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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of April 21, 2014

Title 10: Energy


PART 430—ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS


Contents

Subpart A—General Provisions

§430.1   Purpose and scope.
§430.2   Definitions.
§430.3   Materials incorporated by reference.
§430.4   Sources for information and guidance.

Subpart B—Test Procedures

§430.21   Purpose and scope.
§430.23   Test procedures for the measurement of energy and water consumption.
§430.24   [Reserved]
§430.25   Laboratory Accreditation Program.
§430.27   Petitions for waiver and applications for interim waiver.
Appendix A to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Electric Refrigerators and Electric Refrigerator-Freezers
Appendix A1 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Electric Refrigerators and Electric Refrigerator-Freezers
Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Freezers
Appendix B1 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Freezers
Appendix C to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Dishwashers
Appendix C1 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Dishwashers
Appendix D to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Clothes Dryers
Appendix D1 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Clothes Dryers
Appendix D2 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Clothes Dryers
Appendix E to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Water Heaters
Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners
Appendix G to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Unvented Home Heating Equipment
Appendix H to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Power Consumption of Television Sets
Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Conventional Ranges, Conventional Cooking Tops, Conventional Ovens, and Microwave Ovens
Appendix J1 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Automatic and Semi-Automatic Clothes Washers
Appendix J2 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Automatic and Semi-Automatic Clothes Washers
Appendixes K-L to Subpart B of Part 430 [Reserved]
Appendix M to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps
Appendix N to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Furnaces and Boilers
Appendix O to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Vented Home Heating Equipment
Appendix P to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Pool Heaters
Appendix Q to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts
Appendix Q1 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts
Appendix R to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring Average Lamp Efficacy (LE), Color Rendering Index (CRI), and Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) of Electric Lamps
Appendix S to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Water Consumption of Faucets and Showerheads
Appendix T to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Water Consumption of Water Closets and Urinals
Appendix U to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Ceiling Fans
Appendix V to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Ceiling Fan Light Kits
Appendix W to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Medium Base Compact Fluorescent Lamps
Appendix X to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Dehumidifiers
Appendix Y to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Battery Chargers
Appendix Z to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of External Power Supplies
Appendix AA to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Furnace Fans

Subpart C—Energy and Water Conservation Standards

§430.31   Purpose and scope.
§430.32   Energy and water conservation standards and their compliance dates.
§430.33   Preemption of State regulations.
§430.34   Energy and water conservation standards amendments
§430.35   Petitions with respect to general service lamps.
Appendix A to Subpart C of Part 430—Procedures, Interpretations and Policies for Consideration of New or Revised Energy Conservation Standards for Consumer Products

Subpart D—Petitions To Exempt State Regulation From Preemption; Petitions To Withdraw Exemption of State Regulation

§430.40   Purpose and scope.
§430.41   Prescriptions of a rule.
§430.42   Filing requirements.
§430.43   Notice of petition.
§430.44   Consolidation.
§430.45   Hearing.
§430.46   Disposition of petitions.
§430.47   Effective dates of final rules.
§430.48   Request for reconsideration.
§430.49   Finality of decision.

Subpart E—Small Business Exemptions

§430.50   Purpose and scope.
§430.51   Eligibility.
§430.52   Requirements for applications.
§430.53   Processing of applications.
§430.54   Referral to the Attorney General.
§430.55   Evaluation of application.
§430.56   Decision and order.
§430.57   Duration of temporary exemption.

Subpart F [Reserved]

§§430.60-430.75   [Reserved]
Appendixes A-B to Subpart F of Part 430 [Reserved]

Authority: 42 U.S.C. 6291-6309; 28 U.S.C. 2461 note.

Source: 42 FR 27898, June 1, 1977, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A—General Provisions

§430.1   Purpose and scope.

This part establishes the regulations for the implementation of part B of title III (42 U.S.C. 6291-6309) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (Pub. L. 94-163), as amended by Pub. L. 95-619, Pub. L. 100-12, Pub. L. 100-357, and Pub. L. 102-486 which establishes an energy conservation program for consumer products other than automobiles.

[62 FR 29237, May 29, 1997]

§430.2   Definitions.

Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 20094, Apr. 11, 2014.

Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 22349, Apr. 21, 2014.

For purposes of this part, words shall be defined as provided for in section 321 of the Act and as follows—

3-Way incandescent lamp means an incandescent lamp that—

(1) Employs two filaments, operated separately and in combination, to provide three light levels; and

(2) Is designated on the lamp packaging and marketing materials as being a 3-way incandescent lamp.

Act means the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6291-6316.

Active mode means the condition in which an energy-using product—

(1) Is connected to a main power source;

(2) Has been activated; and

(3) Provides one or more main functions.

Annual fuel utilization efficiency means the efficiency descriptor for furnaces and boilers, determined using test procedures prescribed under section 323 and based on the assumption that all—

(1) Weatherized warm air furnaces or boilers are located out-of-doors;

(2) Warm air furnaces which are not weatherized are located indoors and all combustion and ventilation air is admitted through grill or ducts from the outdoors and does not communicate with air in the conditioned space;

(3) Boilers which are not weatherized are located within the heated space.

ANSI means the American National Standards Institute.

Appliance lamp means any lamp that—

(1) Is specifically designed to operate in a household appliance and has a maximum wattage of 40 watts (including an oven lamp, refrigerator lamp, and vacuum cleaner lamp); and

(2) When sold at retail, is designated and marketed for the intended application, with

(i) The designation on the lamp packaging; and

(ii) Marketing materials that identify the lamp as being for appliance use.

ARM/simulation adjustment factor means a factor used as part of a DOE-approved alternative rating method (ARM) to improve the accuracy of the calculated ratings for untested split-system central air conditioners or heat pumps. The adjustment factor associated with each outdoor unit must be set such that it reduces the difference between the SEER (HSPF) determined using the ARM and a split-system combination tested in accordance with §430.24(m)(1). The ARM/simulation adjustment factor is an integral part of the ARM and must be a DOE-approved element in accordance with 10 CFR 430.24(m)(4) to (m)(6).

ASME means the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Automatic clothes washer means a class of clothes washer which has a control system which is capable of scheduling a preselected combination of operations, such as regulation of water temperature, regulation of the water fill level, and performance of wash, rinse, drain, and spin functions without the need for user intervention subsequent to the initiation of machine operation. Some models may require user intervention to initiate these different segments of the cycle after the machine has begun operation, but they do not require the user to intervene to regulate the water temperature by adjusting the external water faucet valves.

Ballast means a device used with an electric discharge lamp to obtain necessary circuit conditions (voltage, current, and waveform) for starting and operating.

Ballast efficacy factor means the relative light output divided by the power input of a fluorescent lamp ballast, as measured under test conditions specified in ANSI Standard C82.2-1984.

Ballast luminous efficiency means the total fluorescent lamp arc power divided by the fluorescent lamp ballast input power multiplied by the appropriate frequency adjustment factor, as defined in Appendix Q1 of subpart B of this part.

Baseboard electric heater means an electric heater which is intended to be recessed in or surface mounted on walls at floor level, which is characterized by long, low physical dimensions, and which transfers heat by natural convection and/or radiation.

Basic model means all units of a given type of covered product (or class thereof) manufactured by one manufacturer, having the same primary energy source, and which have essentially identical electrical, physical, and functional (or hydraulic) characteristics that affect energy consumption, energy efficiency, water consumption, or water efficiency; and

(1) With respect to general service fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps, and incandescent reflector lamps: Lamps that have essentially identical light output and electrical characteristics—including lumens per watt (lm/W) and color rendering index (CRI).

(2) With respect to faucets and showerheads: Have the identical flow control mechanism attached to or installed within the fixture fittings, or the identical water-passage design features that use the same path of water in the highest flow mode.

(3) with respect to furnace fans: Are marketed and/or designed to be installed in the same type of installation.

Basic-voltage external power supply means an external power supply that is not a low-voltage external power supply.

Batch means a collection of production units of a basic model from which a batch sample is selected.

Batch sample means the collection of units of the same basic model from which test units are selected.

Batch sample size means the number of units in a batch sample.

Batch size means the number of units in a batch.

Battery charger means a device that charges batteries for consumer products, including battery chargers embedded in other consumer products.

Blowout toilet means a water closet that uses a non-siphonic bowl with an integral flushing rim, a trap at the rear of the bowl, and a visible or concealed jet that operates with a blowout action.

BPAR incandescent reflector lamp means a reflector lamp as shown in figure C78.21-278 on page 32 of ANSI C78.21-2003 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

BR30 means a BR incandescent reflector lamp with a diameter of 30/8ths of an inch.

BR40 means a BR incandescent reflector lamp with a diameter of 40/8ths of an inch.

BR incandescent reflector lamp means a reflector lamp that has—

(1) A bulged section below the major diameter of the bulb and above the approximate baseline of the bulb, as shown in figure 1 (RB) on page 7 of ANSI C79.1-1994, (incorporated by reference, see §430.3); and

(2) A finished size and shape shown in ANSI C78.21-1989 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), including the referenced reflective characteristics in part 7 of ANSI C78.21-1989.

BR incandescent reflector lamp means a reflector lamp that has a bulged section below the bulb's major diameter and above its approximate base line as shown in Figure 1 (RB) on page 7 of ANSI C79.1-1994. A BR30 lamp has a lamp wattage of 85 or less than 66 and a BR40 lamp has a lamp wattage of 120 or less.

Btu means British thermal unit, which is the quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit.

Built-in refrigerator/refrigerator-freezer/freezer means any refrigerator, refrigerator-freezer or freezer with 7.75 cubic feet or greater total volume and 24 inches or less depth not including doors, handles, and custom front panels; with sides which are not finished and not designed to be visible after installation; and that is designed, intended, and marketed exclusively (1) To be installed totally encased by cabinetry or panels that are attached during installation, (2) to be securely fastened to adjacent cabinetry, walls or floor, and (3) to either be equipped with an integral factory-finished face or accept a custom front panel.

Candelabra base incandescent lamp means a lamp that uses a candelabra screw base as described in ANSI C81.61, Specifications for Electric Bases, common designations E11 and E12 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

Casement-only means a room air conditioner designed for mounting in a casement window with an encased assembly with a width of 14.8 inches or less and a height of 11.2 inches or less.

Casement-slider means a room air conditioner with an encased assembly designed for mounting in a sliding or casement window with a width of 15.5 inches or less.

Ceiling electric heater means an electric heater which is intended to be recessed in, surface mounted on, or hung from a ceiling, and which transfers heat by radiation and/or convection (either natural or forced).

Ceiling fan means a nonportable device that is suspended from a ceiling for circulating air via the rotation of fan blades.

Ceiling fan light kit means equipment designed to provide light from a ceiling fan that can be—

(1) Integral, such that the equipment is attached to the ceiling fan prior to the time of retail sale; or

(2) Attachable, such that at the time of retail sale the equipment is not physically attached to the ceiling fan, but may be included inside the ceiling fan at the time of sale or sold separately for subsequent attachment to the fan.

