignition temperature in degrees Celsius of the vapors being transferred, whichever is lower, during normal operations. This must be achieved by either separating or insulating the entire VCS from external heat sources.

(h) The VCS must be equipped with a mechanism to eliminate any liquid condensate from the vapor collection system that carries over from the vessel or condenses as a result of an enrichment process.

(1) If a liquid knockout vessel is installed to eliminate any liquid condensate, it must have—

(i) A mechanism to indicate the level of liquid in the device;

(ii) A high liquid level sensor that activates an alarm, meeting the requirements of paragraph (e) of this section;

(iii) A high-high liquid level sensor that closes the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a), and shuts down any vapor-moving devices before carrying liquid over from the vessel to the vapor-moving device. One sensor with two stages may accomplish both this requirement and the requirement of paragraph (h)(1)(ii) of this section; and

(2) If a drip leg is used to eliminate any liquid condensate, it must be fitted with a mechanism to remove liquid from the low point.

(i) Vapor collection piping must be electrically grounded and must be electrically continuous.

(j) If the facility handles inerted vapors of cargoes containing sulfur, the facility must control heating from pyrophoric iron sulfide deposits in the vapor collection line.

(k) All VCS equipment and components, including piping, hoses, valves, flanges, fittings, and gaskets, must be suitable for use with the vapor in the VCS.

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§154.2101   Requirements for facility vapor connections.

(a) A remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve must be installed in the vapor collection line between the facility vapor connection and the nearest point where any inerting, enriching, or diluting gas is introduced into the vapor collection line, or where a detonation arrester is fitted. The valve must—

(1) Close within 30 seconds after detection of a shutdown condition of any component required by this subpart;

(2) Close automatically if the control signal or electrical power to the system is interrupted;

(3) Activate an alarm meeting 33 CFR 154.2100(e) when a signal to shut down is received from a component;

(4) Be capable of manual operation or manual activation;

(5) Have a local valve position indicator, or be designed so that the valve position can be readily determined from the valve handle or valve stem position; and

(6) If the valve seat is fitted with resilient material, be a Category A valve as defined by 46 CFR 56.20-15 and not allow appreciable leakage when the resilient material is damaged or destroyed.

(b) Except when a vapor collection arm is used, the first 1 meter (3.3 feet) of vapor piping downstream of the facility vapor connection must be—

(1) Painted in the sequence of red/yellow/red. The width of the red bands must be 0.1 meter (0.33 foot) and the width of the middle yellow band must be 0.8 meter (2.64 feet); and

(2) Labeled with the word “VAPOR” painted in black letters at least 50.8 millimeters (2 inches) high.

(c) Each facility vapor connection flange face must have a permanent stud projecting outward that is 12.7 millimeters (0.5 inch) in diameter and is at least 25.4 millimeters (1 inch) long. The stud must be located at the top of the flange face, midway between boltholes, and in line with the bolthole pattern.

(d) Each hose that transfers vapors must—

(1) Have a design burst pressure of at least 25 pounds per square inch gauge (psig);

(2) Have a maximum allowable working pressure no less than 5 psig;

(3) Be capable of withstanding at least a 2 pounds per square inch (psi) vacuum without collapsing or constricting;

(4) Be electrically continuous with a maximum resistance of 10,000 ohms;

(5) Have flanges with—

(i) A bolthole arrangement complying with the requirements for 150 pound class flanges, ANSI B16.5 (incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106); and

(ii) One or more 15.9 millimeter (0.625 inch) diameter holes in the flange face, located midway between boltholes, and in line with the bolthole pattern;

(6) Be resistant to abrasion and kinking;

(7) Be compatible with vapors being controlled; and

(8) Have the last 1 meter (3.3 feet) of each end of the vapor hose marked in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section.

(e) Vapor hoses must be adequately supported to prevent kinking, collapse, or contact with any metal of the vessel or facility to prevent unintentional electrical bypassing of the insulating flange or the single length of non-conducting hose required by paragraph (g) of this section.

(f) Fixed vapor collection arms must—

(1) Meet the requirements of paragraphs (d)(1) through (5) of this section; and

(2) Have the last 1 meter (3.3 feet) of the arm marked in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section.

(g) The facility vapor connection must be electrically insulated from the vessel vapor connection in accordance with OCIMF ISGOTT section 17.5 (incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106). In order to prevent electrical arcing during connection and disconnection of the transfer hose/arm, the transfer hose/arm must be fitted with an insulating flange or a single length of non-conducting hose to ensure electrical discontinuity between the vessel and facility. The insulating flange/hose should be inserted at the jetty end and must not be electrically bypassed. The installation, inspection, and testing of the insulating flange/hose must be in accordance with 46 CFR 35.35-4. For each vapor hose, only one insulting flange or non-conductive hose must be provided. See 46 CFR 35.35-4.

(h) A vapor collection system, fitted with a gas injection system that operates at a positive gauge pressure at the facility vapor connection, must be fitted with a means to prevent backflow of vapor to the vessel's vapor collection system during loading.

(i) Electrical bonding between vessel and shore must be in accordance with 46 CFR 35.35-.5.

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§154.2102   Facility requirements for vessel liquid overfill protection.

This section does not apply to facilities collecting vapors emitted from vessel cargo tanks while inerting, padding, or purging the cargo tanks with an inert gas and not loading cargo into the cargo tank.

(a) Each facility that receives cargo vapor from a tank barge that is fitted with overfill protection, in accordance with 46 CFR 39.2009(a)(1)(iii), must provide a 120-volt, 20-amp explosion-proof receptacle for the overfill protection system that meets—

(1) ANSI NEMA WD-6 (incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106);

(2) NFPA 70 (2011), Articles 406.9 and 501.145 (incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106); and

(3) 46 CFR 111.105-9.

(b) Each facility that receives cargo vapor from a tank barge that is fitted with an intrinsically safe cargo tank level sensor system complying with 46 CFR 39.2009(a)(2), as a means of overfill protection, must have an overfill control system on the dock capable of powering and receiving an alarm and shutdown signal from the cargo tank level sensor system that—

(1) Closes the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a) and activates the emergency shutdown system required by 33 CFR 154.550 when—

(i) A tank overfill signal is received from the barge; or

(ii) Electrical continuity of the cargo tank level sensor system is interrupted;

(2) Activates an audible and visible alarm that warns barge and facility personnel when a tank overfill signal, or an optional high-level signal corresponding to a liquid level lower than the tank overfill sensor setting, is received from the barge;

(3) Has a mechanism to test the alarms and automatic shutdown systems electrically and mechanically before operating the vapor control system (VCS);

(4) Has suitable means, such as approved intrinsic safety barriers able to accept passive devices, so that the overfill and optional alarm circuits on the barge side of the overfill control system, including cabling, normally closed switches, and pin and sleeve connectors, are intrinsically safe;

(5) Is labeled at the dock with the maximum allowable inductance (in millihenrys) and capacitance (in microfarads) to be connected to the facility overfill protection system as specified by the equipment manufacturer; and

(6) Has a female connecting plug for the tank barge level sensor system with a five-wire, 16-ampere connector body meeting IEC 60309-1 and IEC 60309-2 (both incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106), that is—

(i) Configured with pins S2 (N) and R1 (L3) for the tank overfill sensor circuit, pin G connected to the cabling shield, and pins N (L2) and T3 (L1) reserved for an optional high-level alarm connection;

(ii) Labeled “Connector for Barge Overfill Control System”; and

(iii) Connected to the overfill control system by a shielded flexible cable.

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§154.2103   Facility requirements for vessel vapor overpressure and vacuum protection.

In this section, the requirements of having a flame arrester or a flame screen at the opening of a pressure relief valve or a vacuum relief valve apply only to facilities collecting vapors of flammable, combustible, or non-high flash point liquid cargoes.

(a) A facility's vapor control system (VCS) must have the capacity for collecting cargo vapor at a rate of not less than the facility's maximum liquid transfer rate for cargoes that are vapor controlled plus the vapor growth for the cargoes and any inerting, diluting, or enriching gas that may be added to the system. Vapor growth must be considered as 25 percent of the cargo's saturated vapor pressure in pounds per square inch absolute (psia) at 115    °F, divided by 12.5 psia (the vapor pressure of gasoline at 115    °F), times the facility's maximum liquid transfer rate, unless there is experimental data for actual vapor growth for turbulent transferring under the most severe conditions for vapor growth. If the cargo is transferred at temperatures above 115    °F, the cargo's true vapor pressure (in psia) at the transferring temperature must be used when determining the vapor growth.

(b) A facility VCS must be designed to prevent the pressure in a vessel's cargo tanks from going below 80 percent of the highest setting of any of the vessel's vacuum relief valves or exceeding 80 percent of the lowest setting of any of the vessel's pressure relief valves for a non-inerted tank vessel. A facility VCS also must be designed to prevent the pressure in a vessel's cargo tanks from going below 0.2 pounds per square inch gauge (psig) or exceeding 80 percent of the lowest setting of any of the vessel's pressure relief valves for an inerted tank vessel. The system must sustain the pressure in the vessel's cargo tanks within this range at any cargo transfer rate less than or equal to the maximum transfer rate determined at the pre-transfer conference.

(c) The pressure measured at the facility vapor connection must be corrected for pressure drops across the vessel's vapor collection system, vapor collection hose or arm, and vapor line up to the location of the pressure sensor.

(d) The facility vapor connection must have a pressure-sensing device that meets the installation requirements of paragraph (h) of this section, which activates an alarm that meets 33 CFR 154.2100(e) when the pressure at the facility vapor connection exceeds either—

(1) The pressure corresponding to the upper pressure determined in paragraph (b) of this section; or

(2) A lower pressure agreed upon at the pre-transfer conference.

