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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR data is current as of May 21, 2020

Title 24Subtitle BChapter IXPart 1000 → Subpart A


Title 24: Housing and Urban Development
PART 1000—NATIVE AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES


Subpart A—General


Contents
§1000.1   What is the applicability and scope of these regulations?
§1000.2   What are the guiding principles in the implementation of NAHASDA?
§1000.4   What are the objectives of NAHASDA?
§1000.6   What is the nature of the IHBG program?
§1000.8   May provisions of these regulations be waived?
§1000.9   How is negotiated rulemaking conducted when promulgating NAHASDA regulations?
§1000.10   What definitions apply in these regulations?
§1000.12   What nondiscrimination requirements are applicable?
§1000.14   What relocation and real property acquisition policies are applicable?
§1000.16   What labor standards are applicable?
§1000.18   What environmental review requirements apply?
§1000.20   Is an Indian tribe required to assume environmental review responsibilities?
§1000.21   Under what circumstances are waivers of the environmental review procedures available to tribes?
§1000.22   Are the costs of the environmental review an eligible cost?
§1000.24   If an Indian tribe assumes environmental review responsibility, how will HUD assist the Indian tribe in performing the environmental review?
§1000.26   What are the administrative requirements under NAHASDA?
§1000.28   May a self-governance Indian tribe be exempted from the applicability of §1000.26?
§1000.30   What prohibitions regarding conflict of interest are applicable?
§1000.32   May exceptions be made to the conflict of interest provisions?
§1000.34   What factors must be considered in making an exception to the conflict of interest provisions?
§1000.36   How long must a recipient retain records regarding exceptions made to the conflict of interest provisions?
§1000.38   What flood insurance requirements are applicable?
§1000.40   Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities under NAHASDA?
§1000.42   Are the requirements of section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 applicable?
§1000.44   What prohibitions on the use of debarred, suspended, or ineligible contractors apply?
§1000.46   Do drug-free workplace requirements apply?
§1000.48   Are Indian or tribal preference requirements applicable to IHBG activities?
§1000.50   What tribal or Indian preference requirements apply to IHBG administration activities?
§1000.52   What tribal or Indian preference requirements apply to IHBG procurement?
§1000.54   What procedures apply to complaints arising out of any of the methods of providing for Indian preference?
§1000.56   How are NAHASDA funds paid by HUD to recipients?
§1000.58   Are there limitations on the investment of IHBG funds?
§1000.60   Can HUD prevent improper expenditure of funds already disbursed to a recipient?
§1000.62   What is considered program income?
§1000.64   What are the permissible uses of program income?

§1000.1   What is the applicability and scope of these regulations?

Under the Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 1996 (25 U.S.C. 4101 et seq.) (NAHASDA) the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides grants, loan guarantees, and technical assistance to Indian tribes and Alaska Native villages for the development and operation of low-income housing in Indian areas. The policies and procedures described in this part apply to grants to eligible recipients under the Indian Housing Block Grant (IHBG) program for Indian tribes and Alaska Native villages. This part also applies to loan guarantee assistance under title VI of NAHASDA. The regulations in this part supplement the statutory requirements set forth in NAHASDA. This part, as much as practicable, does not repeat statutory language.

§1000.2   What are the guiding principles in the implementation of NAHASDA?

(a) The Secretary shall use the following Congressional findings set forth in section 2 of NAHASDA as the guiding principles in the implementation of NAHASDA:

(1) The Federal government has a responsibility to promote the general welfare of the Nation:

(i) By using Federal resources to aid families and individuals seeking affordable homes in safe and healthy environments and, in particular, assisting responsible, deserving citizens who cannot provide fully for themselves because of temporary circumstances or factors beyond their control;

(ii) By working to ensure a thriving national economy and a strong private housing market; and

(iii) By developing effective partnerships among the Federal government, state, tribal, and local governments, and private entities that allow government to accept responsibility for fostering the development of a healthy marketplace and allow families to prosper without government involvement in their day-to-day activities.

(2) There exists a unique relationship between the Government of the United States and the governments of Indian tribes and a unique Federal responsibility to Indian people.

(3) The Constitution of the United States invests the Congress with plenary power over the field of Indian affairs, and through treaties, statutes, and historical relations with Indian tribes, the United States has undertaken a unique trust responsibility to protect and support Indian tribes and Indian people.

(4) The Congress, through treaties, statutes, and the general course of dealing with Indian tribes, has assumed a trust responsibility for the protection and preservation of Indian tribes and for working with Indian tribes and their members to improve their housing conditions and socioeconomic status so that they are able to take greater responsibility for their own economic condition.

(5) Providing affordable homes in safe and healthy environments is an essential element in the special role of the United States in helping Indian tribes and their members to improve their housing conditions and socioeconomic status.

(6) The need for affordable homes in safe and healthy environments on Indian reservations, in Indian communities, and in Native Alaskan villages is acute and the federal government shall work not only to provide housing assistance, but also, to the extent practicable, to assist in the development of private housing finance mechanisms on Indian lands to achieve the goals of economic self-sufficiency and self-determination for Indian tribes and their members.

(7) Federal assistance to meet these responsibilities shall be provided in a manner that recognizes the right of Indian self-determination and tribal self-governance by making such assistance available directly to the Indian tribes or tribally designated entities under authorities similar to those accorded Indian tribes in Public Law 93-638 (25 U.S.C. 450 et seq.).

(b) Nothing in this section shall be construed as releasing the United States government from any responsibility arising under its trust responsibilities towards Indians or any treaty or treaties with an Indian tribe or nation.

[63 FR 12349, Mar. 12, 1998, as amended at 77 FR 71521, Dec. 3, 2012]

§1000.4   What are the objectives of NAHASDA?

The primary objectives of NAHASDA are:

(a) To assist and promote affordable housing activities to develop, maintain and operate affordable housing in safe and healthy environments on Indian reservations and in other Indian areas for occupancy by low-income Indian families;

(b) To ensure better access to private mortgage markets for Indian tribes and their members and to promote self-sufficiency of Indian tribes and their members;

(c) To coordinate activities to provide housing for Indian tribes and their members and to promote self-sufficiency of Indian tribes and their members;

(d) To plan for and integrate infrastructure resources for Indian tribes with housing development for Indian tribes; and

(e) To promote the development of private capital markets in Indian country and to allow such markets to operate and grow, thereby benefiting Indian communities.

