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e-CFR data is current as of October 16, 2020

Title 33Chapter ISubchapter NNPart 150 → Subpart G


Title 33: Navigation and Navigable Waters
PART 150—DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS


Subpart G—Workplace Safety and Health


Contents
§150.600   What does this subpart do?

Safety and Health (General)

§150.601   What are the safety and health requirements for the workplace on a deepwater port?
§150.602   What occupational awareness training is required?
§150.603   What emergency response training is required?
§150.604   Who controls access to medical monitoring and exposure records?
§150.605   What are the procedures for reporting a possible workplace safety or health violation at a deepwater port?
§150.606   After learning of a possible violation, what does the Sector Commander, or the MSU Commander, with COTP and OCMI authority do?

General Workplace Conditions

§150.607   What are the general safe working requirements?

Personal Protective Equipment

§150.608   Who is responsible for ensuring that the personnel use or wear protective equipment and are trained in its use?

Eyes and Face

§150.609   When is eye and face protection required?
§150.610   Where must eyewash equipment be located?

Head

§150.611   What head protection is required?

Feet

§150.612   What footwear is required?

Noise and Hearing Protection

§150.613   What are the requirements for a noise monitoring and hearing protection survey?

Clothing

§150.614   When is protective clothing required?

Electrical

§150.615   What safe practices are required?

Lockout/Tagout

§150.616   What are the requirements for lockout?
§150.617   What are the requirements for tagout?

Respiratory Protection

§150.618   What are the requirements for respiratory protection?

Fall Arrest

§150.619   What are the fall arrest system requirements?

Machine Guards

§150.620   What are the requirements for protecting personnel from machinery?

Slings

§150.621   What are the requirements for slings?

Warning Signs

§150.622   What are the warning sign requirements?

Confined Space Safety

§150.623   What are the requirements for protecting personnel from hazards associated with confined spaces?

Blood-Borne Pathogens

§150.624   What are the requirements for protecting personnel from blood-borne pathogens?

Hazard Communication Program

§150.625   What must the hazard communication program contain?
§150.626   What is the hazard communication program used for?
§150.627   Must material safety data sheets be available to all personnel?
§150.628   How must the operator label, tag, and mark a container of hazardous material?

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§150.600   What does this subpart do?

This subpart sets safety and health requirements for the workplace on a deepwater port.

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Safety and Health (General)

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§150.601   What are the safety and health requirements for the workplace on a deepwater port?

(a) Each operator of a deepwater port must ensure that the port complies with the requirements of this subpart, and must ensure that all places of employment within the port are:

(1) Maintained in compliance with workplace safety and health regulations of this subpart; and

(2) Free from recognized hazardous conditions.

(b) Persons responsible for actual operations, including owners, operators, contractors, and subcontractors must ensure that those operations subject to their control are:

(1) Conducted in compliance with workplace safety and health regulations of this subpart; and

(2) Free from recognized hazardous conditions.

(c) The term “recognized hazardous conditions,” as used in this subpart, means conditions that are:

(1) Generally known among persons in the affected industry as causing, or likely to cause, death or serious physical harm to persons exposed to those conditions; and

(2) Routinely controlled in the affected industry.

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§150.602   What occupational awareness training is required?

(a) Each deepwater port operator must ensure that all deepwater port personnel are provided with information and training on recognized hazardous conditions in their workplace, including, but not limited to, electrical, mechanical, and chemical hazards. Specific required training topics are outlined in §150.15(w) of this part.

(b) As an alternative to compliance with the specific provisions of this subpart, an operator may provide, for workplace safety and health, the implementation of an approved, port-specific safety and environmental management program (SEMP). Operators should consult with the Commandant (CG-5P) in preparing an SEMP. Five copies of a proposed SEMP must be submitted to the Commandant for evaluation. The Commandant may consult with the local Sector Commander, or with the local MSU Commander, with COTP and OCMI authority, and will approve the SEMP if he or she finds that the SEMP provides at least as much protection of workplace safety and health as do the specific provisions of this subpart.