Central air conditioner means a product, other than a packaged terminal air conditioner, which is powered by single phase electric current, air cooled, rated below 65,000 Btu per hour, not contained within the same cabinet as a furnace, the rated capacity of which is above 225,000 Btu per hour, and is a heat pump or a cooling unit only.

Central system humidifier means a class of humidifier designed to add moisture into the air stream of a heating system.

Class A external power supply

(1) Means a device that—

(i) Is designed to convert line voltage AC input into lower voltage AC or DC output;

(ii) Is able to convert to only one AC or DC output voltage at a time;

(iii) Is sold with, or intended to be used with, a separate end-use product that constitutes the primary load;

(iv) Is contained in a separate physical enclosure from the end-use product;

(v) Is connected to the end-use product via a removable or hard-wired male/female electrical connection, cable, cord, or other wiring; and

(vi) Has nameplate output power that is less than or equal to 250 watts;

(2) But, does not include any device that—

(i) Requires Federal Food and Drug Administration listing and approval as a medical device in accordance with section 513 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. 360(c)); or

(ii) Powers the charger of a detachable battery pack or charges the battery of a product that is fully or primarily motor operated.

Clothes washer means a consumer product designed to clean clothes, utilizing a water solution of soap and/or detergent and mechanical agitation or other movement, and must be one of the following classes: automatic clothes washers, semi-automatic clothes washers, and other clothes washers.

Coil family means a group of coils with the same basic design features that affect the heat exchanger performance. These features are the basic configuration, i.e., A-shape, V-shape, slanted or flat top, the heat transfer surfaces on refrigerant and air sides (flat tubes vs. grooved tubes, fin shapes), the tube and fin materials, and the coil circuitry. When a group of coils has all these features in common, it constitutes a “coil family.”

Cold temperature fluorescent lamp means a fluorescent lamp specifically designed to start at −20 °F when used with a ballast conforming to the requirements of ANSI C78.81 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and ANSI C78.901 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), and is expressly designated as a cold temperature lamp both in markings on the lamp and in marketing materials, including catalogs, sales literature, and promotional material.

Colored fluorescent lamp means a fluorescent lamp designated and marketed as a colored lamp and not designed or marketed for general illumination applications with either of the following characteristics:

Component video means a video display interface as defined in the Consumer Electronics Association's (CEA) standard, CEA-770.3-D (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

Composite video means a video display interface that uses Radio Corporation of America (RCA) connections carrying a signal defined by the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers' (SMPTE) standard, SMPTE 170M-2004 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) for regions that support a power frequency of 59.94 Hz or International Telecommunication Union's (ITU) standard, ITU-R BT 470-6 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) for regions that support a power frequency of 50 Hz.

(1) A CRI less than 40, as determined according to the method set forth in CIE Publication 13.3 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3); or

(2) A correlated color temperature less than 2,500K or greater than 7,000K as determined according to the method set forth in IES LM-9 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

Colored incandescent lamp means an incandescent lamp designated and marketed as a colored lamp that has—

(1) A color rendering index of less than 50, as determined according to the test method given in CIE 13.3 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3); or

(2) A correlated color temperature of less than 2,500K, or greater than 4,600K, where correlated temperature is computed according to the “Computation of Correlated Color Temperature and Distribution Temperature,” Journal of the Optical Society of America, (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

Color Rendering Index or CRI means the measured degree of color shift objects undergo when illuminated by a light source as compared with the color of those same objects when illuminated by a reference source of comparable color temperature.

Compact refrigerator/refrigerator-freezer/freezer means any refrigerator, refrigerator-freezer or freezer with total volume less than 7.75 cubic foot (220 liters) (rated volume as determined in appendices A1 and B1 of subpart B of this part before appendices A and B become mandatory and as determined in appendices A and B of this subpart once appendices A and B become mandatory (see the notes at the beginning of appendices A and B)).

Condenser-evaporator coil combination means a condensing unit made by one manufacturer and one of several evaporator coils, either manufactured by the same manufacturer or another manufacturer, intended to be combined with that particular condensing unit.

Condensing unit means a component of a central air conditioner which is designed to remove the heat absorbed by the refrigerant and to transfer it to the outside environment, and which consists of an outdoor coil, compressor(s), and air moving device.

Consumer product means any article (other than an automobile, as defined in Section 501(1) of the Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act):

(1) Of a type—

(i) Which in operation consumes, or is designed to consume, energy or, with respect to showerheads, faucets, water closets, and urinals, water; and

(ii) Which, to any significant extent, is distributed in commerce for personal use or consumption by individuals;

(2) Without regard to whether such article of such type is in fact distributed in commerce for personal use or consumption by an individual, except that such term includes fluorescent lamp ballasts, general service fluorescent lamps, incandescent reflector lamps, showerheads, faucets, water closets, and urinals distributed in commerce for personal or commercial use or consumption.

Convection microwave oven means a microwave oven that incorporates convection features and any other means of cooking in a single compartment.

Conventional cooking top means a class of kitchen ranges and ovens which is a household cooking appliance consisting of a horizontal surface containing one or more surface units which include either a gas flame or electric resistance heating.

Conventional oven means a class of kitchen ranges and ovens which is a household cooking appliance consisting of one or more compartments intended for the cooking or heating of food by means of either a gas flame or electric resistance heating. It does not include portable or countertop ovens which use electric resistance heating for the cooking or heating of food and are designed for an electrical supply of approximately 120 volts.

Conventional range means a class of kitchen ranges and ovens which is a household cooking appliance consisting of a conventional cooking top and one or more conventional ovens.

Convertible cooking appliance means any kitchen range and oven which is a household cooking appliance designed by the manufacturer to be changed in service from use with natural gas to use with LP-gas, and vice versa, by incorporating in the appliance convertible orifices for the main gas burners and a convertible gas pressure regulator.

Cooking products means consumer products that are used as the major household cooking appliances. They are designed to cook or heat different types of food by one or more of the following sources of heat: gas, electricity, or microwave energy. Each product may consist of a horizontal cooking top containing one or more surface units and/or one or more heating compartments. They must be one of the following classes: conventional ranges, conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens, microwave/conventional ranges and other cooking products.

Correlated color temperature means the absolute temperature of a blackbody whose chromaticity most nearly resembles that of the light source.

Covered product means a consumer product:

(1) Of a type specified in section 322 of the Act, or

(2) That is a ceiling fan, ceiling fan light kit, medium base compact fluorescent lamp, dehumidifier, battery charger, external power supply, or torchiere.

Dehumidifier means a self-contained, electrically operated, and mechanically refrigerated encased assembly consisting of—

(1) A refrigerated surface (evaporator) that condenses moisture from the atmosphere;

(2) A refrigerating system, including an electric motor;

(3) An air-circulating fan; and

(4) Means for collecting or disposing of the condensate.

Design voltage with respect to an incandescent lamp means:

(1) The voltage marked as the intended operating voltage;

(2) The mid-point of the voltage range if the lamp is marked with a voltage range; or

(3) 120 V if the lamp is not marked with a voltage or voltage range.

Detachable battery means a battery that is—

(1) Contained in a separate enclosure from the product; and

(2) Intended to be removed or disconnected from the product for recharging.

Direct heating equipment means vented home heating equipment and unvented home heating equipment.

Direct operation external power supply means an external power supply that can operate a consumer product that is not a battery charger without the assistance of a battery.

Direct vent system means a system supplied by a manufacturer which provides outdoor air or air from an unheated space (such as an attic or crawl space) directly to a furnace or vented heater for combustion and for draft relief if the unit is equipped with a draft control device.

Dishwasher means a cabinet-like appliance which with the aid of water and detergent, washes, rinses, and dries (when a drying process is included) dishware, glassware, eating utensils, and most cooking utensils by chemical, mechanical and/or electrical means and discharges to the plumbing drainage system.

DOE means the Department of Energy.

Dual-flush water closet means a water closet incorporating a feature that allows the user to flush the water closet with either a reduced or a full volume of water.

Electric boiler means an electrically powered furnace designed to supply low pressure steam or hot water for space heating application. A low pressure steam boiler operates at or below 15 pounds per square inch gauge (psig) steam pressure; a hot water boiler operates at or below 160 psig water pressure and 250 °F. water temperature.

Electric central furnace means a furnace designed to supply heat through a system of ducts with air as the heating medium, in which heat is generated by one or more electric resistance heating elements and the heated air is circulated by means of a fan or blower.

Electric clothes dryer means a cabinet-like appliance designed to dry fabrics in a tumble-type drum with forced air circulation. The heat source is electricity and the drum and blower(s) are driven by an electric motor(s).

Electric heater means an electric appliance in which heat is generated from electrical energy and dissipated by convection and radiation and includes baseboard electric heaters, ceiling electric heaters, floor electric heaters, portable electric heaters, and wall electric heaters.

Electric refrigerator means a cabinet designed for the refrigerated storage of food, designed to be capable of achieving storage temperatures above 32 °F (0 °C) and below 39 °F (3.9 °C), and having a source of refrigeration requiring single phase, alternating current electric energy input only. An electric refrigerator may include a compartment for the freezing and storage of food at temperatures below 32 °F (0 °C), but does not provide a separate low temperature compartment designed for the freezing and storage of food at temperatures below 8 °F (−13.3 °C).

Electric refrigerator-freezer means a cabinet which consists of two or more compartments with at least one of the compartments designed for the refrigerated storage of food and designed to be capable of achieving storage temperatures above 32 °F (0 °C) and below 39 °F (3.9 °C), and with at least one of the compartments designed for the freezing and storage of food at temperatures below 8 °F (−13.3 °C) which may be adjusted by the user to a temperature of 0 °F (−17.8 °C) or below. The source of refrigeration requires single phase, alternating current electric energy input only.

Electromechanical hydraulic toilet means any water closet that utilizes electrically operated devices, such as, but not limited to, air compressors, pumps, solenoids, motors, or macerators in place of or to aid gravity in evacuating waste from the toilet bowl.

Electronic ballast means a device that uses semiconductors as the primary means to control lamp starting and operation.

Energy conservation standard means any standards meeting the definitions of that term in 42 U.S.C. 6291(6) and 42 U.S.C. 6311(18) as well as any other water conservation standards and design requirements found in this part or parts 430 or 431.

Energy use of a type of consumer product which is used by households means the energy consumed by such product within housing units occupied by households (such as energy for space heating and cooling, water heating, the operation of appliances, or other activities of the households), and includes energy consumed on any property that is contiguous with a housing unit and that is used primarily by the household occupying the housing unit (such as energy for exterior lights or heating a pool).

ER incandescent reflector lamp means a reflector lamp that has—

(1) An elliptical section below the major diameter of the bulb and above the approximate baseline of the bulb, as shown in figure 1 (RE) on page 7 of ANSI C79.1-1994, (incorporated by reference; see §430.3); and

(2) A finished size and shape shown in ANSI C78.21-1989, (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

ER30 means an ER incandescent reflector lamp with a diameter of 30/8ths of an inch.

ER40 means an ER incandescent reflector lamp with a diameter of 40/8ths of an inch.