(e) If a facility draws vapor from a vessel with a vapor-moving device, the facility vapor connection must have a pressure-sensing device, which activates an alarm meeting 33 CFR 154.2100(e) when the pressure at the facility vapor connection falls below either—

(1) The pressure corresponding to the lower pressure determined in paragraph (b) of this section; or

(2) A higher pressure agreed upon at the pre-transfer conference.

(f) The facility vapor connection must have a pressure-sensing device, independent of the device used to activate the alarm required by paragraph (d) of this section, meeting the installation requirements of paragraph (h) of this section, which activates the emergency shutdown system required by 33 CFR 154.550 when the pressure at the facility vapor connection exceeds the lower of the following:

(1) A pressure corresponding to 90 percent of the vessel's lowest pressure relief valve setting, corrected for pressure drops across the vessel's vapor collection system, the vapor collection hose or arm, and any vapor line up to the point where the pressure sensor is located;

(2) A pressure corresponding to 90 percent of the setting of the pressure relief valve at the facility vapor connection, if the facility vapor connection is installed with a pressure relief valve; or

(3) A lower pressure than the pressure in paragraphs (f)(1) and (f)(2) of this section that is agreed upon at the pre-transfer conference.

(g) If a facility draws vapors from a vessel with a vapor-moving device, the facility vapor connection must have a pressure-sensing device, independent of the device used to activate the alarm required by paragraph (e) of this section, which closes the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a) when the vacuum at the facility vapor connection is more than the higher (lesser vacuum) of the following:

(1) A vacuum corresponding to 90 percent of the vessel's highest vacuum relief valve setting;

(2) A vacuum corresponding to 90 percent of the setting of the vacuum relief valve at the facility vapor connection, if the facility vapor connection is installed with a vacuum relief valve; or

(3) A lesser vacuum than the vacuum in paragraphs (g)(1) and (g)(2) of this section that is agreed upon at the pre-transfer conference.

(h) The pressure-sensing devices required by paragraphs (d) and (f) of this section must be located in the vapor collection line between the facility vapor connection and the following:

(1) Any isolation valve, unless an interlock is provided that prevents operation of the system when the isolation valve is closed; and

(2) Any components that could plug and cause a blockage in the vapor line.

(i) A pressure-indicating device must be provided that displays the pressure in the vapor collection line between the facility vapor connection and any isolation valve or any devices which could cause a blockage in the vapor line.

(j) If a facility draws vapor from the vessel with a vapor-moving device capable of drawing more than 1 pound per square inch (psi) vacuum, a vacuum relief valve must be installed in the vapor collection line between the vapor-moving device and the facility vapor connection, which—

(1) Relieves at a predetermined pressure such that the pressure at the facility vapor connection is maintained at −1.0 psig (1.0 psig vacuum) or less vacuum;

(2) Has a relieving capacity equal to or greater than the capacity of the vapor-moving device;

(3) Has a flame arrester or flame screen fitted at the vacuum relief opening; and

(4) Has been tested for relieving capacity in accordance with paragraph 1.5.1.3 of API 2000 (incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106) with a flame arrester or flame screen fitted.

(k) When a facility collects cargo vapor through an extensive length of vapor piping, such as an undersea pipeline from a vessel moored offshore, before reaching the first pressure sensor and vacuum relief valve, the vacuum relief valve may be set at a vacuum greater than 1 psi vacuum, provided the pressure controls take into account the pressure drop across the vessel's vapor collection system, any vapor collection hoses, and the vapor piping as a function of the actual transfer rate.

(l) If the pressure in the vapor collection system can exceed 1.5 psig during a malfunction of a pressure regulator or control valve in an inerting, enriching, or diluting system, a pressure relief valve must—

(1) Be located between where the inerting, enriching, or diluting gas is introduced into the vapor collection system and the facility vapor connection;

(2) Relieve at the higher of the following two pressures:

(i) A pressure such that the pressure at the facility vapor connection does not exceed 1.5 psig; or

(ii) The lowest pressure relief valve setting of vessels that control vapors at the facility;

(3) Have a relieving capacity equal to or greater than the maximum capacity of the facility inerting, enriching, or diluting gas source flowing through the failed pressure regulator or control valve, taking into account the pressure drops across any flame arrester or discharge piping fitted at the relief valve's discharge;

(4) Have a flame arrester or flame screen fitted at the discharge opening, if the design does not secure a minimum vapor discharge velocity of 30 meters (98.4 feet) per second; and

(5) Have been tested for relieving capacity in accordance with paragraph 1.5.1.3 of API 2000.

(m) The relieving capacity test required by paragraph (l)(5) of this section must be carried out with a flame screen fitted at the discharge opening if—

(1) The design of the pressure relief valve does not secure a minimum vapor discharge velocity of 30 meters (98.4 feet) per second; and

(2) The discharge is not fitted with a flame arrester.

(n) A facility that collects vapors emitted from vessel cargo tanks while inerting, padding, or purging cargo tanks must—

(1) Provide a pressure-sensing device that activates an alarm meeting 33 CFR 154.2100(e) when the pressure of the inerting, padding, or purging gas exceeds either the pressure corresponding to the higher pressure determined in paragraph (b) of this section or a lower pressure agreed upon at the pre-transfer conference;

(2) Provide a pressure-sensing device, independent of the device required by paragraph (n)(1) of this section, which automatically stops the flow of inerting, padding, or purging gas to the vessel when the pressure of the inerting, padding, or purging gas exceeds 90 percent of the lowest setting of any pressure relief valve on the vessel; and

(3) Locate the pressure-sensing devices required by paragraphs (n)(1) and (n)(2) of this section in the inerting, padding, or purging gas piping downstream of any devices in the gas piping that could potentially isolate the vessel from the sensing devices.

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§154.2104   Pigging system.

(a) If a pigging system is used to clear cargo in the cargo lines to the tank vessel while the vessel is connected to the facility vapor control system (VCS), the pigging system must be designed with the following safety features:

(1) A bypass loop installed in the main liquid cargo line that contains the pig-receiving device, through which all the liquid flow is channeled during pigging operations. The pig must act as a seal to separate the vessel from the compressed inert gas that is used to propel it as the pig travels from the pig launcher to the pig-receiving device;

(2) A mechanism for restricting liquid and gas flow so that the vessel, personnel, and environment are not endangered. The compressed inert gas flow capacity that this mechanism secures must not be more than 95 percent of the combined capacity of all vessel and facility VCS relief valves located upstream of the facility's remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a);

(3) A fast-action automatic shutoff valve such as a solenoid valve, which closes on a high-pressure signal from the pressure sensor required by 33 CFR 154.2103(f), located in the liquid bypass loop downstream of the pig-receiving device;

(4) An interlock with the main cargo line manual block valve so that line-clearing operations cannot begin unless the main cargo line manual block valve is closed; and

(5) An automatic means to detect arrival of the pig at the pig-receiving device.

(b) If a cargo line clearance system without using pigging is used to clear cargo in the cargo lines to the tank vessel while the vessel is connected to the facility VCS, the cargo line clearance system must be approved by the Commandant.

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§154.2105   Fire, explosion, and detonation protection.

This section applies only to facilities that control vapors of flammable, combustible, or non-high flash point liquid cargoes.

(a) A vapor control system (VCS) with a single facility vapor connection that receives inerted cargo vapor from a vessel and processes it with a vapor recovery unit must—

(1) Be capable of inerting the vapor collection line in accordance with 33 CFR 154.2107(a) before receiving the vessel's vapor and have at least one oxygen analyzer, which satisfies the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2107(f)(1) and (2), (g), and (h)(2) and (3), sampling the vapor concentration continuously at a point as close as practicable to the facility vapor connection. The total pipe length between the analyzer and the facility vapor connection must not exceed 6 meters (19.7 feet); or

(2) Have a detonation arrester located as close as practicable to the facility vapor connection. The total pipe length between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must not exceed 18 meters (59.1 feet) and the vapor piping between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must be protected from any potential internal or external ignition source.

(b) A VCS with a single facility vapor connection that receives only inerted cargo vapor from a vessel and processes it with a vapor destruction unit must—

(1) Satisfy the requirements of paragraph (a)(1) of this section and have a detonation arrester located as close as practicable to the facility vapor connection. The oxygen analyzer required by paragraph (a)(1) can be located 4 meters (13.1 feet) downstream of the detonation arrester. The total pipe length between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must not exceed 18 meters (59.1 feet) and the vapor piping between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must be protected from any potential internal or external ignition source; or

(2) Have an inerting system that meets the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2107.

(c) A VCS with a single facility vapor connection that receives vapor from a vessel with cargo tanks that are not inerted or are partially inerted, and processes it with a vapor recovery unit must—

(1) Have a detonation arrester located as close as practicable to the facility vapor connection. The total pipe length between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must not exceed 18 meters (59.1 feet) and the vapor piping between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must be protected from any potential internal or external ignition source; or

(2) Have an inerting, enriching, or diluting system that meets the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2107.

(d) A VCS with a single facility vapor connection that receives vapor from a vessel with cargo tanks that are not inerted or are partially inerted, and processes the vapor with a vapor destruction unit must—

(1) Have a detonation arrester located as close as practicable to the facility vapor connection. The total pipe length between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must not exceed 18 meters (59.1 feet) and the vapor piping between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must be protected from any potential internal or external ignition source; and

(2) Have an inerting, enriching, or diluting system that satisfies the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2107.

(e) A VCS with multiple facility vapor connections that receives vapor from vessels with cargo tanks that carry inerted, partially inerted, non-inerted, or combinations of inerted, partially inerted, and non-inerted cargoes, and processes them with a vapor recovery unit, must have a detonation arrester located as close as practicable to each facility vapor connection. The total pipe length between the detonation arrester and each facility vapor connection must not exceed 18 meters (59.1 feet) and the vapor piping between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must be protected from any potential internal or external ignition source.

