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Title 14Chapter ISubchapter CPart 21 → Subpart H


Title 14: Aeronautics and Space
PART 21—CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND ARTICLES


Subpart H—Airworthiness Certificates


Contents
§21.171   Applicability.
§21.173   Eligibility.
§21.175   Airworthiness certificates: classification.
§21.177   Amendment or modification.
§21.179   Transferability.
§21.181   Duration.
§21.182   Aircraft identification.
§21.183   Issue of standard airworthiness certificates for normal, utility, acrobatic, commuter, and transport category aircraft; manned free balloons; and special classes of aircraft.
§21.184   Issue of special airworthiness certificates for primary category aircraft.
§21.185   Issue of airworthiness certificates for restricted category aircraft.
§21.187   Issue of multiple airworthiness certification.
§21.189   Issue of airworthiness certificate for limited category aircraft.
§21.190   Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft.
§21.191   Experimental certificates.
§21.193   Experimental certificates: general.
§21.195   Experimental certificates: Aircraft to be used for market surveys, sales demonstrations, and customer crew training.
§21.197   Special flight permits.
§21.199   Issue of special flight permits.

Source: Docket No. 5085, 29 FR 14569, Oct. 24, 1964, unless otherwise noted.

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§21.171   Applicability.

This subpart prescribes procedural requirements for the issue of airworthiness certificates.

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§21.173   Eligibility.

Any registered owner of a U.S.-registered aircraft (or the agent of the owner) may apply for an airworthiness certificate for that aircraft. An application for an airworthiness certificate must be made in a form and manner acceptable to the FAA, and may be submitted to any FAA office.

[Amdt. 21-26, 34 FR 15244, Sept. 30, 1969]

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§21.175   Airworthiness certificates: classification.

(a) Standard airworthiness certificates are airworthiness certificates issued for aircraft type certificated in the normal, utility, acrobatic, commuter, or transport category, and for manned free balloons, and for aircraft designated by the FAA as special classes of aircraft.

(b) Special airworthiness certificates are primary, restricted, limited, light-sport, and provisional airworthiness certificates, special flight permits, and experimental certificates.

[Amdt. 21-21, 33 FR 6858, May 7, 1968, as amended by Amdt. 21-60, 52 FR 8043, Mar. 13, 1987; Amdt. 21-70, 57 FR 41368, Sept. 9, 1992; Amdt. 21-85, 69 FR 44861, July 27, 2004]

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§21.177   Amendment or modification.

An airworthiness certificate may be amended or modified only upon application to the FAA.

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§21.179   Transferability.

An airworthiness certificate is transferred with the aircraft.

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§21.181   Duration.

(a) Unless sooner surrendered, suspended, revoked, or a termination date is otherwise established by the FAA, airworthiness certificates are effective as follows:

(1) Standard airworthiness certificates, special airworthiness certificates—primary category, and airworthiness certificates issued for restricted or limited category aircraft are effective as long as the maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations are performed in accordance with Parts 43 and 91 of this chapter and the aircraft are registered in the United States.

(2) A special flight permit is effective for the period of time specified in the permit.

(3) A special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category is effective as long as—

(i) The aircraft meets the definition of a light-sport aircraft;

(ii) The aircraft conforms to its original configuration, except for those alterations performed in accordance with an applicable consensus standard and authorized by the aircraft's manufacturer or a person acceptable to the FAA;

(iii) The aircraft has no unsafe condition and is not likely to develop an unsafe condition; and

(iv) The aircraft is registered in the United States.

(4) An experimental certificate for research and development, showing compliance with regulations, crew training, or market surveys is effective for 1 year after the date of issue or renewal unless the FAA prescribes a shorter period. The duration of an experimental certificate issued for operating amateur-built aircraft, exhibition, air-racing, operating primary kit-built aircraft, or operating light-sport aircraft is unlimited, unless the FAA establishes a specific period for good cause.

(b) The owner, operator, or bailee of the aircraft must, upon request, make it available for inspection by the FAA.

(c) Upon suspension, revocation, or termination by order of the FAA of an airworthiness certificate, the owner, operator, or bailee of an aircraft must, upon request, surrender the certificate to the FAA.