Estimated annual operating cost means the aggregate retail cost of the energy which is likely to be consumed annually, and in the case of showerheads, faucets, water closets, and urinals, the aggregate retail cost of water and wastewater treatment services likely to be incurred annually, in representative use of a consumer product, determined in accordance with Section 323 of EPCA (42 U.S.C. 6293).

Evaporator coil means a component of a central air conditioner which is designed to absorb heat from an enclosed space and transfer the heat to a refrigerant.

External power supply means an external power supply circuit that is used to convert household electric current into DC current or lower-voltage AC current to operate a consumer product.

External power supply design family means a set of external power supply basic models, produced by the same manufacturer, which share the same circuit layout, output power, and output cord resistance, but differ in output voltage.

Faucet means a lavatory faucet, kitchen faucet, metering faucet, or replacement aerator for a lavatory or kitchen faucet.

Fitting means a device that controls and guides the flow of water.

Floor electric heater means an electric heater which is intended to be recessed in a floor, and which transfers by radiation and/or convection (either natural or forced).

Fluorescent lamp means a low pressure mercury electric-discharge source in which a fluorescing coating transforms some of the ultraviolet energy generated by the mercury discharge into light, including only the following:

(1) Any straight-shaped lamp (commonly referred to as 4-foot medium bipin lamps) with medium bipin bases of nominal overall length of 48 inches and rated wattage of 25 or more;

(2) Any U-shaped lamp (commonly referred to as 2-foot U-shaped lamps) with medium bipin bases of nominal overall length between 22 and 25 inches and rated wattage of 25 or more;

(3) Any rapid start lamp (commonly referred to as 8-foot high output lamps) with recessed double contact bases of nominal overall length of 96 inches;

(4) Any instant start lamp (commonly referred to as 8-foot slimline lamps) with single pin bases of nominal overall length of 96 inches and rated wattage of 52 or more;

(5) Any straight-shaped lamp (commonly referred to as 4-foot miniature bipin standard output lamps) with miniature bipin bases of nominal overall length between 45 and 48 inches and rated wattage of 26 or more; and

(6) Any straight-shaped lamp (commonly referred to 4-foot miniature bipin high output lamps) with miniature bipin bases of nominal overall length between 45 and 48 inches and rated wattage of 49 or more.

Fluorescent lamp ballast means a device which is used to start and operate fluorescent lamps by providing a starting voltage and current and limiting the current during normal operation.

Flushometer tank means a device whose function is defined in flushometer valve, but integrated within an accumulator vessel affixed and adjacent to the fixture inlet so as to cause an effective enlargement of the supply line immediately before the unit.

Flushometer valve means a valve attached to a pressurized water supply pipe and so designed that when actuated, it opens the line for direct flow into the fixture at a rate and quantity to properly operate the fixture, and then gradually closes to provide trap reseal in the fixture in order to avoid water hammer. The pipe to which this device is connected is in itself of sufficient size, that when open, will allow the device to deliver water at a sufficient rate of flow for flushing purposes.

Forced air central furnace means a gas or oil burning furnace designed to supply heat through a system of ducts with air as the heating medium. The heat generated by combustion of gas or oil is transferred to the air within a casing by conduction through heat exchange surfaces and is circulated through the duct system by means of a fan or blower.

Freezer means a cabinet designed as a unit for the freezing and storage of food at temperatures of 0 °F. or below, and having a source of refrigeration requiring single phase, alternating current electric energy input only.

Furnace means a product which utilizes only single-phase electric current, or single-phase electric current or DC current in conjunction with natural gas, propane, or home heating oil, and which—

(1) Is designed to be the principal heating source for the living space of a residence;

(2) Is not contained within the same cabinet with a central air conditioner whose rated cooling capacity is above 65,000 Btu per hour;

(3) Is an electric central furnace, electric boiler, forced-air central furnace, gravity central furnace, or low pressure steam or hot water boiler; and

(4) Has a heat input rate of less than 300,000 Btu per hour for electric boilers and low pressure steam or hot water boilers and less than 225,000 Btu per hour for forced-air central furnaces, gravity central furnaces, and electric central furnaces, gravity central furnaces, and electric central furnaces.

Furnace fan means an electrically-powered device used in a consumer product for the purpose of circulating air through ductwork.

Gas means either natural gas or propane.

Gas clothes dryer means a cabinet-like appliance designed to dry fabrics in a tumble-type drum with forced air circulation. The heat source is gas and the drum and blower(s) are driven by an electric motor(s).

General lighting application means lighting that provides an interior or exterior area with overall illumination.

General service fluorescent lamp means any fluorescent lamp which can be used to satisfy the majority of fluorescent lighting applications, but does not include any lamp designed and marketed for the following nongeneral application:

(1) Fluorescent lamps designed to promote plant growth;

(2) Fluorescent lamps specifically designed for cold temperature applications;

(3) Colored fluorescent lamps;

(4) Impact-resistant fluorescent lamps;

(5) Reflectorized or aperture lamps;

(6) Fluorescent lamps designed for use in reprographic equipment;

(7) Lamps primarily designed to produce radiation in the ultra-violet region of the spectrum; and

(8) Lamps with a Color Rendering Index of 87 or greater.

General service incandescent lamp means a standard incandescent or halogen type lamp that is intended for general service applications; has a medium screw base; has a lumen range of not less than 310 lumens and not more than 2,600 lumens or, in the case of a modified spectrum lamp, not less than 232 lumens and not more than 1,950 lumens; and is capable of being operated at a voltage range at least partially within 110 and 130 volts; however this definition does not apply to the following incandescent lamps—

(1) An appliance lamp;

(2) A black light lamp;

(3) A bug lamp;

(4) A colored lamp;

(5) An infrared lamp;

(6) A left-hand thread lamp;

(7) A marine lamp;

(8) A marine signal service lamp;

(9) A mine service lamp;

(10) A plant light lamp;

(11) A reflector lamp;

(12) A rough service lamp;

(13) A shatter-resistant lamp (including a shatter-proof lamp and a shatter-protected lamp);

(14) A sign service lamp;

(15) A silver bowl lamp;

(16) A showcase lamp;

(17) A 3-way incandescent lamp;

(18) A traffic signal lamp;

(19) A vibration service lamp;

(20) A G shape lamp (as defined in ANSI C78.20) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and ANSI C79.1-2002 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) with a diameter of 5 inches or more;

(21) A T shape lamp (as defined in ANSI C78.20) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and ANSI C79.1-2002 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and that uses not more than 40 watts or has a length of more than 10 inches; and

(22) A B, BA, CA, F, G16-1/2, G-25, G30, S, or M-14 lamp (as defined in ANSI C79.1-2002) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and ANSI C78.20 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) of 40 watts or less.

General service lamp includes general service incandescent lamps, compact fluorescent lamps, general service light-emitting diode lamps, organic light-emitting diode lamps, and any other lamps that the Secretary determines are used to satisfy lighting applications traditionally served by general service incandescent lamps; however, this definition does not apply to any lighting application or bulb shape excluded from the “general service incandescent lamp” definition, or any general service fluorescent lamp or incandescent reflector lamp.

Gravity central furnace means a gas fueled furnace which depends primarily on natural convection for circulation of heated air and which is designed to be used in conjunction with a system of ducts.

Hand-held showerhead means a showerhead that can be held or fixed in place for the purpose of spraying water onto a bather and that is connected to a flexible hose.

Heat pump means a product, other than a packaged terminal heat pump, which consists of one or more assemblies, powered by single phase electric current, rated below 65,000 Btu per hour, utilizing an indoor conditioning coil, compressor, and refrigerant-to-outdoor air heat exchanger to provide air heating, and may also provide air cooling, dehumidifying, humidifying circulating, and air cleaning.

High-definition multimedia interface or HDMI® means an audio and video interface as defined by HDMI® Specification Informational Version 1.0 or greater (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

Home heating equipment, not including furnaces means vented home heating equipment and unvented home heating equipment.

Household means an entity consisting of either an individual, a family, or a group of unrelated individuals, who reside in a particular housing unit. For the purpose of this definition:

(1) Group quarters means living quarters that are occupied by an institutional group of 10 or more unrelated persons, such as a nursing home, military barracks, halfway house, college dormitory, fraternity or sorority house, convent, shelter, jail or correctional institution.

(2) Housing unit means a house, an apartment, a group of rooms, or a single room occupied as separate living quarters, but does not include group quarters.

(3) Separate living quarters means living quarters:

(i) To which the occupants have access either:

(A) Directly from outside of the building, or

(B) Through a common hall that is accessible to other living quarters and that does not go through someone else's living quarters, and

(ii) Occupied by one or more persons who live and eat separately from occupant(s) of other living quarters, if any, in the same building.

Immersed heating element means an electrically powered heating device which is designed to operate while totally immersed in water in such a manner that the heat generated by the device is imparted directly to the water.

Import means to import into the customs territory of the United States.

Incandescent lamp means a lamp in which light is produced by a filament heated to incandescence by an electric current, including only the following:

(1) Any lamp (commonly referred to as lower wattage non-reflector general service lamps, including any tungsten halogen lamp) that has a rated wattage between 30 and 199, has an E26 medium screw base, has a rated voltage or voltage range that lies at least partially in the range of 115 and 130 volts, and is not a reflector lamp.

(2) Any incandescent reflector lamp.

(3) Any general service incandescent lamp (commonly referred to as a high-or higher-wattage lamp) that has a rated wattage above 199 (above 205 for a high wattage reflector lamp).

Incandescent reflector lamp (commonly referred to as a reflector lamp) means any lamp in which light is produced by a filament heated to incandescence by an electric current, which: contains an inner reflective coating on the outer bulb to direct the light; is not colored; is not designed for rough or vibration service applications; is not an R20 short lamp; has an R, PAR, ER, BR, BPAR, or similar bulb shapes with an E26 medium screw base; has a rated voltage or voltage range that lies at least partially in the range of 115 and 130 volts; has a diameter that exceeds 2.25 inches; and has a rated wattage that is 40 watts or higher.

Indirect operation external power supply means an external power supply that cannot operate a consumer product that is not a battery charger without the assistance of a battery as determined by the steps in paragraphs (1)(i) through (v) of this definition:

(1) If the external power supply (EPS) can be connected to an end-use consumer product and that consumer product can be operated using battery power, the method for determining whether that EPS is incapable of operating that consumer product directly is as follows:

(i) If the end-use product has a removable battery, remove it for the remainder of the test and proceed to the step in paragraph (1)(v) of this definition. If not, proceed to the step in paragraph (1)(ii).

(ii) Charge the battery in the application via the EPS such that the application can operate as intended before taking any additional steps.

(iii) Disconnect the EPS from the application. From an off mode state, turn on the application and record the time necessary for it to become operational to the nearest five second increment (5 sec, 10 sec, etc.).

(iv) Operate the application using power only from the battery until the application stops functioning due to the battery discharging.

(v) Connect the EPS first to mains and then to the application. Immediately attempt to operate the application. If the battery was removed for testing and the end-use product operates as intended, the EPS is not an indirect operation EPS and paragraph 2 of this definition does not apply. If the battery could not be removed for testing, record the time for the application to become operational to the nearest five second increment (5 seconds, 10 seconds, etc.).