§1000.6   What is the nature of the IHBG program?

The IHBG program is formula driven whereby eligible recipients of funding receive an equitable share of appropriations made by the Congress, based upon formula components specified under subpart D of this part. IHBG recipients must have the administrative capacity to undertake the affordable housing activities proposed, including the systems of internal control necessary to administer these activities effectively without fraud, waste, or mismanagement.

§1000.8   May provisions of these regulations be waived?

Yes. Upon determination of good cause, the Secretary may, subject to statutory limitations, waive any provision of this part and delegate this authority in accordance with section 106 of the Department of Housing and Urban Development Reform Act of 1989 (42 U.S.C. 3535(q)).

§1000.9   How is negotiated rulemaking conducted when promulgating NAHASDA regulations?

The negotiated rulemaking procedures and requirements set out in section 106(b) of NAHASDA shall be conducted as follows:

(a) Committee membership. In forming a negotiated rulemaking committee, HUD shall appoint as committee members representatives of the Federal Government and representatives of diverse tribes and program recipients.

(b) Initiation of rulemaking. HUD shall initiate a negotiated rulemaking not later than 90 days after the enactment of any act to reauthorize or significantly amend NAHASDA.

(c) Work groups. Negotiated rulemaking committees may form workgroups made up of committee members and other interested parties to meet during committee sessions and between sessions to develop specific rulemaking proposals for committee consideration.

(d) Further review. Negotiated rulemaking committees shall provide recommended rules to HUD. Once rules are proposed by HUD, they shall be published for comment in the Federal Register. Any comments will be further reviewed by the committee and HUD before HUD determines if the rule or rules will be adopted.

[77 FR 71521, Dec. 3, 2012]

§1000.10   What definitions apply in these regulations?

Except as noted in a particular subpart, the following definitions apply in this part:

(a) The terms “Adjusted income,” “Affordable housing,” “Drug-related criminal activity,” “Elderly families and near-elderly families,” “Elderly person,” “Grant beneficiary,” “Indian,” “Indian housing plan (IHP),” “Indian tribe,” “Low-income family,” “Near-elderly persons,” “Nonprofit,” “Recipient,” Secretary,” “State,” and “Tribally designated housing entity (TDHE)” are defined in section 4 of NAHASDA.

(b) In addition to the definitions set forth in paragraph (a) of this section, the following definitions apply to this part:

Affordable housing activities are those activities identified in section 202 of NAHASDA.

Annual Contributions Contract (ACC) means a contract under the 1937 Act between HUD and an IHA containing the terms and conditions under which HUD assists the IHA in providing decent, safe, and sanitary housing for low-income families.

Annual income has one of the following meanings, as determined by the Indian tribe:

(1) “Annual income” as defined for HUD's Section 8 programs in 24 CFR part 5, subpart F (except when determining the income of a homebuyer for an owner-occupied rehabilitation project, the value of the homeowner's principal residence may be excluded from the calculation of Net Family assets); or

(2) Annual income as reported under the Census long-form for the most recent available decennial Census. This definition includes:

(i) Wages, salaries, tips, commissions, etc.;

(ii) Self-employment income;

(iii) Farm self-employment income;

(iv) Interest, dividends, net rental income, or income from estates or trusts;

(v) Social security or railroad retirement;

(vi) Supplemental Security Income, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, or other public assistance or public welfare programs;

(vii) Retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and

(viii) Any other sources of income received regularly, including Veterans' (VA) payments, unemployment compensation, and alimony; or

(3) Adjusted gross income as defined for purposes of reporting under Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Form 1040 series for individual Federal annual income tax purposes.

Assistant Secretary means the Assistant Secretary for Public and Indian Housing.

Department or HUD means the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Family includes, but is not limited to, a family with or without children, an elderly family, a near-elderly family, a disabled family, a single person, as determined by the Indian tribe.

Homebuyer payment means the payment of a family purchasing a home pursuant to a lease purchase agreement.

Homeless family means a family who is without safe, sanitary and affordable housing even though it may have temporary shelter provided by the community, or a family who is homeless as determined by the Indian tribe.

Housing related activities, for purposes of program income, means any facility, community building, infrastructure, business, program, or activity, including any community development or economic development activity, that:

(1) Is determined by the recipient to be beneficial to the provision of housing in an Indian area; and

(2) Would meet at least one of the following conditions:

(i) Would help an Indian tribe or its tribally designated housing entity to reduce the cost of construction of Indian housing;

(ii) Would make housing more affordable, energy efficient, accessible, or practicable in an Indian area;

(iii) Would otherwise advance the purposes of NAHASDA.

Housing related community development:

(1) Means any facility, community building, business, activity, or infrastructure that:

(i) Is owned by an Indian tribe or a tribally designated housing entity;

(ii) Is necessary to the provision of housing in an Indian area; and

(iii)(A) Would help an Indian tribe or tribally designated housing entity reduce the cost of construction of Indian housing;

(B) Would make housing more affordable, energy efficient, accessible, or practicable in an Indian area; or

(C) Would otherwise advance the purposes of NAHASDA.

(2) Does not include any activity conducted by any Indian tribe under the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act (25 U.S.C. 2701 et seq.)

IHBG means Indian Housing Block Grant.

Income means annual income as defined in this subpart.

Indian area means the area within which an Indian tribe operates affordable housing programs or the area in which a TDHE, as authorized by one or more Indian tribes, operates affordable housing programs. Whenever the term “jurisdiction” is used in NAHASDA, it shall mean “Indian Area,” except where specific reference is made to the jurisdiction of a court.

Indian Housing Authority (IHA) means an entity that:

(1) Is authorized to engage or assist in the development or operation of low-income housing for Indians under the 1937 Act; and

(2) Is established:

(i) By exercise of the power of self government of an Indian tribe independent of state law; or

(ii) By operation of state law providing specifically for housing authorities for Indians, including regional housing authorities in the State of Alaska.