[Amdt. 21-21, 33 FR 6858, May 7, 1968, as amended by Amdt. 21-49, 44 FR 46781, Aug. 9, 1979; Amdt. 21-70, 57 FR 41368, Sept. 9, 1992; Amdt. 21-85, 69 FR 44861, July 27, 2004]

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§21.182   Aircraft identification.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each applicant for an airworthiness certificate under this subpart must show that his aircraft is identified as prescribed in §45.11.

(b) Paragraph (a) of this section does not apply to applicants for the following:

(1) A special flight permit.

(2) An experimental certificate for an aircraft not issued for the purpose of operating amateur-built aircraft, operating primary kit-built aircraft, or operating light-sport aircraft.

(3) A change from one airworthiness classification to another, for an aircraft already identified as prescribed in §45.11.

[Amdt. 21-13, 32 FR 188, Jan. 10, 1967, as amended by Amdt. 21-51, 45 FR 60170, Sept. 11, 1980; Amdt. 21-70, 57 FR 41368, Sept. 9, 1992; Amdt. 21-85, 69 FR 44862, July 27, 2004]

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§21.183   Issue of standard airworthiness certificates for normal, utility, acrobatic, commuter, and transport category aircraft; manned free balloons; and special classes of aircraft.

(a) New aircraft manufactured under a production certificate. An applicant for a standard airworthiness certificate for a new aircraft manufactured under a production certificate is entitled to a standard airworthiness certificate without further showing, except that the FAA may inspect the aircraft to determine conformity to the type design and condition for safe operation.

(b) New aircraft manufactured under type certificate. An applicant for a standard airworthiness certificate for a new aircraft manufactured under a type certificate is entitled to a standard airworthiness certificate upon presentation, by the holder or licensee of the type certificate, of the statement of conformity prescribed in §21.130 if the FAA finds after inspection that the aircraft conforms to the type design and is in condition for safe operation.

(c) Import aircraft. An applicant for a standard airworthiness certificate for an import aircraft is entitled to that certificate if—

(1) The aircraft is type certificated in accordance with §21.21 or §21.29 and produced under the authority of another State of Manufacture;

(2) The State of Manufacture certifies, in accordance with the export provisions of an agreement with the United States for import of that aircraft, that the aircraft conforms to the type design and is in condition for safe operation; and

(3) The FAA finds that the aircraft conforms to the type design and is in condition for safe operation.

(d) Used aircraft and surplus aircraft of the U.S. Armed Forces. An applicant for a standard airworthiness certificate for a used aircraft or surplus aircraft of the U.S. Armed Forces is entitled to a standard airworthiness certificate if—

(1) The applicant presents evidence to the FAA that the aircraft conforms to a type design approved under a type certificate or a supplemental type certificate and to applicable Airworthiness Directives;

(2) The aircraft (except an experimentally certificated aircraft that previously had been issued a different airworthiness certificate under this section) has been inspected in accordance with the performance rules for 100-hour inspections set forth in §43.15 of this chapter, or an equivalent performance standard acceptable to the FAA, and found airworthy by—

(i) The manufacturer;

(ii) The holder of a repair station certificate as provided in Part 145 of this chapter;

(iii) The holder of a mechanic certificate as authorized in Part 65 of this chapter; or

(iv) The holder of a certificate issued under part 121 of this chapter, and having a maintenance and inspection organization appropriate to the aircraft type; and

(3) The FAA finds after inspection, that the aircraft conforms to the type design, and is in condition for safe operation.

(e) Noise requirements. Notwithstanding all other provisions of this section, the following must be complied with for the original issuance of a standard airworthiness certificate:

(1) For transport category large airplanes and jet (turbojet powered) airplanes that have not had any flight time before the dates specified in §36.1(d), no standard airworthiness certificate is originally issued under this section unless the FAA finds that the type design complies with the noise requirements in §36.1(d) in addition to the applicable airworthiness requirements in this section. For import airplanes, compliance with this paragraph is shown if the country in which the airplane was manufactured certifies, and the FAA finds, that §36.1(d) (or the applicable airplane noise requirements of the country in which the airplane was manufactured and any other requirements the FAA may prescribe to provide noise levels no greater than those provided by compliance with §36.1(d)) and paragraph (c) of this section are complied with.

