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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR data is current as of May 26, 2020

Title 13Chapter IPart 123 → Subpart F


Title 13: Business Credit and Assistance
PART 123—DISASTER LOAN PROGRAM


Subpart F—Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans


Contents
§123.500   Definitions.
§123.501   Under what circumstances is your business eligible to be considered for a Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loan?
§123.502   Under what circumstances is your business ineligible to be considered for a Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loan?
§123.503   When can you apply for a Military Reservist EIDL?
§123.504   How do you apply for a Military Reservist EIDL?
§123.505   What if you are both an essential employee and the owner of the small business and you started active duty before applying for a Military Reservist EIDL?
§123.506   How much can you borrow under the Military Reservist EIDL Program?
§123.507   Under what circumstances will SBA consider waiving the $2 million loan limit?
§123.508   How can you use Military Reservist EIDL funds?
§123.509   What can't you use Military Reservist EIDL funds for?
§123.510   What if you don't use your Military Reservist EIDL funds as authorized?
§123.511   How will SBA disburse Military Reservist EIDL funds?
§123.512   What is the interest rate on a Military Reservist EIDL?
§123.513   Does SBA require collateral on its Military Reservist EIDL?

Source: 66 FR 38530, July 25, 2001, unless otherwise noted.

§123.500   Definitions.

The following terms have the same meaning wherever they are used in this subpart:

(a) Essential employee is an individual (whether or not an owner of a small business) whose managerial or technical expertise is critical to the successful day-to-day operations of a small business.

(b) Military reservist is a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces ordered to active duty during a period of military conflict.

(c) Period of military conflict means:

(1) A period of war declared by the Congress,

(2) A period of national emergency declared by the Congress or by the President, or

(3) A period of contingency operation, as defined in 10 U.S.C. 101(a).

(d) Principal owner is a person or entity which owns 20 percent or more of the small business.

(e) Substantial economic injury means an economic harm to the small business such that it cannot:

(1) Meet its obligations as they mature,

(2) Pay its ordinary and necessary operating expenses, or

(3) Market, produce or provide a product or service ordinarily marketed, produced or provided by the business. Loss of anticipated profits or a drop in sales is not considered substantial economic injury for this purpose.

§123.501   Under what circumstances is your business eligible to be considered for a Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loan?

Your business is eligible to apply for a Military Reservist EIDL if:

(a) It is a small business as defined in 13 CFR part 121 when the essential employee was called to active duty,

(b) The owner of the business is a military reservist and an essential employee or the business employs a military reservist who is an essential employee,

(c) The essential employee has been called-up to active military duty during a period of military conflict existing on or after March 24, 1999,

(d) The business has suffered or is likely to suffer substantial economic injury as a result of the absence of the essential employee, and

(e) You and your affiliates and principal owners (20% or more ownership interest) have used all reasonably available funds, and you are unable to obtain credit elsewhere (see §123.104).

[66 FR 38530, July 25, 2001, as amended at 67 FR 64519, Oct. 21, 2002]

§123.502   Under what circumstances is your business ineligible to be considered for a Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loan?

Your business is ineligible for a Military Reservist EIDL if it, together with its affiliates, is subject to any of the following conditions:

(a) Any of your business' principal owners has been convicted, during the past year, of a felony during and in connection with a riot or civil disorder;

(b) You have assumed the risk associated with employing the military reservist, as determined by SBA (for example, hiring the “essential employee” after the employee has received call-up orders or been notified that they are imminent);

(c) Any of your business' principal owners is presently incarcerated, or on probation or parole following conviction of a serious criminal offense;

(d) Your business is an agricultural enterprise. Agricultural enterprise means a business primarily engaged in the production of food and fiber, ranching and raising of livestock, aquaculture and all other farming and agriculture-related industries. (See 13 CFR 121.107, “How does SBA determine a concern's primary industry?”) Sometimes a business is engaged in both agricultural and non-agricultural business activities. If the primary business activity of the business is not an agricultural enterprise, it may apply for a Military Reservist EIDL, but loan proceeds may not be used, directly or indirectly, for the benefit of the agricultural enterprises;

(e) Your business is engaged in any illegal activity;

(f) Your business is a government owned entity (except for a business owned or controlled by a Native American tribe);

(g) Your business presents live performances of a prurient sexual nature or derives directly or indirectly more than an insignificant gross revenue through the sale of products or services, or through the presentation of any depictions or displays, of a prurient sexual nature;

(h) Your business is engaged in lending, multi-level sales distribution, speculation, or investment (except for real estate investment with property held for commercial rental);

(i) Your business is a non-profit or charitable concern;

(j) Your business is a consumer or marketing cooperative;

(k) Your business is not a small business concern;

(l) Your business derives more than one-third of its gross annual revenue from legal gambling activities;

(m) Your business is a loan packager which earns more than one-third of its gross annual revenue from packaging SBA loans;

(n) Your business' principal activity is teaching, instructing, counseling, or indoctrinating religion or religious beliefs, whether in a religious or secular setting; or

(o) Your business' principal activity is political or lobbying activities.

§123.503   When can you apply for a Military Reservist EIDL?

Your small business can apply for a Military Reservist EIDL any time beginning on the date your essential employee receives notice of expected call-up and ending one year after the date the essential employee is discharged or released from active duty. The Associate Administrator for Disaster Assistance (AA/DA) or designee may extend the one year limit by no more then one additional year after finding extraordinary or unforeseeable circumstances.

[73 FR 54675, Sept. 23, 2008]

§123.504   How do you apply for a Military Reservist EIDL?