(f) A VCS with multiple facility vapor connections that receives only inerted cargo vapor from vessels and processes it with a vapor destruction unit must—

(1) Satisfy the requirements of paragraph (a)(1) of this section for each facility vapor connection and have a detonation arrester located as close as practicable to each facility vapor connection. The oxygen analyzer required by paragraph (a)(1) can be located 4 meters (13.1 feet) downstream of the detonation arrester. The total pipe length between the detonation arrester and each facility vapor connection must not exceed 18 meters (59.1 feet) and the vapor piping between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must be protected from any potential internal or external ignition source; or

(2) Have an inerting, enriching, or diluting system that meets the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2107.

(g) A VCS with multiple facility vapor connections that receives vapor from vessels with non-inerted or partially inerted cargoes, and processes the vapor with a vapor destruction unit must—

(1) Have a detonation arrester located as close as practicable to each facility vapor connection. The total pipe length between the detonation arrester and each facility vapor connection must not exceed 18 meters (59.1 feet) and the vapor piping between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must be protected from any potential internal or external ignition source; and

(2) Have an inerting, enriching, or diluting system that meets the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2107.

(h) A VCS with multiple facility vapor connections that simultaneously receives vapor from vessels with inerted, partially inerted, and non-inerted cargoes, and processes the vapor with a vapor destruction unit must—

(1) Have a detonation arrester located as close as practicable to each facility vapor connection. The total pipe length between the detonation arrester and each facility vapor connection must not exceed 18 meters (59.1 feet) and the vapor piping between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must be protected from any potential internal or external ignition source; and

(2) Have either an inerting, enriching, or diluting system that meets the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2107, or a base loading system that meets the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2107(m).

(i) A VCS that uses a vapor balancing system in which cargo vapor from a vessel or facility storage tank is transferred through the facility vapor collection system to facility storage tanks or a vessel must meet the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2110.

(j) Each outlet of a VCS that vents to the atmosphere, except for a discharge vent from a vapor destruction unit or relief valve installed to comply with 33 CFR 154.2103(j) and (k) or 33 CFR 154.2203(e), (k), and (l), must have one of the following located at the outlet:

(1) A detonation arrester;

(2) An end-of-line flame arrester that meets ASTM F 1273 (incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106); or

(3) An end-of-line flame arrester that meets UL 525 (incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106) if—

(i) The discharge vent stream's total flammable concentration is proven to be less than 50 percent of the lower flammable limit, or the stream's oxygen concentration is proven to be less than 70 percent by volume of the MOCC, at all times by an outlet concentration analyzer for carbon beds, proof of correct operating temperature for refrigeration systems, or proof of scrubbing medium flow for scrubbers; and

(ii) The proving devices in paragraph (j)(2)(i) of this section close the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required in 33 CFR 154.2101(a) and close the automatic liquid cargo loading valve if operating outside the conditions necessary to maintain the discharge vent non-combustible.

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§154.2106   Detonation arresters installation.

This section applies only to facilities collecting vapors of flammable, combustible, or non-high flash point liquid cargoes.

(a) Detonation arresters must be installed in accordance with the guidelines outlined in the arrester manufacturer's acceptance letter provided by the Coast Guard.

(b) On either side of a detonation arrester, line size expansions must be in a straight pipe run and must be no closer than 120 times the pipe's diameter from the detonation arrester unless the manufacturer has test data to show the expansion can be closer.

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§154.2107   Inerting, enriching, and diluting systems.

This section applies only to facilities that control vapors of flammable, combustible, or non-high flash point liquid cargoes.

(a) Before receiving cargo vapor, a vapor control system (VCS) that uses a gas for inerting, enriching, or diluting must be capable of inerting, enriching, or diluting the vapor collection system, at a minimum of two system volume exchanges of inerting, enriching, or diluting gas, downstream of the injection point.

(b) A VCS that uses an inerting, enriching, or diluting system must be equipped, except as permitted by 33 CFR 154.2105(a), with a gas injection and mixing arrangement located as close as practicable to the facility vapor connection and no closer than 10 meters (32.8 feet) upstream from the vapor processing unit or the vapor-moving device that is not protected by a detonation arrester required by 33 CFR 154.2108(b). The total pipe length between the arrangement and the facility vapor connection must not exceed 22 meters (72.2 feet). The arrangement must be such that it provides complete mixing of the gases within 20 pipe diameters of the injection point. The vapor piping between the arrangement and the facility vapor connection must be protected from any potential internal or external ignition source.

(c) A VCS that uses an inerting or enriching system may not be operated at a vacuum after the injection point unless—

(1) There are no vacuum relief valves or other devices that could allow air into the vapor collection system downstream of the injection point, and pipe connections are flanged, threaded, or welded so no air can leak into the VCS; or

(2) An additional analyzer is used to monitor the vapor concentration downstream of such device and a mechanism is provided to inject additional inerting or enriching gas.

(d) A VCS that uses analyzers to control the amount of inerting, enriching, or diluting gas injected into the vapor collection line must be equipped with at least two analyzers. The analyzers must be connected so that—

(1) When two oxygen analyzers are used, the higher oxygen concentration reading controls the inerting or enriching system and activates the alarm and automatic shutdown system required by paragraph (h), (j), or (k)(2) of this section;

(2) When voting systems using more than two oxygen analyzers are used, the majority pair controls the inerting or enriching system and activates the alarm and automatic shutdown system required by paragraph (h), (j), or (k)(2) of this section;

(3) When two hydrocarbon analyzers are used, the lower hydrocarbon concentration reading controls the enriching system and activates the alarm and automatic shutdown system required by paragraph (i) of this section;

(4) When voting systems using more than two hydrocarbon analyzers are used, the majority pair controls the enriching system and activates the alarm and automatic shutdown system required by paragraph (i) of this section;

(5) When two hydrocarbon analyzers are used, the higher hydrocarbon concentration reading controls the diluting system and activates the alarm and automatic shutdown system required by paragraph (l) of this section; and

(6) When voting systems using more than two hydrocarbon analyzers are used, the majority pair controls the diluting system and activates the alarm and automatic shutdown system required by paragraph (l) of this section.

(e) A VCS that uses volumetric measurements to control the amount of inerting, enriching, or diluting gas injected into the vapor collection line must be equipped, except as permitted by paragraph (m) of this section, with at least one analyzer to activate the alarms and automatic shutdown systems required by this section.

(f) Each oxygen or hydrocarbon analyzer required by this section must—

(1) Be installed in accordance with API 550 (incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106);

(2) Have a system response time of not more than one minute from sample input to 95 percent of final stable value as tested per 33 CFR 154.2180 and 33 CFR 154.2181; and

(3) Continuously sample the vapor concentration not more than 30 pipe diameters from the gas injection point.

(g) A VCS must not use oxygen analyzers that operate at elevated temperatures (i.e., zirconia oxide or thermomagnetic).

(h) An inerting system must—

(1) Supply sufficient inert gas to the vapor stream to ensure that the oxygen concentration downstream of the injection point is maintained at or below 60 percent by volume of the minimum oxygen concentration for combustion (MOCC) for the specific combination of cargo vapors and inert gas being processed, which may be determined by using Coast Guard guidance available at http://homeport.uscg.mil;

(2) Activate an alarm that satisfies the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2100(e) when the oxygen concentration in the vapor collection line exceeds 60 percent by volume of the MOCC for the specific combination of cargo vapors and inert gas being processed, which may be determined by using Coast Guard guidance available at http://homeport.uscg.mil;

(3) Close the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a) when the oxygen concentration in the vapor collection line exceeds 70 percent by volume of the MOCC for the specific combination of cargo vapors and inert gas being processed, which may be determined by using Coast Guard VCS guidance available at http://homeport.uscg.mil;

(4) Have a detonation arrester and a mechanism to prevent the backflow of flammable vapors installed between the combustion device and the inert gas injection point, if a combustion device is used to produce the inert gas; and

(5) Have an alarm value in paragraph (h)(2) of this section that is at least one percentage point less than the shutdown value in paragraph (h)(3) of this section. If the analyzers used to measure oxygen concentrations cannot accurately differentiate between the alarm value and the shutoff value, the alarm value must be lowered until the analyzers become operable.

(i) An enriching system must—

(1) Supply sufficient compatible hydrocarbon vapor to the vapor stream to make sure that the total flammable concentration downstream of the injection point is maintained either at or above 170 percent by volume of the upper flammable limit or above the upper flammable limit plus 10 percentage points, whichever is lower;

(2) Activate an alarm that satisfies the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2100(e) when the total flammable concentration in the vapor collection line either falls below 170 percent by volume of the upper flammable limit or below the upper flammable limit plus 10 percentage points, whichever is lower;

(3) Close the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a) when the total flammable concentration in the vapor collection line either falls below 150 percent by volume of the upper flammable limit or below the upper flammable limit plus 7.5 percentage points, whichever is lower; and

(4) Have an upper flammable limit listed in paragraphs (i)(1), (i)(2), and (i)(3) of this section which is either the cargo's upper flammable limit or the enriching gas's upper flammable limit, whichever is higher. Alternatively, the mixture's upper flammable limit, which may be determined by using methods found in Coast Guard guidance available at http://homeport.uscg.mil, may be used.

