e-CFR banner

Home
gpo.gov
govinfo.gov

e-CFR Navigation Aids

Browse

Simple Search

Advanced Search

 — Boolean

 — Proximity

 

Search History

Search Tips

Corrections

Latest Updates

User Info

FAQs

Agency List

Incorporation By Reference

eCFR logo

Related Resources

 

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR data is current as of February 13, 2020

Title 24Subtitle APart 5 → Subpart F


Title 24: Housing and Urban Development
PART 5—GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS


Subpart F—Section 8 and Public Housing, and Other HUD Assisted Housing Serving Persons with Disabilities: Family Income and Family Payment; Occupancy Requirements for Section 8 Project-Based Assistance


Contents
§5.601   Purpose and applicability.
§5.603   Definitions.

Family Income

§5.609   Annual income.
§5.611   Adjusted income.
§5.612   Restrictions on assistance to students enrolled in an institution of higher education.
§5.613   Public housing program and Section 8 tenant-based assistance program: PHA cooperation with welfare agency.
§5.615   Public housing program and Section 8 tenant-based assistance program: How welfare benefit reduction affects family income.
§5.617   Self-sufficiency incentives for persons with disabilities—Disallowance of increase in annual income.

Family Payment

§5.628   Total tenant payment.
§5.630   Minimum rent.
§5.632   Utility reimbursements.
§5.634   Tenant rent.

Section 8 Project-Based Assistance: Occupancy Requirements

§5.653   Section 8 project-based assistance programs: Admission—Income-eligibility and income-targeting.
§5.655   Section 8 project-based assistance programs: Owner preferences in selection for a project or unit.
§5.657   Section 8 project-based assistance programs: Reexamination of family income and composition.
§5.659   Family information and verification.
§5.661   Section 8 project-based assistance programs: Approval for police or other security personnel to live in project.

Authority: 42 U.S.C. 1437a, 1437c, 1437d, 1437f, 1437n, and 3535(d).

Source: 61 FR 54498, Oct. 18, 1996, unless otherwise noted.

§5.601   Purpose and applicability.

This subpart states HUD requirements on the following subjects:

(a) Determining annual and adjusted income of families who apply for or receive assistance in the Section 8 (tenant-based and project-based) and public housing programs;

(b) Determining payments by and utility reimbursements to families assisted in these programs;

(c) Additional occupancy requirements that apply to the Section 8 project-based assistance programs. These additional requirements concern:

(1) Income-eligibility and income-targeting when a Section 8 owner admits families to a Section 8 project or unit;

(2) Owner selection preferences; and

(3) Owner reexamination of family income and composition;

(d) Determining adjusted income, as provided in §5.611(a) and (b), for families who apply for or receive assistance under the following programs: HOME Investment Partnerships Program (24 CFR part 92); Rent Supplement Payments Program (24 CFR part 200, subpart W); Rental Assistance Payments Program (24 CFR part 236, subpart D); Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (24 CFR part 574); Shelter Plus Care Program (24 CFR part 582); Supportive Housing Program (McKinney Act Homeless Assistance) (24 CFR part 583); Section 202 Supportive Housing Program for the Elderly (24 CFR 891, subpart B); Section 202 Direct Loans for Housing for the Elderly and Persons with Disabilities (24 CFR part 891, subpart E) and the Section 811 Supportive Housing for Persons with Disabilities (24 CFR part 891, subpart C). Unless specified in the regulations for each of the programs listed in paragraph (d) of this section or in another regulatory section of this part 5, subpart F, the regulations in part 5, subpart F, generally are not applicable to these programs; and

(e) Determining earned income disregard for persons with disabilities, as provided in §5.617, for the following programs: HOME Investment Partnerships Program (24 CFR part 92); Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (24 CFR part 574); Supportive Housing Program (McKinney Act Homeless Assistance) (24 CFR part 583); and the Housing Choice Voucher Program (24 CFR part 982).

[66 FR 6222, Jan. 19, 2001]

§5.603   Definitions.

As used in this subpart:

(a) Terms found elsewhere in part 5—(1) Subpart A. The terms 1937 Act, elderly person, public housing, public housing agency (PHA), responsible entity and Section 8 are defined in §5.100.

(2) Subpart D. The terms “disabled family”, “elderly family”, “family”, “live-in aide”, and “person with disabilities” are defined in §5.403.

(b) The following terms shall have the meanings set forth below:

Adjusted income. See §5.611.

Annual income. See §5.609.

Child care expenses. Amounts anticipated to be paid by the family for the care of children under 13 years of age during the period for which annual income is computed, but only where such care is necessary to enable a family member to actively seek employment, be gainfully employed, or to further his or her education and only to the extent such amounts are not reimbursed. The amount deducted shall reflect reasonable charges for child care. In the case of child care necessary to permit employment, the amount deducted shall not exceed the amount of employment income that is included in annual income.

Dependent. A member of the family (except foster children and foster adults) other than the family head or spouse, who is under 18 years of age, or is a person with a disability, or is a full-time student.

Disability assistance expenses. Reasonable expenses that are anticipated, during the period for which annual income is computed, for attendant care and auxiliary apparatus for a disabled family member and that are necessary to enable a family member (including the disabled member) to be employed, provided that the expenses are neither paid to a member of the family nor reimbursed by an outside source.

Economic self-sufficiency program. Any program designed to encourage, assist, train, or facilitate the economic independence of HUD-assisted families or to provide work for such families. These programs include programs for job training, employment counseling, work placement, basic skills training, education, English proficiency, workfare, financial or household management, apprenticeship, and any program necessary to ready a participant for work (including a substance abuse or mental health treatment program), or other work activities.

Extremely low-income family. A very low-income family whose annual income does not exceed the higher of:

(1) The poverty guidelines established by the Department of Health and Human Services applicable to the family of the size involved (except in the case of families living in Puerto Rico or any other territory or possession of the United States); or

(2) Thirty (30) percent of the median income for the area, as determined by HUD, with adjustments for smaller and larger families, except that HUD may establish income ceilings higher or lower than 30 percent of the area median income for the area if HUD finds that such variations are necessary because of unusually high or low family incomes.

Full-time student. A person who is attending school or vocational training on a full-time basis.

Imputed welfare income. See §5.615.

Low income family. A family whose annual income does not exceed 80 percent of the median income for the area, as determined by HUD with adjustments for smaller and larger families, except that HUD may establish income ceilings higher or lower than 80 percent of the median income for the area on the basis of HUD's findings that such variations are necessary because of unusually high or low family incomes.

