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e-CFR data is current as of July 6, 2020

Title 24Subtitle BChapter XXPart 3280 → Subpart E


Title 24: Housing and Urban Development
PART 3280—MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS


Subpart E—Testing


Contents
§3280.401   Structural load tests.
§3280.402   Test procedures for roof trusses.
§3280.403   Requirements for windows, sliding glass doors, and skylights.
§3280.404   Standard for egress windows and devices for use in manufactured homes.
§3280.405   Standard for swinging exterior passage doors for use in manufactured homes.
§3280.406   Air chamber test methods for certification and continuing qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.
§3280.407   Quality control testing, manuals, facilities, and personnel.

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§3280.401   Structural load tests.

Every structural assembly tested shall be capable of meeting the Proof Load Test or the Ultimate Load Test as follows:

(a) Proof load tests. Every structural assembly tested must be capable of sustaining its dead load plus superimposed live loads equal to 1.75 times the required live loads for a period of 12 hours without failure. Tests must be conducted with loads applied and deflections recorded in 14 design live load increments at 10-minute intervals until 1.25 times design live load plus dead load has been reached. Additional load shall then be applied continuously until 1.75 times design live load plus dead load has been reached. Assembly failure shall be considered as design live load deflection (or residual deflection measured 12 hours after live load removal) that is greater than the limits set in §3280.305(d), rupture, fracture, or excessive yielding. Design live load deflection criteria do not apply when the structural assembly being evaluated does not include structural framing members. An assembly to be tested shall be of the minimum quality of materials and workmanship of the production. Each test assembly, component, or subassembly shall be identified as to type and quality or grade of material. All assemblies, components, or subassemblies qualifying under this test shall be subject to a continuing qualification testing program acceptable to HUD.

(b) Ultimate load tests. Ultimate load tests must be performed on a minimum of three assemblies or components to generally evaluate the structural design. Every structural assembly or component tested must be capable of sustaining its total dead load plus the design live load increased by a factor of safety of at least 2.5. A factor of safety greater than 2.5 shall be used when required by an applicable reference standard in §3280.304(b)(1). Tests shall be conducted with loads applied and deflections recorded in 1/4 design live load increments at 10-minute intervals until 1.25 times design live load plus dead load has been reached. Additional loading shall then be applied continuously until failure occurs, or the total of the factor of safety times the design live load plus the dead load is reached. Assembly failure shall be considered as design live load deflection greater than the limits set in §3280.305(d), rupture, fracture, or excessive yielding. Design live load deflection criteria do not apply when the structural assembly being evaluated does not include structural framing members. Assemblies to be tested shall be representative of average quality or materials and workmanship of the production. Each test assembly, component, or subassembly shall be identified as to type and quality or grade of material. All assemblies, components, or subassemblies qualifying under this test shall be subject to a periodic qualification testing program acceptable to HUD.

[40 FR 58752, Dec. 18, 1975. Redesignated at 44 FR 20679, Apr. 6, 1979, as amended at 58 FR 55007, Oct. 25, 1993; 70 FR 72045, Nov. 30, 2005]

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§3280.402   Test procedures for roof trusses.

(a) Roof load tests. This section provides the roof truss test procedure for vertical loading conditions. Where roof trusses act as support for other members, have eave or cornice projections, or support concentrated loads, roof trusses must also be tested for those conditions. These test procedures are required for new truss designs in all three wind zones and for existing truss designs used in Wind Zones II and III.

(b) General. Trusses must be tested in a truss test fixture that replicates the design loads, and actual support points, and does not restrain horizontal movement. When tested singly or in groups of two or more trusses, trusses shall be mounted on supports and positioned as intended to be installed in the manufactured home in order to give the required clear span distance (L) and eave or cornice distance (Lo), if applicable, as specified in the design.