(2) For normal, utility, acrobatic, commuter, or transport category propeller driven small airplanes (except for those airplanes that are designed for “agricultural aircraft operations” (as defined in §137.3 of this chapter, as effective on January 1, 1966) or for dispensing fire fighting materials to which §36.1583 of this chapter does not apply) that have not had any flight time before the applicable date specified in part 36 of this chapter, no standard airworthiness certificate is originally issued under this section unless the applicant shows that the type design complies with the applicable noise requirements of part 36 of this chapter in addition to the applicable airworthiness requirements in this section. For import airplanes, compliance with this paragraph is shown if the country in which the airplane was manufactured certifies, and the FAA finds, that the applicable requirements of part of this chapter (or the applicable airplane noise requirements of the country in which the airplane was manufactured and any other requirements the FAA may prescribe to provide noise levels no greater than those provided by compliance with the applicable requirements of part 36 of this chapter) and paragraph (c) of this section are complied with.

(f) Passenger emergency exit requirements. Notwithstanding all other provisions of this section, each applicant for issuance of a standard airworthiness certificate for a transport category airplane manufactured after October 16, 1987, must show that the airplane meets the requirements of §25.807(c)(7) in effect on July 24, 1989. For the purposes of this paragraph, the date of manufacture of an airplane is the date the inspection acceptance records reflect that the airplane is complete and meets the FAA-approved type design data.

(g) Fuel venting and exhaust emission requirements. Notwithstanding all other provisions of this section, and irrespective of the date of application, no airworthiness certificate is issued, on and after the dates specified in part 34 for the airplanes specified therein, unless the airplane complies with the applicable requirements of that part.

(h) New aircraft manufactured under the provisions of §21.6(b). An applicant for a standard airworthiness certificate for a new aircraft manufactured under the provisions of §21.6(b) is entitled to a standard airworthiness certificate if—

(1) The applicant presents evidence to the FAA that the aircraft conforms to a type design approved under a type certificate or supplemental type certificate and to applicable Airworthiness Directives;

(2) The aircraft has been inspected in accordance with the performance rules for a 100-hour inspections set forth in §43.15 of this chapter and found airworthy by a person specified in paragraph (d)(2) of this section; and

(3) The FAA finds after inspection, that the aircraft conforms to the type design, and is in condition for safe operation.

[Amdt. 21-17, 32 FR 14927, Oct. 28, 1967]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §21.183, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

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§21.184   Issue of special airworthiness certificates for primary category aircraft.

(a) New primary category aircraft manufactured under a production certificate. An applicant for an original, special airworthiness certificate-primary category for a new aircraft that meets the criteria of §21.24(a)(1), manufactured under a production certificate, including aircraft assembled by another person from a kit provided by the holder of the production certificate and under the supervision and quality control of that holder, is entitled to a special airworthiness certificate without further showing, except that the FAA may inspect the aircraft to determine conformity to the type design and condition for safe operation.

(b) Imported aircraft. An applicant for a special airworthiness certificate-primary category for an imported aircraft type certificated under §21.29 is entitled to a special airworthiness certificate if the civil airworthiness authority of the country in which the aircraft was manufactured certifies, and the FAA finds after inspection, that the aircraft conforms to an approved type design that meets the criteria of §21.24(a)(1) and is in a condition for safe operation.

(c) Aircraft having a current standard airworthiness certificate. An applicant for a special airworthiness certificate-primary category, for an aircraft having a current standard airworthiness certificate that meets the criteria of §21.24(a)(1), may obtain the primary category certificate in exchange for its standard airworthiness certificate through the supplemental type certification process. For the purposes of this paragraph, a current standard airworthiness certificate means that the aircraft conforms to its approved normal, utility, or acrobatic type design, complies with all applicable airworthiness directives, has been inspected and found airworthy within the last 12 calendar months in accordance with §91.409(a)(1) of this chapter, and is found to be in a condition for safe operation by the FAA.