Median income for an Indian area is the greater of:

(1) The median income for the counties, previous counties, or their equivalent in which the Indian area is located; or

(2) The median income for the United States.

NAHASDA means the Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 1996 (25 U.S.C. 4101 et seq.).

1937 Act means the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437 et seq.).

Office of Native American Programs (ONAP) means the office of HUD which has been delegated authority to administer programs under this part. An “Area ONAP” is an ONAP field office.

Outcomes are the intended results or consequences important to program beneficiaries, the IHBG recipient, and the tribe generally from carrying out the housing or housing-related activity as determined by the tribe (and/or its TDHE).

Person with Disabilities means a person who—

(1) Has a disability as defined in section 223 of the Social Security Act;

(2) Has a developmental disability as defined in section 102 of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act;

(3) Has a physical, mental, or emotional impairment which-

(i) Is expected to be of long-continued and indefinite duration;

(ii) Substantially impedes his or her ability to live independently; and

(iii) Is of such a nature that such ability could be improved by more suitable housing conditions.

(4) The term “person with disabilities” includes persons who have the disease of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or any condition arising from the etiologic agent for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

(5) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no individual shall be considered a person with disabilities, for purposes of eligibility for housing assisted under this part, solely on the basis of any drug or alcohol dependence. The Secretary shall consult with Indian tribes and appropriate Federal agencies to implement this paragraph.

(6) For purposes of this definition, the term “physical, mental or emotional impairment” includes, but is not limited to:

(i) Any physiological disorder or condition, cosmetic disfigurement, or anatomical loss affecting one or more of the following body systems: Neurological, musculoskeletal, special sense organs, respiratory, including speech organs; cardiovascular; reproductive; digestive; genito-urinary; hemic and lymphatic; skin; and endocrine; or

(ii) Any mental or psychological condition, such as mental retardation, organic brain syndrome, emotional or mental illness, and specific learning disabilities.

(iii) The term “physical, mental, or emotional impairment” includes, but is not limited to, such diseases and conditions as orthopedic, visual, speech, and hearing impairments, cerebral palsy, autism, epilepsy, muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis, cancer, heart disease, diabetes, Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection, mental retardation, and emotional illness.

Tribal program year means the fiscal year of the IHBG recipient.

[63 FR 12349, Mar. 12, 1998, as amended at 77 FR 71522, Dec. 3, 2012]

§1000.12   What nondiscrimination requirements are applicable?

(a) The requirements of the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42 U.S.C. 6101-6107) and HUD's implementing regulations in 24 CFR part 146.

(b) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794) and HUD's regulations at 24 CFR part 8 apply.

(c) The Indian Civil Rights Act (Title II of the Civil Rights Act of 1968; 25 U.S.C. 1301-1303), applies to Federally recognized Indian tribes that exercise powers of self-government.

(d) Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000d) and Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3601 et seq.) apply to Indian tribes that are not covered by the Indian Civil Rights Act. The Title VI and Title VIII requirements do not apply to actions under NAHASDA by federally recognized Indian tribes and their TDHEs. State-recognized Indian tribes and their TDHEs may provide preference for tribal members and other Indian families pursuant to NAHASDA sections 201(b) and 101(k) (relating to tribal preference in employment and contracting).

(e) The equal access to HUD-assisted or -insured housing requirements in 24 CFR 5.105(a)(2).

[63 FR 12349, Mar. 12, 1998, as amended at 77 FR 71522, Dec. 3, 2012; 81 FR 80993, Nov. 17, 2016]

§1000.14   What relocation and real property acquisition policies are applicable?

The following relocation and real property acquisition policies are applicable to programs developed or operated under NAHASDA:

(a) Real Property acquisition requirements. The acquisition of real property for an assisted activity is subject to 49 CFR part 24, subpart B. Whenever the recipient does not have the authority to acquire the real property through condemnation, it shall:

(1) Before discussing the purchase price, inform the owner:

(i) Of the amount it believes to be the fair market value of the property. Such amount shall be based upon one or more appraisals prepared by a qualified appraiser. However, this provision does not prevent the recipient from accepting a donation or purchasing the real property at less than its fair market value.

(ii) That it will be unable to acquire the property if negotiations fail to result in an amicable agreement.

(2) Request HUD approval of the proposed acquisition price before executing a firm commitment to purchase the property if the proposed acquisition payment exceeds the fair market value. The recipient shall include with its request a copy of the appraisal(s) and a justification for the proposed acquisition payment. HUD will promptly review the proposal and inform the recipient of its approval or disapproval.

(b) Minimize displacement. Consistent with the other goals and objectives of this part, recipients shall assure that they have taken all reasonable steps to minimize the displacement of persons (households, businesses, nonprofit organizations, and farms) as a result of a project assisted under this part.

(c) Temporary relocation. The following policies cover residential tenants and homebuyers who will not be required to move permanently but who must relocate temporarily for the project. Such residential tenants and homebuyers shall be provided:

(1) Reimbursement for all reasonable out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with the temporary relocation, including the cost of moving to and from the temporarily occupied housing and any increase in monthly housing costs (e.g., rent/utility costs).

(2) Appropriate advisory services, including reasonable advance written notice of:

(i) The date and approximate duration of the temporary relocation;

(ii) The location of the suitable, decent, safe and sanitary dwelling to be made available for the temporary period;

(iii) The terms and conditions under which the tenant may occupy a suitable, decent, safe, and sanitary dwelling in the building/complex following completion of the repairs; and

(iv) The provisions of paragraph (c)(1) of this section.

(d) Relocation assistance for displaced persons. A displaced person (defined in paragraph (g) of this section) must be provided relocation assistance at the levels described in, and in accordance with the requirements of, the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970, as amended (URA) (42 U.S.C. 4601-4655) and implementing regulations at 49 CFR part 24.

(e) Appeals to the recipient. A person who disagrees with the recipient's determination concerning whether the person qualifies as a “displaced person,” or the amount of relocation assistance for which the person is eligible, may file a written appeal of that determination with the recipient.