Medical expenses. Medical expenses, including medical insurance premiums, that are anticipated during the period for which annual income is computed, and that are not covered by insurance.

Monthly adjusted income. One twelfth of adjusted income.

Monthly income. One twelfth of annual income.

Net family assets. (1) Net cash value after deducting reasonable costs that would be incurred in disposing of real property, savings, stocks, bonds, and other forms of capital investment, excluding interests in Indian trust land and excluding equity accounts in HUD homeownership programs. The value of necessary items of personal property such as furniture and automobiles shall be excluded.

(2) In cases where a trust fund has been established and the trust is not revocable by, or under the control of, any member of the family or household, the value of the trust fund will not be considered an asset so long as the fund continues to be held in trust. Any income distributed from the trust fund shall be counted when determining annual income under §5.609.

(3) In determining net family assets, PHAs or owners, as applicable, shall include the value of any business or family assets disposed of by an applicant or tenant for less than fair market value (including a disposition in trust, but not in a foreclosure or bankruptcy sale) during the two years preceding the date of application for the program or reexamination, as applicable, in excess of the consideration received therefor. In the case of a disposition as part of a separation or divorce settlement, the disposition will not be considered to be for less than fair market value if the applicant or tenant receives important consideration not measurable in dollar terms.

(4) For purposes of determining annual income under §5.609, the term “net family assets” does not include the value of a home currently being purchased with assistance under part 982, subpart M of this title. This exclusion is limited to the first 10 years after the purchase date of the home.

Owner has the meaning provided in the relevant program regulations. As used in this subpart, where appropriate, the term “owner” shall also include a “borrower” as defined in part 891 of this title.

Responsible entity. For §5.611, in addition to the definition of “responsible entity” in §5.100, and for §5.617, in addition to only that part of the definition of “responsible entity” in §5.100 which addresses the Section 8 program covered by §5.617 (public housing is not covered by §5.617), “responsible entity” means:

(1) For the HOME Investment Partnerships Program, the participating jurisdiction, as defined in 24 CFR 92.2;

(2) For the Rent Supplement Payments Program, the owner of the multifamily project;

(3) For the Rental Assistance Payments Program, the owner of the Section 236 project;

(4) For the Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) program, the applicable “State” or “unit of general local government” or “nonprofit organization” as these terms are defined in 24 CFR 574.3, that administers the HOPWA Program;

(5) For the Shelter Plus Care Program, the “Recipient” as defined in 24 CFR 582.5;

(6) For the Supportive Housing Program, the “recipient” as defined in 24 CFR 583.5;

(7) For the Section 202 Supportive Housing Program for the Elderly, the “Owner” as defined in 24 CFR 891.205;

(8) For the Section 202 Direct Loans for Housing for the Elderly and Persons with Disabilities), the “Borrower” as defined in 24 CFR 891.505; and

(9) For the Section 811 Supportive Housing Program for Persons with Disabilities, the “owner” as defined in 24 CFR 891.305.

Tenant rent. The amount payable monthly by the family as rent to the unit owner (Section 8 owner or PHA in public housing). (This term is not used in the Section 8 voucher program.)

Total tenant payment. See §5.628.

Utility allowance. If the cost of utilities (except telephone) and other housing services for an assisted unit is not included in the tenant rent but is the responsibility of the family occupying the unit, an amount equal to the estimate made or approved by a PHA or HUD of the monthly cost of a reasonable consumption of such utilities and other services for the unit by an energy-conservative household of modest circumstances consistent with the requirements of a safe, sanitary, and healthful living environment.

Utility reimbursement. The amount, if any, by which the utility allowance for a unit, if applicable, exceeds the total tenant payment for the family occupying the unit. (This definition is not used in the Section 8 voucher program, or for a public housing family that is paying a flat rent.)

Very low income family. A family whose annual income does not exceed 50 percent of the median family income for the area, as determined by HUD with adjustments for smaller and larger families, except that HUD may establish income ceilings higher or lower than 50 percent of the median income for the area if HUD finds that such variations are necessary because of unusually high or low family incomes.

Welfare assistance. Welfare or other payments to families or individuals, based on need, that are made under programs funded, separately or jointly, by Federal, State or local governments (including assistance provided under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, as that term is defined under the implementing regulations issued by the Department of Health and Human Services at 45 CFR 260.31).

Work activities. See definition at section 407(d) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 607(d)).

[61 FR 54498, Oct. 18, 1996, as amended at 65 FR 16716, Mar. 29, 2000; 65 FR 55161, Sept. 12, 2000; 66 FR 6223, Jan. 19, 2001; 67 FR 47432, July 18, 2002; 81 FR 12370, Mar. 8, 2016]

Family Income

§5.609   Annual income.

(a) Annual income means all amounts, monetary or not, which:

(1) Go to, or on behalf of, the family head or spouse (even if temporarily absent) or to any other family member; or

(2) Are anticipated to be received from a source outside the family during the 12-month period following admission or annual reexamination effective date; and

(3) Which are not specifically excluded in paragraph (c) of this section.

(4) Annual income also means amounts derived (during the 12-month period) from assets to which any member of the family has access.

(b) Annual income includes, but is not limited to:

(1) The full amount, before any payroll deductions, of wages and salaries, overtime pay, commissions, fees, tips and bonuses, and other compensation for personal services;

(2) The net income from the operation of a business or profession. Expenditures for business expansion or amortization of capital indebtedness shall not be used as deductions in determining net income. An allowance for depreciation of assets used in a business or profession may be deducted, based on straight line depreciation, as provided in Internal Revenue Service regulations. Any withdrawal of cash or assets from the operation of a business or profession will be included in income, except to the extent the withdrawal is reimbursement of cash or assets invested in the operation by the family;

(3) Interest, dividends, and other net income of any kind from real or personal property. Expenditures for amortization of capital indebtedness shall not be used as deductions in determining net income. An allowance for depreciation is permitted only as authorized in paragraph (b)(2) of this section. Any withdrawal of cash or assets from an investment will be included in income, except to the extent the withdrawal is reimbursement of cash or assets invested by the family. Where the family has net family assets in excess of $5,000, annual income shall include the greater of the actual income derived from all net family assets or a percentage of the value of such assets based on the current passbook savings rate, as determined by HUD;

(4) The full amount of periodic amounts received from Social Security, annuities, insurance policies, retirement funds, pensions, disability or death benefits, and other similar types of periodic receipts, including a lump-sum amount or prospective monthly amounts for the delayed start of a periodic amount (except as provided in paragraph (c)(14) of this section);

(5) Payments in lieu of earnings, such as unemployment and disability compensation, worker's compensation and severance pay (except as provided in paragraph (c)(3) of this section);

(6) Welfare assistance payments. (i) Welfare assistance payments made under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program are included in annual income only to the extent such payments:

(A) Qualify as assistance under the TANF program definition at 45 CFR 260.31; and

(B) Are not otherwise excluded under paragraph (c) of this section.