(d) Other aircraft. An applicant for a special airworthiness certificate-primary category for an aircraft that meets the criteria of §21.24(a)(1), and is not covered by paragraph (a), (b), or (c) of this section, is entitled to a special airworthiness certificate if—

(1) The applicant presents evidence to the FAA that the aircraft conforms to an approved primary, normal, utility, or acrobatic type design, including compliance with all applicable airworthiness directives;

(2) The aircraft has been inspected and found airworthy within the past 12 calendar months in accordance with §91.409(a)(1) of this chapter and;

(3) The aircraft is found by the FAA to conform to an approved type design and to be in a condition for safe operation.

(e) Multiple-category airworthiness certificates in the primary category and any other category will not be issued; a primary category aircraft may hold only one airworthiness certificate.

[Doc. No. 23345, 57 FR 41368, Sept. 9, 1992, as amended by Amdt. 21-70, 57 FR 43776, Sept. 22, 1992]

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§21.185   Issue of airworthiness certificates for restricted category aircraft.

(a) Aircraft manufactured under a production certificate or type certificate. An applicant for the original issue of a restricted category airworthiness certificate for an aircraft type certificated in the restricted category, that was not previously type certificated in any other category, must comply with the appropriate provisions of §21.183.

(b) Other aircraft. An applicant for a restricted category airworthiness certificate for an aircraft type certificated in the restricted category, that was either a surplus aircraft of the Armed Forces or previously type certificated in another category, is entitled to an airworthiness certificate if the aircraft has been inspected by the FAA and found by him to be in a good state of preservation and repair and in a condition for safe operation.

(c) Import aircraft. An applicant for the original issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a restricted category import aircraft is entitled to that certificate if—

(1) The aircraft is type-certificated in accordance with §21.25 or §21.29 and produced under the authority of another State of Manufacture;

(2) The State of Manufacture certifies, in accordance with the export provisions of an agreement with the United States for import of that aircraft that the aircraft conforms to the type design and is in condition for safe operation; and

(3) The FAA finds that the aircraft conforms to the type design and is in condition for safe operation.

(d) Noise requirements. For propeller-driven small airplanes (except airplanes designed for “agricultural aircraft operations,” as defined in §137.3 of this chapter, as effective on January 1, 1966, or for dispensing fire fighting materials) that have not had any flight time before the applicable date specified in Part 36 of this chapter, and notwithstanding the other provisions of this section, no original restricted category airworthiness certificate is issued under this section unless the FAA finds that the type design complies with the applicable noise requirements of Part 36 of this chapter in addition to the applicable airworthiness requirements of this section. For import airplanes, compliance with this paragraph is shown if the country in which the airplane was manufactured certifies, and the FAA finds, that the applicable requirements of Part 36 of this chapter (or the applicable airplane noise requirements of the country in which the airplane was manufactured and any other requirements the FAA may prescribe to provide noise levels no greater than those provided by compliance with the applicable requirements of Part 36 of this chapter) and paragraph (c) of this section are complied with.

[Amdt. 21-10, 31 FR 9211, July 6, 1966, as amended by Amdt. 21-32, 35 FR 10202, June 23, 1970; Amdt. 21-42, 40 FR 1034, Jan. 6, 1975; Amdt. 21-92, 74 FR 53389, Oct. 16, 2009; Amdt. 21-92, 74 FR 53389, Oct. 16, 2009; Amdt. 21-92A, 75 FR 9095, Mar. 1, 2010]

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§21.187   Issue of multiple airworthiness certification.

(a) An applicant for an airworthiness certificate in the restricted category, and in one or more other categories except primary category, is entitled to the certificate, if—

(1) He shows compliance with the requirements for each category, when the aircraft is in the configuration for that category; and

(2) He shows that the aircraft can be converted from one category to another by removing or adding equipment by simple mechanical means.

(b) The operator of an aircraft certificated under this section must have the aircraft inspected by the FAA, or by a certificated mechanic with an appropriate airframe rating, to determine airworthiness each time the aircraft is converted from the restricted category to another category for the carriage of passengers for compensation or hire, unless the FAA finds this unnecessary for safety in a particular case.

(c) The aircraft complies with the applicable requirements of part 34.