(j) Oxygen analyzers may be used instead of hydrocarbon analyzers in a VCS using an enriching system that receives cargo vapor only from a vessel with non-inerted cargo tanks, providing that the analyzers—

(1) Activate an alarm satisfying the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2100(e) when the oxygen concentration in the vapor collection line exceeds a level corresponding to either a total flammable concentration of 170 percent by volume of the upper flammable limit or the upper flammable limit plus 10 percentage points, whichever yields a higher oxygen concentration;

(2) Close the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a) when the oxygen concentration in the vapor collection line exceeds a level corresponding to either a total flammable concentration of 150 percent by volume of the upper flammable limit or the upper flammable limit plus 7.5 percentage points, whichever yields a higher oxygen concentration;

(3) Have an alarm value in paragraph (j)(1) of this section that is at least one percentage point less than the shutdown value in paragraph (j)(2) of this section. If the oxygen analyzers used to measure oxygen concentrations cannot accurately differentiate between the alarm value and the shutdown value, the alarm value must be lowered until the analyzers become operable; and

(4) Have an upper flammable limit listed in paragraphs (j)(1) and (j)(2) of this section which is either the cargo's upper flammable limit or the enriching gas's upper flammable limit, whichever is higher. Alternatively, the mixture's upper flammable limit, which may be determined by using methods found in Coast Guard VCS guidance available at http://homeport.uscg.mil, may be used.

(k) An enriching system may be used in a VCS that receives inerted cargo vapor from a vessel if—

(1) Hydrocarbon analyzers are used to comply with paragraphs (i)(2) and (i)(3) of this section; or

(2) Oxygen analyzers are used, in which case the analyzers must—

(i) Activate an alarm meeting 33 CFR 154.2100(e) when the oxygen concentration in the vapor collection line exceeds 60 percent by volume of the MOCC for the specific combination of cargo vapors and gases; and

(ii) Close the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a) when the oxygen concentration exceeds 70 percent by volume of the MOCC for the specific combination of cargo vapors and gases; and

(3) The MOCC in paragraphs (k)(2)(i) and (k)(2)(ii) of this section is either the cargo's MOCC or the enriching gas's MOCC, whichever is lower. Alternatively, the mixture's MOCC, which may be determined using Coast Guard VCS guidance available at http://homeport.uscg.mil, may be used.

(l) An air dilution system must—

(1) Supply a sufficient amount of additional air to the vapor stream to keep the total flammable concentration downstream of the injection point below 30 percent by volume of the lower flammable limit;

(2) Activate an alarm that satisfies the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2100(e) when the total flammable concentration in the vapor collection line exceeds 30 percent by volume of the lower flammable limit; and

(3) Close the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a) when the total flammable concentration in the vapor collection line exceeds 50 percent by volume of the lower flammable limit.

(m) An enriching system may use a base loading method to control the amount of enriching gas in a vapor collection system if—

(1) The flow rate of enriching gas is determined by assuming the vapor entering the facility vapor connection consists of 100 percent air;

(2) Two independent devices are used to verify the correct enriching gas volumetric flow rate. One of the two devices must be a flow meter;

(3) One of the devices activates an alarm that satisfies the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2100(e) when the amount of enriching gas added results in a total flammable concentration in the vapor collection line either below 170 percent by volume of the upper flammable limit or below the upper flammable limit plus 10 percentage points, whichever is lower;

(4) The second device activates closure of the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a) when the amount of enriching gas added results in a total flammable concentration in the vapor collection line either below 150 percent by volume of the upper flammable limit or below the upper flammable limit plus 7.5 percentage points, whichever is lower; and

(5) The upper flammable limit in paragraphs (m)(3) and (4) of this section is either the cargo's upper flammable limit or the enriching gas's upper flammable limit, whichever is higher. Alternatively, the mixture's upper flammable limit, which may be determined using Coast Guard guidance available at http://homeport.uscg.mil, may be used.

(n) For controlling vapors of different cargoes at multiple berths while using enriching gas, the highest upper flammable limit or the lowest MOCC of the cargo or enriching gas, whichever is applicable, is used to determine the analyzer alarm and shutdown setpoints. Alternatively, the mixture's upper flammable limit or MOCC, which may be determined by using Coast Guard guidance available at http://homeport.uscg.mil, may be used.

(o) For controlling vapors of inert and non-inert cargoes at multiple berths while using enriching gas—

(1) The lowest MOCC of the cargo or enriching gas is used to determine the analyzer alarm and shutdown setpoints at all berths. Alternatively, the mixture's MOCC, which may be determined using Coast Guard guidance available at http://homeport.uscg.mil, may be used; or

(2) A base loading method meeting the requirements of paragraph (m) of this section is used for all berths.

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§154.2108   Vapor-moving devices.

(a) Paragraphs (b) and (e) of this section apply only to facilities collecting vapors of flammable, combustible, or non-high flash point liquid cargoes.

(b) Each inlet and outlet to a vapor-moving device that handles vapor that has not been inerted, enriched, or diluted in accordance with 33 CFR 154.2107 must be fitted with a detonation arrester; however, the outlet detonation arrester may be omitted if the vapor-moving device is within 50 times the pipe's diameter of the detonation arrester required by 33 CFR 154.2109(a).

(c) If the vapor is handled by a reciprocating or screw-type compressor in the vapor collection system, the compressor must be installed with indicators and audible and visible alarms to warn against the following conditions:

(1) Excessive gas temperature at the compressor outlet;

(2) Excessive cooling water temperature;

(3) Excessive vibration;

(4) Low lube oil level;

(5) Low lube oil pressure; and

(6) Excessive shaft bearing temperature.

(d) If the vapor is handled by a liquid ring-type compressor in the vapor collection system, it must be installed with indicators and audible and visible alarms to warn against the following conditions:

(1) Low level of liquid sealing medium;

(2) Lack of flow of the liquid sealing medium;

(3) Excessive temperature of the liquid sealing medium;

(4) Low lube oil level;

(5) Low lube oil pressure, if pressurized lubricating system; and

(6) Excessive shaft bearing temperature.

(e) If the vapor is handled by a centrifugal compressor, fan, or lobe blower in the vapor collection system, construction of the blades or housing must be one of the following:

(1) Blades or housing of nonmetallic construction;

(2) Blades and housing of nonferrous material;

(3) Blades and housing of corrosion resistant steel;

(4) Ferrous blades and housing with one-half inch or more design tip clearance;

(5) Nonferrous blades and ferrous housing with one-half inch or more design tip clearance; or

(6) Blades of aluminum or magnesium alloy and a ferrous housing with a nonferrous insert sleeve at the periphery of the impeller.

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§154.2109   Vapor recovery and vapor destruction units.

Paragraphs (a), (b), and (e) of this section apply only to facilities collecting vapors of flammable, combustible, or non-high flash point liquid cargoes.

(a) The inlet to a vapor recovery unit that receives vapor that has not been inerted, enriched, or diluted in accordance with 33 CFR 154.2107 must be fitted with a detonation arrester.

(b) The inlet to a vapor destruction unit must—

(1) Have a liquid seal that meets the requirements of paragraph (e) of this section, except as specified by paragraph (b)(3) of this section; and

(2) Have two quick-closing stop valves installed in the vapor line. One of them must be installed upstream of the detonation arrester required by paragraph (c)(2) of this section. The quick-closing stop valves must—

(i) Close within 30 seconds after detection of a condition that requires the closing of these two quick-closing stop valves by a control component required by this subpart for a vapor control system (VCS) with a vapor destruction unit;

(ii) Close automatically if the control signal is lost;

(iii) Have a local valve position indicator or be designed so that the valve position is readily determined from the valve handle or valve stem position; and

(iv) If the valve seat is fitted with resilient material, be a Category A valve as defined by 46 CFR 56.20-15 and not allow appreciable leakage when the resilient material is damaged or destroyed; and

(3) Instead of a liquid seal as required by paragraph (b)(1) of this section, have the following:

(i) An anti-flashback burner accepted by the Commandant and installed at each burner within the vapor destruction unit; and

(ii) A differential pressure sensor that activates the quick-closing stop valves as required by paragraph (b)(2) of this section upon sensing a reverse flow condition.

(c) A vapor destruction unit must—

(1) Not be within 30 meters (98.8 feet) of any tank vessel berth or mooring at the facility;

(2) Have a detonation arrester fitted in the inlet vapor line; and

(3) Activate an alarm that satisfies the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2100(e) and shut down when a flame is detected on the detonation arrester.

(d) When a vapor destruction unit shuts down or has a flame-out condition, the vapor destruction unit control system must—

(1) Activate and close the quick-closing stop valves required by paragraph (b)(2) of this section;

(2) Close the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a); and

(3) Automatically shut down any vapor-moving devices installed in the VCS.

(e) If a liquid seal is installed at the inlet to a vapor destruction unit, then—

(1) The liquid used in the liquid seal must be compatible with the vapors being controlled;

(2) For partially or totally soluble cargoes that can polymerize in solution, there must be an adequate amount of inhibitor in the liquid seal;

(3) The liquid seal must be compatible with the design of the VCS and must not contribute to the flammability of the vapor stream; and

(4) The liquid seal must have a low-level alarm and a low-low level shutdown.

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§154.2110   Vapor balancing requirements.

Paragraphs (a)(2) and (4), (b), and (c) of this section apply only to facilities transferring vapors of flammable, combustible, or non-high flash point liquid cargoes.

(a) A vapor control system (VCS) that uses a vapor balancing system in which cargo vapor is transferred from a vessel cargo tank or facility storage tank through the facility vapor collection system to a facility storage tank or vessel cargo tank must—

(1) Have facility storage tank high-level alarm systems and facility storage tank overfill control systems, independent of the high-level alarm system, arranged to prevent the cargo from entering the vapor return line;

(2) Have a detonation arrester located within the storage tank containment area and a detonation arrester located as close as practicable to the facility vapor connection. The total pipe length between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must not exceed 18 meters (59.1 feet) and the vapor piping between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must be protected from any potential internal or external ignition source;

(3) Meet the overpressure and over-vacuum protection requirements of 33 CFR 154.2103; and

(4) As an alternative to paragraph (a)(2) of this section, inert cargo systems can meet the requirements of 33 CFR 2105(a)(1).