(ii) If the welfare assistance payment includes an amount specifically designated for shelter and utilities that is subject to adjustment by the welfare assistance agency in accordance with the actual cost of shelter and utilities, the amount of welfare assistance income to be included as income shall consist of:

(A) The amount of the allowance or grant exclusive of the amount specifically designated for shelter or utilities; plus

(B) The maximum amount that the welfare assistance agency could in fact allow the family for shelter and utilities. If the family's welfare assistance is ratably reduced from the standard of need by applying a percentage, the amount calculated under this paragraph shall be the amount resulting from one application of the percentage.

(7) Periodic and determinable allowances, such as alimony and child support payments, and regular contributions or gifts received from organizations or from persons not residing in the dwelling;

(8) All regular pay, special pay and allowances of a member of the Armed Forces (except as provided in paragraph (c)(7) of this section).

(9) For section 8 programs only and as provided in 24 CFR 5.612, any financial assistance, in excess of amounts received for tuition and any other required fees and charges, that an individual receives under the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001 et seq.), from private sources, or from an institution of higher education (as defined under the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1002)), shall be considered income to that individual, except that financial assistance described in this paragraph is not considered annual income for persons over the age of 23 with dependent children. For purposes of this paragraph, “financial assistance” does not include loan proceeds for the purpose of determining income.

(c) Annual income does not include the following:

(1) Income from employment of children (including foster children) under the age of 18 years;

(2) Payments received for the care of foster children or foster adults (usually persons with disabilities, unrelated to the tenant family, who are unable to live alone);

(3) Lump-sum additions to family assets, such as inheritances, insurance payments (including payments under health and accident insurance and worker's compensation), capital gains and settlement for personal or property losses (except as provided in paragraph (b)(5) of this section);

(4) Amounts received by the family that are specifically for, or in reimbursement of, the cost of medical expenses for any family member;

(5) Income of a live-in aide, as defined in §5.403;

(6) Subject to paragraph (b)(9) of this section, the full amount of student financial assistance paid directly to the student or to the educational institution;

(7) The special pay to a family member serving in the Armed Forces who is exposed to hostile fire;

(8)(i) Amounts received under training programs funded by HUD;

(ii) Amounts received by a person with a disability that are disregarded for a limited time for purposes of Supplemental Security Income eligibility and benefits because they are set aside for use under a Plan to Attain Self-Sufficiency (PASS);

(iii) Amounts received by a participant in other publicly assisted programs which are specifically for or in reimbursement of out-of-pocket expenses incurred (special equipment, clothing, transportation, child care, etc.) and which are made solely to allow participation in a specific program;

(iv) Amounts received under a resident service stipend. A resident service stipend is a modest amount (not to exceed $200 per month) received by a resident for performing a service for the PHA or owner, on a part-time basis, that enhances the quality of life in the development. Such services may include, but are not limited to, fire patrol, hall monitoring, lawn maintenance, resident initiatives coordination, and serving as a member of the PHA's governing board. No resident may receive more than one such stipend during the same period of time;

(v) Incremental earnings and benefits resulting to any family member from participation in qualifying State or local employment training programs (including training programs not affiliated with a local government) and training of a family member as resident management staff. Amounts excluded by this provision must be received under employment training programs with clearly defined goals and objectives, and are excluded only for the period during which the family member participates in the employment training program;

(9) Temporary, nonrecurring or sporadic income (including gifts);

(10) Reparation payments paid by a foreign government pursuant to claims filed under the laws of that government by persons who were persecuted during the Nazi era;

(11) Earnings in excess of $480 for each full-time student 18 years old or older (excluding the head of household and spouse);

(12) Adoption assistance payments in excess of $480 per adopted child;

(13) [Reserved]

(14) Deferred periodic amounts from supplemental security income and Social Security benefits that are received in a lump sum amount or in prospective monthly amounts, or any deferred Department of Veterans Affairs disability benefits that are received in a lump sum amount or in prospective monthly amounts.

(15) Amounts received by the family in the form of refunds or rebates under State or local law for property taxes paid on the dwelling unit;

(16) Amounts paid by a State agency to a family with a member who has a developmental disability and is living at home to offset the cost of services and equipment needed to keep the developmentally disabled family member at home; or

(17) Amounts specifically excluded by any other Federal statute from consideration as income for purposes of determining eligibility or benefits under a category of assistance programs that includes assistance under any program to which the exclusions set forth in 24 CFR 5.609(c) apply. A notice will be published in the Federal Register and distributed to PHAs and housing owners identifying the benefits that qualify for this exclusion. Updates will be published and distributed when necessary.

(d) Annualization of income. If it is not feasible to anticipate a level of income over a 12-month period (e.g., seasonal or cyclic income), or the PHA believes that past income is the best available indicator of expected future income, the PHA may annualize the income anticipated for a shorter period, subject to a redetermination at the end of the shorter period.

[61 FR 54498, Oct. 18, 1996, as amended at 65 FR 16716, Mar. 29, 2000; 67 FR 47432, July 18, 2002; 70 FR 77743, Dec. 30, 2005; 79 FR 36164, June 25, 2014; 81 FR 12370, Mar. 8, 2016]

§5.611   Adjusted income.

Adjusted income means annual income (as determined by the responsible entity, defined in §5.100 and §5.603) of the members of the family residing or intending to reside in the dwelling unit, after making the following deductions:

(a) Mandatory deductions. In determining adjusted income, the responsible entity must deduct the following amounts from annual income:

(1) $480 for each dependent;

(2) $400 for any elderly family or disabled family;

(3) The sum of the following, to the extent the sum exceeds three percent of annual income:

(i) Unreimbursed medical expenses of any elderly family or disabled family; and

(ii) Unreimbursed reasonable attendant care and auxiliary apparatus expenses for each member of the family who is a person with disabilities, to the extent necessary to enable any member of the family (including the member who is a person with disabilities) to be employed. This deduction may not exceed the earned income received by family members who are 18 years of age or older and who are able to work because of such attendant care or auxiliary apparatus; and

(4) Any reasonable child care expenses necessary to enable a member of the family to be employed or to further his or her education.