(2) If the time recorded in paragraph (1)(v) of this definition is greater than the summation of the time recorded in paragraph (1)(iii) of this definition and five seconds, the EPS cannot operate the application directly and is an indirect operation EPS.

Indoor unit means a component of a split-system central air conditioner or heat pump that is designed to transfer heat between the refrigerant and the indoor air, and which consists of an indoor coil, a cooling mode expansion device, and may include an air moving device.

Intermediate base incandescent lamp means a lamp that uses an intermediate screw base as described in ANSI C81.61, Specifications for Electric Bases, common designation E17 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

Kerosene means No. 1 fuel oil with a viscosity meeting the specifications as specified in UL-730-1974, section 36.9 and in tables 2 and 3 of ANSI Standard Z91.1-1972.

Lamp Efficacy (LE) means the measured lumen output of a lamp in lumens divided by the measured lamp electrical power input in watts expressed in units of lumens per watt (LPW).

Light-emitting diode or LED means a p-n junction solid state device of which the radiated output, either in the infrared region, the visible region, or the ultraviolet region, is a function of the physical construction, material used, and exciting current of the device.

Low consumption has the meaning given such a term in ASME A112.19.2-2008. (see §430.3)

Low pressure steam or hot water boiler means an electric, gas or oil burning furnace designed to supply low pressure steam or hot water for space heating application. A low pressure steam boiler operates at or below 15 pounds psig steam pressure; a hot water boiler operates at or below 160 psig water pressure and 250 °F. water temperature.

Low-voltage external power supply means an external power supply with a nameplate output voltage less than 6 volts and nameplate output current greater than or equal to 550 milliamps.

LP-gas means liquified petroleum gas, and includes propane, butane, and propane/butane mixtures.

Major cooking component means either a conventional cooking top, a conventional oven or a microwave oven.

Manufacture means to manufacture, produce, assemble, or import.

Manufacturer means any person who manufactures a consumer product.

Medium base compact fluorescent lamp means an integrally ballasted fluorescent lamp with a medium screw base, a rated input voltage range of 115 to 130 volts and which is designed as a direct replacement for a general service incandescent lamp; however, the term does not include—

(1) Any lamp that is—

(i) Specifically designed to be used for special purpose applications; and

(ii) Unlikely to be used in general purpose applications, such as the applications described in the definition of “General Service Incandescent Lamp” in this section; or

(2) Any lamp not described in the definition of “General Service Incandescent Lamp” in this section that is excluded by the Secretary, by rule, because the lamp is—

(i) Designed for special applications; and

(ii) Unlikely to be used in general purpose applications.

Medium screw base means an Edison screw base identified with the prefix E-26 in the “American National Standard for Electric Lamp Bases”, ANSI_IEC C81.61-2003, published by the American National Standards Institute.

Microwave/conventional cooking top means a class of kitchen ranges and ovens that is a household cooking appliance consisting of a microwave oven and a conventional cooking top.

Microwave/conventional oven means a class of kitchen ranges and ovens that is a household cooking appliance consisting of a microwave oven and a conventional oven in separate compartments.

Microwave/conventional range means a class of kitchen ranges and ovens that is a household cooking appliance consisting of a microwave oven and a conventional oven in separate compartments and a conventional cooking top.

Microwave oven means a class of kitchen ranges and ovens comprised of household cooking appliances consisting of a compartment designed to cook or heat food by means of microwave energy, including microwave ovens with or without thermal elements designed for surface browning of food and convection microwave ovens.

Mobile home furnace means a direct vent furnace that is designed for use only in mobile homes.

Modified spectrum means, with respect to an incandescent lamp, an incandescent lamp that—

(1) Is not a colored incandescent lamp; and

(2) When operated at the rated voltage and wattage of the incandescent lamp—

(A) Has a color point with (x,y) chromaticity coordinates on the C.I.E. 1931 chromaticity diagram, figure 2, page 3 of IESNA LM-16 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) that lies below the black-body locus; and

(B) Has a color point with (x,y) chromaticity coordinates on the C.I.E. 1931 chromaticity diagram, figure 2, page 3 of IESNA LM-16 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) that lies at least 4 MacAdam steps, as referenced in IESNA LM-16, distant from the color point of a clear lamp with the same filament and bulb shape, operated at the same rated voltage and wattage.

Natural gas means natural gas as defined by the Federal Power Commission.

Off mode means the condition in which an energy using product—

(1) Is connected to a main power source; and

(2) Is not providing any stand-by or active mode function.

Oil means heating oil grade No. 2 as defined in American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D396-71.

Organic light-emitting diode or OLED means a thin-film light-emitting device that typically consists of a series of organic layers between 2 electrical contacts (electrodes).

Other clothes washer means a class of clothes washer which is not an automatic or semi-automatic clothes washer.

Other cooking products means any class of cooking products other than the conventional range, conventional cooking top, conventional oven, microwave oven, and microwave/conventional range classes.

Outdoor furnace or boiler is a furnace or boiler normally intended for installation out-of-doors or in an unheated space (such as an attic or a crawl space).

Outdoor unit means a component of a split-system central air conditioner or heat pump that is designed to transfer heat between the refrigerant and the outdoor air, and which consists of an outdoor coil, compressor(s), an air moving device, and in addition for heat pumps, a heating mode expansion device, reversing valve, and defrost controls.

Packaged terminal air conditioner means a wall sleeve and a separate unencased combination of heating and cooling assemblies specified by the builder and intended for mounting through the wall. It includes a prime source of refrigeration, separable outdoor louvers, forced ventilation, and heating availability energy.

Packaged terminal heat pump means a packaged terminal air conditioner that utilizes reverse cycle refrigeration as its prime heat source and should have supplementary heating availability by builder's choice of energy.

Person includes any individual, corporation, company, association, firm, partnership, society, trust, joint venture or joint stock company, the government, and any agency of the United States or any State or political subdivision thereof.

Pin-based means (1) the base of a fluorescent lamp, that is not integrally ballasted and that has a plug-in lamp base, including multi-tube, multibend, spiral, and circline types, or (2) a socket that holds such a lamp.

Pool heater means an appliance designed for heating nonpotable water contained at atmospheric pressure, including heating water in swimming pools, spas, hot tubs and similar applications.

Portable electric heater means an electric heater which is intended to stand unsupported, and can be moved from place to place within a structure. It is connected to electric supply by means of a cord and plug, and transfers heat by radiation and/or convention (either natural or forced).

Primary heater means a heating device that is the principal source of heat for a structure and includes baseboard electric heaters, ceiling electric heaters, and wall electric heaters.

Private labeler means an owner of a brand or trademark on the label of a consumer product which bears a private label. A consumer product bears a private label if:

(1) Such product (or its container) is labeled with the brand or trademark of a person other than a manufacturer of such product;

(2) The person with whose brand or trademark such product (or container) is labeled has authorized or caused such product to be so labeled; and

(3) The brand or trademark of a manufacturer of such product does not appear on such label.

Propane means a hydrocarbon whose chemical composition is predominantly C3H8, whether recovered from natural gas or crude oil.

R20 incandescent reflector lamp means a reflector lamp that has a face diameter of approximately 2.5 inches, as shown in figure 1(R) on page 7 of ANSI C79.1-1994 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

R20 short lamp means a lamp that is an R20 incandescent reflector lamp that has a rated wattage of 100 watts; has a maximum overall length of 3 and 5/8, or 3.625, inches; and is designed, labeled, and marketed specifically for pool and spa applications.

Rated lifetime for general service incandescent lamps means the length of operating time of a sample of lamps (as defined in §429.27(a)(2)(iv) of this chapter) between first use and failure of 50 percent of the sample size in accordance with test procedures described in IESNA LM-49 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), as determined in section 4.2 of Appendix R of this subpart. The operating time is based on the middle lamp operating time for an odd number of samples and the average operating time of the two middle lamps for an even number of samples.

Rated voltage with respect to incandescent lamps means:

(1) The design voltage if the design voltage is 115 V, 130 V or between 115V and 130 V:

(2) 115 V if the design voltage is less than 115 V and greater than or equal to 100 V and the lamp can operate at 115 V; and

(3) 130 V if the design voltage is greater than 130 V and less than or equal to 150 V and the lamp can operate at 130 V.

Rated wattage means:

(1) With respect to fluorescent lamps and general service fluorescent lamps:

(i) If the lamp is listed in ANSI C78.81 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) or ANSI C78.901 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), the rated wattage of a lamp determined by the lamp designation of Clause 11.1 of ANSI C78.81 or ANSI C78.901;

(ii) If the lamp is a residential straight-shaped lamp, and not listed in ANSI C78.81 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), the wattage of a lamp when operated on a reference ballast for which the lamp is designed; or

(iii) If the lamp is neither listed in one of the ANSI standards referenced in (1)(i) of this definition, nor a residential straight-shaped lamp, the electrical power of a lamp when measured according to the test procedures outlined in appendix R to subpart B of this part.

(2) With respect to general service incandescent lamps and incandescent reflector lamps, the electrical power measured according to the test procedures outlined in appendix R to subpart B of this part.

Refrigerator means an electric refrigerator.

Refrigerator-freezer means an electric refrigerator-freezer.

Replacement ballast means a ballast that—

(1) Is designed for use to replace an existing fluorescent lamp ballast in a previously installed luminaire;

(2) Is marked “FOR REPLACEMENT USE ONLY”;

(3) Is shipped by the manufacturer in packages containing not more than 10 fluorescent lamp ballasts; and

(4) Has output leads that when fully extended are a total length that is less than the length of the lamp with which the ballast is intended to be operated.

Residential straight-shaped lamp means a low pressure mercury electric-discharge source in which a fluorescing coating transforms some of the ultraviolet energy generated by the mercury discharge into light, including a straight-shaped fluorescent lamp with medium bi-pin bases of nominal overall length of 48 inches and is either designed exclusively for residential applications; or designed primarily and marketed exclusively for residential applications.

(1) A lamp is designed exclusively for residential applications if it will not function for more than 100 hours with a commercial high-power-factor ballast.

(2) A lamp is designed primarily and marketed exclusively for residential applications if it:

(i) Is permanently and clearly marked as being for residential use only;

(ii) Has a life of 6,000 hours or less when used with a commercial high-power-factor ballast;

(iii) Is not labeled or represented as a replacement for a fluorescent lamp that is a covered product; and

(iv) Is marketed and distributed in a manner designed to minimize use of the lamp with commercial high-power-factor ballasts.

(3) A manufacturer may market and distribute a lamp in a manner designed to minimize use of the lamp with commercial high-power-factor ballasts by:

(i) Packaging and labeling the lamp in a manner that clearly indicates the lamp is for residential use only and includes appropriate instructions concerning proper and improper use; if the lamp is included in a catalog or price list that also includes commercial/industrial lamps, listing the lamp in a separate residential section accompanied by notes about proper use on the same page; and providing as part of any express warranty accompanying the lamp that improper use voids such warranty; or

(ii) Using other comparably effective measures to minimize use with commercial high-power-factor ballasts.

