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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR data is current as of November 13, 2019

Title 21Chapter ISubchapter HPart 866 → Subpart D


Title 21: Food and Drugs
PART 866—IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES


Subpart D—Serological Reagents


Contents
§866.3010   Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.
§866.3020   Adenovirus serological reagents.
§866.3035   Arizona spp. serological reagents.
§866.3040   Aspergillus spp. serological reagents.
§866.3045   In vitro diagnostic device for Bacillus spp. detection.
§866.3050   Beta-glucan serological assays.
§866.3060   Blastomyces dermatitidis serological reagents.
§866.3065   Bordetella spp. serological reagents.
§866.3085   Brucella spp. serological reagents.
§866.3110   Campylobacter fetus serological reagents.
§866.3120   Chlamydia serological reagents.
§866.3125   Citrobacter spp. serological reagents.
§866.3130   Clostridium difficile toxin gene amplification assay.
§866.3135   Coccidioides immitis serological reagents.
§866.3140   Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents.
§866.3145   Coxsackievirus serological reagents.
§866.3165   Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.
§866.3175   Cytomegalovirus serological reagents.
§866.3200   Echinococcus spp. serological reagents.
§866.3205   Echovirus serological reagents.
§866.3210   Endotoxin assay.
§866.3215   Device to detect and measure non-microbial analyte(s) in human clinical specimens to aid in assessment of patients with suspected sepsis.
§866.3220   Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents.
§866.3225   Enterovirus nucleic acid assay.
§866.3235   Epstein-Barr virus serological reagents.
§866.3240   Equine encephalomyelitis virus serological reagents.
§866.3250   Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents.
§866.3255   Escherichia coli serological reagents.
§866.3270   Flavobacterium spp. serological reagents.
§866.3280   Francisella tularensis serological reagents.
§866.3290   Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).
§866.3300   Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.
§866.3305   Herpes simplex virus serological assays.
§866.3309   Herpes virus nucleic acid-based cutaneous and mucocutaneous lesion panel.
§866.3310   Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays.
§866.3320   Histoplasma capsulatum serological reagents.
§866.3328   Influenza virus antigen detection test system.
§866.3330   Influenza virus serological reagents.
§866.3332   Reagents for detection of specific novel influenza A viruses.
§866.3336   John Cunningham Virus serological reagents.
§866.3340   Klebsiella spp. serological reagents.
§866.3350   Leptospira spp. serological reagents.
§866.3355   Listeria spp. serological reagents.
§866.3360   Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.
§866.3361   Mass spectrometer system for clinical use for the identification of microorganisms.
§866.3365   Multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures.
§866.3370   Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.
§866.3372   Nucleic acid-based in vitro diagnostic devices for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in respiratory specimens.
§866.3373   Nucleic acid-based in vitro diagnostic devices for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB-complex) and the genetic mutations associated with MTB-complex antibiotic resistance in respiratory specimens.
§866.3375   Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.
§866.3380   Mumps virus serological reagents.
§866.3390   Neisseria spp. direct serological test reagents.
§866.3395   Norovirus serological reagents.
§866.3400   Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.
§866.3402   Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.
§866.3405   Poliovirus serological reagents.
§866.3410   Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.
§866.3415   Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.
§866.3460   Rabiesvirus immunofluorescent reagents.
§866.3470   Reovirus serological reagents.
§866.3480   Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.
§866.3490   Rhinovirus serological reagents.
§866.3500   Rickettsia serological reagents.
§866.3510   Rubella virus serological reagents.
§866.3520   Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.
§866.3550   Salmonella spp. serological reagents.
§866.3600   Schistosoma spp. serological reagents.
§866.3630   Serratia spp. serological reagents.
§866.3660   Shigella spp. serological reagents.
§866.3680   Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents.
§866.3700   Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.
§866.3720   Streptococcus spp. exoenzyme reagents.
§866.3740   Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.
§866.3780   Toxoplasma gondii serological reagents.
§866.3820   Treponema pallidum nontreponemal test reagents.
§866.3830   Treponema pallidum treponemal test reagents.
§866.3850   Trichinella spiralis serological reagents.
§866.3860   Trichomonas vaginalis nucleic acid assay.
§866.3870   Trypanosoma spp. serological reagents.
§866.3900   Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents.
§866.3920   Assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays.
§866.3930   Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.
§866.3940   West Nile virus serological reagents.
§866.3945   Dengue virus serological reagents.
§866.3946   Dengue virus nucleic acid amplification test reagents.
§866.3950   In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.
§866.3960   Nucleic acid-based device for the amplification, detection, and identification of microbial pathogens directly from whole blood specimens.
§866.3970   Device to detect and identify microbial pathogen nucleic acids in cerebrospinal fluid.
§866.3980   Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay.
§866.3985   Device to detect and identify microorganisms and associated resistance marker nucleic acids directly in respiratory specimens.
§866.3990   Gastrointestinal microorganism multiplex nucleic acid-based assay.

§866.3010   Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus serological reagents are devices that consist of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus antigens and antisera used to identify this bacterium from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by the bacterium Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and provides epidemiological information on disease caused by this microorganism. This organism becomes pathogenic in patients with burns or with immunologic deficiency, and infection can result in sepsis (blood poisoning).

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25046, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38791, July 25, 2001]

§866.3020   Adenovirus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Adenovirus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to adenovirus in serum. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of adenovirus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye and are used to identify adenoviruses directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by adenoviruses and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Adenovirus infections may cause pharyngitis (inflammation of the throat), acute respiratory diseases, and certain external diseases of the eye (e.g., conjunctivitis).

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25046, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38791, July 25, 2001]

§866.3035   Arizona spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Arizona spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antisera and antigens used to identify Arizona spp. in cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Arizona and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these microorganisms. Arizona spp. can cause gastroenteritis (food poisoning) and sepsis (blood poisoning).

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25046, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38791, July 25, 2001]

§866.3040   Aspergillus spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Aspergillus spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in various serological tests to identify antibodies to Aspergillus spp. in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of aspergillosis caused by fungi belonging to the genus Aspergillus. Aspergillosis is a disease marked by inflammatory granulomatous (tumor-like) lessions in the skin, ear, eyeball cavity, nasal sinuses, lungs, and occasionally the bones.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 65 FR 2311, Jan. 14, 2000]

§866.3045   In vitro diagnostic device for Bacillus spp. detection.

(a) Identification. An in vitro diagnostic device for Bacillus species (spp.) detection is a prescription device used to detect and differentiate among Bacillus spp. and presumptively identify B. anthracis and other Bacillus spp. from cultured isolates or clinical specimens as an aid in the diagnosis of anthrax and other diseases caused by Bacillus spp. This device may consist of Bacillus spp. antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to presumptively identify bacillus-like organisms in clinical specimens; bacteriophage used for differentiating B. anthracis from other Bacillus spp. based on susceptibility to lysis by the phage; or antigens used to identify antibodies to B. anthracis (anti-toxin and anti-capsular) in serum. Bacillus infections include anthrax (cutaneous, inhalational, or gastrointestinal) caused by B. anthracis, and gastrointestinal disease and non-gastrointestinal infections caused by B. cereus.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls are set forth in FDA's special controls guideline document entitled “In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for Bacillus spp. Detection; Class II Special Controls Guideline for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff.” For availability of the guideline document, see §866.1(e).

(c) Restriction on Distribution. The distribution of these devices is limited to laboratories that follow public health guidelines that address appropriate biosafety conditions, interpretation of test results, and coordination of findings with public health authorities.

(d) Restriction on Use. The use of this device is restricted to prescription use and must comply with the following:

(1) The device must be in the possession of:

(i)(A) A person, or his agents or employees, regularly and lawfully engaged in the manufacture, transportation, storage, or wholesale or retail distribution of such device; or

(B) A practitioner, such as a physician, licensed by law to use or order the use of such device; and

(ii) The device must be sold only to or on the prescription or other order of such practitioner for use in the course of his professional practice.

(2) The label of the device shall bear the statement “Caution: Federal law restricts this device to sale by or on the order of a ____”, the blank to be filled with the word “physician” or with the descriptive designation of any other practitioner licensed by the law of the State in which he practices to use or order the use of the device.

(3) Any labeling, as defined in section 201(m) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, whether or not it is on or within a package from which the device is to be dispensed, distributed by, or on behalf of the manufacturer, packer, or distributor of the device, that furnishes or purports to furnish information for use of the device contains adequate information for such use, including indications, effects, routes, methods, and frequency and duration of administration and any relevant hazards, contraindications, side effects, and precautions, under which practitioners licensed by law to employ the device can use the device safely and for the purposes for which it is intended, including all purposes for which it is advertised or represented. This information will not be required on so-called reminder-piece labeling which calls attention to the name of the device but does not include indications or other use information.

(4) All labeling, except labels and cartons, bearing information for use of the device also bears the date of the issuance or the date of the latest revision of such labeling.

[84 FR 12088, Apr. 1, 2019]

§866.3050   Beta-glucan serological assays.