(b) A vapor balancing system, while in operation to transfer vapor to or from a vessel cargo tank and connected by way of the facility storage tank vent to a facility's main VCS with a vapor destruction unit, must have—

(1) A means to prevent backflow of vapor from the facility's main VCS to the marine vapor line; and

(2) Two fail-safe, quick-closing valves installed in the marine vapor line at the facility storage tank that automatically close when—

(i) Flame is detected on the facility storage tank; or

(ii) The temperature of the facility storage tank's vapor space reaches 177 °C (350    °F) or 70 percent of the vapor's auto-ignition temperature in degrees Celsius, whichever is lower.

(c) Transferring vapor from a non-inerted facility storage tank to a vessel cargo tank that is required to be inerted in accordance with 46 CFR 32.53, 153.500, or Table 151.05, is prohibited.

(d) A vapor balancing system that transfers vapor to a vessel cargo tank must not use a vapor-moving device to assist vapor transfer or inject inerting, enriching, or diluting gas into the vapor line without approval from the Commandant.

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§154.2111   Vapor control system connected to a facility's main vapor control system.

(a) When a marine vapor control system (VCS), or a marine vapor collection system, is connected to a facility's main VCS serving other facility processing areas that are not related to tank vessel operations, the marine vapor line, before the point where the marine VCS connects to the facility's main VCS, must be fitted with—

(1) A detonation arrester, unless both the marine VCS and the facility's main VCS only control vapors of cargoes that are non-flammable, non-combustible, or that have high flashpoints;

(2) Two fail-safe, quick closing valves, one on each side of any detonation arrester required by paragraph (a)(1) of this section, which automatically close when—

(i) A flame is detected on the detonation arrester;

(ii) The facility's marine VCS is not in operation; or

(iii) Vapor back flow to the marine vapor line is detected; and

(3) A means to prevent backflow of vapors to the marine vapor line.

(b) Vapors from facility processing areas unrelated to tank vessel operations must not enter the vapor line of a marine VCS before the devices required by paragraph (a) of this section.

(c) Except as specified by paragraph (d) of this section, a facility that wants to connect a facility vapor line, which collects vapor from other facility processing areas that are not related to tank vessel operations, to a marine VCS before the devices required by 33 CFR 154.2109(b)(1) and (2) and (c)(2), must receive approval in writing from the Commandant.

(d) A facility may connect a facility vapor line, which collects vapor from other facility processing areas that are not related to tank vessel operations, to a marine vapor line downstream of the devices required by 33 CFR 154.2109(b)(1) and (2) and (c)(2) to share the marine vapor destruction unit.

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§154.2112   Vapors with potential to polymerize or freeze—Special requirements.

(a) A vapor control system (VCS) that controls vapors with the potential to polymerize at a normal ambient condition must—

(1) Be designed to prevent condensation of monomer vapor. Methods such as heat tracing and insulation are permitted if they do not result in an increased risk of polymerization;

(2) Be designed so that polymerization can be detected. Any points suspected of being sites for potential polymerization buildup must be equipped with inspection openings; and

(3) Include devices to measure the pressure drop across detonation arresters due to polymerization. The devices should activate an alarm on high pressure drop to warm of polymerization. Any device used for this purpose, including differential pressure monitors, must not have the capability of transmitting a detonation across the detonation arrester.

(b) A VCS that controls cargo vapors that potentially freeze at ambient temperature must have a design that prevents the freezing of vapors or condensate at ambient temperature or that detects and removes the liquid condensate and solids to prevent accumulation.

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§154.2113   Alkylene oxides—Special requirements.

A vapor control system (VCS) that controls vapors of an alkylene oxide, except for carriage under 46 CFR part 151 (listed in Table 151.05 with “Pressure” entry in the “Cargo identification, Pressure, b” column), must comply with paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section.

(a)(1) The VCS's equipment, hoses, piping, and all piping components, including valves, flanges, and fittings, must be of a type and constructed out of materials suitable for use with alkylene oxide;

(2) The VCS used for collecting an alkylene oxide vapor must not be used for collecting other vapors and must be separated from any other VCS, except as specified by paragraph (b) of this section; and

(b) The VCS must be adequately cleaned in accordance with 33 CFR 154.2150(p) and either recertified by a certifying entity or approved by a marine chemist if—

(1) The VCS is used to control other vapors; or

(2) The VCS is returned to alkylene oxide service after being used to control other cargo vapors.

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Transfer Facilities—Operations

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§154.2150   General requirements.

(a) No transfer operation using a vapor control system (VCS) may be conducted unless the facility operator has a copy of the facility operations manual, with the VCS addendum, marked by the local Coast Guard Captain of the Port (COTP) as required by 33 CFR 154.325(d).

(b) Personnel in charge of a facility must ensure that—

(1) The facility controls vapor only from cargoes that are properly authorized for vapor control in the facility's certification letter;

(2) The facility transfers vapor only to or from a vessel that has its certificate of inspection or certificate of compliance endorsed in accordance with 46 CFR 39.1013 or 46 CFR 39.1015 for each cargo intended for transfer; and

(3) If the vessel tanks to be vapor controlled contain vapor from previous cargo transfers other than the cargo or cargoes intended for transfer, the facility and vessel must be authorized to control the additional vapor from the previous cargo transfers. Any oxygen or hydrocarbon analyzer alarm and shutdown setpoints must be set to accommodate all of the cargo vapors.

(c) The facility personnel in charge must ensure that safety system testing is conducted as follows:

(1) Pressure sensors, alarms, and automatic shutdown systems required by 33 CFR 154.2103, 154.2107, and 154.2110, except as exempted by paragraph (c)(2) or specified by paragraph (c)(3) of this section, must be tested by applying altering test pressures at the sensors not more than 24 hours before each transfer;

(2) The pressure sensors required by 33 CFR 154.2103 may meet the requirements of the test program contained in 33 CFR 154.2180 and 33 CFR 154.2181 instead of the current program, which mandates tests within 24 hours before each transfer as required by paragraph (c)(1) of this section;

(3) Visible and audible alarm indicators must be tested not more than 24 hours before each transfer;

(4) The analyzers, except for flammability analyzers, required by 33 CFR 154.2105, 154.2107, and 154.2110, except as exempted by paragraph (c)(5) of this section, must be checked for calibration response by using a zero gas and a span gas not more than 24 hours before each transfer;

(5) The analyzers required by 33 CFR 154.2105, 154.2107, and 154.2110 may be checked for calibration response by use of a zero gas and a span gas as defined by the test program contained in 33 CFR 154.2180 and 33 CFR 154.2181, and comply with the minimum requirements as defined in 33 CFR 154.2180 and 33 CFR 154.2181, instead of the test required by paragraph (c)(4) of this section; and

(6) The vacuum and pressure relief valves required by 33 CFR 154.2103 must be manually checked per manufacturers' instructions to verify that the valves unseat easily and then reset to the closed position without constraint. Any required flame screens or flame arresters must also be visually checked to ensure that they are not damaged.

(d) The proper position of all valves in the vapor line between the vessel's tanks and the facility vapor collection system must be verified before the start of the transfer operation.

(e) A tank barge overfill control system that meets the requirements of 46 CFR 39.2009(a)(2) must—

(1) Not be connected to an overfill sensor circuit that exceeds the system's rated inductance and capacitance; and

(2) Be tested for proper operation after connection is made with the vessel by simulating liquid high level and overfill at each tank.

(f) When receiving vapor from a vessel with cargo tanks that are required to be inerted in accordance with 46 CFR 32.53, 46 CFR 153.500, or 46 CFR Table 151.05, the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a) must not be opened until the pressure at the facility vapor connection, downstream of the facility vapor connection, exceeds 0.2 pounds per square inch gauge (psig).

(g) The initial cargo transfer rate must not exceed the rate agreed upon at the pre-transfer conference and 46 CFR 39.3001(g).

(h) The cargo transfer rate must not exceed the maximum allowable transfer rate as determined by the lesser of the following:

(1) A transfer rate corresponding to the maximum vapor processing rate for the VCS, as specified in the facility operations manual; or

(2) The vessel's maximum transfer rate in accordance with 46 CFR 39.3001(d).

(i) While transferring cargo to a vessel connected to a VCS, compressed air or gas may be used to clear cargo hoses and loading arms, but must not be used to clear cargo lines. However, compressed inert gas such as nitrogen can be used to clear cargo lines if a pigging system that meets 33 CFR 154.2104 is provided.

(j) If a pigging system is used to clear cargo lines to the tank vessel while the vessel is connected to the facility VCS, the following operational requirements apply:

(1) The VCS must be in operation, with all of the high-pressure alarms and shutdowns required by 33 CFR 154.2103 active, before and during pigging operations;

(2) Personnel performing the pigging operation must be adequately trained on the specific pigging system being used. Accurate written procedures that address event sequence, equipment, safety precautions, and overpressurization hazards must be made available to all personnel involved in the pigging operations;

(3) Pigging procedures must be reviewed by both the vessel and facility personnel in charge as part of the pre-transfer conference. Topics of discussion during the pre-transfer conference must include, but need not be limited to—

(i) Event sequence;

(ii) Equipment;

(iii) Safety precautions;

(iv) Overpressurization hazards;

(v) Personnel roles;

(vi) Gas volumetric flow rates;

(vii) Gas pressures;

(viii) Volume of residual cargo in the line;

(ix) Amount of ullage space that is available for line displacement and connections;

(x) Valve alignment;

(xi) Units of measure;

(xii) Terminology; and

(xiii) Anticipated duration of the evolution;

(4) The pig must be inspected to ensure that it is of sufficient durability and condition; be of an appropriate size, type, and construction for the intended operation; and be inspected for defects before each use and replaced if necessary;

(5) Personnel performing pigging operations must monitor pig movement at all times. The facility and vessel manifold valves must be closed immediately after the pig reaches the pig-receiving device; and

(6) If the pigging system contains pressure-sensing, relieving, or alarming components in addition to those required by 33 CFR 154.2103, the components must be periodically tested in accordance with paragraphs (c) and (q) of this section.