(l) When trusses are tested singly, trusses shall be positioned in a test fixture, with supports properly located and the roof loads evenly applied. See Figure 3280.402(b)(1).

eCFR graphic er18ja13.001.gif

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(2) When tested in groups of two or more, the top chords are permitted to be sheathed with nominal 1/4-inch × 12-inch plywood strips. The plywood strips shall be at least long enough to cover the top chords of the trusses at the designated design truss spacing. Adjacent plywood strips shall be separated by at least 1/8-inch. The plywood strips shall be nailed with 4d nails or equivalent staples no closer than 8 inches on center along the top chord. The bottom chords of the adjacent trusses shall be permitted to be one of the following:

(i) Unbraced; or

(ii) Laterally braced together (not cross-braced) with 1-inch × 2-inch stripping no closer than 24 inches on center, nailed with only one 8d nail at each truss. See Figure 3280.402(b)(2).

eCFR graphic er18ja13.002.gif

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(c) Measuring and loading methods. Deflections must be measured at the free end of an eave or cornice projection and at least at the truss mid-span and quarter points. Scissors or other unique truss configurations are to be measured at as many additional bottom chord panel points as necessary to obtain an accurate representation of the deflected shape of the truss so as to be able to locate and record the point(s) of maximum deflection. Deflections must be read and recorded relative to a fixed reference datum. Deflections must be read and recorded to the nearest 1/32-inch. Dead load must be applied to the top and bottom chord, and live load must be applied to the top chord through a suitable hydraulic, pneumatic, or mechanical system or weights to simulate design loads. Load unit weights for uniformly distributed top chord loads must be separated so that arch action does not occur and be spaced not more than 12 inches on center so as to simulate uniform loading. Bottom chord loading must be spaced as uniformly as practical. Truss gravity loads must be calculated based on the overall truss length (horizontal projection), including eave or cornice projections.

(d) Testing procedures. Either the testing method in paragraph (d)(1) or (d)(2) of this section may be used, however, the testing method in paragraph (d)(3) of this section must be used, to test trusses to establish compliance with the provisions of these standards.

(1) Proof load truss test procedure. At least three average quality/consecutively tested trusses must pass all requirements of the test, for initial qualification of the truss design. All tests for initial qualification of the truss designs evaluated by this procedure must be certified by a Registered Engineer or Architect, or by a nationally recognized testing laboratory. An in-house quality control and follow-up testing program (see paragraphs (e) and (f) of this section) must be approved prior to entering production of any truss design evaluated by this procedure.

(i) Dead load. Measure and record initial elevation of the truss or trusses in the test position at no load. Apply to the top and bottom chords of the truss dead loads that are representative of the actual weights of materials to be supported by the truss. However, the dead load may only be applied as indicated in paragraph (e)(4) of this section for ongoing follow-up testing. Dead loads to be applied to the truss test assembly are permitted to include only the weights of materials supported by the truss and not the weight of the truss itself. However, readings from load cells (when used) on which the test truss rests must reflect the sum of the applied load plus the weight of the truss. Apply dead loads and hold for 5 minutes. Measure and record the deflections.

(ii) Live load. Maintaining the dead loads, apply live load to the top chord in approximate 14 live load increments until dead load plus the live load is reached. Measure and record the deflections no sooner than one minute after each 14 live load increment has been applied and 5 minutes after the full live load has been reached.

(iii) Initial recovery phase. Remove the design live load but not the dead load. Measure and record the deflections 5 minutes after the total live load has been removed.

(iv) Continue to load the truss to:

(A) Dead load plus 2.0 times the design live load. Maintain this loading for 6 hours and inspect the truss for failure. Failure is rupture, fracture, or excessive yielding; or

(B) Dead load plus 1.75 times the design live load. Maintain this loading for 12 hours and inspect the truss for failure. Failure is rupture, fracture, or excessive yielding.

(v) Final recovery phase. Remove 2.0 times the design live load, but not the dead load or 1.75 times the design live load, but not the dead load. Measure and record deflections within 4 hours after removing 2.0 times the design live load or 1.75 times the design live load.

(vi) Acceptance criteria. The truss design is acceptable if all of the following conditions are met:

(A) The maximum deflection between no load and dead load must be L/480 or less for simply supported clear spans and Lo/180 or less for eave and cornice projections; and

(B) The maximum deflection between dead load and design live load must be L/180 or less for simply supported clear spans and Lo/90 or less for eave and cornice projections; and

(C) After the design live load is removed, and with the dead load still applied, the maximum recovery deflection must be L/360 or less for simply supported spans and Lo/180 or less for eave and cornice projections; and

(D) The truss must maintain the overload condition for 6 hours without rupture or fracture, or excessive yielding; and

(E) After 2.0 times the design live load has been removed, and with the dead load still applied, the maximum recovery deflection must be L/180 or less for simply supported clear spans and Lo/90 or less for eave and cornice projections; and

(F) As applicable, each truss design must also meet all requirements for uplift loads required by paragraph (d)(3) of this section. For Wind Zone I uplift load requirements, see paragraph (d)(3)(i) of this section. For Wind Zones II and III uplift load requirements, see paragraph (d)(3)(ii) of this section.