[USCG-1998-3884, 71 FR 57651, Sept. 29, 2006, as amended by USCG-2013-0397, 78 FR 39182, July 1, 2013]

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§150.603   What emergency response training is required?

The requirements for emergency response training must be outlined in the deepwater port operations manual.

[USCG-1998-3884, 71 FR 57651, Sept. 29, 2006, as amended by USCG-2013-0397, 78 FR 39183, July 1, 2013]

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§150.604   Who controls access to medical monitoring and exposure records?

If medical monitoring is performed or exposure records are maintained by an employer, the owner, operator, or person in charge must establish procedures for access to these records by personnel.

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§150.605   What are the procedures for reporting a possible workplace safety or health violation at a deepwater port?

Any person may notify the Sector Commander, or the MSU Commander, with COTP and OCMI authority verbally or in writing of:

(a) A possible violation of a regulation in this part; or

(b) A hazardous or unsafe working condition on any deepwater port.

[USCG-1998-3884, 71 FR 57651, Sept. 29, 2006, as amended by USCG-2013-0397, 78 FR 39183, July 1, 2013]

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§150.606   After learning of a possible violation, what does the Sector Commander, or the MSU Commander, with COTP and OCMI authority do?

After reviewing the information received under §150.605 of this part, and conducting any necessary investigation, the Sector Commander, or the MSU Commander, with COTP and OCMI authority notifies the owner or operator of any deficiency or hazard and initiates enforcement measures as the circumstances warrant. The identity of any person making a report of a violation will remain confidential, except to the extent necessary for the performance of official duties or as agreed to by the person.

[USCG-1998-3884, 71 FR 57651, Sept. 29, 2006, as amended by USCG-2013-0397, 78 FR 39183, July 1, 2013]

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General Workplace Conditions

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§150.607   What are the general safe working requirements?

(a) All equipment, including machinery, cranes, derricks, portable power tools, and, most importantly, safety gear must be used in a safe manner and in accordance with the manufacturer's recommended practice, unless otherwise stated in this subchapter.

(b) All machinery and equipment must be maintained in proper working order or removed.

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Personal Protective Equipment

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§150.608   Who is responsible for ensuring that the personnel use or wear protective equipment and are trained in its use?

(a) Each deepwater port operator must ensure that all personnel wear personal protective equipment when within designated work areas.

(b) Each deepwater port operator must ensure that:

(1) All personnel engaged in the operation are trained in the proper use, limitations, and maintenance of the personal protective equipment specified by this subpart;

(2) The equipment is maintained and used or worn as required by this subpart; and

(3) The equipment is made available and on hand for all personnel engaged in the operation.

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Eyes and Face

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§150.609   When is eye and face protection required?

The operator must provide eye and face protectors for the use of persons engaged in or observing activities where damage to the eye is possible, such as welding, grinding, machining, chipping, handling hazardous materials, or burning or cutting acetylene. These eye and face protectors must be:

(a) Properly marked and in compliance with the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.133; and

(b) Maintained in good condition or replaced when necessary.

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§150.610   Where must eyewash equipment be located?

Portable or fixed eyewash equipment providing emergency relief must be immediately available near any area where there is a reasonable probability that eye injury may occur.

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Head

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§150.611   What head protection is required?

The deepwater port operator must ensure that where there is a reasonable probability of injury from falling objects or contact with electrical conductors, personnel working or visiting such an area wear head protectors designed to protect them against such injury and complying with 29 CFR 1910.135.

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Feet

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§150.612   What footwear is required?

The deepwater port operator must ensure that while personnel are working in an area, or engaged in activities, where there is a reasonable probability for foot injury to occur, they wear footwear that complies with 29 CFR 1910.136, except for when environmental conditions exist that present a hazard greater than that against which the footwear is designed to protect.