[Doc. No. 5085, 29 FR 14569, Oct. 24, 1964, as amended by Amdt. 21-68, 55 FR 32860, Aug. 10, 1990; Amdt. 21-70, 57 FR 41369, Sept. 9, 1992]

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§21.189   Issue of airworthiness certificate for limited category aircraft.

(a) An applicant for an airworthiness certificate for an aircraft in the limited category is entitled to the certificate when—

(1) He shows that the aircraft has been previously issued a limited category type certificate and that the aircraft conforms to that type certificate; and

(2) The FAA finds, after inspection (including a flight check by the applicant), that the aircraft is in a good state of preservation and repair and is in a condition for safe operation.

(b) The FAA prescribes limitations and conditions necessary for safe operation.

[Doc. No. 5085, 29 FR 14570, Oct. 24, 1964, as amended by Amdt. 21-4, 30 FR 9437, July 29, 1965]

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§21.190   Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft.

(a) Purpose. The FAA issues a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category to operate a light-sport aircraft, other than a gyroplane.

(b) Eligibility. To be eligible for a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category:

(1) An applicant must provide the FAA with—

(i) The aircraft's operating instructions;

(ii) The aircraft's maintenance and inspection procedures;

(iii) The manufacturer's statement of compliance as described in paragraph (c) of this section; and

(iv) The aircraft's flight training supplement.

(2) The aircraft must not have been previously issued a standard, primary, restricted, limited, or provisional airworthiness certificate, or an equivalent airworthiness certificate issued by a foreign civil aviation authority.

(3) The aircraft must be inspected by the FAA and found to be in a condition for safe operation.

(c) Manufacturer's statement of compliance for light-sport category aircraft. The manufacturer's statement of compliance required in paragraph (b)(1)(iii) of this section must—

(1) Identify the aircraft by make and model, serial number, class, date of manufacture, and consensus standard used;

(2) State that the aircraft meets the provisions of the identified consensus standard;

(3) State that the aircraft conforms to the manufacturer's design data, using the manufacturer's quality assurance system that meets the identified consensus standard;

(4) State that the manufacturer will make available to any interested person the following documents that meet the identified consensus standard:

(i) The aircraft's operating instructions.

(ii) The aircraft's maintenance and inspection procedures.

(iii) The aircraft's flight training supplement.

(5) State that the manufacturer will monitor and correct safety-of-flight issues through the issuance of safety directives and a continued airworthiness system that meets the identified consensus standard;

(6) State that at the request of the FAA, the manufacturer will provide unrestricted access to its facilities; and

(7) State that the manufacturer, in accordance with a production acceptance test procedure that meets an applicable consensus standard has—

(i) Ground and flight tested the aircraft;

(ii) Found the aircraft performance acceptable; and

(iii) Determined that the aircraft is in a condition for safe operation.

(d) Light-sport aircraft manufactured outside the United States. For aircraft manufactured outside of the United States to be eligible for a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category, an applicant must meet the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section and provide to the FAA evidence that—

(1) The aircraft was manufactured in a country with which the United States has a Bilateral Airworthiness Agreement concerning airplanes or Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement with associated Implementation Procedures for Airworthiness concerning airplanes, or an equivalent airworthiness agreement; and

(2) The aircraft is eligible for an airworthiness certificate, flight authorization, or other similar certification in its country of manufacture.

[Amdt. 21-85, 69 FR 44862, July 27, 2004]

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§21.191   Experimental certificates.

Experimental certificates are issued for the following purposes:

(a) Research and development. Testing new aircraft design concepts, new aircraft equipment, new aircraft installations, new aircraft operating techniques, or new uses for aircraft.

(b) Showing compliance with regulations. Conducting flight tests and other operations to show compliance with the airworthiness regulations including flights to show compliance for issuance of type and supplemental type certificates, flights to substantiate major design changes, and flights to show compliance with the function and reliability requirements of the regulations.

(c) Crew training. Training of the applicant's flight crews.

(d) Exhibition. Exhibiting the aircraft's flight capabilities, performance, or unusual characteristics at air shows, motion picture, television, and similar productions, and the maintenance of exhibition flight proficiency, including (for persons exhibiting aircraft) flying to and from such air shows and productions.