(a) Identification. Beta-glucan serological assays are devices that consist of antigens or proteases used in serological assays. The device is intended for use for the presumptive diagnosis of fungal infection. The assay is indicated for use in patients with symptoms of, or medical conditions predisposing the patient to invasive fungal infection. The device can be used as an aid in the diagnosis of deep seated mycoses and fungemias.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control is FDA's guidance document entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Serological Assays for the Detection of Beta-Glucan.” See §866.1(e) for the availability of this guidance document.

[69 FR 56936, Sept. 23, 2004]

§866.3060   Blastomyces dermatitidis serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Blastomyces dermatitidis serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to Blastomyces determatitidis in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of blastomycosis caused by the fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis. Blastomycosis is a chronic granulomatous (tumor-like) disease, which may be limited to the skin or lung or may be widely disseminated in the body resulting in lesions of the bones, liver, spleen, and kidneys.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 63 FR 59226, Nov. 3, 1998]

§866.3065   Bordetella spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Bordetella spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera, including antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye, used in serological tests to identify Bordetella spp. from cultured isolates or directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Bordetella and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Bordetella spp. cause whooping cough (Bordetella pertussis) and other similiarly contagious and acute respiratory infections characterized by pneumonitis (inflammation of the lungs).

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25046, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38791, July 25, 2001]

§866.3085   Brucella spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Brucella spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used for serological identification of Brucella spp. from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens or to identify antibodies to Brucella spp. in serum. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Brucella spp. directly from clinical specimens or cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of brucellosis (e.g., undulant fever, Malta fever) caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Brucella and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these microorganisms.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 63 FR 59226, Nov. 3, 1998]

§866.3110   Campylobacter fetus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Campylobacter fetus serological reagents are devices that consist of antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye used to identify Campylobacter fetus from clinical specimens or cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by this bacterium and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Campylobacter fetus is a frequent cause of abortion in sheep and cattle and is sometimes responsible for endocarditis (inflammation of certain membranes of the heart) and enteritis (inflammation of the intestines) in humans.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls).

§866.3120   Chlamydia serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Chlamydia serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to chlamydia in serum. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of chlamydia antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye used to identify chlamydia directly from clinical specimens or cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Chlamydia and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Chlamydia are the causative agents of psittacosis (a form of pneumonia), lymphogranuloma venereum (a venereal disease), and trachoma (a chronic disease of the eye and eyelid).

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls).

§866.3125   Citrobacter spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Citrobacter spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Citrobacter spp. from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Citrobacter and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these microorganisms. Citrobacter spp. have occasionally been associated with urinary tract infections.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25046, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38791, July 25, 2001]

§866.3130   Clostridium difficile toxin gene amplification assay.

(a) Identification. A Clostridium difficile toxin gene amplification assay is a device that consists of reagents for the amplification and detection of target sequences in Clostridium difficile toxin genes in fecal specimens from patients suspected of having Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The detection of clostridial toxin genes, in conjunction with other laboratory tests, aids in the clinical laboratory diagnosis of CDI caused by Clostridium difficile.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls are set forth in FDA's guideline document entitled: “Class II Special Controls Guideline: Toxin Gene Amplification Assays for the Detection of Clostridium difficile; Guideline for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff.” See §866.1(e) for information on obtaining this document.

[80 FR 51939, Aug. 27, 2015]

§866.3135   Coccidioides immitis serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Coccidioides immitis serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to Coccidioides immitis in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis caused by a fungus belonging to the genus Coccidioides and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by this microorganism. An infection with Coccidioides immitis produces symptoms varying in severity from those accompanying the common cold to those of influenza.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 63 FR 59226, Nov. 3, 1998]

§866.3140   Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye used to identify Corynebacterium spp. from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Corynebacterium and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these microorganisms. The principal human pathogen of this genus, Corynebacterium diphtheriae, causes diphtheria. However, many other types of corynebacteria form part of the normal flora of the human respiratory tract, other mucus membranes, and skin, and are either nonpathogenic or have an uncertain role.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 65 FR 2311, Jan. 14, 2000]

§866.3145   Coxsackievirus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Coxsackievirus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to coxsackievirus in serum. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of coxsackievirus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye that are used to identify coxsackievirus from clinical specimens or from tissue culture isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of coxsackievirus infections and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these viruses. Coxsackieviruses produce a variety of infections, including common colds, meningitis (inflammation of brain and spinal cord membranes), herpangina (brief fever accompanied by ulcerated lesions of the throat), and myopericarditis (inflammation of heart tissue).

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 65 FR 2311, Jan. 14, 2000]

§866.3165   Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens used in serological tests to identify antibodies to Cryptococcus neoformans in serum. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) and are used to identify Cryptococcus neoformans directly from clinical specimens or from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of cryptococcosis and provides epidemiological information on this type of disease. Cryptococcosis infections are found most often as chronic meningitis (inflammation of brain membranes) and, if not treated, are usually fatal.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 63 FR 59226, Nov. 3, 1998]

§866.3175   Cytomegalovirus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Cytomegalovirus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to cytomegalovirus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by cytomegaloviruses (principally cytomegalic inclusion disease) and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Cytomegalic inclusion disease is a generalized infection of infants and is caused by intrauterine or early postnatal infection with the virus. The disease may cause severe congenital abnormalities, such as microcephaly (abnormal smallness of the head), motor disability, and mental retardation. Cytomegalovirus infection has also been associated with acquired hemolytic anemia, acute and chronic hepatitis, and an infectious mononucleosis-like syndrome.

(b) Classification. Class II (performance standards).

§866.3200   Echinococcus spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Echinococcus spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of Echinococcus spp. antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to Echinococcus spp. in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of echinococcosis, caused by parasitic tapeworms belonging to the genus Echinococcus and provides epidemiological information on this disease. Echinococcosis is characterized by the development of cysts in the liver, lung, kidneys, and other organs formed by the larva of the infecting organisms.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 65 FR 2311, Jan. 14, 2000]

§866.3205   Echovirus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Echovirus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to echovirus in serum. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of echovirus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye used to identify echoviruses from clinical specimens or from tissue culture isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of echovirus infections and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these viruses. Echoviruses cause illnesses such as meningitis (inflammation of the brain and spinal cord membranes), febrile illnesses (accompanied by fever) with or without rash, and the common cold.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25046, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38791, July 25, 2001]

§866.3210   Endotoxin assay.

(a) Identification. An endotoxin assay is a device that uses serological techniques in whole blood. The device is intended for use in conjunction with other laboratory findings and clinical assessment of the patient to aid in the risk assessment of critically ill patients for progression to severe sepsis.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device is the FDA guidance entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Endotoxin Assay.” See §866.1(e) for the availability of this guidance document.

[68 FR 62008, Oct. 31, 2003. Redesignated at 70 FR 53069, Sept. 7, 2005]

§866.3215   Device to detect and measure non-microbial analyte(s) in human clinical specimens to aid in assessment of patients with suspected sepsis.

(a) Identification. A device to detect and measure non-microbial analyte(s) in human clinical specimens to aid in assessment of patients with suspected sepsis is identified as an in vitro device intended for the detection and qualitative and/or quantitative measurement of one or more non-microbial analytes in human clinical specimens to aid in the assessment of patients with suspected sepsis when used in conjunction with clinical signs and symptoms and other clinical and laboratory findings.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls for this device are:

(1) Premarket notification submissions must include the device's detailed Indications for Use statement describing what the device detects and measures, the results provided to the user, whether the measure is qualitative and/or quantitative, the clinical indications for which the test is to be used, and the specific population(s) for which the device use is intended.

(2) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed documentation of the device description, including (as applicable), all device components, software, ancillary reagents required but not provided, explanation of the device principle and methodology, and for molecular devices include detailed documentation of the primer/probe sequence, design, and rationale for sequence selection.

(3) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed documentation of applicable analytical studies, such as, analytical sensitivity (Limit of Detection, Limit of Blank, and Limit of Quantitation), precision, reproducibility, analytical measuring range, interference, cross-reactivity, and specimen stability.

(4) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed documentation of a prospective clinical study or, if appropriate, results from an equivalent sample set. This detailed documentation must include the following information:

(i) Results must demonstrate adequate device performance relative to a well-accepted comparator.

(ii) Clinical sample results must demonstrate consistency of device output throughout the device measuring range likely to be encountered in the Intended Use population.

(iii) Clinical study documentation must include the original study protocol (including predefined statistical analysis plan), study report documenting support for the Indications for Use(s), and results of all statistical analyses.

(5) Premarket notification submissions must include evaluation of the level of the non-microbial analyte in asymptomatic patients with demographic characteristics (e.g., age, racial, ethnic, and gender distribution) similar to the Intended Use population.

(6) As part of the risk management activities performed under 21 CFR 820.30 design controls, you must document an appropriate end user device training program that will be offered as part of your efforts to mitigate the risk of failure to correctly operate the instrument.