(k) If one or more analyzers required by 33 CFR 154.2107(d) or (e) or 154.2110 become inoperable during a transfer operation, the operation may continue, provided that at least one analyzer remains operational; however, no further transfer operations may start until all inoperable analyzers are replaced or repaired.

(l) Whenever a condition results in a shutdown of the VCS, the emergency shutdown system required by 33 CFR 154.550 must be automatically activated to terminate cargo loading into tanks which are being vapor controlled.

(m) If it is suspected that a flare in the VCS has had a flashback, or if a flame is detected on a detonation arrester required by 33 CFR 154.2109(c)(2), the transfer operation must stop and cannot restart until that detonation arrester and any quick-closing stop valves downstream of the detonation arrester are inspected and found to be in satisfactory condition.

(n) Before each transfer operation, the freezing point of each cargo must be determined. If there is a possibility that the ambient air temperature during transfer operations will be at or below the freezing point of the cargo, adequate precautions must be taken to prevent freezing of vapor or condensate, or to detect and remove the frozen liquid and condensation to prevent accumulation.

(o) Before each transfer operation, the cargo vapor must be evaluated to determine its potential to polymerize, and adequate precautions must be taken to prevent and detect polymerization of the cargo vapors.

(p) Mixing of incompatible vapors is prohibited. The VCS piping, equipment, hoses, valves, and arresters must be purged between vapor control operations that involve incompatible chemical vapors in accordance with the following:

(1) Chemical compatibility must be determined by using the procedures contained in 46 CFR part 150;

(2) Purge gas must be an inert gas, air, or enriching gas, and must be adequate to reduce the level of residual vapor to a level at which reaction with the subsequent vapor cannot occur; and

(3) The required duration of purge time must be calculated and approved by the certifying entity during the certification or recertification.

(q) After each transfer operation, the VCS piping, equipment, hoses, valves, and arresters must be purged with at least two-system volume exchanges of non-reactive gas or air so the VCS is left with a safe condition.

(r) VCS equipment and instrumentation must be tested in compliance with 33 CFR 156.170(g) or (i), with the COTP or designated representative invited to observe these tests. The test procedure and a checklist must be approved by the certifying entity during the initial certification of the system and incorporated into the facility operations manual.

(s) A transfer operation that includes collection of vapor emitted to or from a vessel's cargo tanks must meet the transfer requirements of 33 CFR 156.120(aa), and a declaration of inspection meeting the requirements of 33 CFR 156.150 must be completed before each transfer.

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Alternative Analyzer and Pressure Sensor Reliability Testing

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§154.2180   Alternative testing program—Generally.

(a) As an alternative to complying with the vapor control system (VCS) analyzer and pressure sensor safety testing requirements provided by 33 CFR 154.2150(c) and 33 CFR 154.2250(c), the facility person in charge may administer a reliability assurance test program in accordance with this section and 33 CFR 154.2181.

(b) As used in this section—

(1) Calibration drift or CD means the difference in the analyzer output readings from the established reference value after a stated period of operation during which no unscheduled maintenance, repair, or adjustment took place;

(2) Calibration error or CE means the difference between the gas concentration exhibited by the gas analyzer and the known concentration of the cylinder gas;

(3) Response time or RT means the time interval between the start of a step change in the system input (e.g., change of calibration gas) and the time when the data recording system displays 95 percent of the final stable value; and

(4) Sampling system bias or SSB means the difference between the gas concentrations indicated by the measurement system when a known cylinder gas is introduced at or near the sampling probe and when the same gas is introduced directly to the analyzer.

(c) All analyzers used in a VCS must be tested for safety system functions, CE, CD, RT, and SSB, in accordance with 33 CFR 154.2181.

(d) All pressure sensors/switches used in a VCS must be tested for safety system functions, CE and CD, in accordance with 33 CFR 154.2181.

(e) The facility person in charge must ensure the following:

(1) Calibration of instrumentation using standard procedures provided by the manufacturer or service provider;

(2) Monitoring of all interlocks, alarms, and recording devices for proper operation while instrumentation is being calibrated;

(3) Use of a certified gas standard that is within plus or minus two (2) percent of its certified concentration to calibrate the analyzers; and

(4) Use of a certified secondary standard that is standardized against a primary standard to calibrate the pressure sensors/switches.

(f) Upon failing any test under 33 CFR 154.2181, the facility person in charge must ensure that all monthly and quarterly tests, including CE, CD, RT, and SSB, are conducted; and until all quarterly tests are completed, the person in charge must ensure that the vapor control alarms and automatic shutdown system are tested no more than 24 hours prior to any transfer or tank barge cleaning operation.

(g) Analyzers required by 33 CFR 154.2105(a) and (j) and 154.2107(d) and (e) must be checked for calibration using a zero gas and a span gas.

(h) The facility operator must maintain and make available upon the request of the Commandant and the certifying entity that certifies the VCS the following reliability assurance test program documents for two years:

(1) All test procedures;

(2) The dates of all tests, type of tests made, and who conducted the tests;

(3) Results of the tests, including the “as found” and “as left” conditions; and

(4) A record of the date and time of repairs made.

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§154.2181   Alternative testing program—Test requirements.

(a) The safety system function test required by 33 CFR 154.2180 must be performed once every two weeks and test for the proper operation and interaction of the analyzer or pressure sensor/switch with shutdown interlocks, and audible and visible alarm devices.

(b) The calibration error (CE) test required by 33 CFR 154.2180 must be performed once every month and documented as shown in Forms 154.2181(b)(2) and 154.2181(b)(3) of this section, to document the accuracy and linearity of the monitoring equipment for the entire measurement range.

(1) The CE test must expose the measurement system, including all monitoring components (e.g., sample lines, filters, scrubbers, conditioners, and as much of the probe as practicable), to the calibration gases, introduced through an injection port located so as to allow a check of the entire measurement system when calibration gases are introduced;

(2) The CE test must check the calibrated range of each analyzer using a lower (zero) and upper (span) reference gas standard. Three measurements must be taken against each standard and recorded as shown in Form 154.2181(b)(2) of this section, with the average of the three values in each case then used to calculate the CE according to this equation (where CE = percentage calibration error based upon span of the instrument, R = reference value of zero or high-level calibration gas introduced into the monitoring system, A = actual monitoring system response to the calibration gas, and S = span of the instrument):

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Form 154.2181(b)(2): Calibration error determination.

   Calibration valueMonitor
response
Difference
ZeroSpan
1-Zero
1-Span
2-Zero
2-Span
3-Zero
3-Span
Mean Difference =
Calibration Error =%%

(3) The CE test must check each pressure sensor/switch for upscale (activate) and downscale (deactivate) hysteresis around the sensor/switch set pressure. The calibration error must be calculated and recorded as shown in Form 154.2181(b)(3) of this section. Test the pressure sensor/switch three times and record the desired setting and the as-found set pressure. Calculate and record the difference of the two settings. Calculate the error percentage using this equation (where CE = percentage calibration error based upon span of the instrument, R = reference setting of the instrument, A = actual response as recorded on the test instrument, and S = span of the instrument):

eCFR graphic er16jy13.002.gif

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Record sensor “as-left” setting only if an adjustment is made.

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(c) The calibration drift (CD) test required by 33 CFR 154.2180 must be performed once every quarter and documented as shown in Form 154.2181(c)(3) of this section, to verify the ability of the instrument to conform to the established calibration.

(1) The CD measurement must be conducted once daily for 7 consecutive days without making any adjustments to the instruments.

(2) Conduct the CD test at zero level (between 0 and 20 percent of the instrument span) and at high level (between 75 and 95 percent of the instrument span).

(3) Calculate and record the CD for 7 consecutive days using the equations in paragraphs (b)(2) and (3) of this section and Form 154.2181(c)(3) of this section.

Form 154.2181(c)(3): Calibration drift determination.

DayDay/timeReference value (RV)Monitor valueDifferencePercent of RV
Low-Level:
High-Level:

(d) The response time (RT) test required by 33 CFR 154.2180 must be performed once every quarter and documented as shown in Form 154.2181(d) of this section, to determine the RT which is the largest average response time in the upscale or downscale direction.

(1) For systems that normally operate below 20 percent of calibrated range, only a span (upscale) test is required.

(2) Record the span (upscale) value, zero (downscale) cylinder gas value, and stable, initial process-measured variable value.

(3) Determine the step change, which is equal to the average difference between the initial process-measured variable value and the average final stable cylinder gas-measured value.

(4) To determine both upscale and downscale step change intervals—

(i) Inject span (or zero) cylinder gas into the sample system as close to the sample probe as possible. Existing systems that inject the gas at the analyzer box do not need to be modified. However, the gas transit time between the analyzer box and the sample probe must be taken into account;

(ii) Allow the analyzer to stabilize and record the stabilized value. A stable reading is achieved when the concentration reading deviates less than 6 percent from the measured average concentration in 6 minutes or if it deviates less than 2 percent of the monitor's span value in 1 minute;

(iii) Stop the span (or zero) gas flow, allow the monitor to stabilize back to the measured variable value, and record the stabilized value; and

(iv) Repeat this procedure a total of three times and subtract the average final monitor reading from the average starting monitor value to determine the average upscale (or downscale) step change.

(5) Determine the response time, which is equal to the elapsed time at which 95 percent of the step change occurred.

(i) To find this value, take 5 percent of the average step change value and subtract the result from the cylinder gas analyzed value as shown in the following equation:

95% step change value = cylinder gas value − (0.05 × avg. step change)

(ii) Inject span (or zero) cylinder gas into the sample system as close to the sample probe as possible, and measure the time it takes to reach the 95 percent step change value.

(iii) Repeat the previous step (paragraph (d)(5)(ii) of this section) a total of three times each with span and zero cylinder gas to determine average upscale and downscale response times.