(b) Additional deductions. (1) For public housing, a PHA may adopt additional deductions from annual income. The PHA must establish a written policy for such deductions.

(2) For the HUD programs listed in §5.601(d), the responsible entity shall calculate such other deductions as required and permitted by the applicable program regulations.

[66 FR 6223, Jan. 19, 2001]

§5.612   Restrictions on assistance to students enrolled in an institution of higher education.

No assistance shall be provided under section 8 of the 1937 Act to any individual who:

(a) Is enrolled as a student at an institution of higher education, as defined under section 102 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1002);

(b) Is under 24 years of age;

(c) Is not a veteran of the United States military;

(d) Is unmarried;

(e) Does not have a dependent child;

(f) Is not a person with disabilities, as such term is defined in section 3(b)(3)(E) of the 1937 Act and was not receiving assistance under section 8 of the 1937 Act as of November 30, 2005; and

(g) Is not otherwise individually eligible, or has parents who, individually or jointly, are not eligible on the basis of income to receive assistance under section 8 of the 1937 Act.

[70 FR 77743, Dec. 30, 2005, as amended at 73 FR 49333, Aug. 21, 2008]

§5.613   Public housing program and Section 8 tenant-based assistance program: PHA cooperation with welfare agency.

(a) This section applies to the public housing program and the Section 8 tenant-based assistance program.

(b) The PHA must make best efforts to enter into cooperation agreements with welfare agencies under which such agencies agree:

(1) To target public assistance, benefits and services to families receiving assistance in the public housing program and the Section 8 tenant-based assistance program to achieve self-sufficiency;

(2) To provide written verification to the PHA concerning welfare benefits for families applying for or receiving assistance in these housing assistance programs.

[65 FR 16717, Mar. 29, 2000]

§5.615   Public housing program and Section 8 tenant-based assistance program: How welfare benefit reduction affects family income.

(a) Applicability. This section applies to covered families who reside in public housing (part 960 of this title) or receive Section 8 tenant-based assistance (part 982 of this title).

(b) Definitions. The following definitions apply for purposes of this section:

Covered families. Families who receive welfare assistance or other public assistance benefits (“welfare benefits”) from a State or other public agency (“welfare agency”) under a program for which Federal, State, or local law requires that a member of the family must participate in an economic self-sufficiency program as a condition for such assistance.

Economic self-sufficiency program. See definition at §5.603.

Imputed welfare income. The amount of annual income not actually received by a family, as a result of a specified welfare benefit reduction, that is nonetheless included in the family's annual income for purposes of determining rent.

Specified welfare benefit reduction.

(1) A reduction of welfare benefits by the welfare agency, in whole or in part, for a family member, as determined by the welfare agency, because of fraud by a family member in connection with the welfare program; or because of welfare agency sanction against a family member for noncompliance with a welfare agency requirement to participate in an economic self-sufficiency program.

(2) “Specified welfare benefit reduction” does not include a reduction or termination of welfare benefits by the welfare agency:

(i) at expiration of a lifetime or other time limit on the payment of welfare benefits;

(ii) because a family member is not able to obtain employment, even though the family member has complied with welfare agency economic self-sufficiency or work activities requirements; or

(iii) because a family member has not complied with other welfare agency requirements.

(c) Imputed welfare income. (1) A family's annual income includes the amount of imputed welfare income (because of a specified welfare benefits reduction, as specified in notice to the PHA by the welfare agency), plus the total amount of other annual income as determined in accordance with §5.609.

(2) At the request of the PHA, the welfare agency will inform the PHA in writing of the amount and term of any specified welfare benefit reduction for a family member, and the reason for such reduction, and will also inform the PHA of any subsequent changes in the term or amount of such specified welfare benefit reduction. The PHA will use this information to determine the amount of imputed welfare income for a family.

(3) A family's annual income includes imputed welfare income in family annual income, as determined at the PHA's interim or regular reexamination of family income and composition, during the term of the welfare benefits reduction (as specified in information provided to the PHA by the welfare agency).

(4) The amount of the imputed welfare income is offset by the amount of additional income a family receives that commences after the time the sanction was imposed. When such additional income from other sources is at least equal to the imputed welfare income, the imputed welfare income is reduced to zero.

(5) The PHA may not include imputed welfare income in annual income if the family was not an assisted resident at the time of sanction.

(d) Review of PHA decision—(1) Public housing. If a public housing tenant claims that the PHA has not correctly calculated the amount of imputed welfare income in accordance with HUD requirements, and if the PHA denies the family's request to modify such amount, the PHA shall give the tenant written notice of such denial, with a brief explanation of the basis for the PHA determination of the amount of imputed welfare income. The PHA notice shall also state that if the tenant does not agree with the PHA determination, the tenant may request a grievance hearing in accordance with part 966, subpart B of this title to review the PHA determination. The tenant is not required to pay an escrow deposit pursuant to §966.55(e) for the portion of tenant rent attributable to the imputed welfare income in order to obtain a grievance hearing on the PHA determination.

(2) Section 8 participant. A participant in the Section 8 tenant-based assistance program may request an informal hearing, in accordance with §982.555 of this title, to review the PHA determination of the amount of imputed welfare income that must be included in the family's annual income in accordance with this section. If the family claims that such amount is not correctly calculated in accordance with HUD requirements, and if the PHA denies the family's request to modify such amount, the PHA shall give the family written notice of such denial, with a brief explanation of the basis for the PHA determination of the amount of imputed welfare income. Such notice shall also state that if the family does not agree with the PHA determination, the family may request an informal hearing on the determination under the PHA hearing procedure.

(e) PHA relation with welfare agency. (1) The PHA must ask welfare agencies to inform the PHA of any specified welfare benefits reduction for a family member, the reason for such reduction, the term of any such reduction, and any subsequent welfare agency determination affecting the amount or term of a specified welfare benefits reduction. If the welfare agency determines a specified welfare benefits reduction for a family member, and gives the PHA written notice of such reduction, the family's annual incomes shall include the imputed welfare income because of the specified welfare benefits reduction.

(2) The PHA is responsible for determining the amount of imputed welfare income that is included in the family's annual income as a result of a specified welfare benefits reduction as determined by the welfare agency, and specified in the notice by the welfare agency to the PHA. However, the PHA is not responsible for determining whether a reduction of welfare benefits by the welfare agency was correctly determined by the welfare agency in accordance with welfare program requirements and procedures, nor for providing the opportunity for review or hearing on such welfare agency determinations.