(f) Responsibility of recipient. (1) The recipient shall certify that it will comply with the URA, the regulations at 49 CFR part 24, and the requirements of this section. The recipient shall ensure such compliance notwithstanding any third party's contractual obligation to the recipient to comply with the provisions in this section.

(2) The cost of required relocation assistance is an eligible project cost in the same manner and to the same extent as other project costs. However, such assistance may also be paid for with funds available to the recipient from any other source.

(3) The recipient shall maintain records in sufficient detail to demonstrate compliance with this section.

(g) Definition of displaced person. (1) For purposes of this section, the term “displaced person” means any person (household, business, nonprofit organization, or farm) that moves from real property, or moves his or her personal property from real property, permanently, as a direct result of rehabilitation, demolition, or acquisition for a project assisted under this part. The term “displaced person” includes, but is not limited to:

(i) A tenant-occupant of a dwelling unit who moves from the building/complex permanently after the submission to HUD of an IHP that is later approved.

(ii) Any person, including a person who moves before the date described in paragraph (g)(1)(i) of this section, that the recipient determines was displaced as a direct result of acquisition, rehabilitation, or demolition for the assisted project.

(iii) A tenant-occupant of a dwelling unit who moves from the building/complex permanently after the execution of the agreement between the recipient and HUD, if the move occurs before the tenant is provided written notice offering him or her the opportunity to lease and occupy a suitable, decent, safe and sanitary dwelling in the same building/complex, under reasonable terms and conditions, upon completion of the project. Such reasonable terms and conditions include a monthly rent and estimated average monthly utility costs that do not exceed the greater of:

(A) The tenant-occupant's monthly rent and estimated average monthly utility costs before the agreement; or

(B) 30 percent of gross household income.

(iv) A tenant-occupant of a dwelling who is required to relocate temporarily, but does not return to the building/complex, if either:

(A) The tenant-occupant is not offered payment for all reasonable out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with the temporary relocation, including the cost of moving to and from the temporarily occupied unit, any increased housing costs and incidental expenses; or

(B) Other conditions of the temporary relocation are not reasonable.

(v) A tenant-occupant of a dwelling who moves from the building/complex after he or she has been required to move to another dwelling unit in the same building/complex in order to carry out the project, if either:

(A) The tenant-occupant is not offered reimbursement for all reasonable out-of-pocket expenses incurred in connection with the move; or

(B) Other conditions of the move are not reasonable.

(2) Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraph (g)(1) of this section, a person does not qualify as a “displaced person” (and is not eligible for relocation assistance under the URA or this section), if:

(i) The person moved into the property after the submission of the IHP to HUD, but, before signing a lease or commencing occupancy, was provided written notice of the project, its possible impact on the person (e.g., the person may be displaced, temporarily relocated or suffer a rent increase) and the fact that the person would not qualify as a “displaced person” or for any assistance provided under this section as a result of the project.

(ii) The person is ineligible under 49 CFR 24.2(g)(2).

(iii) The recipient determines the person is not displaced as a direct result of acquisition, rehabilitation, or demolition for an assisted project. To exclude a person on this basis, HUD must concur in that determination.

(3) A recipient may at any time ask HUD to determine whether a specific displacement is or would be covered under this section.

(h) Definition of initiation of negotiations. For purposes of determining the formula for computing the replacement housing assistance to be provided to a person displaced as a direct result of rehabilitation or demolition of the real property, the term “initiation of negotiations” means the execution of the agreement covering the rehabilitation or demolition (See 49 CFR part 24).

§1000.16   What labor standards are applicable?

(a) Davis-Bacon wage rates. (1) As described in section 104(b) of NAHASDA, contracts and agreements for assistance, sale, or lease under NAHASDA must require prevailing wage rates determined by the Secretary of Labor under the Davis-Bacon Act (40 U.S.C. 3141-44, 3146, and 3147) to be paid to laborers and mechanics employed in the development of affordable housing.

(2) When NAHASDA assistance is only used to assist homebuyers to acquire single family housing, the Davis-Bacon wage rates apply to the construction of the housing if there is a written agreement with the owner or developer of the housing that NAHASDA assistance will be used to assist homebuyers to buy the housing.

(3) Prime contracts not in excess of $2000 are exempt from Davis-Bacon wage rates.

(b) HUD-determined wage rates. Section 104(b) also mandates that contracts and agreements for assistance, sale or lease under NAHASDA require that prevailing wages determined or adopted (subsequent to a determination under applicable state, tribal or local law) by HUD shall be paid to maintenance laborers and mechanics employed in the operation, and to architects, technical engineers, draftsmen and technicians employed in the development, of affordable housing.

(c) Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act. Contracts in excess of $100,000 to which Davis-Bacon or HUD-determined wage rates apply are subject by law to the overtime provisions of the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act (40 U.S.C. 3701).

(d) Volunteers. The requirements in 24 CFR part 70 concerning exemptions for the use of volunteers on projects subject to Davis-Bacon and HUD-determined wage rates are applicable.

(e) Paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section shall not apply to any contract or agreement for assistance, sale, or lease pursuant to NAHASDA, or to any contract for construction, development, operations, or maintenance thereunder, if such contract or agreement for assistance, sale, or lease is otherwise covered by one or more laws or regulations adopted by an Indian tribe that requires the payment of not less than prevailing wages, as determined by the Indian tribe. Paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section shall also not apply to work performed directly by tribal or TDHE employees under a contract or agreement for assistance, sale, or lease, that is covered by one or more such laws or regulations adopted by an Indian tribe.

(f) Other laws and issuances. Recipients, contractors, subcontractors, and other participants must comply with regulations issued under the labor standards provisions cited in this section, other applicable Federal laws and regulations pertaining to labor standards, and HUD Handbook 1344.1 (Federal Labor Standards Compliance in Housing and Community Development Programs).

[63 FR 12349, Mar. 12, 1998, as amended at 77 FR 71522, Dec. 3, 2012]

§1000.18   What environmental review requirements apply?