(2) Ultimate load truss test procedure. (i) At least two average quality/consecutively tested trusses must pass all requirements of the test, for initial qualification of the truss design. All tests for initial qualification of the truss designs evaluated by this procedure must be certified by a Registered Engineer or Architect, or by a nationally recognized testing laboratory. An in-house quality control and follow-up testing program (see paragraph (e) and (f) of this section) must be approved prior to entering production of any truss design evaluated by this procedure.

(ii) Dead load. Measure and record initial elevation of the truss or trusses in the test position at no load. Apply to the top and bottom chords of the truss dead loads that are representative of the actual weights of materials to be supported by the truss. However, the dead load may only be applied as indicated in paragraph (e)(4) of this section for ongoing follow-up testing. Dead loads to be applied to the truss test assembly shall be permitted to include only the weights of materials supported by the truss, and not the weight of the truss itself. However, readings from load cells (when used) on which the test truss rests must reflect the sum of the applied load plus the weight of the truss. Apply dead loads and hold for 5 minutes. Measure and record the deflections.

(iii) Live load. Maintaining the dead loads, apply live load at a uniform rate to the top chord in approximate 14 live load increments until the dead load plus the live load is reached. Measure and record the deflections no sooner than one minute after each 14 live load increment has been applied and 5 minutes after the full live load has been reached.

(iv) Initial recovery phase. Remove the design live load but not the dead load. Measure and record the deflections 5 minutes after the design live load has been removed.

(v) Overload phase. After the recovery phase is completed, reapply the full live load to the truss assembly. Additional loading shall then be applied continuously until the dead load plus 2.5 times the design live load is reached. This overload condition must be maintained for at least 5 minutes.

(vi) Final recovery phase. Remove 2.5 times the design live load but not the dead load. Measure and record deflections within 4 hours after 2.5 times the design live load has been removed.

(vii) Acceptance criteria. The truss design is acceptable if all of the following conditions are met:

(A) The maximum deflection between no load and dead load must be L/480 or less for simply supported clear spans and Lo/180 or less for eave and cornice projections; and

(B) Dead load to design live load deflections shall be L/180 or less for simply supported clear spans and Lo/90 or less for eave and cornice projections; and

(C) After the design live load is removed and with the dead load still applied, the maximum recovery deflection must be L/360 or less for simply supported spans and Lo/180 or less for eave and cornice projections; and

(D) The truss shall maintain the overload condition for 5 minutes without rupture, fracture, or excessive yielding; and

(E) After 2.5 times the design live load is removed, and with the dead load still applied, the truss must recover to at least L/180 for simply supported clear spans and Lo/90 for eave and cornice within 4 hours after the total live load has been removed; and

(F) As applicable, each truss design must also meet all requirements for uplift loads in Wind Zone I or Wind Zone II and III, as required by paragraph (d)(3) of this section. For Wind Zone I uplift load requirements, see paragraph (d)(3)(i) of this section. For Wind Zones II and III uplift load requirements, see paragraph (d)(3)(ii) of this section.

(3) Uplift load tests. Each truss design must also pass all requirements of the uplift load test, as applicable, in paragraph (d)(3)(i) or (d)(3)(ii) and paragraphs (d)(3)(iii) and (d)(3)(iv) of this section.

(i) Wind Zone I uplift load test. Where there are engineered connectors between the top chord and web members of the truss, such as metal connector plates or wood gussets or their equivalents, uplift testing in Wind Zone I is at the discretion of the Registered Engineer or Architect or nationally recognized testing laboratory certifying the truss design. When testing is deemed necessary by the Registered Engineer or Architect or nationally recognized testing laboratory certifying the truss design, a minimum of one average quality uplift load test is to be conducted for each such truss design and must pass all requirements of the test for initial qualification of the truss design. The net uplift load for trusses designed for use in Wind Zone I is 9 psf for the clear span of the truss and 22.5 psf for eave or cornice projections.