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Noise and Hearing Protection

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§150.613   What are the requirements for a noise monitoring and hearing protection survey?

(a) The deepwater port operator must measure noise and provide hearing protection in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.95.

(b) The initial noise survey for a deepwater port must be completed within one year of beginning operations.

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Clothing

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§150.614   When is protective clothing required?

The deepwater port operator must ensure that personnel exposed to flying particles, radiant energy, heavy dust, or hazardous materials wear clothing and gloves that protect against the hazard involved.

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Electrical

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§150.615   What safe practices are required?

(a) The deepwater port operator must ensure that before personnel begin work that might expose them to an electrical charge, they turn off the electricity, unless doing so is not feasible.

(b) The deepwater port operator must ensure that personnel turning off equipment pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section follow the lockout or tagging procedures specified in 29 CFR 1910.147, and in §§150.616 and 150.617 of this part.

(c) The deepwater port operator must ensure that, to prevent electrical shock, personnel receive training in electrical, safety-related work practices in the area of the work they perform, including the use of electrical personal protective equipment appropriate to protect against potential electrical hazards.

[USCG-1998-3884, 71 FR 57651, Sept. 29, 2006, as amended by USCG-2013-0397, 78 FR 39183, July 1, 2013]

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Lockout/Tagout

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§150.616   What are the requirements for lockout?

The deepwater port operator must ensure that, if electrical, hydraulic, mechanical, or pneumatic equipment does not need to be powered during the work described in §150.615(a) of this part, and has a lockout or other device to prevent the equipment from being turned on unintentionally, that the lockout or other device is activated.

[USCG-1998-3884, 71 FR 57651, Sept. 29, 2006, as amended by USCG-2013-0397, 78 FR 39183, July 1, 2013]

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§150.617   What are the requirements for tagout?

(a) The deepwater port operator must ensure that, before work takes place on equipment that is disconnected from the power source, a tag complying with this section is placed at the location where the power is disconnected. The operator must ensure that, if there is a control panel for the equipment in line between the equipment and the location where the power is disconnected, a tag complying with this section is also placed on the control panel.

(b) Each tag or sign must have words stating:

(1) That equipment is being worked on;

(2) That power must not be restored or the equipment activated; and

(3) The name of the person who placed the tag.

(c) Only the person who placed the tag, that person's immediate supervisor, or the relief person of either, is authorized to remove the tag.

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Respiratory Protection

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§150.618   What are the requirements for respiratory protection?

(a) The deepwater port operator must ensure that respiratory protection measures are taken in compliance with 29 CFR 1910.134 including establishment of a formal respiratory protection program.

(b) The deepwater port operator must ensure that measures for protection from exposure to asbestos are taken in compliance with 29 CFR 1910.1001.

(c) The deepwater port operator must ensure that measures for protection from exposure to inorganic lead are taken in compliance with 29 CFR 1910.1025.

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Fall Arrest

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§150.619   What are the fall arrest system requirements?

(a) The deepwater port operator must ensure that all personnel who are exposed to the risk of falling more than 6 feet, or who are at risk of falling any distance onto equipment with irregular surfaces, exposed moving components, electrically energized cables or connectors, or water, are protected against such a fall by guardrails or other measures that comply with 29 CFR 1910.23 or 1910.28, or by the use of suitable lifesaving equipment that complies with 46 CFR part 160.

(b) In addition, the operator must take measures to control the risk of falling, tripping, or slipping in work areas and walkways due to the presence of loose material or wet conditions, including spills.

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Machine Guards

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§150.620   What are the requirements for protecting personnel from machinery?

The deepwater port operator must ensure that all personnel are protected from the risks created by operating machinery through the use of guard devices or other measures that comply with 29 CFR 1910.212, or through the use of conspicuously posted warning signs that comply with §150.626 of this part.

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Slings

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§150.621   What are the requirements for slings?

The use of slings for handling material must comply with the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.184.

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Warning Signs

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§150.622   What are the warning sign requirements?