The environmental effects of each activity carried out with assistance under this part must be evaluated in accordance with the provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (42 U.S.C. 4321) and the related authorities listed in HUD's implementing regulations at 24 CFR parts 50 and 58. An environmental review does not have to be completed prior to HUD approval of an IHP.

§1000.20   Is an Indian tribe required to assume environmental review responsibilities?

(a) No. It is an option an Indian tribe may choose. If an Indian tribe declines to assume the environmental review responsibilities, HUD will perform the environmental review in accordance with 24 CFR part 50. The timing of HUD undertaking the environmental review will be subject to the availability of resources. A HUD environmental review must be completed for any NAHASDA assisted activities not excluded from review under 24 CFR 50.19(b) before a recipient may acquire, rehabilitate, convert, lease, repair or construct property, or commit HUD or local funds used in conjunction with such NAHASDA assisted activities with respect to the property.

(b) If an Indian tribe assumes environmental review responsibilities:

(1) Its certifying officer must certify that he/she is authorized and consents on behalf of the Indian tribe and such officer to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal courts for the purpose of enforcement of the responsibilities of the certifying officer as set forth in section 105(c) of NAHASDA; and

(2) The Indian tribe must follow the requirements of 24 CFR part 58.

(3) No funds may be committed to a grant activity or project before the completion of the environmental review and approval of the request for release of funds and related certification required by sections 105(b) and 105(c) of NAHASDA, except as authorized by 24 CFR part 58 such as for the costs of environmental reviews and other planning and administrative expenses.

(c) Where an environmental assessment (EA) is appropriate under 24 CFR part 50, instead of an Indian tribe assuming environmental review responsibilities under paragraph (b) of this section or HUD preparing the EA itself under paragraph (a) of this section, an Indian tribe or TDHE may prepare an EA for HUD review. In addition to complying with the requirements of 40 CFR 1506.5(a), HUD shall make its own evaluation of the environmental issues and take responsibility for the scope and content of the EA in accordance with 40 CFR 1506.5(b).

§1000.21   Under what circumstances are waivers of the environmental review procedures available to tribes?

A tribe or recipient may request that the Secretary waive the requirements under section 105 of NAHASDA. The Secretary may grant the waiver if the Secretary determines that a failure on the part of a recipient to comply with provisions of this section:

(a) Will not frustrate the goals of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.) or any other provision of law that furthers the goals of that Act;

(b) Does not threaten the health or safety of the community involved by posing an immediate or long-term hazard to residents of that community;

(c) Is a result of inadvertent error, including an incorrect or incomplete certification provided under section 105(c)(1) of NAHASDA; and

(d) May be corrected through the sole action of the recipient.

[77 FR 71522, Dec. 3, 2012]

§1000.22   Are the costs of the environmental review an eligible cost?

Yes, costs of completing the environmental review are eligible.

§1000.24   If an Indian tribe assumes environmental review responsibility, how will HUD assist the Indian tribe in performing the environmental review?

As set forth in section 105(a)(2)(B) of NAHASDA and 24 CFR 58.77, HUD will provide for monitoring of environmental reviews and will also facilitate training for the performance for such reviews by Indian tribes.

§1000.26   What are the administrative requirements under NAHASDA?

(a) Except as addressed in §1000.28, recipients shall comply with the requirements and standards of 2 CFR part 200, “Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, And Audit Requirements for Federal Awards”, except for the following sections:

(1) Section 200.113 applies, except that, in lieu of the remedies described in §200.338, HUD shall be authorized to seek remedies under subpart F of this part.

(2) Section 200.302(a), “Financial management.”

(3) Section 200.305, “Payment,” applies, except that HUD shall not require a recipient to expend retained program income before drawing down or expending IHBG funds.

(4) Section 200.306, “Cost sharing or matching.”

(5) Section 200.307, “Program income.”

(6) Section 200.308, “Revision of budget and program plans.”

(7) Section 200.311, “Real property,” except as provided in 24 CFR 5.109.

(8) Section 200.313, “Equipment,” applies, except that in all cases in which the equipment is sold, the proceeds shall be program income.

(9) Section 200.314, “Supplies,” applies, except in all cases in which the supplies are sold, the proceeds shall be program income.

(10) Section 200.317, “Procurement by states.”

(11) Sections 200.318 through 200.326 apply, as modified in this paragraph (a)(11):

(i) De minimis procurement. A recipient shall not be required to comply with 2 CFR 200.318 through 200.326 with respect to any procurement, using a grant provided under NAHASDA, of goods and services with a value of less than $5,000.

(ii) Utilizing Federal supply sources in procurement. In accordance with Section 101(j) of NAHASDA, recipients may use Federal supply sources made available by the General Services Administration pursuant to 40 U.S.C. 501.

(12) Section 200.325, “Bonding requirements,” applies. There may be circumstances under which the bonding requirements of 2 CFR 200.325 are inconsistent with other responsibilities and obligations of the recipient. In such circumstances, acceptable methods to provide performance and payment assurance may include:

(i) Deposit with the recipient of a cash escrow of not less than 20 percent of the total contract price, subject to reduction during the warranty period, commensurate with potential risk;

(ii) Letter of credit for 25 percent of the total contract price, unconditionally payable upon demand of the recipient, subject to reduction during any warranty period commensurate with potential risk; or

(iii) Letter of credit for 10 percent of the total contract price, unconditionally payable upon demand of the recipient, subject to reduction during any warranty period commensurate with potential risk, and compliance with the procedures for monitoring of disbursements by the contractor.

(13) Section 200.328(b) through (d) and (f), “Monitoring and reporting program performance.”

(14) Section 200.333, “Retention requirements for records.”

(15) Section 200.338, “Remedies for noncompliance.”

(16) Section 200.343, “Closeout.”

(b)(1) With respect to the applicability of cost principles, all items of cost listed in 2 CFR part 200, subpart E, which require prior Federal agency approval are allowable without the prior approval of HUD to the extent that they comply with the general policies and principles stated in 2 CFR part 200, subpart E and are otherwise eligible under this part, except for the following:

(i) Depreciation method for fixed assets shall not be changed without the approval of the Federal cognizant agency.