(iv) Compare the response times achieved for the upscale and downscale tests. The longer of these two times equals the response time for the analyzer.

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(e) The sample system bias (SSB) test required by 33 CFR 154.2180 must be performed once every quarter and documented, to establish that the system has no additional influence on the measurement being made by the analyzer.

(1) Conduct a close CE test in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section, by injecting calibration gas as close as possible to the analyzer, eliminating as much of the sample system components as possible, while still simulating the normal source operating conditions.

(2) If system integrity is maintained, and it has not become contaminated, the difference between the close and standard CE tests should be the same.

(f) For CE and CD tests, analyzers and pressure sensors must meet the following minimum compliance requirements:

(1) Oxygen analyzers must not deviate from the reference value of the zero- or high-level calibration gas by more than 0.5 percent of full scale;

(2) Total hydrocarbon analyzers must not deviate from the reference value of the zero- or high-level calibration gas by more than 1 percent of full scale; and

(3) Pressure sensors/switches must not deviate from the reference value of the zero- or high-level calibration gas by more than 1.5 percent of full range.

(g) For RT tests, each oxygen or hydrocarbon analyzer must respond, in less than 1 minute, to 95 percent of the final stable value of a test span gas.

(h) For SSB tests, the analyzer system bias must be less than 5 percent of the average difference between the standard CE test and the close CE test, divided by the individual analyzer span.

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Tank Barge Cleaning Facilities—VCS Design and Installation

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§154.2200   Applicable transfer facility design and installation requirements.

A tank barge cleaning facility's (TBCF's) vapor control system (VCS) must meet the following design and installation requirements of this subpart for a transfer facility's VCS:

(a) 33 CFR 154.2100(b), (c), (f), (g), (i), (j), and (k): general design and installation requirements;

(b) 33 CFR 154.2102: facility requirements for vessel liquid overfill protection, if a TBCF receives vapor from a tank barge that is required by 46 CFR 39.6001(f)(3) to be equipped with a liquid overfill protection arrangement and meet 46 CFR 39.2009;

(c) 33 CFR 154.2106: detonation arrester installation;

(d) 33 CFR 154.2107: inerting, enriching, and diluting systems;

(e) 33 CFR 154.2108: vapor-moving devices;

(f) 33 CFR 154.2109: vapor recovery and vapor destruction units;

(g) 33 CFR 154.2111: VCS connected to a facility's main VCS;

(h) 33 CFR 154.2112: special requirements for vapors with the potential to polymerize or freeze; and

(i) 33 CFR 154.2113: special requirements for alkylene oxides.

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§154.2201   Vapor control system—general requirements.

(a) Vapor control system (VCS) design and installation must eliminate potential overpressure and vacuum hazards, sources of ignition, and mechanical damage to the maximum practicable extent. Each remaining hazard source that is not eliminated must be specifically addressed in the protection system design and system operational requirements.

(b) Any pressure, flow, or concentration indication required by this part must provide a remote indicator on the facility where the VCS is controlled, unless the local indicator is clearly visible and readable from the operator's normal position at the VCS control station.

(c) Any condition requiring an alarm as specified in this part must activate an audible and visible alarm where the VCS is controlled.

(d) A mechanism must be developed and used to eliminate any liquid from the VCS.

(e) A liquid knockout vessel must be installed between the facility vapor connection and any vapor-moving device in systems that have the potential for two-phase (vapor/liquid) flow from the barge or the potential for liquid condensate to form as a result of the enrichment process. The liquid knockout vessel must have—

(1) A means to indicate the level of liquid in the device;

(2) A high liquid level sensor that activates an alarm that satisfies the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2100(e); and

(3) A high-high liquid level sensor that closes the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a) and shuts down any vapor-moving device before liquid is carried over to the vapor-moving device. One sensor with two stages may be used to meet this requirement as well as paragraph (e)(2) of this section.

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§154.2202   Vapor line connections.

(a) 33 CFR 154.2101(a), (e), and (g) apply to a tank barge cleaning facility's (TBCF's) vapor control system (VCS).

(b) The remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a) must be located upstream of the liquid knockout vessel required by 33 CFR 154.2201(e).

(c) A fluid displacement system must have a remotely operated shutoff valve installed in the fluid injection supply line between the point where the inert gas or other medium is generated and the fluid injection connection. The valve must comply with 33 CFR 154.2101(a)(1) through (6).

(d) Each hose used for transferring vapors must—

(1) Have a design burst pressure of at least 25 pounds per square inch gauge (psig);

(2) Have a maximum allowable working pressure (MAWP) no less than 5 psig;

(3) Be capable of withstanding at least the maximum vacuum rating of the vapor-moving device without collapsing or constricting;

(4) Be electrically continuous, with a maximum resistance of 10,000 ohms;

(5) Have flanges with a bolthole arrangement complying with the requirements for Class 150 ANSI B16.5 flanges (incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106);

(6) Be abrasion and kinking resistant; and

(7) Be compatible with vapors being transferred.

(e) Fixed vapor collection arms must meet the requirements of paragraph (d) of this section.

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§154.2203   Facility requirements for barge vapor overpressure and vacuum protection.

In this section, the requirements of having a flame arrester or a flame screen at the opening of a pressure relief valve or a vacuum relief valve apply only to facilities collecting vapors of flammable, combustible, or non-high flash point liquid cargoes.

(a) A facility vapor collection system must have a capacity for collecting cleaning facility vapors at a rate of no less than 1.1 times the facility's maximum allowable gas-freeing rate, plus any inerting, diluting, or enriching gas that may be added to the system.

(b) A facility vapor control system (VCS) must be designed to prevent the pressure in a vessel's cargo tanks from going below 80 percent of the highest setting of any of the barge's vacuum relief valves or exceeding 80 percent of the lowest setting of any of the barge's pressure relief valves. The VCS must be capable of maintaining the pressure in the barge's cargo tanks within this range at any gas-freeing rate less than or equal to the maximum gas-freeing rate determined by the requirements in 46 CFR 39.6007(c).

(c) A fluid displacement system must provide a pressure-sensing device that activates an alarm that satisfies the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2100(e) when the pressure at the fluid injection connection exceeds either the pressure corresponding to the upper pressure determined in paragraph (b) of this section or a lower pressure agreed upon by the facility and barge persons in charge. The pressure-sensing device must be located in the fluid displacement system's piping downstream of any devices that could potentially isolate the barge's vapor collection system from the pressure-sensing device. The pressure measured by the sensing device must be corrected for pressure drops across any barge piping, hoses, or arms that are used to inject the fluid.

(d) A fluid displacement system must provide a pressure-sensing device that is independent of the device required by paragraph (c) of this section. This pressure-sensing device must activate the fluid displacement system emergency shutdown and close the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a). It must also close the remotely operated shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2202(c) when the pressure at the fluid injection connection reaches a corresponding 90 percent of the lowest setting of any pressure relief valve on the barge. The pressure-sensing device must be located in the fluid displacement system's piping downstream of any device that could potentially isolate the barge's VCS from the pressure-sensing device. The pressure measured by the sensing device must be corrected for pressure drops across any barge piping, hoses, or arms that are used to inject the fluid.

(e) If a vapor-moving device capable of drawing more than 0.5 pounds per square inch gauge (psig) vacuum is used to draw vapor, air, inert gas, or other medium from the barge, a vacuum relief valve must be installed on the facility's fixed vapor collection system piping between the facility vapor connection and the vapor-moving device. The vacuum relief valve must—

(1) Relieve at a pressure such that the pressure at the facility vapor connection is maintained at or above 14.2 pounds per square inch absolute (psia) (−0.5 psig);

(2) Have a relieving capacity equal to or greater than the maximum capacity of the vapor-moving device;

(3) Have a flame arrester or flame screen fitted at the vacuum relief opening;

(4) Have been tested for relieving capacity in accordance with paragraph 1.5.1.3 of API 2000 (incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106), with a flame arrester or flame screen fitted; and

(5) Be constructed of materials compatible with the vapors being gas-freed.

(f) The vacuum relief valve requirements of paragraph (e) of this section may include a valve to isolate it from the facility vapor collection piping, provided—

(1) The isolation valve must be interlocked with any vapor-moving device such that the vapor-moving device cannot activate unless the isolation valve is in the full open position (i.e., the vacuum relief valve is not isolated); and

(2) The isolation valve can only be closed after the facility person in charge has acknowledged that the hatch opening required by 33 CFR 154.2250(i) is open and secured.

(g) If a vapor-moving device capable of drawing more than 0.5 psig vacuum is used to draw vapor, air, inert gas, or other medium from the barge, the facility must install portable, intrinsically safe, pressure-sensing devices on any cargo tank, or on the common vapor header, at the connection required by 46 CFR 39.6003(b) before any cleaning operation begins on the tank. A pressure-sensing device must be provided that—

(1) Activates an alarm that satisfies 33 CFR 154.2100(e) when the pressure in the cargo tank being cleaned falls below 80 percent of the highest setting of any of the barge's vacuum relief valves, or a higher pressure agreed upon by the facility and barge persons in charge; and

(2) Activates the emergency shutdown system for the vapor-moving device and closes the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve described in 33 CFR 154.2101(a) when the pressure in the cargo tank being cleaned falls below 90 percent of the highest setting of any of the barge's vacuum relief valves, or a higher pressure agreed upon by the facility and barge persons in charge. This pressure-sensing device must be independent of the device used to activate an alarm required by paragraph (g)(1) of this section.

(h) The pressure-sensing devices required by paragraph (g) of this section must—

(1) Have suitable means, such as approved intrinsic safety barriers that are able to accept passive devices, so that the under-pressure alarm circuits of the barge side of the under-pressure control system, including cabling, normally closed switches, and pin and sleeve connectors, are intrinsically safe;

(2) Be connected to the under-pressure alarm system by a four-wire, 16-ampere shielded flexible cable; and

(3) Have cable shielding grounded to the under-pressure alarm system.