(ii) Wind Zones II and III uplift loads test. This test is required for all trusses designed for use in Wind Zones II and III. A minimum of three average quality/consecutive uplift load tests are to be conducted for each truss design when tested in the inverted position and a minimum of two average quality/consecutive uplift load tests are to be conducted for trusses in the upright position. The trusses must pass all requirements of the test for initial qualification of the truss design. The uplift load for trusses designed to be used in Wind Zones II and III for the clear span or eave cornice projections is to be determined by subtracting the dead load applied to the truss from the uplift load provided in the Table of Design Wind Pressures in §3280.305(c)(1)(ii)(B).

(iii) Trusses designed for use in Wind Zone I, when tested (see paragraph (d)(3)(i) of this section), must be tested in either the inverted position to 2.5 times the net wind uplift load or in the upright position to 1.75 times the net wind uplift load. Trusses designed for use in Wind Zones II and III (see paragraph (d)(3)(ii) of this section) must be tested to 2.0 times the uplift load minus the dead load in the inverted position and to 1.75 times the uplift load minus the dead load in the upright position. See Figure 3280.402(b)(3).

(iv) The following describes how to conduct the uplift test with the truss in the upright position. Similar procedures must be used if conducting the test in the inverted position.

(A) Place the truss in the test fixture and position as it is intended to be installed in the manufactured home. See Figure 3280.402(b)(3).

eCFR graphic er18ja13.003.gif

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(B) Position the load measurement devices to register the wind uplift loads that will be applied to the top chord of the truss. The uplift loads shall be applied through tension devices not wider than one inch and spaced not greater than approximately 12 inches on center and shall be applied as uniform as possible, so as to simulate uniform loading. Gravity and wind uplift load tests may be performed on the same truss in this single setup mode. For the wind uplift test, it is permissible to stabilize the bottom chord of the truss in the test fixture to simulate ceiling materials or purlin supports. Measure and record the initial elevation of the bottom chord of the truss in the test position at the mid-span and quarter points of the truss, and at the free end of an eave or cornice projection greater than 12 inches. Scissors or other unique truss configurations are to be measured at as many additional bottom chord panel points as necessary to obtain an accurate representation of the deflected shape of the truss, so as to be able to locate and record the point(s) of maximum deflection. Eave or cornice projection loads are applied separately for eaves or cornice projections greater than 12 inches. For eave or cornice projections greater than 12 inches, the additional required load must be applied to the eave simultaneously with the main body load. For eave or cornice projections of 12 inches or less, add the additional required load to the main body load and apply it to the entire top chord.

(C) Measure and record the deflection 5 minutes after the net uplift load has been applied. Design load deflection shall be L/180 or less for a simply supported clear span and Lo/90 or less for eave or cornice projections.

(D) For trusses tested in the upright position, continue to load the truss to 1.75 times the net uplift load in paragraph (d)(3)(i) of this section for Wind Zone I and 1.75 times the uplift load in paragraph (d)(3)(ii) for Wind Zones II and III, and maintain the load for one minute. For trusses tested in the inverted position, continue to load the truss to 2.50 times the net uplift load in paragraph (d)(3)(i) for Wind Zone I and to 2.0 times the uplift load minus the dead load in paragraph (d)(3)(ii) for Wind Zones II and III, and maintain the full load for one minute. Regardless of the test position of the truss, upright or inverted, trusses must maintain the overload for the specified time period without rupture, fracture, or excessive yielding.

(e) Follow-up testing. Follow-up testing procedures must include the following:

(1) All trusses qualifying under these test procedures must be subject to a quality control and follow-up testing program.

(i) Manufacturers of listed or labeled trusses must follow an in-house quality control program with follow-up testing approved by a nationally recognized testing program as specified in paragraph (e)(3) of this section. The in-house quality control program must include, at a minimum, procedures for quality of materials including, but not limited to, grade(s) of materials, allowable splits, knots, and other applicable lumber qualities; workmanship including, but not limited to, plate placement and embedment tolerances; other manufacturing tolerances; description and calibration of test equipment; truss retesting criteria; and procedures in the event of noncomplying results.