(ii) Penalties, damages, fines and other settlements are unallowable costs to the IHBG program.

(iii) Costs of housing (e.g., depreciation, maintenance, utilities, furnishings, rent), housing allowances and personal living expenses (goods or services for personal use), regardless of whether reported as taxable income to the employees (2 CFR 200.445) requires HUD prior approval.

(2) In addition, no person providing consultant services in an employer-employee type of relationship shall receive more than a reasonable rate of compensation for personal services paid with IHBG funds. In no event, however, shall such compensation exceed the equivalent of the daily rate paid for Level IV of the Executive Schedule.

[63 FR 12349, Mar. 12, 1998, as amended at 77 FR 71523, Dec. 3, 2012; 80 FR 75943, Dec. 7, 2015]

§1000.28   May a self-governance Indian tribe be exempted from the applicability of §1000.26?

Yes. A self-governance Indian tribe shall certify that its administrative requirements, standards and systems meet or exceed the comparable requirements of §1000.26. For purposes of this section, a self-governance Indian tribe is an Indian tribe that participates in tribal self-governance as authorized under Public Law 93-638, as amended (25 U.S.C. 450 et seq.).

§1000.30   What prohibitions regarding conflict of interest are applicable?

(a) Applicability. In the procurement of supplies, equipment, other property, construction and services by recipients and subrecipients, the conflict of interest provisions of 2 CFR 200.318 shall apply. In all cases not governed by 2 CFR 200.318, the following provisions of this section shall apply.

(b) Conflicts prohibited. No person who participates in the decision-making process or who gains inside information with regard to NAHASDA assisted activities may obtain a personal or financial interest or benefit from such activities, except for the use of NAHASDA funds to pay salaries or other related administrative costs. Such persons include anyone with an interest in any contract, subcontract or agreement or proceeds thereunder, either for themselves or others with whom they have business or immediate family ties. Immediate family ties are determined by the Indian tribe or TDHE in its operating policies.

(c) The conflict of interest provision does not apply in instances where a person who might otherwise be included under the conflict provision is low-income and is selected for assistance in accordance with the recipient's written policies for eligibility, admission and occupancy of families for housing assistance with IHBG funds, provided that there is no conflict of interest under applicable tribal or state law. The recipient must make a public disclosure of the nature of assistance to be provided and the specific basis for the selection of the person. The recipient shall provide the appropriate Area ONAP with a copy of the disclosure before the assistance is provided to the person.

[63 FR 12349, Mar. 12, 1998, as amended at 80 FR 75944, Dec. 7, 2015]

§1000.32   May exceptions be made to the conflict of interest provisions?

(a) Yes. HUD may make exceptions to the conflict of interest provisions set forth in §1000.30(b) on a case-by-case basis when it determines that such an exception would further the primary objective of NAHASDA and the effective and efficient implementation of the recipient's program, activity, or project.

(b) A public disclosure of the conflict must be made and a determination that the exception would not violate tribal laws on conflict of interest (or any applicable state laws) must also be made.

§1000.34   What factors must be considered in making an exception to the conflict of interest provisions?

In determining whether or not to make an exception to the conflict of interest provisions, HUD must consider whether undue hardship will result, either to the recipient or to the person affected, when weighed against the public interest served by avoiding the prohibited conflict.

§1000.36   How long must a recipient retain records regarding exceptions made to the conflict of interest provisions?

A recipient must maintain all such records for a period of at least 3 years after an exception is made.

§1000.38   What flood insurance requirements are applicable?

Under the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4001-4128), a recipient may not permit the use of Federal financial assistance for acquisition and construction purposes (including rehabilitation) in an area identified by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) as having special flood hazards, unless the following conditions are met:

(a) The community in which the area is situated is participating in the National Flood Insurance Program in accord with section 202(a) of the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 (42 U.S.C. 4106(a)), or less than a year has passed since FEMA notification regarding such flood hazards. For this purpose, the “community” is the governmental entity, such as an Indian tribe or authorized tribal organization, an Alaska Native village, or authorized Native organization, or a municipality or county, that has authority to adopt and enforce flood plain management regulations for the area; and

(b) Where the community is participating in the National Flood Insurance Program, flood insurance on the building is obtained in compliance with section 102(a) of the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 (42 U.S.C. 4012(a)); provided, that if the financial assistance is in the form of a loan or an insurance or guaranty of a loan, the amount of flood insurance required need not exceed the outstanding principal balance of the loan and need not be required beyond the term of the loan.

§1000.40   Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities under NAHASDA?

Yes, lead-based paint requirements apply to housing activities assisted under NAHASDA. The applicable requirements for NAHASDA are HUD's regulations at part 35, subparts A, B, H, J, K, M and R of this title, which implement the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act (42 U.S.C. 4822-4846) and the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992 (42 U.S.C. 4851-4856).

[64 FR 50230, Sept. 15, 1999; 65 FR 3387, Jan. 21, 2000]

§1000.42   Are the requirements of section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 applicable?

(a) General. Yes. Recipients shall comply with section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 (12 U.S.C. 1701u) and HUD's implementing regulations in 24 CFR part 135, to the maximum extent feasible and consistent with, but not in derogation of, compliance with section 7(b) of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 450e(b)). Section 3 provides job training, employment, and contracting opportunities for low-income individuals.

(b) Threshold requirement. The requirements of section 3 apply only to those section 3 covered projects or activities for which the amount of assistance exceeds $200,000.

(c) Tribal preference. Recipients meet the section 3 requirements when they comply with employment and contract preference laws adopted by their tribe in accordance with section 101(k) of NAHASDA.

(d) Applicability. For purposes of section 3, NAHASDA funding is subject to the requirements applicable to the category of programs entitled “Other Programs” that provide housing and community development assistance (12 U.S.C. 1701u(c)(2), (d)(2)).

[63 FR 12349, Mar. 12, 1998, as amended at 77 FR 71523, Dec. 3, 2012]

§1000.44   What prohibitions on the use of debarred, suspended, or ineligible contractors apply?