(e) Air racing. Participating in air races, including (for such participants) practicing for such air races and flying to and from racing events.

(f) Market surveys. Use of aircraft for purposes of conducting market surveys, sales demonstrations, and customer crew training only as provided in §21.195.

(g) Operating amateur-built aircraft. Operating an aircraft the major portion of which has been fabricated and assembled by persons who undertook the construction project solely for their own education or recreation.

(h) Operating primary kit-built aircraft. Operating a primary category aircraft that meets the criteria of §21.24(a)(1) that was assembled by a person from a kit manufactured by the holder of a production certificate for that kit, without the supervision and quality control of the production certificate holder under §21.184(a).

(i) Operating light-sport aircraft. Operating a light-sport aircraft that—

(1) Has not been issued a U.S. or foreign airworthiness certificate and does not meet the provisions of §103.1 of this chapter. An experimental certificate will not be issued under this paragraph for these aircraft after January 31, 2008;

(2) Has been assembled—

(i) From an aircraft kit for which the applicant can provide the information required by §21.193(e); and

(ii) In accordance with manufacturer's assembly instructions that meet an applicable consensus standard; or

(3) Has been previously issued a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category under §21.190.

[Amdt. 21-21, 38 FR 6858, May 7, 1968, as amended by Amdt. 21-57, 49 FR 39651, Oct. 9, 1984; Amdt. 21-70, 57 FR 41369, Sept. 9, 1992; Amdt. 21-85, 69 FR 44862, July 27, 2004; Amdt. 21-85, 69 FR 53336, Sept. 1, 2004]

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§21.193   Experimental certificates: general.

An applicant for an experimental certificate must submit the following information:

(a) A statement, in a form and manner prescribed by the FAA setting forth the purpose for which the aircraft is to be used.

(b) Enough data (such as photographs) to identify the aircraft.

(c) Upon inspection of the aircraft, any pertinent information found necessary by the FAA to safeguard the general public.

(d) In the case of an aircraft to be used for experimental purposes—

(1) The purpose of the experiment;

(2) The estimated time or number of flights required for the experiment;

(3) The areas over which the experiment will be conducted; and

(4) Except for aircraft converted from a previously certificated type without appreciable change in the external configuration, three-view drawings or three-view dimensioned photographs of the aircraft.

(e) In the case of a light-sport aircraft assembled from a kit to be certificated in accordance with §21.191(i)(2), an applicant must provide the following:

(1) Evidence that an aircraft of the same make and model was manufactured and assembled by the aircraft kit manufacturer and issued a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category.

(2) The aircraft's operating instructions.

(3) The aircraft's maintenance and inspection procedures.

(4) The manufacturer's statement of compliance for the aircraft kit used in the aircraft assembly that meets §21.190(c), except that instead of meeting §21.190(c)(7), the statement must identify assembly instructions for the aircraft that meet an applicable consensus standard.

(5) The aircraft's flight training supplement.

(6) In addition to paragraphs (e)(1) through (e)(5) of this section, for an aircraft kit manufactured outside of the United States, evidence that the aircraft kit was manufactured in a country with which the United States has a Bilateral Airworthiness Agreement concerning airplanes or a Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement with associated Implementation Procedures for Airworthiness concerning airplanes, or an equivalent airworthiness agreement.

[Doc. No. 5085, 29 FR 14569, Oct. 24, 1964, as amended by Amdt. 21-85, 69 FR 44862, July 27, 2004]

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§21.195   Experimental certificates: Aircraft to be used for market surveys, sales demonstrations, and customer crew training.

(a) A manufacturer of aircraft manufactured within the United States may apply for an experimental certificate for an aircraft that is to be used for market surveys, sales demonstrations, or customer crew training.

(b) A manufacturer of aircraft engines who has altered a type certificated aircraft by installing different engines, manufactured by him within the United States, may apply for an experimental certificate for that aircraft to be used for market surveys, sales demonstrations, or customer crew training, if the basic aircraft, before alteration, was type certificated in the normal, acrobatic, commuter, or transport category.