To apply for a Military Reservist EIDL you must complete a SBA Military Reservist EIDL application package (SBA Form 5R and supporting documentation can be obtained through SBA's Disaster Area Office) including:

(a) A copy of the essential employee's official call-up orders for active duty showing the date of call-up, and, if known, the date of release from active duty. For an essential employee who expects to be called up and who has not received official call-up orders, the application shall include the notice of the expected call-up including, if known, the expected date of call-up and expected date of release from active duty;

(b) A statement from the business owner that the reservist is essential to the successful day-to-day operations of the business (detailing the employee's duties and responsibilities and explaining why these duties and responsibilities can't be completed in the essential employee's absence);

(c) A certification by the essential employee supporting that he or she concurs with the business owner's statement as described in paragraph (b) of this section;

(d) A written explanation and financial estimate of how the call-up of the essential employee has or will result in economic injury to your business;

(e) The steps your business is taking to alleviate the economic injury; and

(f) The business owners' certification that the essential employee will be offered the same or a similar job upon the employee's return from active duty.

[61 FR 3304, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 73 FR 54675, Sept. 23, 2008]

§123.505   What if you are both an essential employee and the owner of the small business and you started active duty before applying for a Military Reservist EIDL?

If you are both an essential employee and the owner of the small business and you started active duty before applying for an Military Reservist EIDL, a person who has a power of attorney with the authority to borrow and make other related commitments on your behalf, may complete and submit the EIDL loan application package for you.

§123.506   How much can you borrow under the Military Reservist EIDL Program?

You can borrow an amount equal to the substantial economic injury you have suffered or are likely to suffer until normal operations resume as a result of the absence of one or more essential employees called to active duty, up to a maximum of $2 million.

[73 FR 54675, Sept. 23, 2008]

§123.507   Under what circumstances will SBA consider waiving the $2 million loan limit?

SBA will consider waiving the $2 million limit if you can certify to the following conditions and SBA approves of such certification based on the information supplied in your application:

(a) Your small business is a major source of employment. A major source of employment is a business concern that, on or after the date of the disaster:

(1) Employs 10 percent or more of the work force within the commuting area of the geographically identifiable community (no larger than a county) in which the business employing the essential employee is located, provided that the commuting area does not extend more than 50 miles from such community; or

(2) Employs 5 percent of the work force in an industry within such commuting area and, if the small business is a non-manufacturing small business, employs no less than 50 employees in the same commuting area, or if the small business is a manufacturing small business, employs no less than 150 employees in the commuting area; or

(3) Employs no less than 250 employees within such commuting area;

(b) Your small business is in imminent danger of going out of business as a result of one or more essential employees being called up to active duty during a period of military conflict, and a loan in excess of $2 million is necessary to reopen or keep open the small business; and

(c) Your small business has used all reasonably available funds from the small business, its affiliates, its principal owners and all available credit elsewhere to alleviate the small business' economic injury. Credit elsewhere means financing from non-Federal sources on reasonable terms given your available cash flow and disposable assets which SBA believes your small business, its affiliates and principal owners could obtain.

[61 FR 3304, Jan. 31, 1996, as amended at 73 FR 54675, Sept. 23, 2008; 75 FR 14333, Mar. 25, 2010]

§123.508   How can you use Military Reservist EIDL funds?

Your small business can use Military Reservist EIDL to:

(a) Meet obligations as they mature,

(b) Pay ordinary and necessary operating expenses, or

(c) Enable the business to market, produce or provide products or services ordinarily marketed, produced, or provided by the business, which cannot be done as a result of the essential employee's military call-up.

§123.509   What can't you use Military Reservist EIDL funds for?

Your small business can not use Military Reservist EIDL funds for purposes described in §123.303(b) (See §123.303, “ How can my business spend my economic injury disaster loan?”).

§123.510   What if you don't use your Military Reservist EIDL funds as authorized?

If your small business does not use Military Reservist EIDL funds as authorized by §123.508, then §123.9 applies (See §123.9, “What happens if I don't use loan proceeds for the intended purpose?”).

§123.511   How will SBA disburse Military Reservist EIDL funds?

Funds will be disbursed only after the essential employee has been called to active duty, and you have provided a copy of the essential employee's official call-up orders for active duty showing the date of the call-up. SBA will disburse your funds in quarterly installments (unless otherwise specified in your loan authorization agreement) based on a continued need as demonstrated by comparative financial information. On or about 30 days before your scheduled fund disbursement, SBA will request ordinary and usual financial statements (including balance sheets and profit and loss statements). Based on this information, SBA will assess your continued need for disbursements under this program. Upon making such assessment, SBA will notify you of the status of future disbursements.

[73 FR 54675, Sept. 23, 2008]

§123.512   What is the interest rate on a Military Reservist EIDL?

The interest rate on a Military Reservist EIDL will be 4 percent per annum or less. SBA will publish the interest rate quarterly in the Federal Register.

§123.513   Does SBA require collateral on its Military Reservist EIDL?

SBA will not generally require you to pledge collateral to secure a Military Reservist EIDL of $50,000 or less. For loans larger than $50,000, you will be required to provide available collateral such as a lien on business property, a security interest in personal property, or both. SBA will not decline a loan if you do not have a particular amount of collateral so long as SBA is reasonably sure that you can repay the loan. If you refuse to pledge the available collateral when requested by SBA, however, SBA may decline or cancel your loan.

[73 FR 54675, Sept. 23, 2008]

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