In addition to any tribal requirements, the prohibitions in 2 CFR part 2424 on the use of debarred, suspended, or ineligible contractors apply.

[72 FR 73497, Dec. 27, 2007]

§1000.46   Do drug-free workplace requirements apply?

Yes. In addition to any tribal requirements, the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 (41 U.S.C. 701, et seq.) and HUD's implementing regulations in 2 CFR part 2429 apply.

[76 FR 45168, July 28, 2011]

§1000.48   Are Indian or tribal preference requirements applicable to IHBG activities?

Grants under this part are subject to Indian preference under section 7(b) of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 450e(b)) or, if applicable under section 101(k) of NAHASDA, tribal preference in employment and contracting.

(a)(1) Section 7(b) provides that any contract, subcontract, grant, or subgrant pursuant to an act authorizing grants to Indian organizations or for the benefit of Indians shall require that, to the greatest extent feasible:

(i) Preference and opportunities for training and employment shall be given to Indians; and

(ii) Preference in the award of contracts and subcontracts shall be given to Indian organizations and Indian-owned economic enterprises as defined in section 3 of the Indian Financing Act of 1974 (25 U.S.C. 1452).

(2) The following definitions apply:

(i) The Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act defines “Indian” to mean a person who is a member of an Indian tribe and defines “Indian tribe” to mean any Indian tribe, band, nation, or other organized group or community, including any Alaska Native village or regional or village corporation as defined or established pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, which is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians.

(ii) In section 3 of the Indian Financing Act of 1974, “economic enterprise” is defined as any Indian-owned commercial, industrial, or business activity established or organized for the purpose of profit, except that Indian ownership must constitute not less than 51 percent of the enterprise. This act defines “Indian organization” to mean the governing body of any Indian tribe or entity established or recognized by such governing body.

(b) If tribal employment and contract preference laws have not been adopted by the Indian tribe, section 7(b) Indian preference provisions shall apply.

(c) Exception for de minimis procurements. A recipient shall not be required to apply Indian preference requirements under Section 7(b) of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act with respect to any procurement, using a grant provided under NAHASDA, of goods and services with a value less than $5,000.

[77 FR 71523, Dec. 3, 2012]

§1000.50   What tribal or Indian preference requirements apply to IHBG administration activities?

(a) In accordance with Section 101(k) of NAHASDA, a recipient shall apply the tribal employment and contract preference laws (including regulations and tribal ordinances) adopted by the Indian tribe that receives a benefit from funds granted to the recipient under NAHASDA.

(b) In the absence of tribal employment and contract preference laws, a recipient must, to the greatest extent feasible, give preference and opportunities for training and employment in connection with the administration of grants awarded under this part to Indians in accordance with section 7(b) of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 450e(b)).

[77 FR 71523, Dec. 3, 2012]

§1000.52   What tribal or Indian preference requirements apply to IHBG procurement?

(a) In accordance with Section 101(k) of NAHASDA, a recipient shall apply the tribal employment and contract preference laws (including regulations and tribal ordinances) adopted by the Indian tribe that receives a benefit from funds granted to the recipient under NAHASDA.

(b) In the absence of tribal employment and contract preference laws, a recipient must, to the greatest extent feasible, give preference in the award of contracts for projects funded under this part to Indian organizations and Indian-owned economic enterprises in accordance with Section 7(b) of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 450e(b)).

(c) The following provisions apply to the application of Indian preference under paragraph (b) of this section:

(1) In applying Indian preference, each recipient shall:

(i) Certify to HUD that the policies and procedures adopted by the recipient will provide preference in procurement activities consistent with the requirements of section 7(b) of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 450e(b)) (An Indian preference policy that was previously approved by HUD for a recipient will meet the requirements of this section); or

(ii) Advertise for bids or proposals limited to qualified Indian organizations and Indian-owned enterprises; or

(iii) Use a two-stage preference procedure, as follows:

(A) Stage 1. Invite or otherwise solicit Indian-owned economic enterprises to submit a statement of intent to respond to a bid announcement or request for proposals limited to Indian-owned firms.

(B) Stage 2. If responses are received from more than one Indian enterprise found to be qualified, advertise for bids or proposals limited to Indian organizations and Indian-owned economic enterprises.

(2) If the recipient selects a method of providing preference that results in fewer than two responsible qualified organizations or enterprises submitting a statement of intent, a bid, or a proposal to perform the contract at a reasonable cost, then the recipient shall:

(i) Readvertise the contract, using any of the methods described in paragraph (c)(1) of this section; or

(ii) Readvertise the contract without limiting the advertisement for bids or proposals to Indian organizations and Indian-owned economic enterprises; or

(iii) If one approvable bid or proposal is received, request Area ONAP review and approval of the proposed contract and related procurement documents, in accordance with 2 CFR 200.318 through 200.326, in order to award the contract to the single bidder or offeror.

(3) Procurements that are within the dollar limitations established for small purchases under 2 CFR 200.320 need not follow the formal bid or proposal procedures of since these procurements are governed by the small purchase procedures of 2 CFR 200.320. However, a recipient's small purchase procurement shall, to the greatest extent feasible, provide Indian preference in the award of contracts.

(4) All preferences shall be publicly announced in the advertisement and bidding or proposal solicitation documents and the bidding and proposal documents.

(5) A recipient, at its discretion, may require information of prospective contractors seeking to qualify as Indian organizations or Indian-owned economic enterprises. Recipients may require prospective contractors to provide the following information before submitting a bid or proposal, or at the time of submission:

(i) Evidence showing fully the extent of Indian ownership and interest;

(ii) Evidence of structure, management, and financing affecting the Indian character of the enterprise, including major subcontracts and purchase agreements; materials or equipment supply arrangements; management salary or profit-sharing arrangements; and evidence showing the effect of these on the extent of Indian ownership and interest; and

(iii) Evidence sufficient to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the recipient that the prospective contractor has the technical, administrative, and financial capability to perform contract work of the size and type involved.