(i) A pressure-indicating device must be provided within 6 meters (19.7 feet) of the facility vapor connection which displays the pressure in the vapor collection line upstream of any isolation valve and any devices, such as strainers, that could cause a blockage in the vapor line.

(j) A fluid displacement system must include a pressure-indicating device that displays the pressure in the fluid displacement system injection line. This device must be within 6 meters (19.7 feet) of the fluid injection connection.

(k) If a fluid displacement system used to inject inert gas or another medium into the cargo tank of a barge being gas-freed is capable of producing a pressure greater than 2 psig, a pressure relief valve must be installed in the fluid displacement system injection line between the fluid injection source and the fluid injection connection that—

(1) Relieves at a predetermined pressure such that the pressure in the fluid displacement system at the fluid injection connection does not exceed 1.5 psig;

(2) Has a relieving capacity equal to or greater than the maximum volumetric flow capacity of the fluid displacement system;

(3) Has a flame screen or flame arrester fitted at the relief opening; and

(4) Has been tested for relieving capacity in accordance with paragraph 1.5.1.3 of API 2000, when fitted with a flame screen or flame arrester.

(l) When using the fluid displacement system, if the pressure in the facility's fixed vapor collection system can exceed 2 psig during a malfunction in an inerting, enriching, or diluting system, a pressure relief valve must—

(1) Be installed between the point where inerting, enriching, or diluting gas is added to the facility's fixed vapor collection system piping and the facility vapor connection;

(2) Relieve at a predetermined pressure such that the pressure at the facility vapor connection does not exceed 1.5 psig;

(3) Have a relieving capacity equal to or greater than the maximum capacity of the facility's inerting, enriching, or diluting gas source;

(4) Have a flame screen or flame arrester fitted at the relief opening;

(5) Have been tested for relieving capacity in accordance with paragraph 1.5.1.3 of API 2000, when fitted with a flame screen or flame arrester; and

(6) Be constructed of materials compatible with the vapors being gas-freed.

(m) For fluid displacement systems, the fluid injection connection must be electrically insulated from the fluid injection source in accordance with OCIMF ISGOTT section 17.5 (incorporated by reference, see 33 CFR 154.106).

(n) If the pressure relief valve is not designed with a minimum vapor discharge velocity of 30 meters (98.4 feet) per second, the relieving capacity test required by paragraphs (k)(4) and (l)(5) of this section must be carried out with a flame screen or flame arrester fitted at the discharge opening.

(o) A pressure indicating device must be provided by the facility for installation at the connection required by 46 CFR 39.6003(b).

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§154.2204   Fire, explosion, and detonation protection.

This section applies to tank barge cleaning facilities (TBCFs) collecting vapors of flammable, combustible, or non-high flash point liquid cargoes.

(a) A vapor control system (VCS) with a single facility vapor connection that processes vapor with a vapor recovery unit must—

(1) Have a detonation arrester located as close as practicable to the facility vapor connection. The total pipe length between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must not exceed 18 meters (59.1 feet) and the vapor piping between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must be protected from any potential internal or external ignition source; or

(2) Have an inerting, enriching, or diluting system that meets the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2107.

(b) A VCS with a single facility vapor connection that processes vapor with a vapor destruction unit must—

(1) Have a detonation arrester located as close as practicable to the facility vapor connection. The total pipe length between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must not exceed 18 meters (59.1 feet) and the vapor piping between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must be protected from any potential internal or external ignition source; and

(2) Have an inerting, enriching, or diluting system that meets the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2107.

(c) A VCS with multiple facility vapor connections that processes vapor with a vapor recovery unit must have a detonation arrester located as close as practicable to each facility vapor connection. The total pipe length between the detonation arrester and each facility vapor connection must not exceed 18 meters (59.1 feet) and the vapor piping between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must be protected from any potential internal or external ignition source.

(d) A VCS with multiple facility vapor connections that processes vapor with a vapor destruction unit must—

(1) Have a detonation arrester located as close as practicable to each facility vapor connection. The total pipe length between the detonation arrester and each facility vapor connection must not exceed 18 meters (59.1 feet) and the vapor piping between the detonation arrester and the facility vapor connection must be protected from any potential internal or external ignition source; and

(2) Have an inerting, enriching, or diluting system that meets the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2107.

(e) 33 CFR 154.2105(j) applies to a TBCF's VCS.

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Tank Barge Cleaning Facilities—Operations

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§154.2250   General requirements.

(a) No tank barge cleaning operation using a vapor control system (VCS) may be conducted unless the facility operator has a copy of the facility operations manual, with the VCS addendum, marked by the local Coast Guard Captain of the Port (COTP) as required by 33 CFR 154.325(d).

(b) The facility person in charge must ensure that a facility can receive vapors only from a barge with a VCS that has been approved by the Coast Guard Marine Safety Center as meeting the requirements of 46 CFR 39.6000.

(c) The facility person in charge must ensure that safety system tests are conducted as follows:

(1) Pressure sensors, alarms, and automatic shutdown systems required by 33 CFR 154.2203, except as exempted by paragraph (c)(2) or as specified by paragraph (c)(3) of this section, must be tested by applying altering test pressures at the sensors not more than 24 hours before each cleaning operation;

(2) The pressure sensors required by 33 CFR 154.2203 may meet the test program in accordance with 33 CFR 154.2180 and 33 CFR 154.2181 instead of the test within 24 hours before each cleaning operation as required by paragraph (c)(1) of this section;

(3) Visible and audible alarm indicators must be tested not more than 24 hours before each cleaning operation;

(4) The analyzers, except for flammability analyzers, required by 33 CFR 154.2105(j) and 154.2107, except as exempted by paragraph (c)(5) of this section, must be checked for calibration response by use of a zero gas and a span gas not more than 24 hours before each cleaning operation;

(5) The analyzers required by 33 CFR 154.2105(j) and 154.2107 may be checked for calibration response by use of a zero gas and a span gas as defined by the test program contained in 33 CFR 154.2180 and 33 CFR 154.2181, and comply with the minimum requirements as defined in 33 CFR 154.2180 and 33 CFR 154.2181, instead of as provided by paragraph (c)(4) of this section; and

(6) The vacuum and pressure relief valves required by 33 CFR 154.2203 must be manually checked per manufacturers' instructions to verify that the valves unseat easily and then reset to the closed position without constraint. Any required flame screens or flame arresters must also be visually checked to ensure that they are not damaged.

(d) The facility person in charge must verify the following before beginning cleaning operations:

(1) Each valve in the vapor collection system between the barge's cargo tank and the facility vapor collection system is correctly positioned to allow the collection of vapors;

(2) A vapor collection hose or arm is connected to the barge's vapor collection system;

(3) The electrical insulating devices required by 33 CFR 154.2101(g) and 154.2203(m) are installed;

(4) The maximum allowable gas-freeing rate as determined by the lesser of the following:

(i) A gas-freeing rate corresponding to the maximum vapor processing rate for the tank barge cleaning facility's (TBCF's) VCS, as specified in the facility operations manual; or

(ii) The barge's maximum gas-freeing rate determined in accordance with 46 CFR 39.6007(c);

(5) The gas-freeing rate will not exceed the maximum allowable gas-freeing rate as determined in paragraph (d)(4) of this section;

(6) The maximum allowable stripping rate is determined and does not exceed the volumetric capacity of the barge's vacuum relief valve at the valve's setpoint for the cargo tank being stripped;

(7) The barge's maximum and minimum operating pressures;

(8) Each vapor collection hose has no unrepaired or loose covers, kinks, bulges, soft spots, or any other defects that would permit the discharge of vapor through the hose material; and no external gouges, cuts, or slashes that penetrate the first layer of hose reinforcement;

(9) The freezing point of each cargo. If there is a possibility that the ambient air temperature during cleaning operations will be at or below the freezing point of the cargo, adequate precautions have been taken to prevent freezing of vapor or condensate, or to detect and remove the frozen liquid and condensate to prevent accumulation; and

(10) The cargo vapor is evaluated for the potential to polymerize, and adequate precautions have been taken to prevent and detect polymerization of the cargo vapors.

(e) VCS equipment and instrumentation must be tested in compliance with 33 CFR 156.170(g) or (i), with the COTP or designated representative invited to observe these tests. The test procedure and a checklist must be approved by the certifying entity during the initial certification of the system and incorporated into the facility operations manual.

(f) If one or more analyzers required by 33 CFR 154.2107(d) or (e) become inoperable during gas-freeing operations, the operation may continue, provided that at least one analyzer remains operational; however, no further gas-freeing operations may be started until all inoperable analyzers are repaired or replaced.

(g) Whenever a condition results in a shutdown of the VCS, the cleaning operations must be immediately terminated. The operation may not resume until the cause of the shutdown has been investigated and corrective action taken.

(h) If it is suspected that a flare in the VCS has had a flashback, or if a flame is detected on a detonation arrester required by 33 CFR 154.2109(c)(2), the cleaning operation must be stopped and may not resume until the detonation arrester and any quick-closing stop valves downstream of the detonation arrester have been inspected and found to be in satisfactory condition.

(i) If a vacuum displacement system is used for gas-freeing, the facility person in charge of the cleaning operation must verify the following items:

(1) The minimum amount of open area for air flow on the barge has been determined so that the pressure in the cargo tank cannot be less than 14.5 pounds per square inch absolute (psia) (−0.2 pounds per square inch gauge (psig)) at the maximum flow capacity of the vapor-moving device;

(2) Any hatch or fitting providing the minimum open area has been secured open so that accidental closure is not possible; and

(3) The hatch and/or fitting must be opened before the pressure in the cargo tank falls below 10 percent of the highest setting of any of the barge's vacuum relief valves.

(j) 33 CFR 154.2150(p) and (q) apply to a TBCF's VCS.

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