(7) A detailed explanation of the interpretation of results and acceptance criteria must be included in the device's 21 CFR 809.10(b)(9) compliant labeling, and a detailed explanation of the interpretation of the limitations of the samples (e.g., collected on day of diagnosis) must be included in the device's 21 CFR 809.10(b)(10) compliant labeling.

[82 FR 49099, Oct. 24, 2017]

§866.3220   Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to Entamoeba histolytica in serum. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Entamoeba histolytica directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of amebiasis caused by the microscopic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by this parasite. The parasite may invade the skin, liver, intestines, lungs, and diaphragm, causing disease conditions such as indolent ulcers, an amebic hepatitis, amebic dysentery, and pulmonary lesions.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982; 47 FR 56846, Dec. 21, 1982, as amended at 63 FR 59226, Nov. 3, 1998]

§866.3225   Enterovirus nucleic acid assay.

(a) Identification. An enterovirus nucleic acid assay is a device that consists of primers, probes, enzymes, and controls for the amplification and detection of enterovirus ribonucleic acid (RNA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from individuals who have signs and symptoms consistent with meningitis or meningoencephalitis. The detection of enterovirus RNA, in conjunction with other laboratory tests, aids in the clinical laboratory diagnosis of viral meningitis caused by enterovirus.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control is FDA's guidance document entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Nucleic Acid Amplification Assay for the Detection of Enterovirus RNA.” See §866.1(e) for the availability of this guidance document.

[74 FR 8, Jan. 2, 2009]

§866.3235   Epstein-Barr virus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Epstein-Barr virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of Epstein-Barr virus infections and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these viruses. Epstein-Barr viruses are thought to cause infectious mononucleosis and have been associated with Burkitt's lymphoma (a tumor of the jaw in African children and young adults) and postnasal carcinoma (cancer).

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls).

§866.3240   Equine encephalomyelitis virus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Equine encephalomyelitis virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antobodies to equine encephalomyelitis virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by equine encephalomyelitis viruses and provides epidemiological information on these viruses. Equine encephalomyelitis viruses are transmitted to humans by the bite of insects, such as mosquitos and ticks, and may cause encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), rash, acute arthritis, or hepatitis.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 65 FR 2311, Jan. 14, 2000]

§866.3250   Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by this bacterium belonging to the genus Erysipelothrix. This organism is responsible for a variety of inflammations of the skin following skin abrasions from contact with fish, shellfish, or poultry.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25046, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38791, July 25, 2001]

§866.3255   Escherichia coli serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of Escherichia coli antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye used to identify Escherichia coli directly from clinical specimens or cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by this bacterium belonging to the genus Escherichia, and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by this microorganism. Although Escherichia coli constitutes the greater part of the microorganisms found in the intestinal tract in humans and is usually nonpathogenic, those strains which are pathogenic may cause urinary tract infections or epidemic diarrheal disease, especially in children.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25046, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38791, July 25, 2001]

§866.3270   Flavobacterium spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Flavobacterium spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Flavobacteriuim spp. from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Flavobacterium and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these microorganisms. Most members of this genus are found in soil and water and, under certain conditions, may become pathogenic to humans. Flavobacterium meningosepticum is highly virulent for the newborn, in whom it may cause epidemics of septicemia (blood poisoning) and meningitis (inflammation of the membranes of the brain) and is usually attributable to contaminated hospital equipment.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25046, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38792, July 25, 2001]

§866.3280   Francisella tularensis serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Francisella tularensis serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to Francisella tularensis in serum or to identify Francisella tularensis in cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Francisella tularensis directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of tularemia caused by Francisella tularensis and provides epidemiological information on this disease. Tularemia is a desease principally of rodents, but may be transmitted to humans through handling of infected animals, animal products, or by the bites of fleas and ticks. The disease takes on several forms depending upon the site of infection, such as skin lesions, lymph node enlargements, or pulmonary infection.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 63 FR 59226, Nov. 3, 1998]

§866.3290   Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

(a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that consists of the reagents intended to identify by immunochemical techniques, such as latex agglutination, indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera of asymptomatic females at low risk of infection. Identification of antibodies with this device may indicate past or present infection of the patient with Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

(b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval) (transitional device).

(c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. As of May 28, 1976, an approval under section 515 of the act is required before this device may be commercially distributed. See §866.3.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 52 FR 17734, May 11, 1987]

§866.3300   Haemophilus spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Haemophilus spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera, including antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye, that are used in serological tests to identify Haemophilus spp. directly from clinical specimens or tissue culture isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Haemophilus and provides epidemiological information on diseases cause by these microorganisms. Diseases most often caused by Haemophilus spp. include pneumonia, pharyngitis, sinusitis, vaginitis, chancroid venereal disease, and a contagious form of conjunctivitis (inflammation of eyelid membranes).

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 63 FR 59226, Nov. 3, 1998]

§866.3305   Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

(a) Identification. Herpes simplex virus serological assays are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in various serological tests to identify antibodies to herpes simplex virus in serum. Additionally, some of the assays consist of herpes simplex virus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent assays) used to identify herpes simplex virus directly from clinical specimens or tissue culture isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by herpes simplex viruses and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Herpes simplex viral infections range from common and mild lesions of the skin and mucous membranes to a severe form of encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Neonatal herpes virus infections range from a mild infection to a severe generalized disease with a fatal outcome.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is classified as class II (special controls). The special control for the device is FDA's revised guidance document entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological Assays.” For availability of the guidance revised document, see §866.1(e).

[72 FR 15830, Apr. 3, 2007, as amended at 74 FR 42775, Aug. 25, 2009; 76 FR 48717, Aug. 9, 2011]

§866.3309   Herpes virus nucleic acid-based cutaneous and mucocutaneous lesion panel.

(a) Identification. A herpes virus nucleic acid-based cutaneous and mucocutaneous lesion panel is a qualitative in vitro diagnostic device intended for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of different herpes viruses in cutaneous and mucocutaneous lesion samples from symptomatic patients suspected of Herpetic infections. Negative results do not preclude infection and should not be used as the sole basis for treatment or other patient management decisions. The assay is not intended for use in cerebrospinal fluid samples.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls for this device are:

(1) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed documentation for the device description, including the device components, ancillary reagents required but not provided, and a detailed explanation of the methodology including primer design and selection.

(2) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed documentation from the following analytical and clinical performance studies: Analytical sensitivity (Limit of Detection), reactivity, inclusivity, precision, reproducibility, interference, cross reactivity, carry-over, and cross contamination.

(3) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed documentation of a clinical study using lesion samples in which Herpes Simplex Virus 1, Herpes Simplex Virus 2, or Varicella Zoster Virus DNA detection was requested. The study must compare the device performance to an appropriate well established reference method.

(4) A detailed explanation of the interpretation of results and acceptance criteria must be included in the device's 21 CFR 809.10(b)(9) compliant labeling.

(5) The device labeling must include a limitation statement that reads: “The device is not intended for use with cerebrospinal fluid or to aid in the diagnosis of HSV or VZV infections of the central nervous system (CNS).”

(6) Premarket notification submissions must include quality assurance protocols and a detailed documentation for device software, including, but not limited to, standalone software applications and hardware-based devices that incorporate software.

(7) The risk management activities performed as part of the manufacturer's 21 CFR 820.30 design controls must document an appropriate end user device training program that will be offered as part of efforts to mitigate the risk of failure to correctly operate the instrument.

[83 FR 52314, Oct. 17, 2018]

§866.3310   Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays.

(a) Identification. HAV serological assays are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of hepatitis A virus-specific IgM, IgG, or total antibodies (IgM and IgG), in human serum or plasma. These devices are used for testing specimens from individuals who have signs and symptoms consistent with acute hepatitis to determine if an individual has been previously infected with HAV, or as an aid to identify HAV-susceptible individuals. The detection of these antibodies aids in the clinical laboratory diagnosis of an acute or past infection by HAV in conjunction with other clinical laboratory findings. These devices are not intended for screening blood or solid or soft tissue donors.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control is “Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Hepatitis A Virus Serological Assays.” See §866.1(e) for the availability of this guidance document.

[71 FR 6679, Feb. 9, 2006]

§866.3320   Histoplasma capsulatum serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Histoplasma capsulatum serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to Histoplasma capsulatum in serum. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of Histoplasma capsulatum antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Histoplasma capsulatum from clinical specimens or cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of histoplasmosis caused by this fungus belonging to the genus Histoplasma and provides epidemiological information on the diseases caused by this fungus. Histoplasmosis usually is a mild and often asymptomatic respiratory infection, but in a small number of infected individuals the lesions may spread to practically all tissues and organs.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 63 FR 59227, Nov. 3, 1998]

§866.3328   Influenza virus antigen detection test system.