(3) Such welfare agency determinations are the responsibility of the welfare agency, and the family may seek appeal of such determinations through the welfare agency's normal due process procedures. The PHA shall be entitled to rely on the welfare agency notice to the PHA of the welfare agency's determination of a specified welfare benefits reduction.

[65 FR 16717, Mar. 29, 2000]

§5.617   Self-sufficiency incentives for persons with disabilities—Disallowance of increase in annual income.

(a) Applicable programs. The disallowance of earned income provided by this section is applicable only to the following programs: HOME Investment Partnerships Program (24 CFR part 92); Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (24 CFR part 574); Supportive Housing Program (24 CFR part 583); and the Housing Choice Voucher Program (24 CFR part 982).

(b) Definitions. The following definitions apply for purposes of this section.

Baseline income. The annual income immediately prior to implementation of the disallowance described in paragraph (c)(1) of this section of a person with disabilities (who is a member of a qualified family).

Disallowance. Exclusion from annual income.

Previously unemployed includes a person with disabilities who has earned, in the twelve months previous to employment, no more than would be received for 10 hours of work per week for 50 weeks at the established minimum wage.

Qualified family. A family residing in housing assisted under one of the programs listed in paragraph (a) of this section or receiving tenant-based rental assistance under one of the programs listed in paragraph (a) of this section.

(1) Whose annual income increases as a result of employment of a family member who is a person with disabilities and who was previously unemployed for one or more years prior to employment;

(2) Whose annual income increases as a result of increased earnings by a family member who is a person with disabilities during participation in any economic self-sufficiency or other job training program; or

(3) Whose annual income increases, as a result of new employment or increased earnings of a family member who is a person with disabilities, during or within six months after receiving assistance, benefits or services under any state program for temporary assistance for needy families funded under Part A of Title IV of the Social Security Act, as determined by the responsible entity in consultation with the local agencies administering temporary assistance for needy families (TANF) and Welfare-to-Work (WTW) programs. The TANF program is not limited to monthly income maintenance, but also includes such benefits and services as one-time payments, wage subsidies and transportation assistance—provided that the total amount over a six-month period is at least $500.

(c) Disallowance of increase in annual income—(1) Initial 12-month exclusion. During the 12-month period beginning on the date a member who is a person with disabilities of a qualified family is first employed or the family first experiences an increase in annual income attributable to employment, the responsible entity must exclude from annual income (as defined in the regulations governing the applicable program listed in paragraph (a) of this section) of a qualified family any increase in income of the family member who is a person with disabilities as a result of employment over prior income of that family member.

(2) Second 12-month exclusion and phase-in. Upon the expiration of the 12-month period defined in paragraph (c)(1) of this section and for the subsequent 12-month period, the responsible entity must exclude from annual income of a qualified family at least 50 percent of any increase in income of such family member as a result of employment over the family member's baseline income.

(3) Maximum 2-year disallowance. The disallowance of increased income of an individual family member who is a person with disabilities as provided in paragraph (c)(1) or (c)(2) of this section is limited to a lifetime 24-month period. The disallowance applies for a maximum of 12 months for disallowance under paragraph (c)(1) of this section and a maximum of 12 months for disallowance under paragraph (c)(2) of this section, during the 24- month period starting from the initial exclusion under paragraph (c)(1) of this section.

(4) Effect of changes on currently participating families. Families eligible for and participating in the disallowance of earned income under this section prior to May 9, 2016 will continue to be governed by this section in effect as it existed immediately prior to that date (see 24 CFR parts 0 to 199, revised as of April 1, 2016).

(d) Inapplicability to admission. The disallowance of increases in income as a result of employment of persons with disabilities under this section does not apply for purposes of admission to the program (including the determination of income eligibility or any income targeting that may be applicable).

[66 FR 6223, Jan. 19, 2001, as amended at 67 FR 6820, Feb. 13, 2002; 81 FR 12370, Mar. 8, 2016]

Family Payment

§5.628   Total tenant payment.

(a) Determining total tenant payment (TTP). Total tenant payment is the highest of the following amounts, rounded to the nearest dollar:

(1) 30 percent of the family's monthly adjusted income;

(2) 10 percent of the family's monthly income;

(3) If the family is receiving payments for welfare assistance from a public agency and a part of those payments, adjusted in accordance with the family's actual housing costs, is specifically designated by such agency to meet the family's housing costs, the portion of those payments which is so designated; or

(4) The minimum rent, as determined in accordance with §5.630.

(b) Determining TTP if family's welfare assistance is ratably reduced. If the family's welfare assistance is ratably reduced from the standard of need by applying a percentage, the amount calculated under paragraph (a)(3) of this section is the amount resulting from one application of the percentage.

[65 FR 16718, Mar. 29, 2000]

§5.630   Minimum rent.

(a) Minimum rent. (1) The PHA must charge a family no less than a minimum monthly rent established by the responsible entity, except as described in paragraph (b) of this section.

(2) For the public housing program and the section 8 moderate rehabilitation, and certificate or voucher programs, the PHA may establish a minimum rent of up to $50.

(3) For other section 8 programs, the minimum rent is $25.

(b) Financial hardship exemption from minimum rent—(1) When is family exempt from minimum rent? The responsible entity must grant an exemption from payment of minimum rent if the family is unable to pay the minimum rent because of financial hardship, as described in the responsible entity's written policies. Financial hardship includes these situations:

(i) When the family has lost eligibility for or is awaiting an eligibility determination for a Federal, State, or local assistance program, including a family that includes a member who is a noncitizen lawfully admitted for permanent residence under the Immigration and Nationality Act who would be entitled to public benefits but for title IV of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act of 1996;

(ii) When the family would be evicted because it is unable to pay the minimum rent;

(iii) When the income of the family has decreased because of changed circumstances, including loss of employment;

(iv) When a death has occurred in the family; and

(v) Other circumstances determined by the responsible entity or HUD.

(2) What happens if family requests a hardship exemption? (i) Public housing. (A) If a family requests a financial hardship exemption, the PHA must suspend the minimum rent requirement beginning the month following the family's request for a hardship exemption, and continuing until the PHA determines whether there is a qualifying financial hardship and whether it is temporary or long term.

(B) The PHA must promptly determine whether a qualifying hardship exists and whether it is temporary or long term.

(C) The PHA may not evict the family for nonpayment of minimum rent during the 90-day period beginning the month following the family's request for a hardship exemption.