Room air conditioner means a consumer product, other than a “packaged terminal air conditioner,” which is powered by a single phase electric current and which is an encased assembly designed as a unit for mounting in a window or through the wall for the purpose of providing delivery of conditioned air to an enclosed space. It includes a prime source of refrigeration and may include a means for ventilating and heating.

Rough or vibration service incandescent reflector lamp means a reflector lamp: in which a C-11 (5 support), C-17 (8 support), or C-22 (16 support) filament is mounted (the number of support excludes lead wires); in which the filament configuration is as shown in Chapter 6 of the 1993 Illuminating Engineering Society of North America Lighting Handbook, 8th Edition (see 10 CFR 430.22); and that is designated and marketed specifically for rough or vibration service applications.

Rough service lamp means a lamp that—

(1) Has a minimum of 5 supports with filament configurations that are C-7A, C-11, C-17, and C-22 as listed in Figure 6-12 of the IESNA Lighting Handbook (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), or similar configurations where lead wires are not counted as supports; and

(2) Is designated and marketed specifically for ‘rough service’ applications, with

(i) The designation appearing on the lamp packaging; and

(ii) Marketing materials that identify the lamp as being for rough service.

S-video means a video display interface that transmits analog video over two channels: luma and chroma as defined by IEC 60933-5 Ed. 1.0 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

Secretary means the Secretary of the Department of Energy.

Security or life safety alarm or surveillance system means:

(1) Equipment designed and marketed to perform any of the following functions (on a continuous basis):

(i) Monitor, detect, record, or provide notification of intrusion or access to real property or physical assets or notification of threats to life safety.

(ii) Deter or control access to real property or physical assets, or prevent the unauthorized removal of physical assets.

(iii) Monitor, detect, record, or provide notification of fire, gas, smoke, flooding, or other physical threats to real property, physical assets, or life safety.

(2) This term does not include any product with a principal function other than life safety, security, or surveillance that:

(i) Is designed and marketed with a built-in alarm or theft-deterrent feature; or

(ii) Does not operate necessarily and continuously in active mode.

Semi-automatic clothes washer means a class of clothes washer that is the same as an automatic clothes washer except that user intervention is required to regulate the water temperature by adjusting the external water faucet valves.

Shatter-resistant lamp, shatter-proof lamp, or shatter-protected lamp means a lamp that—

(1) Has a coating or equivalent technology that is compliant with NSF/ANSI 51 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and is designed to contain the glass if the glass envelope of the lamp is broken; and

(2) Is designated and marketed for the intended application, with

(i) The designation on the lamp packaging; and

(ii) Marketing materials that identify the lamp as being shatter-resistant, shatter-proof, or shatter-protected.

Showerhead means a component or set of components distributed in commerce for attachment to a single supply fitting, for spraying water onto a bather, typically from an overhead position, excluding safety shower showerheads.

Small duct, high velocity system means a heating and cooling product that contains a blower and indoor coil combination that—

(1) Is designed for, and produces, at least 1.2 inches of external static pressure when operated at the certified air volume rate of 220-350 CFM per rated ton of cooling; and

(2) When applied in the field, uses high velocity room outlets generally greater than 1,000 fpm that have less than 6.0 square inches of free area.

Space constrained product means a central air conditioner or heat pump:

(1) That has rated cooling capacities no greater than 30,000 BTU/hr;

(2) That has an outdoor or indoor unit having at least two overall exterior dimensions or an overall displacement that:

(i) Is substantially smaller than those of other units that are:

(A) Currently usually installed in site-built single family homes; and

(B) Of a similar cooling, and, if a heat pump, heating capacity; and

(ii) If increased, would certainly result in a considerable increase in the usual cost of installation or would certainly result in a significant loss in the utility of the product to the consumer; and

(3) Of a product type that was available for purchase in the United States as of December 1, 2000.

Specialty application mercury vapor lamp ballast means a mercury vapor lamp ballast that—

(1) Is designed and marketed for operation of mercury vapor lamps used in quality inspection, industrial processing, or scientific use, including fluorescent microscopy and ultraviolet curing; and

(2) In the case of a specialty application mercury vapor lamp ballast, the label of which—

(i) Provides that the specialty application mercury vapor lamp ballast is ‘For specialty applications only, not for general illumination’; and

(ii) Specifies the specific applications for which the ballast is designed.

Standby mode means the condition in which an energy-using product—

(1) Is connected to a main power source; and

(2) Offers one or more of the following user-oriented or protective functions:

(i) To facilitate the activation or deactivation of other functions (including active mode) by remote switch (including remote control), internal sensor, or timer; or

(ii) Continuous functions, including information or status displays (including clocks) or sensor-based functions.

State means a State, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, or any territory or possession of the United States.

State regulation means a law or regulation of a State or political subdivision thereof.

Supplementary heater means a heating device that provides heat to a space in addition to that which is supplied by a primary heater. Supplementary heaters include portable electric heaters.

Surface unit means either a heating unit mounted in a cooking top, or a heating source and its associated heated area of the cooking top, on which vessels are placed for the cooking or heating of food.

Television set or TV means a product designed to produce dynamic video, contains an internal TV tuner encased within the product housing, and that is capable of receiving dynamic visual content from wired or wireless sources including but not limited to:

(1) Broadcast and similar services for terrestrial, cable, satellite, and/or broadband transmission of analog and/or digital signals; and/or

(2) Display-specific data connections, such as HDMI, Component video, S-video, Composite video; and/or

(3) Media storage devices such as a USB flash drive, memory card, or a DVD; and/or

(4) Network connections, usually using Internet Protocol, typically carried over Ethernet or Wi-Fi.

Tested combination means a multi-split system with multiple indoor coils having the following features:

(1) The basic model of a system used as a tested combination shall consist of one outdoor unit, with one or more compressors, that is matched with between 2 and 5 indoor units; for multi-split systems, each of these indoor units shall be designed for individual operation.

(2) The indoor units shall—

(i) Represent the highest sales model family, or another indoor model family if the highest sales model family does not provide sufficient capacity (see ii);

(ii) Together, have a nominal capacity that is between 95% and 105% of the nominal capacity of the outdoor unit;

(iii) Not, individually, have a capacity that is greater than 50% of the nominal capacity of the outdoor unit;

(iv) Operate at fan speeds that are consistent with the manufacturer's specifications; and

(v) All be subject to the same minimum external static pressure requirement (i.e., 0 inches of water column for non-ducted, see Table 2 in appendix M to subpart B of this part for ducted indoor units) while being configurable to produce the same static pressure at the exit of each outlet plenum when manifolded as per section 2.4.1 of appendix M.

Through-the-wall air conditioner and heat pump means a central air conditioner or heat pump that is designed to be installed totally or partially within a fixed-size opening in an exterior wall, and:

(1) Is manufactured prior to January 23, 2010;

(2) Is not weatherized;

(3) Is clearly and permanently marked for installation only through an exterior wall;

(4) Has a rated cooling capacity no greater than 30,000 Btu/hr;

(5) Exchanges all of its outdoor air across a single surface of the equipment cabinet; and

(6) Has a combined outdoor air exchange area of less than 800 square inches (split systems) or less than 1,210 square inches (single packaged systems) as measured on the surface described in paragraph (5) of this definition.

Torchiere means a portable electric lamp with a reflector bowl that directs light upward to give indirect illumination.

Unvented gas heater means an unvented, self-contained, free-standing, nonrecessed gas-burning appliance which furnishes warm air by gravity or fan circulation.

Unvented home heating equipment means a class of home heating equipment, not including furnaces, used for the purpose of furnishing heat to a space proximate to such heater directly from the heater and without duct connections and includes electric heaters and unvented gas and oil heaters.

Unvented oil heater means an unvented, self-contained, free-standing, nonrecessed oil-burning appliance which furnishes warm air by gravity or fan circulation.

Urinal means a plumbing fixture which receives only liquid body waste and, on demand, conveys the waste through a trap seal into a gravity drainage system, except such term does not include fixtures designed for installations in prisons.

Vented floor furnace means a self-contained vented heater suspended from the floor of the space being heated, taking air for combustion from outside this space. The vented floor furnace supplies heated air circulated by gravity or by a fan directly into the space to be heated through openings in the casing.

Vented hearth heater means a vented appliance which simulates a solid fuel fireplace and is designed to furnish warm air, with or without duct connections, to the space in which it is installed. The circulation of heated room air may be by gravity or mechanical means. A vented hearth heater may be freestanding, recessed, zero clearance, or a gas fireplace insert or stove. The following products are not subject to the energy conservation standards for vented hearth heaters:

(1) Vented gas log sets and

(2) Vented gas hearth products that meet all of the following four criteria:

(i) Certified to ANSI Z21.50 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), but not to ANSI Z21.88 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3);

(ii) Sold without a thermostat and with a warranty provision expressly voiding all manufacturer warranties in the event the product is used with a thermostat;

(iii) Expressly and conspicuously identified on its rating plate and in all manufacturer's advertising and product literature as a “Decorative Product: Not for use as a Heating Appliance”; and

(iv) With respect to products sold after January 1, 2015, not equipped with a standing pilot light or other continuously-burning ignition source.

Vented home heating equipment or vented heater means a class of home heating equipment, not including furnaces, designed to furnish warmed air to the living space of a residence, directly from the device, without duct connections (except that boots not to exceed 10 inches beyond the casing may be permitted and except for vented hearth heaters, which may be with or without duct connections) and includes: vented wall furnace, vented floor furnace, vented room heater, and vented hearth heater.

Vented room heater means a self-contained, free standing, nonrecessed, vented heater for furnishing warmed air to the space in which it is installed. The vented room heater supplies heated air circulated by gravity or by a fan directly into the space to be heated through openings in the casing.

Vented wall furnace means a self-contained vented heater complete with grilles or the equivalent, designed for incorporation in, or permanent attachment to, a wall of a residence and furnishing heated air circulated by gravity or by a fan directly into the space to be heated through openings in the casing.

Vibration service lamp means a lamp that—

(1) Has filament configurations that are C-5, C-7A, or C-9, as listed in Figure 6-12 of the IESNA Lighting Handbook (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) or similar configurations;

(2) Has a maximum wattage of 60 watts;

(3) Is sold at retail in packages of 2 lamps or less; and

(4) Is designated and marketed specifically for vibration service or vibration-resistant applications, with—

(i) The designation appearing on the lamp packaging; and

(ii) Marketing materials that identify the lamp as being vibration service only.

Voltage range means a band of operating voltages as marked on an incandescent lamp, indicating that the lamp is designed to operate at any voltage within the band.

Wall electric heater means an electric heater (excluding baseboard electric heaters) which is intended to be recessed in or surface mounted on walls, which transfers heat by radiation and/or convection (either natural or forced) and which includes forced convectors, natural convectors, radiant heaters, high wall or valance heaters.

Water closet means a plumbing fixture that has a water-containing receptor which receives liquid and solid body waste, and upon actuation, conveys the waste through an exposed integral trap seal into a gravity drainage system, except such term does not include fixtures designed for installation in prisons.