(c) A person who has altered the design of a type certificated aircraft may apply for an experimental certificate for the altered aircraft to be used for market surveys, sales demonstrations, or customer crew training if the basic aircraft, before alteration, was type certificated in the normal, utility, acrobatic, or transport category.

(d) An applicant for an experimental certificate under this section is entitled to that certificate if, in addition to meeting the requirements of §21.193—

(1) He has established an inspection and maintenance program for the continued airworthiness of the aircraft; and

(2) The applicant shows that the aircraft has been flown for at least 50 hours, or for at least 5 hours if it is a type certificated aircraft which has been modified. The FAA may reduce these operational requirements if the applicant provides adequate justification.

[Amdt. 21-21, 33 FR 6858, May 7, 1968, as amended by Amdt. 21-28, 35 FR 2818, Feb. 11, 1970; Amdt. 21-57, 49 FR 39651, Oct. 9, 1984; Amdt. 21-59, 52 FR 1836, Jan. 15, 1987; Amdt. 21-92, 74 FR 53389, Oct. 16, 2009]

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§21.197   Special flight permits.

(a) A special flight permit may be issued for an aircraft that may not currently meet applicable airworthiness requirements but is capable of safe flight, for the following purposes:

(1) Flying the aircraft to a base where repairs, alterations, or maintenance are to be performed, or to a point of storage.

(2) Delivering or exporting the aircraft.

(3) Production flight testing new production aircraft.

(4) Evacuating aircraft from areas of impending danger.

(5) Conducting customer demonstration flights in new production aircraft that have satisfactorily completed production flight tests.

(b) A special flight permit may also be issued to authorize the operation of an aircraft at a weight in excess of its maximum certificated takeoff weight for flight beyond the normal range over water, or over land areas where adequate landing facilities or appropriate fuel is not available. The excess weight that may be authorized under this paragraph is limited to the additional fuel, fuel-carrying facilities, and navigation equipment necessary for the flight.

(c) Upon application, as prescribed in §§91.1017 or 119.51 of this chapter, a special flight permit with a continuing authorization may be issued for aircraft that may not meet applicable airworthiness requirements, but are capable of safe flight for the purpose of flying aircraft to a base where maintenance or alterations are to be performed. The permit issued under this paragraph is an authorization, including conditions and limitations for flight, which is set forth in the certificate holder's operations specifications. The permit issued under this paragraph may be issued to—

(1) Certificate holders authorized to conduct operations under part 119 of this chapter, that have an approved program for continuing flight authorization; or

(2) Management specification holders authorized to conduct operations under part 91, subpart K of this chapter for those aircraft they operate and maintain under a continuous airworthiness maintenance program prescribed by §91.1411 of this chapter.

[Doc. No. 5085, 29 FR 14570, Oct. 24, 1964, as amended by Amdt. 21-21, 33 FR 6859, May 7, 1968; Amdt. 21-51, 45 FR 60170, Sept. 11, 1980; Amdt. 21-54, 46 FR 37878, July 23, 1981; Amdt. 21-79, 66 FR 21066, Apr. 27, 2001; Amdt. 21-84, 68 FR 54559, Sept. 17, 2003; Amdt. 21-87, 71 FR 536, Jan. 4, 2006; Amdt. 21-92, 74 FR 53389, Oct. 16, 2009]

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§21.199   Issue of special flight permits.

(a) Except as provided in §21.197(c), an applicant for a special flight permit must submit a statement in a form and manner prescribed by the FAA, indicating—

(1) The purpose of the flight.

(2) The proposed itinerary.

(3) The crew required to operate the aircraft and its equipment, e.g., pilot, co-pilot, navigator, etc.

(4) The ways, if any, in which the aircraft does not comply with the applicable airworthiness requirements.

(5) Any restriction the applicant considers necessary for safe operation of the aircraft.

(6) Any other information considered necessary by the FAA for the purpose of prescribing operating limitations.

(b) The FAA may make, or require the applicant to make appropriate inspections or tests necessary for safety.

[Doc. No. 5085, 29 FR 14570, Oct. 24, 1964, as amended by Amdt. 21-21, 33 FR 6859, May 7, 1968; Amdt. 21-22, 33 FR 11901, Aug. 22, 1968]

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