(D) If the PHA determines that a qualifying financial hardship is temporary, the PHA must reinstate the minimum rent from the beginning of the suspension of the minimum rent. The PHA must offer the family a reasonable repayment agreement, on terms and conditions established by the PHA, for the amount of back minimum rent owed by the family.

(ii) All section 8 programs. (A) If a family requests a financial hardship exemption, the responsible entity must suspend the minimum rent requirement beginning the month following the family's request for a hardship exemption until the responsible entity determines whether there is a qualifying financial hardship, and whether such hardship is temporary or long term.

(B) The responsible entity must promptly determine whether a qualifying hardship exists and whether it is temporary or long term.

(C) If the responsible entity determines that a qualifying financial hardship is temporary, the PHA must not impose the minimum rent during the 90-day period beginning the month following the date of the family's request for a hardship exemption. At the end of the 90-day suspension period, the responsible entity must reinstate the minimum rent from the beginning of the suspension. The family must be offered a reasonable repayment agreement, on terms and conditions established by the responsible entity, for the amount of back rent owed by the family.

(iii) All programs. (A) If the responsible entity determines there is no qualifying financial hardship exemption, the responsible entity must reinstate the minimum rent, including back rent owed from the beginning of the suspension. The family must pay the back rent on terms and conditions established by the responsible entity.

(B) If the responsible entity determines a qualifying financial hardship is long term, the responsible entity must exempt the family from the minimum rent requirements so long as such hardship continues. Such exemption shall apply from the beginning of the month following the family's request for a hardship exemption until the end of the qualifying financial hardship.

(C) The financial hardship exemption only applies to payment of the minimum rent (as determined pursuant to §5.628(a)(4) and §5.630), and not to the other elements used to calculate the total tenant payment (as determined pursuant to §5.628(a)(1), (a)(2) and (a)(3)).

(3) Public housing: Grievance hearing concerning PHA denial of request for hardship exemption. If a public housing family requests a hearing under the PHA grievance procedure, to review the PHA's determination denying or limiting the family's claim to a financial hardship exemption, the family is not required to pay any escrow deposit in order to obtain a grievance hearing on such issues.

[65 FR 16718, Mar. 29, 2000]

§5.632   Utility reimbursements.

(a) Applicability. This section is applicable to:

(1) The Section 8 programs other than the Section 8 voucher program (for distribution of a voucher housing assistance payment that exceeds rent to owner, see §982.514(b) of this title);

(2) A public housing family paying an income-based rent (see §960.253 of this title). (Utility reimbursement is not paid for a public housing family that is paying a flat rent.)

(b) Payment of utility reimbursement. (1) The responsible entity pays a utility reimbursement if the utility allowance (for tenant-paid utilities) exceeds the amount of the total tenant payment. The responsible entity has the option of making utility reimbursement payments not less than once per calendar-year quarter, for reimbursements totaling $45 or less per quarter. In the event a family leaves the program in advance of its next quarterly reimbursement, the responsible entity must reimburse the family for a prorated share of the applicable reimbursement. PHAs and owners exercising this option must have a hardship policy in place for tenants.

(2) In the public housing program (where the family is paying an income-based rent), the Section 8 moderate rehabilitation program and the Section 8 certificate or voucher program, the PHA may pay the utility reimbursement either to the family or directly to the utility supplier to pay the utility bill on behalf of the family. If the PHA elects to pay the utility supplier, the PHA must notify the family of the amount paid to the utility supplier.

(3) In the other Section 8 programs, the owner must pay the utility reimbursement either:

(i) To the family, or

(ii) With consent of the family, to the utility supplier to pay the utility bill on behalf of the family.

[65 FR 16719, Mar. 29, 2000, as amended at 82 FR 58339, Dec. 12, 2017]

§5.634   Tenant rent.

(a) Section 8 programs. For Section 8 programs other than the Section 8 voucher program, tenant rent is total tenant payment minus any utility allowance.

(b) Public housing. See §960.253 of this title for the determination of tenant rent.

[65 FR 16719, Mar. 29, 2000]

Section 8 Project-Based Assistance: Occupancy Requirements

§5.653   Section 8 project-based assistance programs: Admission—Income-eligibility and income-targeting.

(a) Applicability. This section describes requirements concerning income-eligibility and income-targeting that apply to the Section 8 project-based assistance programs, except for the moderate rehabilitation and the project-based certificate or voucher programs.

(b) Who is eligible?—(1) Basic eligibility. An applicant must meet all eligibility requirements in order to receive housing assistance. At a minimum, the applicant must be a family, as defined in §5.403, and must be income-eligible, as described in this section. Such eligible applicants include single persons.

(2) Low income limit. No family other than a low income family is eligible for admission to the Section 8 project-based assistance programs. (This paragraph (b) does not apply to the Section 8 project-based voucher program under part 983 of this title.)

(c) Targeting to extremely low income families. For each project assisted under a contract for project-based assistance, of the dwelling units that become available for occupancy in any fiscal year that are assisted under the contract, not less than 40 percent shall be available for leasing only by families that are extremely low income families at the time of admission.

(d) Limitation on admission of non-very low income families—(1) Admission to units available before October 1, 1981. Not more than 25 percent of the Section 8 project-based dwelling units that were available for occupancy under Section 8 Housing Assistance Payments Contracts effective before October 1, 1981 and that are leased on or after that date shall be available for leasing by low income families other than very low income families. HUD reserves the right to limit the admission of low income families other than very low income families to these units.

(2) Admission to units available on or after October 1, 1981. Not more than 15 percent of the Section 8 project-based dwelling units that initially become available for occupancy under Section 8 Housing Assistance Payments (HAP) Contracts on or after October 1, 1981 shall be available for leasing by low income families other than families that are very low income families at the time of admission to the Section 8 program. Except with the prior approval of HUD under paragraphs (d)(3) and (d)(4) of this section, the owner may only lease such units to very low income families.

(3) Request for exception. A request by an owner for approval of admission of low income families other than very low income families to section 8 project-based units must state the basis for requesting the exception and provide supporting data. Bases for exceptions that may be considered include the following:

(i) Need for admission of a broader range of tenants to preserve the financial or management viability of a project because there is an insufficient number of potential applicants who are very low income families;

(ii) Commitment of an owner to attaining occupancy by families with a broad range of incomes;

(iii) Project supervision by a State Housing Finance Agency having a policy of occupancy by families with a broad range of incomes supported by evidence that the Agency is pursuing this goal throughout its assisted projects in the community, or a project with financing through Section 11(b) of the 1937 Act (42 U.S.C. 1437i) or under Section 103 of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 103); and

(iv) Low-income families that otherwise would be displaced from a Section 8 project.