(a) Identification. An influenza virus antigen detection test system is a device intended for the qualitative detection of influenza viral antigens directly from clinical specimens in patients with signs and symptoms of respiratory infection. The test aids in the diagnosis of influenza infection and provides epidemiological information on influenza. Due to the propensity of the virus to mutate, new strains emerge over time which may potentially affect the performance of these devices. Because influenza is highly contagious and may lead to an acute respiratory tract infection causing severe illness and even death, the accuracy of these devices has serious public health implications.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls for this device are:

(1) The device's sensitivity and specificity performance characteristics or positive percent agreement and negative percent agreement, for each specimen type claimed in the intended use of the device, must meet one of the following two minimum clinical performance criteria:

(i) For devices evaluated as compared to an FDA-cleared nucleic acid based-test or other currently appropriate and FDA accepted comparator method other than correctly performed viral culture method:

(A) The positive percent agreement estimate for the device when testing for influenza A and influenza B must be at the point estimate of at least 80 percent with a lower bound of the 95 percent confidence interval that is greater than or equal to 70 percent.

(B) The negative percent agreement estimate for the device when testing for influenza A and influenza B must be at the point estimate of at least 95 percent with a lower bound of the 95 percent confidence interval that is greater than or equal to 90 percent.

(ii) For devices evaluated as compared to correctly performed viral culture method as the comparator method:

(A) The sensitivity estimate for the device when testing for influenza A must be at the point estimate of at least 90 percent with a lower bound of the 95 percent confidence interval that is greater than or equal to 80 percent. The sensitivity estimate for the device when testing for influenza B must be at the point estimate of at least 80 percent with a lower bound of the 95 percent confidence interval that is greater than or equal to 70 percent.

(B) The specificity estimate for the device when testing for influenza A and influenza B must be at the point estimate of at least 95 percent with a lower bound of the 95 percent confidence interval that is greater than or equal to 90 percent.

(2) When performing testing to demonstrate the device meets the requirements in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, a currently appropriate and FDA accepted comparator method must be used to establish assay performance in clinical studies.

(3) Annual analytical reactivity testing of the device must be performed with contemporary influenza strains. This annual analytical reactivity testing must meet the following criteria:

(i) The appropriate strains to be tested will be identified by FDA in consultation with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and sourced from CDC or an FDA-designated source. If the annual strains are not available from CDC, FDA will identify an alternative source for obtaining the requisite strains.

(ii) The testing must be conducted according to a standardized protocol considered and determined by FDA to be acceptable and appropriate.

(iii) By July 31 of each calendar year, the results of the last 3 years of annual analytical reactivity testing must be included as part of the device's labeling. If a device has not been on the market long enough for 3 years of annual analytical reactivity testing to have been conducted since the device received marketing authorization from FDA, then the results of every annual analytical reactivity testing since the device received marketing authorization from FDA must be included. The results must be presented as part of the device's labeling in a tabular format, which includes the detailed information for each virus tested as described in the certificate of authentication, either by:

(A) Placing the results directly in the device's §809.10(b) of this chapter compliant labeling that physically accompanies the device in a separate section of the labeling where the analytical reactivity testing data can be found; or

(B) In the device's label or in other labeling that physically accompanies the device, prominently providing a hyperlink to the manufacturer's public Web site where the analytical reactivity testing data can be found. The manufacturer's home page, as well as the primary part of the manufacturer's Web site that discusses the device, must provide a prominently placed hyperlink to the Web page containing this information and must allow unrestricted viewing access.

(4) If one of the actions listed at section 564(b)(1)(A)-(D) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act occurs with respect to an influenza viral strain, or if the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) determines, under section 319(a) of the Public Health Service Act, that a disease or disorder presents a public health emergency, or that a public health emergency otherwise exists, with respect to an influenza viral strain:

(i) Within 30 days from the date that FDA notifies manufacturers that characterized viral samples are available for test evaluation, the manufacturer must have testing performed on the device with those viral samples in accordance with a standardized protocol considered and determined by FDA to be acceptable and appropriate. The procedure and location of testing may depend on the nature of the emerging virus.

(ii) Within 60 days from the date that FDA notifies manufacturers that characterized viral samples are available for test evaluation and continuing until 3 years from that date, the results of the influenza emergency analytical reactivity testing, including the detailed information for the virus tested as described in the certificate of authentication, must be included as part of the device's labeling in a tabular format, either by:

(A) Placing the results directly in the device's §809.10(b) of this chapter compliant labeling that physically accompanies the device in a separate section of the labeling where analytical reactivity testing data can be found, but separate from the annual analytical reactivity testing results; or

(B) In a section of the device's label or in other labeling that physically accompanies the device, prominently providing a hyperlink to the manufacturer's public Web site where the analytical reactivity testing data can be found. The manufacturer's home page, as well as the primary part of the manufacturer's Web site that discusses the device, must provide a prominently placed hyperlink to the Web page containing this information and must allow unrestricted viewing access.

[82 FR 3618, Jan. 12, 2017]

§866.3330   Influenza virus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Influenza virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to influenza in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of influenza (flu) and provides epidemiological information on influenza. Influenza is an acute respiratory tract disease, which is often epidemic.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25047, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38792, July 25, 2001]

§866.3332   Reagents for detection of specific novel influenza A viruses.

(a) Identification. Reagents for detection of specific novel influenza A viruses are devices that are intended for use in a nucleic acid amplification test to directly detect specific virus RNA in human respiratory specimens or viral cultures. Detection of specific virus RNA aids in the diagnosis of influenza caused by specific novel influenza A viruses in patients with clinical risk of infection with these viruses, and also aids in the presumptive laboratory identification of specific novel influenza A viruses to provide epidemiological information on influenza. These reagents include primers, probes, and specific influenza A virus controls.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls are:

(1) FDA's guidance document entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Reagents for Detection of Specific Novel Influenza A Viruses.” See §866.1(e) for information on obtaining this document.

(2) The distribution of these devices is limited to laboratories with experienced personnel who have training in standardized molecular testing procedures and expertise in viral diagnosis, and appropriate biosafety equipment and containment.

[71 FR 14379, Mar. 22, 2006]

§866.3336   John Cunningham Virus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. John Cunningham Virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological assays to identify antibodies to John Cunningham Virus in serum and plasma. The identification aids in the risk stratification for the development of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease patients undergoing natalizumab therapy. These devices are for adjunctive use, in the context of other clinical risk factors for the development of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device is the FDA guideline document entitled “Class II Special Controls Guideline: John Cunningham Virus Serological Reagents.” For availability of the guideline document, see §866.1(e).

[79 FR 3740, Jan. 23, 2014]

§866.3340   Klebsiella spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Klebsiella spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera, including antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents), that are used in serological tests to identify Klebsiella spp. from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Klebsiella and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. These organisms can cause serious urinary tract and pulmonary infections, particularly in hospitalized patients.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25047, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38792, July 25, 2001]

§866.3350   Leptospira spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Leptospira spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to Leptospira spp. in serum or identify Leptospira spp. from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. Additionally, some of these antisera are conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) and used to identify Leptospira spp. directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of leptospirosis caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Leptospira and provides epidemiological information on this disease. Leptospira infections range from mild fever-producing illnesses to severe liver and kidney involvement producing hemorrhage and dysfunction of these organs.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 63 FR 59227, Nov. 3, 1998]

§866.3355   Listeria spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Listeria spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Listeria spp. from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of Listeria spp. antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Listeria spp. directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of listeriosis, a disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Listeria, and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these microorganisms. Listeria monocytogenes, the most common human pathogen of this genus, causes meningitis (inflammation of the brain membranes) and meningoencephalitis (inflammation of the brain and brain membranes) and is often fatal if untreated. A second form of human listeriosis is an intrauterine infection in pregnant women that results in a high mortality rate for infants before or after birth.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 65 FR 2311, Jan. 14, 2000]

§866.3360   Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these viruses. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis viruses usually cause a mild cerebral meningitis (inflammation of membranes that envelop the brain) and occasionally a mild pneumonia, but in rare instances may produce severe and even fatal illnesses due to complications from cerebral meningitis and pneumonia.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 65 FR 2311, Jan. 14, 2000]

§866.3361   Mass spectrometer system for clinical use for the identification of microorganisms.

(a) Identification. A mass spectrometer system for clinical use for the identification of microorganisms is a qualitative in vitro diagnostic device intended for the identification of microorganisms cultured from human specimens. The device is comprised of an ionization source, a mass analyzer, and a spectral database. The device is indicated for use in conjunction with other clinical and laboratory findings to aid in the diagnosis of bacterial and fungal infections.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls for this device are:

(1) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed documentation for device software, including, but not limited to, standalone software applications and hardware-based devices that incorporate software.

(2) Premarket notification submissions must include database implementation methodology, construction parameters, and quality assurance protocols.

(3) A detailed explanation of the interpretation of results and acceptance criteria must be included in the device's 21 CFR 809.10(b)(9) compliant labeling.