(6) The recipient shall incorporate the following clause (referred to as the section 7(b) clause) in each contract awarded in connection with a project funded under this part:

(i) The work to be performed under this contract is on a project subject to section 7(b) of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 450e(b)) (the Indian Act). Section 7(b) requires that, to the greatest extent feasible:

(A) Preferences and opportunities for training and employment shall be given to Indians; and

(B) Preferences in the award of contracts and subcontracts shall be given to Indian organizations and Indian-owned economic enterprises.

(ii) The parties to this contract shall comply with the provisions of section 7(b) of the Indian Act.

(iii) In connection with this contract, the contractor shall, to the greatest extent feasible, give preference in the award of any subcontracts to Indian organizations and Indian-owned economic enterprises, and preferences and opportunities for training and employment to Indians.

(iv) The contractor shall include this section 7(b) clause in every subcontract in connection with the project; shall require subcontractors at each level to include this section 7(b) clause in every subcontract they execute in connection with the project; and shall, at the direction of the recipient, take appropriate action pursuant to the subcontract upon a finding by the recipient or HUD that the subcontractor has violated the section 7(b) clause of the Indian Act.

(d) A recipient shall not be required to apply Indian preference requirements under Section 7(b) of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act with respect to any procurement, using a grant provided under NAHASDA, of goods and services with a value less than $5,000.

[77 FR 71523, Dec. 3, 2012, as amended at 80 FR 75944, Dec. 7, 2015]

§1000.54   What procedures apply to complaints arising out of any of the methods of providing for Indian preference?

The following procedures are applicable to complaints arising out of any of the methods of providing for Indian preference contained in this part, including alternate methods. Tribal policies that meet or exceed the requirements of this section shall apply.

(a) Each complaint shall be in writing, signed, and filed with the recipient.

(b) A complaint must be filed with the recipient no later than 20 calendar days from the date of the action (or omission) upon which the complaint is based.

(c) Upon receipt of a complaint, the recipient shall promptly stamp the date and time of receipt upon the complaint, and immediately acknowledge its receipt.

(d) Within 20 calendar days of receipt of a complaint, the recipient shall either meet, or communicate by mail or telephone, with the complainant in an effort to resolve the matter. The recipient shall make a determination on a complaint and notify the complainant, in writing, within 30 calendar days of the submittal of the complaint to the recipient. The decision of the recipient shall constitute final administrative action on the complaint.

§1000.56   How are NAHASDA funds paid by HUD to recipients?

(a) Each year funds shall be paid directly to a recipient in a manner that recognizes the right of Indian self-determination and tribal self-governance and the trust responsibility of the Federal government to Indian tribes consistent with NAHASDA.

(b) Payments shall be made as expeditiously as practicable.

§1000.58   Are there limitations on the investment of IHBG funds?

(a) A recipient may invest IHBG funds for the purposes of carrying out affordable housing activities in investment securities and other obligations as provided in this section.

(b) The recipient may invest IHBG funds so long as it demonstrates to HUD:

(1) That there are no unresolved significant and material audit findings or exceptions in the most recent annual audit completed under the Single Audit Act or in an independent financial audit prepared in accordance with generally accepted auditing principles; and

(2) That it is a self-governance Indian tribe or that it has the administrative capacity and controls to responsibly manage the investment. For purposes of this section, a self-governance Indian tribe is an Indian tribe that participates in tribal self-governance as authorized under Public Law 93-638, as amended (25 U.S.C. 450 et seq.).

(c) Recipients shall invest IHBG funds only in:

(1) Obligations of the United States; obligations issued by Government sponsored agencies; securities that are guaranteed or insured by the United States; mutual (or other) funds registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission and which invest only in obligations of the United States or securities that are guaranteed or insured by the United States; or

(2) Accounts that are insured by an agency or instrumentality of the United States or fully collateralized to ensure protection of the funds, even in the event of bank failure.

(d) IHBG funds shall be held in one or more accounts separate from other funds of the recipient. Each of these accounts shall be subject to an agreement in a form prescribed by HUD sufficient to implement the regulations in this part and permit HUD to exercise its rights under §1000.60.

(e) Expenditure of funds for affordable housing activities under section 204(a) of NAHASDA shall not be considered investment.

(f) A recipient may invest its IHBG annual grant in an amount equal to the annual formula grant amount.

(g) Investments under this section may be for a period no longer than 5 years.

[63 FR 12349, Mar. 12, 1998, as amended at 77 FR 71524, Dec. 3, 2012]

§1000.60   Can HUD prevent improper expenditure of funds already disbursed to a recipient?

Yes. In accordance with the standards and remedies contained in §1000.532 relating to substantial noncompliance, HUD will use its powers under a depository agreement and take such other actions as may be legally necessary to suspend funds disbursed to the recipient until the substantial noncompliance has been remedied. In taking this action, HUD shall comply with all appropriate procedures, appeals, and hearing rights prescribed elsewhere in this part.

[77 FR 71524, Dec. 3, 2012]

§1000.62   What is considered program income?

(a) Program income is defined as any income that is realized from the disbursement of grant amounts. Program income does not include any amounts generated from the operation of 1937 Act units unless the units are assisted with grant amounts and the income is attributable to such assistance. Program income includes income from fees for services performed from the use of real or rental of real or personal property acquired with grant funds, from the sale of commodities or items developed, acquired, etc. with grant funds, and from payments of principal and interest earned on grant funds prior to disbursement.

(b) If the amount of income received in a single year by a recipient and all its subrecipients, which would otherwise be considered program income, does not exceed $25,000, such funds may be retained but will not be considered to be or treated as program income.

(c) If program income is realized from an eligible activity funded with both grant funds as well as other funds (i.e., funds that are not grant funds), then the amount of program income realized will be based on a percentage calculation that represents the proportional share of funds provided for the activity generating the program income.

(d) Costs incident to the generation of program income shall be deducted from gross income to determine program income.

[63 FR 12349, Mar. 12, 1998, as amended at 77 FR 71524, Dec. 3, 2012]

§1000.64   What are the permissible uses of program income?

Program income may be used for any housing or housing related activity and is not subject to other federal requirements.

[77 FR 71524, Dec. 3, 2012]

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