(4) Action on request for exception. Whether to grant any request for exception is a matter committed by law to HUD's discretion, and no implication is intended to be created that HUD will seek to grant approvals up to the maximum limits permitted by statute, nor is any presumption of an entitlement to an exception created by the specification of certain grounds for exception that HUD may consider. HUD will review exceptions granted to owners at regular intervals. HUD may withdraw permission to exercise those exceptions for program applicants at any time that exceptions are not being used or after a periodic review, based on the findings of the review.

(e) Income used for eligibility and targeting. Family annual income (see §5.609) is used both for determination of income-eligibility and for income-targeting under this section.

(f) Reporting. The Section 8 owner must comply with HUD-prescribed reporting requirements, including income reporting requirements that will permit HUD to maintain the data necessary to monitor compliance with income-eligibility and income-targeting requirements.

[65 FR 16719, Mar. 29, 2000]

§5.655   Section 8 project-based assistance programs: Owner preferences in selection for a project or unit.

(a) Applicability. This section applies to the section 8 project-based assistance programs. The section describes requirements concerning the Section 8 owner's selection of residents to occupy a project or unit, except for the moderate rehabilitation and the project-based certificate or voucher programs.

(b) Selection—(1) Selection for owner's project or unit. Selection for occupancy of a project or unit is the function of the Section 8 owner. However, selection is subject to the income-eligibility and income-targeting requirements in §5.653.

(2) Tenant selection plan. The owner must adopt a written tenant selection plan in accordance with HUD requirements.

(3) Amount of income. The owner may not select a family for occupancy of a project or unit in an order different from the order on the owner's waiting list for the purpose of selecting a relatively higher income family. However, an owner may select a family for occupancy of a project or unit based on its income in order to satisfy the targeting requirements of §5.653(c).

(4) Selection for particular unit. In selecting a family to occupy a particular unit, the owner may match family characteristics with the type of unit available, for example, number of bedrooms. If a unit has special accessibility features for persons with disabilities, the owner must first offer the unit to families which include persons with disabilities who require such features (see §§8.27 and 100.202 of this title).

(5) Housing assistance limitation for single persons. A single person who is not an elderly or displaced person, a person with disabilities, or the remaining member of a resident family may not be provided a housing unit with two or more bedrooms.

(c) Particular owner preferences. The owner must inform all applicants about available preferences and must give applicants an opportunity to show that they qualify for available preferences.

(1) Residency requirements or preferences. (i) Residency requirements are prohibited. Although the owner is not prohibited from adopting a residency preference, the owner may only adopt or implement residency preferences in accordance with non-discrimination and equal opportunity requirements listed at §5.105(a).

(ii) A residency preference is a preference for admission of persons who reside in a specified geographic area (“residency preference area”).

(iii) An owner's residency preference must be approved by HUD in one of the following methods:

(A) Prior approval of the housing market area in the Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing plan (in accordance with §108.25 of this title) as a residency preference area;

(B) Prior approval of the residency preference area in the PHA plan of the jurisdiction in which the project is located;

(C) Modification of the Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing Plan, in accordance with §108.25 of this title,

(iv) Use of a residency preference may not have the purpose or effect of delaying or otherwise denying admission to a project or unit based on the race, color, ethnic origin, gender, religion, disability, or age of any member of an applicant family.

(v) A residency preference must not be based on how long an applicant has resided or worked in a residency preference area.

(vi) Applicants who are working or who have been notified that they are hired to work in a residency preference area must be treated as residents of the residency preference area. The owner may treat graduates of, or active participants in, education and training programs in a residency preference area as residents of the residency preference area if the education or training program is designed to prepare individuals for the job market.

(2) Preference for working families. (i) The owner may adopt a preference for admission of working families (families where the head, spouse or sole member is employed). However, an applicant shall be given the benefit of the working family preference if the head and spouse, or sole member, is age 62 or older, or is a person with disabilities.

(ii) If the owner adopts a preference for admission of working families, the owner must not give a preference based on the amount of earned income.

(3) Preference for person with disabilities. The owner may adopt a preference for admission of families that include a person with disabilities. However, the owner may not adopt a preference for admission of persons with a specific disability.

(4) Preference for victims of domestic violence. The owner should consider whether to adopt a preference for admission of families that include victims of domestic violence.

(5) Preference for single persons who are elderly, displaced, homeless or persons with disabilities over other single persons. The owner may adopt a preference for admission of single persons who are age 62 or older, displaced, homeless, or persons with disabilities over other single persons.

[65 FR 16720, Mar. 29, 2000]

§5.657   Section 8 project-based assistance programs: Reexamination of family income and composition.

(a) Applicability. This section states requirements for reexamination of family income and composition in the Section 8 project-based assistance programs, except for the moderate rehabilitation and the project-based certificate or voucher programs.

(b) Regular reexamination. The owner must conduct a reexamination and redetermination of family income and composition at least annually.

(c) Interim reexaminations. A family may request an interim reexamination of family income because of any changes since the last examination. The owner must make the interim reexamination within a reasonable time after the family request. The owner may adopt policies prescribing when and under what conditions the family must report a change in family income or composition.

(d) Streamlined income determination—(1) General. An owner may elect to apply a streamlined income determination to families receiving fixed income as described in paragraph (d)(3) of this section.

(2) Definition of “fixed income”. For purposes of this section, “fixed income” means periodic payments at reasonably predictable levels from one or more of the following sources:

(i) Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, Supplemental Disability Insurance.

(ii) Federal, state, local, or private pension plans.

(iii) Annuities or other retirement benefit programs, insurance policies, disability or death benefits, or other similar types of periodic receipts.

(iv) Any other source of income subject to adjustment by a verifiable COLA or current rate of interest.

(3) Method of streamlined income determination. Owners using the streamlined income determination must adjust a family's income according to the percentage of a family's unadjusted income that is from fixed income.

(i) When 90 percent or more of a family's unadjusted income consists of fixed income, owners using streamlined income determinations must apply a COLA or COLAs to the family's fixed-income sources, provided that the family certifies both that 90 percent or more of their unadjusted income is fixed income and that their sources of fixed income have not changed from the previous year. For non-fixed income, owners may choose, but are not required, to make appropriate adjustments pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section.

(ii) When less than 90 percent of a family's unadjusted income consists of fixed income, owners using streamlined income determinations must apply a COLA to each of the family's sources of fixed income. Owners must determine all other income pursuant to paragraph (b) of this section.