(4) As part of the risk management activities performed as part of your 21 CFR 820.30 design controls, you must document an appropriate end user device training program that will be offered as part of your efforts to mitigate the risk of failure to correctly operate the instrument.

(5) Premarket notification submissions must include details on the appropriate end user device training program that will be offered while marketing the device.

[82 FR 49101, Oct. 24, 2017]

§866.3365   Multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures.

(a) Identification. A multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures is a qualitative in vitro device intended to simultaneously detect and identify microorganism nucleic acids from blood cultures that test positive by Gram stain or other microbiological stains. The device detects specific nucleic acid sequences for microorganism identification as well as for antimicrobial resistance. This device aids in the diagnosis of bloodstream infections when used in conjunction with other clinical and laboratory findings. However, the device does not replace traditional methods for culture and susceptibility testing.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device is FDA's guideline document entitled “Class II Special Controls Guideline: Multiplex Nucleic Acid Assay for Identification of Microorganisms and Resistance Markers from Positive Blood Cultures.” For availability of the guideline document, see §866.1(e).

[80 FR 30154, May 27, 2015]

§866.3370   Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

(a) Identification. Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents are devices that consist of antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye used to identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of tuberculosis and provides epidemiological information on this disease. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the common causative organism in human tuberculosis, a chronic infectious disease characterized by formation of tubercles (small rounded nodules) and tissue necrosis (destruction), usually occurring in the lung.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls).

§866.3372   Nucleic acid-based in vitro diagnostic devices for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in respiratory specimens.

(a) Identification. Nucleic acid-based in vitro diagnostic devices for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in respiratory specimens are qualitative nucleic acid-based in vitro diagnostic devices intended to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex nucleic acids extracted from human respiratory specimens. These devices are non-multiplexed and intended to be used as an aid in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis when used in conjunction with clinical and other laboratory findings. These devices do not include devices intended to detect the presence of organism mutations associated with drug resistance. Respiratory specimens may include sputum (induced or expectorated), bronchial specimens (e.g., bronchoalveolar lavage or bronchial aspirate), or tracheal aspirates.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device is the FDA document entitled “Class II Special Controls Guideline: Nucleic Acid-Based In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for the Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Respiratory Specimens.” For availability of the guideline document, see §866.1(e).

[79 FR 31027, May 30, 2014]

§866.3373   Nucleic acid-based in vitro diagnostic devices for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB-complex) and the genetic mutations associated with MTB-complex antibiotic resistance in respiratory specimens.

(a) Identification. Nucleic acid-based in vitro diagnostic devices for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB-complex) and the genetic mutations associated with MTB-complex antibiotic resistance in respiratory specimens are qualitative nucleic acid-based devices that detect the presence of MTB-complex-associated nucleic acid sequences in respiratory samples. These devices are intended to aid in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis and the selection of an initial treatment regimen when used in conjunction with clinical findings and other laboratory results. These devices do not provide confirmation of antibiotic susceptibility since other mechanisms of resistance may exist that may be associated with a lack of clinical response to treatment other than those detected by the device.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls for this device are:

(1) The FDA document entitled “Class II Special Controls Guideline: Nucleic Acid-Based In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for the Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and Genetic Mutations Associated with Antibiotic Resistance in Respiratory Specimens,” which addresses the mitigation of risks specific to the detection of MTB-complex. For availability of the document, see §866.1(e).

(2) The following items, which address the mitigation of risks specific to the detection of the genetic mutations associated with antibiotic resistance of MTB-complex:

(i) The device must include an external positive assay control as appropriate. Acceptable positive assay controls include MTB-complex isolates containing one or more antibiotic-resistance associated target sequences detected by the device.

(ii) The device must include internal controls as appropriate. An acceptable internal control may include human nucleic acid co-extracted with MTB-complex containing nucleic acid sequences associated with antibiotic resistance and primers amplifying human housekeeping genes (e.g., RNaseP, β-actin).

(iii) The device's intended use must include a description of the scope of antibiotic resistance targeted by the assay, i.e., the specific drugs and/or drug classes.

(iv) The specific performance characteristics section of the device's labeling must include information regarding the specificity of the assay oligonucleotides for detecting mutations associated with antibiotic resistance of MTB-complex, and any information indicating the potential for non-specific binding (e.g., BLAST search).

(v) In demonstrating device performance you must perform:

(A) Pre-analytical studies that evaluate:

(1) Frozen samples. If there is use of any frozen samples in the device performance studies, or if there is a device claim for the use of frozen samples for testing, the effect of freezing samples prior to testing and the effect of multiple freeze/thaw cycles on both antibiotic susceptible and antibiotic resistant strains of MTB-complex.

(2) Nucleic acid extraction methods. Extraction methods must parallel those used in devices for the detection of MTB-complex nucleic acid and confirm that the detection of the genetic mutations associated with antibiotic resistance is not affected.

(B) Analytical studies that analyze:

(1) Limit of Detection. Limit of Detection must be determined in the most challenging matrix (e.g., sputum) claimed for use with the device. The Limit of Detection must be determined using both antibiotic susceptible and antibiotic resistant strains of MTB-complex. The antibiotic resistant strains must be those with well characterized genetic mutations associated with antibiotic resistance.

(2) Analytical Reactivity (Inclusivity). Testing must be conducted to evaluate the ability of the device to detect genetic mutations associated with antibiotic resistance in a diversity of MTB-complex strains. Isolates used in testing must be well characterized. Isolate strain characterization must be determined using standardized reference methods recognized by a reputable scientific body and appropriate to the strain lineage.

(3) Within-Laboratory (Repeatability) Precision Testing. Within-laboratory precision studies, if appropriate, must include at least one antibiotic resistant and one antibiotic susceptible strain of MTB-complex.

(4) Between Laboratory Reproducibility Testing. The protocol for the reproducibility study may vary slightly depending on the assay format; however, the panel must include at least one antibiotic resistant and one antibiotic susceptible strain of MTB-complex.

(C) Clinical Studies. Clinical performance of the device must be established by conducting prospective clinical studies that include subjects with culture confirmed active tuberculosis. Studies must attempt to enroll subjects at risk for antibiotic-resistant MTB-complex; however, it may be necessary to include supplemental antibiotic resistant retrospective and contrived samples. Clinical studies must compare device results to both phenotypic drug susceptibility testing and genotypic reference methods. The genotypic reference method must be a polymerase chain reaction based method that uses primers different from those in the experimental device and confirmed by bidirectional sequencing.

[79 FR 63036, Oct. 22, 2014]

§866.3375   Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to Mycoplasma spp. in serum. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of Mycoplasma spp. antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Mycoplasma spp. directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Mycoplasma and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these microorganisms. Mycoplasma spp. are associated with inflammatory conditions of the urinary and respiratory tracts, the genitals, and the mouth. The effects in humans of infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae range from inapparent infection to mild or severe upper respiratory disease, ear infection, and bronchial pneumonia.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 65 FR 2311, Jan. 14, 2000]

§866.3380   Mumps virus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Mumps virus serological reagents consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to mumps virus in serum. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used in serological tests to identify mumps viruses from tissue culture isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of mumps and provides epidemiological information on mumps. Mumps is an acute contagious disease, particularly in children, characterized by an enlargement of one or both of the parotid glands (glands situated near the ear), although other organs may also be involved.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 65 FR 2311, Jan. 14, 2000]

§866.3390   Neisseria spp. direct serological test reagents.

(a) Identification. Neisseria spp. direct serological test reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Neisseria spp. from cultured isolates. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of Neisseria spp. antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) which may be used to detect the presence of Neisseria spp. directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Neisseria, such as epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis, meningococcal disease, and gonorrhea, and also provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these microorganisms. The device does not include products for the detection of gonorrhea in humans by indirect methods, such as detection of antibodies or of oxidase produced by gonococcal organisms.

(b) Classification. Class II (performance standards).

§866.3395   Norovirus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Norovirus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to detect the presence of norovirus antigens in fecal samples. These devices aid in the diagnosis of norovirus infection in the setting of an individual patient with symptoms of acute gastroenteritis when the individual patient is epidemiologically linked to other patients with symptoms of acute gastroenteritis and/or aid in the identification of norovirus as the etiology of an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in the setting of epidemiologically linked patients with symptoms of acute gastroenteritis.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control is FDA's guidance document entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Norovirus Serological Reagents.” See §866.1(e) for the availability of this guidance document.

[76 FR 14274, Mar. 9, 2012]

§866.3400   Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Parainfluenza virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to parainfluenza virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of parainfluenza virus infections and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these viruses. Parainfluenza viruses cause a variety of respiratory illnesses ranging from the common cold to pneumonia.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25047, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38792, July 25, 2001]

§866.3402   Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

(a) Identification. A Plasmodium species antigen detection assay is a device that employs antibodies for the detection of specific malaria parasite antigens, including histidine-rich protein-2 (HRP2) specific antigens, and pan malarial antigens in human whole blood. These devices are used for testing specimens from individuals who have signs and symptoms consistent with malaria infection. The detection of these antigens aids in the clinical laboratory diagnosis of malaria caused by the four malaria species capable of infecting humans: Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium ovale, and Plasmodium malariae, and aids in the differential diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infections from other less virulent Plasmodium species. The device is intended for use in conjunction with other clinical laboratory findings.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control is FDA's guidance document entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Plasmodium species Antigen Detection Assays.” See §866.1(e) for the availability of this guidance document.