(ii) Those home manufacturers producing trusses for their own use, and which are not listed or labeled, must have an in-house quality control program (see paragraph (i) of this section) that includes follow-up testing, as specified in this section, and is approved by their Design Approval Primary Inspection Agency (DAPIA).

(2) Truss designs that are qualified but not in production are not subject to follow-up testing until produced. When the truss design is brought into production, a follow-up test is to be performed if the truss design has been out of production for more than 6 months.

(3) The frequency of truss manufacturer's quality control follow-up testing for trusses must be at least:

(i) One test for the first 100 trusses produced, with a subsequent test for every 2,500 trusses for trusses qualified under the proof load truss test procedure or inverted uplift test procedure for trusses used in Wind Zones II and III or once every 6 months, whichever is more frequent, for every truss design produced; or

(ii) One test for every 4,000 trusses produced for trusses qualified under the ultimate load truss test procedure or upright uplift test procedure for trusses used in Wind Zones II and III or once every 6 months, whichever is more frequent, for every truss design produced.

(4) For follow-up testing only, the full dead load may be applied to the top chord of the truss, when the bottom chord dead load is 5 psf or less.

[78 FR 4065, Jan. 18, 2013]

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§3280.403   Requirements for windows, sliding glass doors, and skylights.

(a) Scope. This section establishes the requirements for prime windows and sliding glass doors, except that windows used in an entry door are components of the door and are excluded from these requirements.

(b)(1) Standard. All primary windows and sliding glass doors shall comply with AAMA 1701.2-95, Voluntary Standard Primary Window and Sliding Glass Door for Utilization in Manufactured Housing, except the exterior and interior pressure tests must be conducted at the design wind loads required for components and cladding specified in §3280.305(c)(1).

(2) All skylights must comply with AAMA/WDMA/CSA/101/I.S.2/A440-08: North American Fenestration Standard/Specifications for Windows, Doors and Skylights (incorporated by reference, see §3280.4). Skylights must withstand the roof loads for the applicable Roof Load Zone specified in §3280.305(c)(3), and the following wind loads:

(i) For Wind Zone I, the wind loads specified in §3280.305(c)(1)(i); and

(ii) For Wind Zones II and III, the wind loads specified for exterior roof coverings, sheathing, and fastenings in §3280.305(c)(1)(ii).

(c) Installation. All primary windows, sliding glass doors, and skylights must be installed in a manner that allows proper operation and provides protection against the elements, as required by §3280.307.

(d)  Glass. (1) Safety glazing materials, where used shall meet Standard for Safety Glazing Materials used in Buildings—Safety Performance Specifications and Methods of Test, ANSI Z97.1-2004 (incorporated by reference, see §3280.4).

(2) Sealed insulating glass, where used, must meet all performance requirements for Class C in accordance with ASTM E 774-97, Standard Specification for the Classification of the Durability of Sealed Insulating Glass Units. The sealing system must be qualified in accordance with ASTM E 773-97, Standard Test Methods for Accelerated Weathering of Sealed Insulating Glass Units. Each glass unit must be permanently identified with the name of the insulating glass manufacturer.

(e) Certification. All primary windows and sliding glass doors to be installed in manufactured homes must be certified as complying with AAMA 1701.2-95. This certification must be based on tests conducted at the design wind loads specified in §3280.305(c)(1).

(1) All such windows and doors must show evidence of certification by affixing a quality certification label to the product in accordance with ANSI Z34.1-1993, Third-Party Certification Programs for Products, Processes, and Services.

(2) In determining certifiability of the products, an independent quality assurance agency shall conduct pre-production specimen tests in accordance with AAMA 1701.2-95. Further, such agency must inspect the product manufacturer's facility at least twice per year.

(3) All skylights installed in manufactured homes must be certified as complying with AAMA/WDMA/CSA 101/I.S.2/A440-08: North American Fenestration Standard/Specifications for Windows, Doors, and Skylights (incorporated by reference, see §3280.4). This certification must be based on applicable loads specified in paragraph (b) of this section.