(4) COLA rate applied by owners. Owners using streamlined income determinations must adjust a family's fixed income using a COLA or current interest rate that applies to each specific source of fixed income and is available from a public source or through tenant-provided, third-party-generated documentation. If no public verification or tenant-provided documentation is available, then the owner must obtain third-party verification of the income amounts in order to calculate the change in income for the source.

(5) Triennial verification. For any income determined pursuant to a streamlined income determination, an owner must obtain third-party verification of all income amounts every 3 years.

[65 FR 16720, Mar. 29, 2000, as amended at 81 FR 12371, Mar. 8, 2016; 82 FR 58340, Dec. 12, 2017]

§5.659   Family information and verification.

(a) Applicability. This section states requirements for reexamination of family income and composition in the Section 8 project-based assistance programs, except for the moderate rehabilitation program and the project-based certificate or voucher programs.

(b) Family obligation to supply information. (1) The family must supply any information that HUD or the owner determines is necessary in administration of the Section 8 program, including submission of required evidence of citizenship or eligible immigration status (as provided by part 5, subpart E of this title). “Information” includes any requested certification, release or other documentation.

(2) The family must supply any information requested by the owner or HUD for use in a regularly scheduled reexamination or an interim reexamination of family income and composition in accordance with HUD requirements.

(3) For requirements concerning the following, see part 5, subpart B of this title:

(i) Family verification and disclosure of social security numbers;

(ii) Family execution and submission of consent forms for obtaining wage and claim information from State Wage Information Collection Agencies (SWICAs).

(4) Any information supplied by the family must be true and complete.

(c) Family release and consent. (1) As a condition of admission to or continued occupancy of a unit with Section 8 assistance, the owner must require the family head, and such other family members as the owner designates, to execute a HUD-approved release and consent form (including any release and consent as required under §5.230 of this title) authorizing any depository or private source of income, or any Federal, State or local agency, to furnish or release to the owner or HUD such information as the owner or HUD determines to be necessary.

(2) The use or disclosure of information obtained from a family or from another source pursuant to this release and consent shall be limited to purposes directly connected with administration of the Section 8 program.

(d) Owner responsibility for verification. Except as allowed under paragraph (e), the owner must obtain and document in the family file third party verification of the following factors, or must document in the file why third party verification was not available:

(1) Reported family annual income;

(2) The value of assets;

(3) Expenses related to deductions from annual income; and

(4) Other factors that affect the determination of adjusted income.

(e) Verification of assets. For a family with net assets equal to or less than $5,000, an owner may accept, for purposes of recertification of income, a family's declaration that it has net assets equal to or less than $5,000 without taking additional steps to verify the accuracy of the declaration, except as required in paragraph (e)(2) of this section.

(1) The declaration must state the amount of income the family expects to receive from such assets; this amount must be included in the family's income.

(2) An owner must obtain third-party verification of all family assets every 3 years.

[65 FR 16721, Mar. 29, 2000, as amended at 82 FR 58340, Dec. 12, 2017]

§5.661   Section 8 project-based assistance programs: Approval for police or other security personnel to live in project.

(a) Applicability. This section describes when a Section 8 owner may lease a Section 8 unit to police or other security personnel with continued Section 8 assistance for the unit. This section applies to the Section 8 project-based assistance programs.

(b) Terms. (1) Security personnel means:

(i) A police officer, or

(ii) A qualified security professional, with adequate training and experience to provide security services for project residents.

(2) Police officer means a person employed on a full-time basis as a duly licensed professional police officer by a Federal, State or local government or by any agency of these governments.

(3) Security includes the protection of project residents, including resident project management from criminal or other activity that is a threat to person or property, or that arouses fears of such threat.

(c) Owner application. (1) The owner may submit a written application to the contract administrator (PHA or HUD) for approval to lease an available unit in a Section 8 project to security personnel who would not otherwise be eligible for Section 8 assistance, for the purpose of increasing security for Section 8 families residing in the project.

(2) The owner's application must include the following information:

(i) A description of criminal activities in the project and the surrounding community, and the effect of criminal activity on the security of project residents.

(ii) Qualifications of security personnel who will reside in the project, and the period of residence by such personnel. How owner proposes to check backgrounds and qualifications of any security personnel who will reside in the project.

(iii) Full disclosure of any family relationship between the owner and any security personnel. For this purpose, “owner” includes a principal or other interested party.

(iv) How residence by security personnel in a project unit will increase security for Section 8 assisted families residing in the project.

(v) The amount payable monthly as rent to the unit owner by security personnel residing in the project (including a description of how this amount is determined), and the amount of any other compensation by the owner to such resident security personnel.

(vi) The terms of occupancy by such security personnel. The lease by owner to the approved security personnel may provide that occupancy of the unit is authorized only while the security personnel is satisfactorily performing any agreed responsibilities and functions for project security.

(vii) Other information as requested by the contract administrator.

(d) Action by contract administrator. (1) The contract administrator shall have discretion to approve or disapprove owner's application, and to impose conditions for approval of occupancy by security personnel in a section 8 project unit.

(2) Notice of approval by the contract administrator shall specify the term of such approved occupancy. Such approval may be withdrawn at the discretion of the contract administrator, for example, if the contract administrator determines that such occupancy is not providing adequate security benefits as proposed in the owner's application; or that security benefits from such occupancy are not a sufficient return for program costs.

(e) Housing assistance payment and rent. (1) During approved occupancy by security personnel as provided in this section, the amount of the monthly housing assistance payment to the owner shall be equal to the contract rent (as determined in accordance with the HAP contract and HUD requirements) minus the amount (as approved by the contract administrator) of rent payable monthly as rent to the unit owner by such security personnel. The owner shall bear the risk of collecting such rent from such security personnel, and the amount of the housing assistance payment shall not be increased because of non-payment by such security personnel. The owner shall not be entitled to receive any vacancy payment for the period following occupancy by such security personnel.

(2) In approving the amount of monthly rent payable by security personnel for occupancy of a contract unit, the contract administrator may consider whether security services to be performed are an adequate return for housing assistance payments on the unit, or whether the cost of security services should be borne by the owner from other project income.

[65 FR 16721, Mar. 29, 2000]

Effective Date Note: At 65 FR 16721, Mar. 29, 2000, §5.661 was added. This section contains information collection and recordkeeping requirements and will not become effective until approval has been given by the Office of Management and Budget.

Need assistance?