The construction and use of warning signs must be in compliance with 29 CFR 1910.144 and 1910.145.

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Confined Space Safety

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§150.623   What are the requirements for protecting personnel from hazards associated with confined spaces?

(a) All personnel must be protected by suitable measures from inadvertently entering a confined space containing a hazardous atmosphere that can cause death or serious injury.

(b) Each deepwater port operator must evaluate the specific hazards associated with entering the port's confined spaces, and develop a confined space safe entry program that complies with:

(1) 29 CFR 1910.146 for permit-required confined spaces, where applicable; and

(2) A national consensus standard, as that term is defined in 29 CFR 1910.2, or that is set by a nationally recognized testing laboratory as defined in 29 CFR 1910.7 and that provides levels of personnel protection at least equivalent to those provided for shipyard personnel by 29 CFR part 1915, subpart B.

(c) To implement the confined space safe entry program, the deepwater port operator must determine the education, training, and experience needed by the designated competent persons to safely conduct their duties, including:

(1) Identification, testing, and certification of confined spaces; and

(2) Training of personnel regarding dangers.

(d) These measures must be specified in the port operations manual, along with a list of all confined spaces on the port, describing the specific hazards associated with each such space.

[USCG-1998-3884, 71 FR 57651, Sept. 29, 2006, as amended by USCG-2013-0397, 78 FR 39183, July 1, 2013]

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Blood-Borne Pathogens

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§150.624   What are the requirements for protecting personnel from blood-borne pathogens?

Measures for protection from the dangers of blood-borne pathogens must be taken in compliance with 29 CFR 1910.1030.

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Hazard Communication Program

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§150.625   What must the hazard communication program contain?

(a) Each deepwater port must have a hazard communication program available for the training of, and review by, all personnel on the deepwater port.

(b) The program must be in writing and describe or include:

(1) An inventory of each hazardous material on the deepwater port;

(2) The potential hazards of the material;

(3) The material's intended use on the deepwater port;

(4) The methods for handling and storing the material;

(5) The protective measures and equipment used to avoid hazardous exposure;

(6) The labeling, marking, or tagging of the material;

(7) The special precautions, such as lockout and tagout under §§150.616 and 150.617 of this part, that should be emphasized when working around the material;

(8) Information and training required for personnel on board the deepwater port; and

(9) A material safety data sheet for the material.

(c) The information on a material safety data sheet itself may be used by the employer as a tool for educating employees about the hazards posed by the material, provided the employees acknowledge and can demonstrate appropriate precautionary measures to minimize risk to health and safety.

(d) The program must be supplemented as necessary to address each hazardous material newly introduced on the deepwater port.

[USCG-1998-3884, 71 FR 57651, Sept. 29, 2006, as amended by USCG-2013-0397, 78 FR 39183, July 1, 2013]

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§150.626   What is the hazard communication program used for?

(a) The hazard communication program must ensure that all deepwater port employees, when required by their duties, work safely and responsibly with hazardous materials.

(b) The person in charge for safety must ensure that, before a person is allowed to work at the deepwater port:

(1) A copy of the hazard communication program is made available to the person; and

(2) The person is trained in the information contained in the program.

(c) The training must be supplemented to address each hazardous material newly introduced on the deepwater port.

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§150.627   Must material safety data sheets be available to all personnel?

(a) The person in charge must ensure that a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each hazardous material on the fixed or floating deepwater port is made available to all personnel on the port.

(b) Each MSDS must contain at least information on the use, proper storage, potential hazards, and appropriate protective and response measures to be taken when exposed to or handling the material.

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§150.628   How must the operator label, tag, and mark a container of hazardous material?

The operator must label, tag, or mark each container of hazardous material with the identity of the hazardous material and the appropriate physical, health, reactive and other special condition hazard warnings. The only exception is for portable containers that transfer hazardous material from a labeled container to the work site for immediate use by the person who performs the transfer.

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