Water heater means a product which utilizes oil, gas, or electricity to heat potable water for use outside the heater upon demand, including—

(1) Storage type units which heat and store water at a thermostatically controlled temperature, including gas storage water heaters with an input of 75,000 Btu per hour or less, oil storage water heaters with an input of 105,000 Btu per hour or less, and electric storage water heaters with an input of 12 kilowatts or less;

(2) Instantaneous type units which heat water but contain no more than one gallon of water per 4,000 Btu per hour of input, including gas instantaneous water heaters with an input of 200,000 Btu per hour or less, oil instantaneous water heaters with an input of 210,000 Btu per hour or less, and electric instantaneous water heaters with an input of 12 kilowatts or less; and

(3) Heat pump type units, with a maximum current rating of 24 amperes at a voltage no greater than 250 volts, which are products designed to transfer thermal energy from one temperature level to a higher temperature level for the purpose of heating water, including all ancillary equipment such as fans, storage tanks, pumps, or controls necessary for the device to perform its function.

Water use means the quantity of water flowing through a showerhead, faucet, water closet, or urinal at point of use, determined in accordance with test procedures under appendices S and T of subpart B of this part.

Weatherized warm air furnace or boiler means a furnace or boiler designed for installation outdoors, approved for resistance to wind, rain, and snow, and supplied with its own venting system.

[42 FR 27898, June 1, 1977]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §430.2, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys.gov.

§430.3   Materials incorporated by reference.

Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 22349, Apr. 21, 2014.

(a) General. We incorporate by reference the following standards into part 430. The material listed has been approved for incorporation by reference by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Any subsequent amendment to a standard by the standard-setting organization will not affect the DOE regulations unless and until amended by DOE. Material is incorporated as it exists on the date of the approval and a notice of any change in the material will be published in the Federal Register. All approved material is available for inspection at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. Also, this material is available for inspection at U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, 6th Floor, 950 L'Enfant Plaza, SW., Washington, DC 20024, (202) 586-2945, or go to: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/. Standards can be obtained from the sources below.

(b) AHRI. Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute, 2111 Wilson Blvd, Suite 500, Arlington, VA 22201, 703-524-8800, or go to http://www.ahrinet.org.

(1) ARI 210/240-2006, Unitary Air-Conditioning and Air-Source Heat Pump Equipment, approved March 26, 1998, IBR approved for appendix M to subpart B.

(2) [Reserved]

(c) AATCC. American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists, P.O. Box 12215, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919) 549-3526, or go to www.aatcc.org.

(1) AATCC Test Method 79-2010, Absorbency of Textiles, Revised 2010, IBR approved for Appendix J2 to Subpart B.

(2) AATCC Test Method 118-2007, Oil Repellency: Hydrocarbon Resistance Test, Revised 2007, IBR approved for Appendix J2 to Subpart B.

(3) AATCC Test Method 135-2010, Dimensional Changes of Fabrics after Home Laundering, Revised 2010, IBR approved for Appendix J2 to Subpart B.

(d) ANSI. American National Standards Institute, 25 W. 43rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10036, 212-642-4900, or go to http://www.ansi.org.

(1) ANSI C78.3-1991 (“ANSI C78.3”), American National Standard for Fluorescent Lamps-Instant-start and Cold-Cathode Types-Dimensional and Electrical Characteristics, approved July 15, 1991; IBR approved for §430.32.

(2) ANSI C78.20-2003, Revision of ANSI C78.20-1995 (“ANSI C78.20”), American National Standard for electric lamps—A, G, PS, and Similar Shapes with E26 Medium Screw Bases, approved October 30, 2003; IBR approved for §430.2.

(3) ANSI C78.21-1989, American National Standard for Electric Lamps—PAR and R Shapes, approved March 3, 1989, IBR approved for §430.2.

(4) ANSI C78.21-2003, Revision of ANSI C78.21-1995 with all supplements, American National Standard for Electric Lamps—PAR and R Shapes, approved October 30, 2003, IBR approved for §430.2.

(5) ANSI_ANSLG C78.81-2010, (“ANSI C78.81”), American National Standard for Electric Lamps—Double-Capped Fluorescent Lamps— Dimensional and Electrical Characteristics, approved January 14, 2010, IBR approved for §430.2, §430.32, appendix Q, appendix Q1, and appendix R to subpart B.

(6) ANSI C78.375-1997, Revision of ANSI C78.375-1991 (“ANSI C78.375”), American National Standard for Fluorescent Lamps—Guide for Electrical Measurements, first edition, approved September 25, 1997; IBR approved for appendix Q, appendix Q1 and appendix R to subpart B.

(7) ANSI_IEC C78.901-2005, Revision of ANSI C78.901-2001 (“ANSI C78.901”), American National Standard for Electric Lamps—Single-Based Fluorescent Lamps—Dimensional and Electrical Characteristics, approved March 23, 2005; IBR approved for §430.2 and appendix R to subpart B.

(8) ANSI C79.1-1994, American National Standard for Nomenclature for Glass Bulbs—Intended for Use with Electric Lamps, approved March 24, 1994, IBR approved for §430.2.

(9) ANSI C79.1-2002, American National Standard for Electric Lamps—Nomenclature for Glass Bulbs Intended for Use with Electric Lamps, approved September 16, 2002, IBR approved for §430.2.

(10) ANSI_ANSLG_ C81.61-2006, Revision of ANSI C81.61-2005, (“ANSI C81.61”), American National Standard for electrical lamp bases—Specifications for Bases (Caps) for Electric Lamps, approved August 25, 2006, IBR approved for §430.2.

(11) ANSI C82.1-2004, (“ANSI C82.1”), American National Standard for Lamp Ballast—Line Frequency Fluorescent Lamp Ballast, approved November 19, 2004; IBR approved for appendix Q and appendix Q1 to subpart B.

(12) ANSI C82.2-2002, (“ANSI C82.2”), American National Standard for Lamp Ballasts—Method of Measurement of Fluorescent Ballasts, Approved June 6, 2002, IBR approved for appendix Q and appendix Q1 to subpart B.

(13) ANSI C82.3-2002, Revision of ANSI C82.3-1983 (R 1995) (“ANSI C82.3”), American National Standard for Reference Ballasts for Fluorescent Lamps, approved September 4, 2002; IBR approved for appendix Q, appendix Q1 and appendix R to subpart B.

(14) ANSI C82.11 Consolidated-2002, (“ANSI C82.11”), American National Standard for Lamp Ballasts—High-frequency Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts—Supplements, approved March 11, 1999, August 5, 1999 and January 17, 2002; IBR approved for appendix Q and appendix Q1 to subpart B.

(15) ANSI C82.13-2002 (“ANSI C82.13”), American National Standard for Lamp Ballasts—Definitions for Fluorescent Lamps and Ballasts, approved July 23, 2002; IBR approved for appendix Q and appendix Q1 to subpart B.

(16) ANSI Z21.56-2006, section 2.10 (“ANSI Z21.56”), Standard for Gas-Fired Pool Heaters, approved December 13, 2005, IBR approved for appendix P to subpart B.

(17) ANSI Z21.50-2007 (CSA 2.22-2007), (“ANSI Z21.50”), Vented Gas Fireplaces, Fifth Edition, Approved February 22, 2007, IBR approved for §430.2.

(18) ANSI Z21.88-2009 (CSA 2.33-2009), (“ANSI Z21.88”), Vented Gas Fireplace Heaters, Fifth Edition, Approved March 26, 2009, IBR approved for §430.2.

(e) [Reserved]

(f) ASHRAE. American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc., Publication Sales, 1791 Tullie Circle, NE., Atlanta, GA 30329, 800-527-4723 or 404-636-8400, or go to http://www.ashrae.org.

(1) ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 16-1983 (“ANSI/ASHRAE 16”) (RA 2009), (Reaffirmation of ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 16-1983 [RA 1999]), Method of Testing for Rating Room Air Conditioners and Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners, ASHRAE approved October 18, 1988, and reaffirmed June 20, 2009. ANSI approved October 20, 1998 and reaffirmed June 25, 2009. IBR approved for appendix F to subpart B.

(2) ASHRAE 23-2005, Methods of Testing for Rating Positive Displacement Refrigerant Compressors and Condensing Units, approved February 10, 2005, IBR approved for appendix M to subpart B.

(3) ASHRAE 37-2005, Methods of Testing for Rating Unitary Air-Conditioning and Heat Pump Equipment, approved March 11, 2005, IBR approved for appendix M to subpart B.

(4) ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 37-2009, (“ASHRAE 37-2009”), Methods of Testing for Rating Electrically Driven Unitary Air-Conditioning and Heat Pump Equipment, ANSI approved June 25, 2009, IBR approved for appendix AA to subpart B.

(5) ASHRAE 41.1-1986 (Reaffirmed 2006), Standard Method for Temperature Measurement, approved February 18, 1987, IBR approved for appendices E, M, and AA to subpart B.

(6) ASHRAE 41.2-1987 (Reaffirmed 1992), Standard Methods for Laboratory Airflow Measurement, approved October 1, 1987, IBR approved for appendix M to subpart B.

(7) ASHRAE 41.6-1994 (Reaffirmed 2001), Standard Method for Measurement of Moist Air Properties, approved August 30, 1994, IBR approved for appendix M to subpart B.

(8) ASHRAE 41.9-2000, Calorimeter Test Methods for Mass Flow Measurements of Volatile Refrigerants, approved October 6, 2000, IBR approved for appendix M to subpart B.

(9) ASHRAE/AMCA 51-1999/210-1999, Laboratory Methods of Testing Fans for Aerodynamic Performance Rating, approved December 2, 1999, IBR approved for appendix M to subpart B.

(10) ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 103-2007, (“ASHRAE 103-2007”), Methods of Testing for Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency of Residential Central Furnaces and Boilers, except for sections 7.2.2.5, 8.6.1.1, 9.1.2.2, 9.5.1.1, 9.5.1.2.1, 9.5.1.2.2, 9.5.2.1, 9.7.1, 11.2.12, 11.3.12, 11.4.12, 11.5.12 and appendices B and C, ANSI approved March 25, 2008, IBR approved for appendix AA to subpart B.

(11) ASHRAE 116-1995 (RA 2005), Methods of Testing for Rating Seasonal Efficiency of Unitary Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps, approved July 24, 1995, IBR approved for appendix M to subpart B.

(g) ASME. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Service Center, 22 Law Drive, P.O. Box 2900, Fairfield, NJ 07007, 973-882-1170, or go to http://www.asme.org.

(1) ASME A112.18.1-2012, (“ASME A112.18.1-2012”), “Plumbing supply fittings,” section 5.4, approved December, 2012, IBR approved for appendix S to subpart B.

(2) ASME A112.19.2-2008, (“ASME A112.19.2-2008”), “Ceramic plumbing fixtures,” sections 7.1, 7.1.1, 7.1.2, 7.1.3, 7.1.4, 7.1.5, 7.4, 8.2, 8.2.1, 8.2.2, 8.2.3, 8.6, Table 5, and Table 6 approved August 2008, including Update No. 1, dated August 2009, and Update No. 2, dated March 2011, IBR approved for §430.2 and appendix T to subpart B.