(f) Protection of primary window and sliding glass door openings in high wind areas. For homes designed to be located in Wind Zones II and III, manufacturers shall design exterior walls surrounding the primary window and sliding glass door openings to allow for the installation of shutters or other protective covers, such as plywood, to cover these openings. Although not required, the Department encourages manufacturers to provide the shutters or protective covers and to install receiving devices, sleeves, or anchors for fasteners to be used to secure the shutters or protective covers to the exterior walls. If the manufacturer does not provide shutters or other protective covers to cover these openings, the manufacturer must provide to the homeowner instructions for at least one method of protecting primary window and sliding glass door openings. This method must be capable of resisting the design wind pressures specified in §3280.305 without taking the home out of conformance with the standards in this part. These instructions must be included in the printed instructions that accompany each manufactured home. The instructions shall also indicate whether receiving devices, sleeves, or anchors, for fasteners to be used to secure the shutters or protective covers to the exterior walls, have been installed or provided by the manufacturer.

[52 FR 4583, Feb. 12, 1987, as amended at 52 FR 35543, Sept. 22, 1987; 58 FR 55009, Oct. 25, 1993; 59 FR 2474, Jan. 14, 1994; 70 FR 72046, Nov. 30, 2005; 78 FR 73983, Dec. 9, 2013]

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§3280.404   Standard for egress windows and devices for use in manufactured homes.

(a) Scope and purpose. The purpose of this section is to establish the requirements for the design, construction, and installation of windows and approved devices intended to be used as an emergency exit during conditions encountered in a fire or similar disaster.

(b) Performance. Egress windows including auxiliary frame and seals, if any, shall meet all requirements of AAMA 1701.2-95, Voluntary Standard Primary Window and Sliding Glass Door for Utilization in Manufactured Housing and AAMA Standard 1704-1985, Voluntary Standard Egress Window Systems for Utilization in Manufactured Housing, except the exterior and interior pressure tests for components and cladding must be conducted at the design wind loads required by §3280.305(c)(1).

(c) Installation. (1) The installation of egress windows or devices shall be installed in a manner which allows for proper operation and provides protection against the elements. (See §3280.307.)

(2) An operational check of each installed egress window or device must be made at the manufactured home factory. All egress windows and devices must be capable of being opened to the minimum required dimensions by normal operation of the window without binding or requiring the use of tools. Any window or device failing this check must be repaired or replaced. A repaired window must conform to its certification. Any repaired or replaced window or device must pass the operational check.

(3) Windows that require the removal of the sash to meet egress size requirements are prohibited.

(d) Operating instructions. Operating instructions shall be affixed to each egress window and device and carry the legend “Do Not Remove.”

(e) Certification of egress windows and devices. Egress windows and devices shall be listed in accordance with the procedures and requirements of AAMA Standard 1704-1985. As of January 17, 1995, this certification must be based on tests conducted at the design wind loads specified in §3280.305(c)(1).

(f) Protection of egress window openings in high wind areas. For homes designed to be located in Wind Zones II and III, manufacturers shall design exterior walls surrounding the egress window openings to allow for the installation of shutters or other protective covers, such as plywood, to cover these openings. Although not required, the Department encourages manufacturers to provide the shutters or protective covers and to install receiving devices, sleeves, or anchors for fasteners to be used to secure the shutters or protective covers to the exterior walls. If the manufacturer does not provide shutters or other protective covers to cover these openings, the manufacturer must provide to the homeowner instructions for at least one method of protecting egress window openings. This method must be capable of resisting the design wind pressures specified in §3280.305 without taking the home out of conformance with the standards in this part. These instructions must be included in the printed instructions that accompany each manufactured home. The instructions shall also indicate whether receiving devices, sleeves, or anchors, for fasteners to be used to secure the shutters or protective covers to the exterior walls, have been installed or provided by the manufacturer.

[52 FR 4583, Feb. 12, 1987, as amended at 59 FR 2474, Jan. 14, 1994; 70 FR 72046, Nov. 30, 2005; 78 FR 73983, Dec. 9, 2013]

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§3280.405   Standard for swinging exterior passage doors for use in manufactured homes.

(a) Introduction. This standard applies to all exterior passage door units, excluding sliding doors and doors used for access to utilities and compartments. This standard applies only to the door frame consisting of jambs, head and sill and the attached door or doors.

(b) Performance requirements. The design and construction of exterior door units must meet all requirements of AAMA 1702.2-95, Voluntary Standard Swinging Exterior Passage Door for Utilization in Manufactured Housing.