[73 FR 29054, May 20, 2008]

§866.3405   Poliovirus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Poliovirus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to poliovirus in serum. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of poliovirus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify polioviruses from clinical specimens or from tissue culture isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of poliomyelitis (polio) and provides epidemiological information on this disease. Poliomyelitis is an acute infectious disease which in its serious form affects the central nervous system resulting in atrophy (wasting away) of groups of muscles, ending in contraction and permanent deformity.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 65 FR 2312, Jan. 14, 2000]

§866.3410   Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera, including antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents), derived from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris used in agglutination tests (a specific type of antigen-antibody reaction) for the detection of antibodies to rickettsia (virus-like bacteria) in serum. Test results aid in the diagnosis of diseases caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Rickettsiae and provide epidemiological information on these diseases. Rickettsia are generally transmitted by arthropods (e.g., ticks and mosquitoes) and produce infections in humans characterized by rash and fever (e.g., typhus fever, spotted fever, Q fever, and trench fever).

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25047, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38792, July 25, 2001]

§866.3415   Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera, including antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents), used to identify Pseudomonas spp. from clinical specimens or from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections, and has been associated with urinary tract infections, eye infections, burn and wound infections, blood poisoning, abscesses, and meningitis (inflammation of brain membranes). Pseudomonas pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a chronic pneumonia.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 63 FR 59227, Nov. 3, 1998]

§866.3460   Rabiesvirus immunofluorescent reagents.

(a) Identification. Rabiesvirus immunofluorescent reagents are devices that consist of rabiesvirus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye used to identify rabiesvirus in specimens taken from suspected rabid animals. The identification aids in the diagnosis of rabies in patients exposed by animal bites and provides epidemiological information on rabies. Rabies is an acute infectious disease of the central nervous system which, if undiagnosed, may be fatal. The disease is commonly transmitted to humans by a bite from a rabid animal.

(b) Classification. Class II (performance standards).

§866.3470   Reovirus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Reovirus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to reovirus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of reovirus infections and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these viruses. Reoviruses are thought to cause only mild respiratory and gastrointestinal illnesses.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25047, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38792, July 25, 2001]

§866.3480   Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to respiratory syncytial virus in serum. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of respiratory syncytial virus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) and used to identify respiratory syncytial viruses from clinical specimens or from tissue culture isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of respiratory syncytial virus infections and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these viruses. Respiratory syncytial viruses cause a number of respiratory tract infections, including the common cold, pharyngitis, and infantile bronchopneumonia.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 65 FR 2312, Jan. 14, 2000]

§866.3490   Rhinovirus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Rhinovirus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to rhinovirus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of rhinovirus infections and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these viruses. Rhinoviruses cause common colds.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25047, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38792, July 25, 2001]

§866.3500   Rickettsia serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Rickettsia serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to rickettsia in serum. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of rickettsial antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify rickettsia directly from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by virus-like bacteria belonging to the genus Rickettsiae and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Rickettsia are generally transmitted by arthropods (e.g., ticks and mosquitoes) and produce infections in humans characterized by rash and fever (e.g., typhus fever, spotted fever, Q fever, and trench fever).

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 65 FR 2312, Jan. 14, 2000]

§866.3510   Rubella virus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Rubella virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to rubella virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of rubella (German measles) or confirmation of a person's immune status from past infections or immunizations and provides epidemiological information on German measles. Newborns infected in the uterus with rubella virus may be born with multiple congenital defects (rubella syndrome).

(b) Classification. Class II. The special controls for this device are:

(1) National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards':

(i) 1/LA6 “Detection and Quantitation of Rubella IgG Antibody: Evaluation and Performance Criteria for Multiple Component Test Products, Speciment Handling, and Use of the Test Products in the Clinical Laboratory, October 1997,”

(ii) 1/LA18 “Specifications for Immunological Testing for Infectious Diseases, December 1994,”

(iii) D13 “Agglutination Characteristics, Methodology, Limitations, and Clinical Validation, October 1993,”

(iv) EP5 “Evaluation of Precision Performance of Clinical Chemistry Devices, February 1999,” and

(v) EP10 “Preliminary Evaluation of the Linearity of Quantitive Clinical Laboratory Methods, May 1998,”

(2) Centers for Disease Control's:

(i) Low Titer Rubella Standard,

(ii) Reference Panel of Well Characterized Rubella Sera, and

(3) World Health Organization's International Rubella Standard.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 52 FR 17734, May 11, 1987; 65 FR 17144, Mar. 31, 2000]

§866.3520   Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to rubeola virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of measles and provides epidemiological information on the disease. Measles is an acute, highly infectious disease of the respiratory and reticuloendothelial tissues, particularly in children, characterized by a confluent and blotchy rash.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25047, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38792, July 25, 2001]

§866.3550   Salmonella spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Salmonella spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Salmonella spp. from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Salmonella spp. directly from clinical specimens or cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of salmonellosis caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Salmonella and provides epidemiological information on this disease. Salmonellosis is characterized by high grade fever (“enteric fever”), severe diarrhea, and cramps.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 63 FR 59227, Nov. 3, 1998]

§866.3600   Schistosoma spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Schistosoma spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to Schistosoma spp. in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of schistosomiasis caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma. Schistosomiasis is characterized by a variety of acute and chronic infections. Acute infection is marked by fever, allergic symptoms, and diarrhea. Chronic effects are usually severe and are caused by fibrous degeneration of tissue around deposited eggs of the parasite in the liver, lungs, and central nervous system. Schistosomes can also cause schistosome dermatitis (e.g., swimmer's itch), a skin disease marked by intense itching.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 65 FR 2312, Jan. 14, 2000]

§866.3630   Serratia spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Serratia spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Serratia spp. from cultured isolates. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Serratia and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Serratia spp. are occasionally associated with gastroenteritis (food poisoning) and wound infections.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25047, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38792, July 25, 2001]

§866.3660   Shigella spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Shigella spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera, including antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents), used in serological tests to identify Shigella spp. from cultured isolates. The identification aids in the diagnosis of shigellosis caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Shigella and provides epidemiological information on this disease. Shigellosis is characterized by abdominal pain, cramps, diarrhea, and fever.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 63 FR 59227, Nov. 3, 1998]

§866.3680   Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to Sporothrix schenckii in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of sporothrichosis caused by a fungus belonging to the genus Sporothrix and provides epidemiological information on this disease. Sporothrichosis is a chronic tumorlike infection primarily of the skin.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 65 FR 2312, Jan. 14, 2000]

§866.3700   Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify enterotoxin (toxin affecting the intestine) producing staphylococci from cultured isolates. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by this bacterium belonging to the genus Staphylococcus and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus produce an enterotoxin while growing in meat, dairy, or bakery products. After ingestion, this enterotoxin is absorbed in the gut and causes destruction of the intestinal lining (gastroenteritis).

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 54 FR 25047, June 12, 1989; 66 FR 38792, July 25, 2001]

§866.3720   Streptococcus spp. exoenzyme reagents.

(a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. exoenzyme reagents are devices used to identify antibodies to Streptococcus spp. exoenzyme in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Streptococcus and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Pathogenic streptococci are associated with infections, such as sore throat, impetigo (an infection characterized by small pustules on the skin), urinary tract infections, rheumatic fever, and kidney disease.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to the limitations in §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 61 FR 1119, Jan. 16, 1996; 66 FR 38792, July 25, 2001]

§866.3740   Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera (excluding streptococcal exoenzyme reagents made from enzymes secreted by streptococci) used in serological tests to identify Streptococcus spp. from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Streptococcus and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Pathogenic streptococci are associated with infections, such as sore throat, impetigo (an infection characterized by small pustules on the skin), urinary tract infections, rheumatic fever, and kidney disease.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 65 FR 2312, Jan. 14, 2000]

§866.3780   Toxoplasma gondii serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Toxoplasma gondii serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in serum. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Toxoplasma gondii from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis caused by the parasitic protozoan Toxoplasma gondii and provides epidemiological information on this disease. Congenital toxoplasmosis is characterized by lesions of the central nervous system, which if undetected and untreated may lead to brain defects, blindness, and death of an unborn fetus. The disease is characterized in children by inflammation of the brain and spinal cord.

(b) Classification. Class II (performance standards).

§866.3820   Treponema pallidum nontreponemal test reagents.