(h) AHAM. Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers, 1111 19th Street, NW., Suite 402, Washington, DC 20036, 202-872-5955, or go to http://www.aham.org.

(1) ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008 (“ANSI/AHAM DH-1”), Dehumidifiers, ANSI approved May 9, 2008, IBR approved for appendix X to subpart B.

(2) ANSI/AHAM DW-1-1992, American National Standard, Household Electric Dishwashers, approved February 6, 1992, IBR approved for appendix C to subpart B and §430.32.

(3) ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010, Household Electric Dishwashers, (ANSI approved September 18, 2010), IBR approved for appendix C1 to subpart B.

(4) AHAM HLD-1-2009 (“AHAM HLD-1”), Household Tumble Type Clothes Dryers, (2009), IBR approved for appendix D1 and D2 to subpart B.

(5) ANSI/AHAM HRF-1-1979, (Revision of ANSI B38.1-1970), (“HRF-1-1979”), American National Standard, Household Refrigerators, Combination Refrigerator-Freezers and Household Freezers, approved May 17, 1979, IBR approved for appendices A1 and B1 to subpart B.

(6) AHAM HRF-1-2008, (“HRF-1-2008”), Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers, Energy and Internal Volume of Refrigerating Appliances (2008), including Errata to Energy and Internal Volume of Refrigerating Appliances, Correction Sheet issued November 17, 2009, IBR approved for appendices A and B to subpart B.

(7) ANSI/AHAM RAC-1-2008 (“ANSI/AHAM RAC-1”), Room Air Conditioners, (2008; ANSI approved July 7, 2008), IBR approved for appendix F to subpart B.

(i) CEA. Consumer Electronics Association, Technology & Standards Department, 1919 S. Eads Street, Arlington, VA 22202, 703-907-7600, or go to www.CE.org.

(1) CEA Standard, CEA-770.3-D, High Definition TV Analog Component Video Interface, published February 2008; IBR approved for §430.2.

(2) [Reserved]

(j) CEC. California Energy Commission, 1516 Ninth Street, MS-25, Sacramento, CA 95814, 916-654-4091, or go to http://www.energy.ca.gov.

(1) CEC Test Method for Calculating the Energy Efficiency of Single-Voltage External Ac-Dc and Ac-Ac Power Supplies, August 11, 2004, IBR approved for appendix Z to subpart B.

(2) [Reserved]

(k) CIE. Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE), Central Bureau, Kegelgasse 27, A-1030, Vienna, Austria, 011+43 1 714 31 87 0, or go to http://www.cie.co.at.

(1) CIE 13.3-1995 (“CIE 13.3”), Technical Report: Method of Measuring and Specifying Colour Rendering Properties of Light Sources, 1995, ISBN 3 900 734 57 7; IBR approved for §430.2 and appendix R to subpart B.

(2) CIE 15:2004 (“CIE 15”), Technical Report: Colorimetry, 3rd edition, 2004, ISBN 978 3 901906 33 6; IBR approved for appendix R to subpart B.

(l) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), ENERGY STAR documents published by the Environmental Protection Agency are available online at http://www.energystar.gov or by contacting the Energy Star hotline at 1-888-782-7937.

(1) ENERGY STAR Testing Facility Guidance Manual: Building a Testing Facility and Performing the Solid State Test Method for ENERGY STAR Qualified Ceiling Fans, Version 1.1, approved December 9, 2002, IBR approved for appendix U to subpart B.

(2) ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Residential Light Fixtures, Version 4.0, approved January 10, 2005, IBR approved for appendix V to subpart B.

(3) ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Dehumidifiers, approved January 1, 2001, IBR approved for appendix X to subpart B.

(4) Energy Star Program Requirements for Single Voltage External Ac-Dc and Ac-Ac Power Supplies, Eligibility Criteria (Version 2.0), effective date for EPS Manufacturers November 1, 2008, IBR approved for subpart C, §430.32.

(5) Test Methodology for Determining the Energy Performance of Battery Charging Systems, approved December 2005, IBR approved for appendix Y to subpart B.

(m) HDMI®. High-Definition Multimedia Interface Licensing, LLC, 1140 East Arques Avenue, Suite 100, Sunnyvale, CA 94085, 408-616-1542, or go to www.hdmi.org.

(1) HDMI Specification Informational Version 1.0, High-Definition Multimedia Interface Specification, published September 4, 2003; IBR approved for §430.2.

(2) [Reserved]

(n) IESNA. Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, 120 Wall Street, Floor 17, New York, NY 10005-4001, 212-248-5000, or go to http://www.iesna.org.

(1) The IESNA Lighting Handbook, Reference & Application, (“The IESNA Lighting Handbook”), 9th ed., Chapter 6, “Light Sources,” July 2000, IBR approved for §430.2.

(2) IES LM-9-09, (“IES LM-9”), IES Approved Method for the Electrical and Photometric Measurement of Fluorescent Lamps, approved January 31, 2009; IBR approved for §430.2 and appendix R to subpart B.

(3) IESNA LM-16-1993 (“IESNA LM-16”), IESNA Practical Guide to Colorimetry of Light Sources, December 1993, IBR approved for §430.2.

(4) IES LM-20-1994, IESNA Approved Method for Photometric Testing of Reflector-Type Lamps, approved December 3, 1994, IBR approved for appendix R to subpart B.

(5) IES LM-45-09, (“IES LM-45”), IES Approved Method for the Electrical and Photometric Measurement of General Service Incandescent Filament Lamps, approved December 14, 2009; IBR approved for appendix R to subpart B.

(6) IESNA LM-49-01 (“IESNA LM-49”), IESNA Approved Method for Life Testing of Incandescent Filament Lamps, approved December 1, 2001, IBR approved for §430.2 and appendix R to subpart B.

(7) IES LM-58-1994, IESNA Guide to Spectroradiometric Measurements, approved December 3, 1994, IBR approved for appendix R to subpart B.

(o) IEC. International Electrotechnical Commission, available from the American National Standards Institute, 25 W. 43rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10036, (212) 642-4900, or go to http://webstore.ansi.org.

(1) IEC Standard 933-5:1992, (“IEC 60933-5 Ed. 1.0”), Audio, video and audiovisual systems—Interconnections and matching values—Part 5: Y/C connector for video systems—Electrical matching values and description of the connector, First Edition, 1992-12; IBR approved for §430.2. (Note: IEC 933-5 is also known as IEC 60933-5.)

(2) IEC Standard 62087:2011, (“IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0”), Methods of measurement for the power consumption of audio, video, and related equipment, Edition 3.0, 2011-04, Sections 3.1.1, 3.1.18, 11.4.1, 11.4.2, 11.4.5, 11.4.6, 11.4.8, 11.4.9, 11.4.10, 11.4.11, 11.5.5, and annexc.3; IBR approved for Appendix H to subpart B of this part.

(3) International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Standard 62301 (“IEC 62301”), Household electrical appliances—Measurement of standby power (first edition, June 2005), IBR approved for appendix F, and appendix I to subpart B.

(4) IEC 62301 (“IEC 62301”), Household electrical appliances—Measurement of standby power, (Edition 2.0, 2011-01), IBR approved for appendices C1, D1, D2, G, H, I, J2, N, O, P, and X to subpart B.

(p) U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Resource Room of the Building Technologies Program, 950 L'Enfant Plaza SW., 6th Floor, Washington, DC 20024, 202-586-2945, (Energy Star materials are also found at http://www.energystar.gov.)

(1) ITU-R BT.470-6, Conventional Television Systems, published November 1998; IBR approved for §430.2.

(2) [Reserved]

(3) International Efficiency Marking Protocol for External Power Supplies, Version 3.0, September 2013, IBR approved for §430.32.

(q) NSF International. NSF International, P.O. Box 130140, 789 North Dixboro Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48113-0140, 1-800-673-6275, or go to http://www.nsf.org.

(1) NSF/ANSI 51-2007 (“NSF/ANSI 51”), Food equipment materials, revised and adopted April 2007, IBR approved for §430.2.

(2) [Reserved]

(r) Optical Society of America. Optical Society of America, 2010 Massachusetts Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20036-1012, 202-223-8130, or go to http://www.opticsinfobase.org;

(1) “Computation of Correlated Color Temperature and Distribution Temperature,” A.R. Robertson, Journal of the Optical Society of America, Volume 58, Number 11, November 1968, pages 1528-1535, IBR approved for §430.2.

(2) [Reserved]

(s) SMPTE. Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers, 3 Barker Ave., 5th Floor, White Plains, NY 10601, 914-761-1100, or go to http://standards.smpte.org.

(1) SMPTE 170M-2004, (“SMPTE 170M-2004”), SMPTE Standard for Television—Composite Analog Video Signal—NTSC for Studio Applications, approved November 30, 2004; IBR approved for §430.2.

(2) [Reserved]

(t) U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Resource Room of the Building Technologies Program, 950 L'Enfant Plaza, SW., 6th Floor, Washington, DC 20024, 202-586-2945, or go to http://www.energystar.gov.

(1) ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for [Compact Fluorescent Lamps] CFLs, Version 3.0, approved October 30, 2003, IBR approved for appendix V to subpart B.

(2) ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for [Compact Fluorescent Lamps] CFLs, approved August 9, 2001, IBR approved for appendix W to subpart B.

[74 FR 12066, Mar. 23, 2009]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §430.3, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys.gov.

§430.4   Sources for information and guidance.

(a) General. The standards listed in this paragraph are referred to in the DOE test procedures and elsewhere in this part but are not incorporated by reference. These sources are given here for information and guidance.

(b) IESNA. Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, 120 Wall Street, Floor 17, New York, NY 10005-4001, 212-248-5000, or go to http://www.iesna.org.

(1) Illuminating Engineering Society of North America Lighting Handbook, 8th Edition, 1993.

(2) [Reserved]

(c) IEEE. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., 3 Park Avenue, 17th Floor, New York, NY, 10016-5997, 212-419-7900, or go to http://www.ieee.org.

(1) IEEE 1515-2000, IEEE Recommended Practice for Electronic Power Subsystems: Parameter Definitions, Test Conditions, and Test Methods, March 30, 2000.

(2) IEEE 100, Authoritative Dictionary of IEEE Standards Terms, 7th Edition, January 1, 2006.

(d) IEC. International Electrotechnical Commission, available from the American National Standards Institute, 11 W. 42nd Street, New York, NY 10036, 212-642-4936, or go to http://www.iec.ch.

(1) IEC 62301, Household electrical appliances—Measurement of standby power, First Edition, June 13, 2005.

(2) IEC 60050, International Electrotechnical Vocabulary.

(e) National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program, Standards Services Division, NIST, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 2140, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-2140, 301-975-4016, or go to http://ts.nist.gov/standards/accreditation.

(1) National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Handbook 150-01, Energy Efficient Lighting Products, Lamps and Luminaires, August 1993.

(2) [Reserved]

[74 FR 12066, Mar. 23, 2009]

Subpart B—Test Procedures

§430.21   Purpose and scope.