(c) Materials and methods. Any material or method of construction shall conform to the performance requirements as outlined in paragraph (b) of this section. Plywood shall be exterior type and preservative treated in accordance with NWWDA I.S.4-81, Water Repellent Preservative Non-Pressure Treatment for Millwork.

(d) Exterior doors. All swinging exterior doors shall be installed in a manner which allows proper operation and provides protection against the elements (see §3280.307).

(e) Certification. All swinging exterior doors to be installed in manufactured homes must be certified as complying with AAMA 1702.2-95, Voluntary Standard Swinging Exterior Passage Door for Utilization in Manufactured Housing.

(1) All such doors must show evidence of certification by affixing a quality certification label to the product in accordance with ANSI Z34.1-1993, Third Party Certification Programs for Products, Processes, and Services.

(2) In determining certifiability of the products, an independent quality assurance agency must conduct a pre-production specimen test in accordance with AAMA 1702.2-95, Voluntary Standard Swinging Exterior Passage Door for Utilization in Manufactured Housing.

(f) Protection of exterior doors in high wind areas. For homes designed to be located in Wind Zones II and III, manufacturers shall design exterior walls surrounding the exterior door openings to allow for the installation of shutters or other protective covers, such as plywood, to cover these openings. Although not required, the Department encourages manufacturers to provide the shutters or protective covers and to install receiving devices, sleeves, or anchors for fasteners to be used to secure the shutters or protective covers to the exterior walls. If the manufacturer does not provide shutters or other protective covers to cover these openings, the manufacturer must provide to the homeowner instructions for at least one method of protecting exterior door openings. This method must be capable of resisting the design wind pressures specified in §3280.305 without taking the home out of conformance with the standards in this part. These instructions must be included in the printed instructions that accompany each manufactured home. The instructions shall also indicate whether receiving devices, sleeves, or anchors, for fasteners to be used to secure the shutters or protective covers to the exterior walls, have been installed or provided by the manufacturer.

[40 FR 58752, Dec. 18, 1975. Redesignated at 44 FR 20679, Apr. 6, 1979, as amended at 52 FR 4583, Feb. 12, 1987; 52 FR 35543, Sept. 22, 1987; 58 FR 55009, Oct. 25, 1993; 59 FR 2474, Jan. 14, 1994; 70 FR 72046, Nov. 30, 2005]

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§3280.406   Air chamber test methods for certification and continuing qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.

(a) Definitions. For purposes of this section, the definitions found in 40 CFR 770.3 apply.

(b) Testing requirements. Testing of composite wood products must be performed pursuant to the general requirements of 40 CFR 770.20(a) and (b). Certification testing must be performed pursuant to one of the air chamber test methods specified in 40 CFR 770.15 (ASTM E1333-14, or ASTM D6007-14, both incorporated by reference, see §3280.4). Quarterly testing must be performed pursuant to one of the air chamber test methods specified in 40 CFR 770.20(c) (ASTM E1333-14 or ASTM D6007-14).

(c) Samples for testing. Samples for testing shall comply with 40 CFR 770.24.

[85 FR 5566, Jan. 31, 2020]

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§3280.407   Quality control testing, manuals, facilities, and personnel.

(a) Definitions. For purposes of this section, the definitions found in 40 CFR 770.3 apply.

(b) Quality control testing. Quality control testing is required for hardwood plywood made with a veneer core or composite core, medium density fiberboard, thin medium density fiberboard, and particleboard and must be performed in accordance with the general requirements in 40 CFR 770.20(a) and by one of the test methods and at the frequency specified in 40 CFR 770.20(b). Panels being tested with an equivalence and correlation must be determined in accordance with 40 CFR 770.20(d).

(c) Quality control manuals, facilities, and personnel. A panel producer must have a written quality control manual, must designate a quality control facility for conducting quality control formaldehyde testing under this section, and must designate a person as quality control manager with adequate experience and/or training to be responsible for formaldehyde emissions quality control consistent with 40 CFR 770.21. A panel producer means a manufacturing plant or other facility that manufactures (excluding facilities that solely import products) composite wood products (hardwood plywood made with a veneer or composite core, medium-density fiberboard, and particleboard) on the premises.

[85 FR 5566, Jan. 31, 2020]

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