(a) Identification. Treponema pallidum nontreponemal test reagents are devices that consist of antigens derived from nontreponemal sources (sources not directly associated with treponemal organisms) and control sera (standardized sera with which test results are compared) used in serological tests to identify reagin, an antibody-like agent, which is produced from the reaction of treponema microorganisms with body tissues. The identification aids in the diagnosis of syphilis caused by microorganisms belonging to the genus Treponema and provides epidemiological information on syphilis.

(b) Classification. Class II (performance standards).

§866.3830   Treponema pallidum treponemal test reagents.

(a) Identification. Treponema pallidum treponemal test reagents are devices that consist of the antigens, antisera and all control reagents (standardized reagents with which test results are compared) which are derived from treponemal sources and that are used in the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test (FTA-ABS), the Treponema pallidum immobilization test (T.P.I.), and other treponemal tests used to identify antibodies to Treponema pallidum directly from infecting treponemal organisms in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of syphilis caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Treponema and provides epidemiological information on syphilis.

(b) Classification. Class II (performance standards).

§866.3850   Trichinella spiralis serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Trichinella spiralis serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to Trichinella spiralis in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of trichinosis caused by parasitic roundworms belonging to the genus Trichinella and provides epidemiological information on trichinosis. Trichinosis is caused by ingestion of undercooked, infested meat, especially pork, and characterized by fever, muscle weakness, and diarrhea.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 65 FR 2312, Jan. 14, 2000]

§866.3860   Trichomonas vaginalis nucleic acid assay.

(a) Identification. A Trichomonas vaginalis nucleic acid assay is a device that consists of primers, probes, enzymes, and controls for the amplification and detection of trichomonas nucleic acids in endocervical swabs, vaginal swabs, and female urine specimens, from women symptomatic for vaginitis, cervicitis, or urethritis and/or to aid in the diagnosis of trichomoniasis in asymptomatic women. The detection of trichomonas nucleic acids, in conjunction with other laboratory tests, aids in the clinical laboratory diagnosis of trichomoniasis caused by Trichomonas vaginalis.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls are set forth in FDA's guideline document entitled: “Class II Special Controls Guideline: Nucleic Acid Amplification Assays for the Detection of Trichomonas vaginalis; Guideline for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff.” See §866.1(e) for information on obtaining this document.

[80 FR 46192, Aug. 4, 2015]

§866.3870   Trypanosoma spp. serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Trypanosoma spp. serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to Trypanosoma spp. in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of trypanosomiasis, a disease caused by parasitic protozoans belonging to the genus Trypanosoma. Trypanosomiasis in adults is a chronic disease characterized by fever, chills, headache, and vomiting. Central nervous system involvement produces typical sleeping sickness syndrome: physical exhaustion, inability to eat, tissue wasting, and eventual death. Chagas disease, an acute form of trypanosomiasis in children, most seriously affects the central nervous system and heart muscle.

(b) Classification. Class I (general controls).

§866.3900   Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Varicella-zoster virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify antibodies to varicella-zoster in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by varicella-zoster viruses and provides epidemiological information on these diseases. Varicella (chicken pox) is a mild, highly infectious disease, chiefly of children. Zoster (shingles) is the recurrent form of the disease, occurring in adults who were previously infected with varicella-zoster viruses. Zoster is the response (characterized by a rash) of the partially immune host to a reactivation of varicella viruses present in latent form in the patient's body.

(b) Classification. Class II (performance standards).

§866.3920   Assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays.

(a) Identification. An assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays is a device indicated for use in a test system to estimate test precision or to detect systematic analytical deviations that may arise from reagent or analytical instrument variation. This type of device consists of single or multiple microbiological analytes intended for use with either qualitative or quantitative assays.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls for this device are:

(1) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed device description documentation and information concerning the composition of the quality control material, including, as appropriate:

(i) Analyte concentration;

(ii) Expected values;

(iii) Analyte source;

(iv) Base matrix;

(v) Added components;

(vi) Safety and handling information; and

(vii) Detailed instructions for use.

(2) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed documentation, including line data as well as detailed study protocols and a statistical analysis plan used to establish performance, including:

(i) Description of the process for value assignment and validation.

(ii) Description of the protocol(s) used to establish stability.

(iii) Line data establishing precision/reproducibility.

(iv) Where applicable, assessment of matrix effects and any significant differences between the quality control material and typical patient samples in terms of conditions known to cause analytical error or affect assay performance.

(v) Where applicable, identify or define traceability or relationship to a domestic or international standard reference material and/or method.

(vi) Where applicable, detailed documentation related to studies for surrogate controls.

(3) Premarket notification submissions must include an adequate mitigation (e.g., real-time stability program) to the risk of false results due to potential modifications to the assays specified in the device's 21 CFR 809.10 compliant labeling.

(4) Your 21 CFR 809.10 compliant labeling must include the following:

(i) The intended use of your 21 CFR 809.10(a)(2) and (b)(2) compliant labeling must include the following:

(A) Assayed control material analyte(s);

(B) Whether the material is intended for quantitative or qualitative assays;

(C) Stating if the material is a surrogate control; and

(D) The system(s), instrument(s), or test(s) for which the quality control material is intended.

(ii) The intended use in your 21 CFR 809.10(a)(2) and (b)(2) compliant labeling must include the following statement: “This product is not intended to replace manufacturer controls provided with the device.”

(iii) A limiting statement that reads “Quality control materials should be used in accordance with local, state, federal regulations, and accreditation requirements.”

[82 FR 34850, July 27, 2017]

§866.3930   Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Vibrio cholerae serological reagents are devices that are used in the agglutination (an antigen-antibody clumping reaction) test to identify Vibrio cholerae from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids in the diagnosis of cholera caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae and provides epidemiological information on cholera. Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and electrolyte (salts) depletion, and by vomiting, muscle cramps, and prostration. If untreated, the severe dehydration may lead to shock, renal failure, cardiovascular collapse, and death.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in subpart E of part 807 of this chapter subject to §866.9.

[47 FR 50823, Nov. 9, 1982, as amended at 63 FR 59227, Nov. 3, 1998]

§866.3940   West Nile virus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. West Nile virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of anti-West Nile virus IgM antibodies, in human serum, from individuals who have signs and symptoms consistent with viral meningitis/encephalitis. The detection aids in the clinical laboratory diagnosis of viral meningitis/encephalitis caused by West Nile virus.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control is FDA's guidance entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Serological Reagents for the Laboratory Diagnosis of West Nile Virus.” See §866.1(e) for the availability of this guidance document.

[68 FR 61745, Oct. 30, 2003]

§866.3945   Dengue virus serological reagents.

(a) Identification. Dengue virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antibodies for the detection of dengue virus and dengue antibodies in individuals who have signs and symptoms of dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever. The detection aids in the clinical laboratory diagnosis of dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever caused by dengue virus.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control is FDA's guideline entitled “Class II Special Controls Guideline: Dengue Virus Serological Reagents.” For availability of the guideline document, see §866.1(e).

[79 FR 31023, May 30, 2014]

§866.3946   Dengue virus nucleic acid amplification test reagents.

(a) Identification. Dengue virus nucleic acid amplification test reagents are devices that consist of primers, probes, enzymes, and controls for the amplification and detection of dengue virus serotypes 1, 2, 3, or 4 from viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) in human serum and plasma from individuals who have signs and symptoms consistent with dengue (mild or severe). The identification of dengue virus serotypes 1, 2, 3, or 4 in human serum and plasma (sodium citrate) collected from human patients with dengue provides epidemiologic information for surveillance of circulating dengue viruses.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control is FDA's guideline entitled “Class II Special Controls Guideline: Dengue Virus Nucleic Acid Amplification Test Reagents.” For availability of the guideline document, see §866.1(e).

[79 FR 53609, Sept. 10, 2014]

§866.3950   In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

(a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid reagent primers and probes together with software for predicting drug resistance/susceptibility based on results obtained with these primers and probes. It is intended for use in detecting HIV genomic mutations that confer resistance to specific antiretroviral drugs, as an aid in monitoring and treating HIV infection.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device is FDA's guidance document entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: In Vitro HIV Drug Resistance Genotype Assay.” See §866.1(e) for the availability of this guidance document.

[72 FR 44382, Aug. 8, 2007]

§866.3960   Nucleic acid-based device for the amplification, detection, and identification of microbial pathogens directly from whole blood specimens.

(a) Identification. A nucleic acid-based device for the amplification, detection, and identification of microbial pathogens directly from whole blood specimens is a qualitative in vitro device intended for the amplification, detection, and identification of microbial-associated nucleic acid sequences from patients with suspected bloodstream infections. This device is intended to aid in the diagnosis of bloodstream infection when used in conjunction with clinical signs and symptoms and other laboratory findings.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls for this device are:

(1) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed device description documentation, including the device components, ancillary reagents required but not provided, and a detailed explanation of the methodology, including primer/probe sequence, design, and rationale for sequence selection.

(2) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed documentation from the following analytical and clinical performance studies: Analytical sensitivity (limit of detection), reactivity, inclusivity, precision, reproducibility, interference, cross reactivity, carryover, and cross contamination.

(3) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed documentation from a clinical study. The study, performed on a study population consistent with the intended use population, must compare the device performance to results obtained from well-accepted reference methods.

(4) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed documentation for device software, including, but not limited to, software applications and hardware-based devices that incorporate software.

(5) The device labeling must include limitations regarding the need for culture confirmation of negative specimens, as appropriate.

(6) A detailed explanation of the interpretation of results and acceptance criteria must be included in the device's 21 CFR 809.10(b)(9) compliant labeling.

(7) Premarket notification submissions must include details on an end user device training program that will be offered while marketing the device, as appropriate.

(8) As part of the risk management activities performed as part of your 21 CFR 820.30 design controls, you must document an appropriate end user device training program that will be offered as part of your efforts to mitigate the risk of failure to correctly operate the instrument.

[82 FR 47967, Oct. 16, 2017]

§866.3970   Device to detect and identify microbial pathogen nucleic acids in cerebrospinal fluid.

(a) Identification. A device to detect and identify microbial pathogen nucleic acids in cerebrospinal fluid is a qualitative in vitro device intended for the detection and identification of microbial-associated nucleic acid sequences from patients suspected of meningitis or encephalitis. A device to detect and identify microbial pathogen nucleic acids in cerebrospinal fluid is intended to aid in the diagnosis of meningitis or encephalitis when used in conjunction with clinical signs and symptoms and other clinical and laboratory findings.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls for this device are:

(1) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed device description documentation, including the device components, ancillary reagents required but not provided, and a detailed explanation of the methodology, including primer/probe sequence, design, and rationale for sequence selection.

(2) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed documentation from the following analytical studies: Analytical sensitivity (limit of detection), inclusivity, reproducibility, interference, cross reactivity, and specimen stability.

(3) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed documentation from a clinical study. The study, performed on a study population consistent with the intended use population, must compare the device performance to results obtained from well-accepted comparator methods.

(4) Premarket notification submissions must include detailed documentation for device software, including, but not limited to, software applications and hardware-based devices that incorporate software.

(5) The Intended Use statement in the device labeling must include a statement that the device is intended to be used in conjunction with standard of care culture.

(6) A detailed explanation of the interpretation of results and acceptance criteria must be included in the device's 21 CFR 809.10(b)(9) compliant labeling.

(7) The device labeling must include a limitation stating that the negative results do not preclude the possibility of central nervous system infection.

(8) The device labeling must include a limitation stating that device results are not intended to be used as the sole basis for diagnosis, treatment, or other patient management decisions.

(9) The device labeling must include a limitation stating that positive results do not mean that the organism detected is infectious or is the causative agent for clinical symptoms.

(10) As part of the risk management activities performed as part of your 21 CFR 820.30 design controls, you must document an appropriate end user device training program that will be offered as part of your efforts to mitigate the risk of failure to correctly operate the instrument.

[82 FR 48763, Oct. 20, 2017]

§866.3980   Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay.

(a) Identification. A respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay is a qualitative in vitro diagnostic device intended to simultaneously detect and identify multiple viral nucleic acids extracted from human respiratory specimens or viral culture. The detection and identification of a specific viral nucleic acid from individuals exhibiting signs and symptoms of respiratory infection aids in the diagnosis of respiratory viral infection when used in conjunction with other clinical and laboratory findings. The device is intended for detection and identification of a combination of the following viruses:

(1) Influenza A and Influenza B;

(2) Influenza A subtype H1 and Influenza A subtype H3;

(3) Respiratory Syncytial Virus subtype A and Respiratory Syncytial Virus subtype B;

(4) Parainfluenza 1, Parainfluenza 2, and Parainfluenza 3 virus;

(5) Human Metapneumovirus;

(6) Rhinovirus; and

(7) Adenovirus.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls are:

(1) FDA's guidance document entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Respiratory Viral Panel Multiplex Nucleic Acid Assay;”

(2) For a device that detects and identifies Human Metapneumovirus, FDA's guidance document entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Testing for Human Metapneumovirus (hMPV) Using Nucleic Acid Assays;” and

(3) For a device that detects and differentiates Influenza A subtype H1 and subtype H3, FDA's guidance document entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Testing for Detection and Differentiation of Influenza A Virus Subtypes Using Multiplex Nucleic Acid Assays.” See §866.1(e) for the availability of these guidance documents.

[74 FR 52138, Oct. 9, 2009]

§866.3985   Device to detect and identify microorganisms and associated resistance marker nucleic acids directly in respiratory specimens.

(a) Identification. A device to detect and identify microorganisms and associated resistance marker nucleic acids directly from respiratory specimens is an in vitro diagnostic device intended for the detection and identification of microorganisms and associated resistance markers in respiratory specimens collected from patients with signs or symptoms of respiratory infection. The device is intended to aid in the diagnosis of respiratory infection in conjunction with clinical signs and symptoms and other laboratory findings. These devices do not provide confirmation of antibiotic susceptibility since mechanisms of resistance may exist other than those detected by the device.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls for this device are:

(1) The intended use for the 21 CFR 809.10 labeling must include a detailed description of what the device detects, the type of results provided to the user, the clinical indications appropriate for test use, and the specific population(s) for which the device is intended.

(2) The 21 CFR 809.10(b) labeling must include:

(i) A detailed device description, including all device components, control elements incorporated into the test procedure, instrument requirements, ancillary reagents required but not provided, and a detailed explanation of the methodology, including all pre-analytical methods for processing of specimens.

(ii) Performance characteristics from analytical studies, including, but not limited to, limit of detection, inclusivity, reproducibility, cross reactivity, interfering substances, competitive inhibition, carryover/cross contamination, specimen stability, and linearity, as applicable.

(iii) A limiting statement that the device is intended to be used in conjunction with clinical history, signs and symptoms, and results of other diagnostic tests, including culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

(iv) A detailed explanation of the interpretation of test results for clinical specimens and acceptance criteria for any quality control testing.

(v) A limiting statement that negative results for microorganisms do not preclude the possibility of infection, and should not be used as the sole basis for diagnosis, treatment, or other patient management decisions.

(vi) If applicable, a limiting statement that detected microorganisms may not be the cause of lower respiratory tract infection and may be indicative of colonizing or normal respiratory flora.

(vii) If applicable, a limiting statement that detection of resistance markers cannot be definitively linked to specific microorganisms and that the source of a detected resistance marker may be an organism not detected by the assay, including colonizing flora.

(viii) If applicable, a limiting statement that detection of antibiotic resistance markers may not correlate with phenotypic gene expression.

(3) The 21 CFR 809.10(b) labeling and any test report generated by the device must include a limiting statement that negative results for resistance markers do not indicate susceptibility of detected microorganisms.

(4) Design verification and validation must include:

(i) Performance characteristics from clinical studies that include prospective (sequential) samples and, if appropriate, additional characterized samples. The study must be performed on a study population consistent with the intended use population and compare the device performance to results obtained from an FDA accepted reference method and/or FDA accepted comparator method, as appropriate. Results from the clinical studies must include the clinical study protocol (including predefined statistical analysis plan, if applicable), clinical study report, and results of all statistical analyses.

(ii) A detailed device description including the following:

(A) Thorough description of the assay methodology including, but not limited to, primer/probe sequences, primer/probe design, and rationale for target sequence selection, as applicable.

(B) Algorithm used to generate a final result from raw data (e.g., how raw signals are converted into a reported result).

(iii) A detailed description of device software, including, but not limited to, validation activities and outcomes.

(iv) As part of the risk management activities, an appropriate end user device training program must be offered as an effort to mitigate the risk of failure from user error.

[84 FR 9228, Mar. 14, 2019]

§866.3990   Gastrointestinal microorganism multiplex nucleic acid-based assay.

(a) Identification. A gastrointestinal microorganism multiplex nucleic acid-based assay is a qualitative in vitro diagnostic device intended to simultaneously detect and identify multiple gastrointestinal microbial nucleic acids extracted from human stool specimens. The device detects specific nucleic acid sequences for organism identification as well as for determining the presence of toxin genes. The detection and identification of a specific gastrointestinal microbial nucleic acid from individuals exhibiting signs and symptoms of gastrointestinal infection aids in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal infection when used in conjunction with clinical evaluation and other laboratory findings. A gastrointestinal microorganism multiplex nucleic acid-based assay also aids in the detection and identification of acute gastroenteritis in the context of outbreaks.

(b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls are set forth in FDA's guideline document entitled: “Class II Special Controls Guideline: Gastrointestinal Microorganism Multiplex Nucleic Acid-Based Assays for Detection and Identification of Microorganisms and Toxin Genes from Human Stool Specimens.” For availability of the guideline document, see §866.1(e).

[80 FR 67314, Nov. 2, 2015]

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