This subpart contains test procedures required to be prescribed by DOE pursuant to section 323 of the Act.

§430.23   Test procedures for the measurement of energy and water consumption.

Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 22349, Apr. 21, 2014.

When the test procedures of this section call for rounding off of test results, and the results fall equally between two values of the nearest dollar, kilowatt-hour, or other specified nearest value, the result shall be rounded up to the nearest higher value.

(a) Refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers. (1) The estimated annual operating cost for electric refrigerators and electric refrigerator-freezers without an anti-sweat heater switch shall be the product of the following three factors, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year:

(i) The representative average-use cycle of 365 cycles per year;

(ii) The average per-cycle energy consumption for the standard cycle in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 6.2 (6.3.6 for externally vented units) of appendix A1 of this subpart before appendix A becomes mandatory and 6.2 (6.3.6 for externally vented units) of appendix A of this subpart after appendix A becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix A); and

(iii) The representative average unit cost of electricity in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided by the Secretary.

(2) The estimated annual operating cost for electric refrigerators and electric refrigerator-freezers with an anti-sweat heater switch shall be the product of the following three factors, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year:

(i) The representative average-use cycle of 365 cycles per year;

(ii) Half the sum of the average per-cycle energy consumption for the standard cycle and the average per-cycle energy consumption for a test cycle type with the anti-sweat heater switch in the position set at the factory just before shipping, each in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 6.2 (6.3.6 for externally vented units) of appendix A1 of this subpart before appendix A becomes mandatory and 6.2 (6.3.6 for externally vented units) of appendix A of this subpart after appendix A becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix A); and

(iii) The representative average unit cost of electricity in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided by the Secretary.

(3) The estimated annual operating cost for any other specified cycle type for electric refrigerators and electric refrigerator-freezers shall be the product of the following three factors, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year:

(i) The representative average-use cycle of 365 cycles per year;

(ii) The average per-cycle energy consumption for the specified cycle type, determined according to 6.2 (6.3.6 for externally vented units) of appendix A1 to this subpart before appendix A becomes mandatory and 6.2 (6.3.6 for externally vented units) of appendix A of this subpart after appendix A becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix A); and

(iii) The representative average unit cost of electricity in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided by the Secretary.

(4) The energy factor for electric refrigerators and electric refrigerator-freezers, expressed in cubic feet per kilowatt-hour per cycle, shall be:

(i) For electric refrigerators and electric refrigerator-freezers without an anti-sweat heater switch, the quotient of:

(A) The adjusted total volume in cubic feet, determined according to 6.1 of appendix A1 of this subpart before appendix A becomes mandatory and 6.1 of appendix A of this subpart after appendix A becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix A), divided by—

(B) The average per-cycle energy consumption for the standard cycle in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 6.2 (6.3.6 for externally vented units) of appendix A1 of this subpart before appendix A becomes mandatory and 6.2 (6.3.6 for externally vented units) of appendix A of this subpart after appendix A becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix A), the resulting quotient then being rounded off to the second decimal place; and

(ii) For electric refrigerators and electric refrigerator-freezers having an anti-sweat heater switch, the quotient of:

(A) The adjusted total volume in cubic feet, determined according to 6.1 of appendix A1 of this subpart before appendix A becomes mandatory and 6.1 of appendix A of this subpart after appendix A becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix A), divided by —

(B) Half the sum of the average per-cycle energy consumption for the standard cycle and the average per-cycle energy consumption for a test cycle type with the anti-sweat heater switch in the position set at the factory just before shipping, each in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 6.2 (6.3.6 for externally vented units) of appendix A1 of this subpart before appendix A becomes mandatory and 6.2 (6.3.6 for externally vented units) of appendix A of this subpart after appendix A becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix A), the resulting quotient then being rounded off to the second decimal place.

(5) The annual energy use of electric refrigerators and electric refrigerator-freezers, expressed in kilowatt-hours per year, shall be the following, rounded to the nearest kilowatt-hour per year:

(i) For electric refrigerators and electric refrigerator-freezers without an anti-sweat heater switch, the representative average use cycle of 365 cycles per year multiplied by the average per-cycle energy consumption for the standard cycle in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 6.2 (6.3.6 for externally vented units) of appendix A1 of this subpart before appendix A becomes mandatory and 6.2 (6.3.6 for externally vented units) of appendix A of this subpart after appendix A becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix A), and

(ii) For electric refrigerators and electric refrigerator-freezers having an anti-sweat heater switch, the representative average use cycle of 365 cycles per year multiplied by half the sum of the average per-cycle energy consumption for the standard cycle and the average per-cycle energy consumption for a test cycle type with the anti-sweat heater switch in the position set at the factory just before shipping, each in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 6.2 (6.3.6 for externally vented units) of appendix A1 of this subpart before appendix A becomes mandatory and 6.2 (6.3.6 for externally vented units) of appendix A of this subpart after appendix A becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix A).

(6) Other useful measures of energy consumption for electric refrigerators and electric refrigerator-freezers shall be those measures of energy consumption for electric refrigerators and electric refrigerator-freezers that the Secretary determines are likely to assist consumers in making purchasing decisions which are derived from the application of appendix A1 of this subpart before appendix A becomes mandatory appendix A of this subpart after appendix A becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix A).

(7) The estimated regional annual operating cost for externally vented electric refrigerators and externally vented electric refrigerator-freezers without an anti-sweat heater switch shall be the product of the following three factors, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year:

(i) The representative average-use cycle of 365 cycles per year,

(ii) The regional average per-cycle energy consumption for the standard cycle in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 6.3.7 of appendix A1 of this subpart before appendix A becomes mandatory and 6.3.7 of appendix A of this subpart after appendix A becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix A); and

(iii) The representative average unit cost of electricity in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided by the Secretary.

(8) The estimated regional annual operating cost for externally vented electric refrigerators and externally vented electric refrigerator-freezers with an anti-sweat heater switch shall be the product of the following three factors, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year:

(i) The representative average-use cycle of 365 cycles per year;

(ii) Half the sum of the average per-cycle energy consumption for the standard cycle and the regional average per-cycle energy consumption for a test cycle with the anti-sweat heater switch in the position set at the factory just before shipping, each in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 6.3.7 of appendix A1 of this subpart before appendix A becomes mandatory and 6.3.7 of appendix A of this subpart after appendix A becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix A); and

(iii) The representative average unit cost of electricity in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided by the Secretary.

(9) The estimated regional annual operating cost for any other specified cycle for externally vented electric refrigerators and externally vented electric refrigerator-freezers shall be the product of the following three factors, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year:

(i) The representative average-use cycle of 365 cycles per year;

(ii) The regional average per-cycle energy consumption for the specified cycle, in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 6.3.7 of appendix A1 of this subpart before appendix A becomes mandatory and 6.3.7 of appendix A of this subpart after appendix A becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix A); and

(iii) The representative average unit cost of electricity in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided by the Secretary.

(10) The following principles of interpretation should be applied to the test procedure. The intent of the energy test procedure is to simulate typical room conditions (approximately 70 °F (21 °C)) with door openings, by testing at 90 °F (32.2 °C) without door openings. Except for operating characteristics that are affected by ambient temperature (for example, compressor percent run time), the unit, when tested under this test procedure, shall operate in a manner equivalent to the unit in typical room conditions. The energy used by the unit shall be calculated when a calculation is provided by the test procedure. Energy consuming components that operate in typical room conditions (including as a result of door openings, or a function of humidity), and that are not exempted by this test procedure, shall operate in an equivalent manner during energy testing under this test procedure, or be accounted for by all calculations as provided for in the test procedure. If:

(i) A product contains energy consuming components that operate differently during the prescribed testing than they would during representative average consumer use and

(ii) Applying the prescribed test to that product would evaluate it in a manner that is unrepresentative of its true energy consumption (thereby providing materially inaccurate comparative data), a manufacturer must obtain a waiver in accordance with the relevant provisions of 10 CFR part 430. Examples:

A. Energy saving features that are designed to be activated by a lack of door openings shall not be functional during the energy test.

B. The defrost heater should not either function or turn off differently during the energy test than it would when operating in typical room conditions.

C. Electric heaters that would normally operate at typical room conditions with door openings should also operate during the energy test.

D. Energy used during adaptive defrost shall continue to be tested and adjusted per the calculation provided for in this test procedure.

(b) Freezers. (1) The estimated annual operating cost for freezers without an anti-sweat heater switch shall be the product of the following three factors, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year:

(i) The representative average-use cycle of 365 cycles per year;

(ii) The average per-cycle energy consumption for the standard cycle in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 6.2 of appendix B1 of this subpart before appendix B becomes mandatory and 6.2 of appendix B of this subpart after appendix B becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix B); and

(iii) The representative average unit cost of electricity in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided by the Secretary.

(2) The estimated annual operating cost for freezers with an anti-sweat heater switch shall be the product of the following three factors, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year:

(i) The representative average-use cycle of 365 cycles per year;

(ii) Half the sum of the average per-cycle energy consumption for the standard cycle and the average per-cycle energy consumption for a test cycle type with the anti-sweat heater switch in the position set at the factory just before shipping, each in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 6.2 of appendix B1 of this subpart before appendix B becomes mandatory and 6.2 of appendix B of this subpart after appendix B becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix B); and

(iii) The representative average unit cost of electricity in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided by the Secretary.

(3) The estimated annual operating cost for any other specified cycle type for freezers shall be the product of the following three factors, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year:

(i) The representative average-use cycle of 365 cycles per year;

(ii) The average per-cycle energy consumption for the specified cycle type, determined according to 6.2 of appendix B1 of this subpart before appendix B becomes mandatory and 6.2 of appendix B of this subpart after appendix B becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix B); and

(iii) The representative average unit cost of electricity in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided by the Secretary.

(4) The energy factor for freezers, expressed in cubic feet per kilowatt-hour per cycle, shall be:

(i) For freezers not having an anti-sweat heater switch, the quotient of:

(A) The adjusted net refrigerated volume in cubic feet, determined according to 6.1 of appendix B1 of this subpart before appendix B becomes mandatory and 6.1 of appendix B of this subpart after appendix B becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix B), divided by—

(B) The average per-cycle energy consumption for the standard cycle in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 6.2 of appendix B1 of this subpart before appendix B becomes mandatory and 6.2 of appendix B of this subpart after appendix B becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix B), the resulting quotient then being rounded off to the second decimal place; and

(ii) For freezers having an anti-sweat heater switch, the quotient of:

(A) The adjusted net refrigerated volume in cubic feet, determined according to 6.1 of appendix B1 of this subpart before appendix B becomes mandatory and 6.1 of appendix B of this subpart after appendix B becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix B), divided by—

(B) Half the sum of the average per-cycle energy consumption for the standard cycle and the average per-cycle energy consumption for a test cycle type with the anti-sweat heater switch in the position set at the factory just before shipping, each in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 6.2 of appendix B1 of this subpart before appendix B becomes mandatory and 6.2 of appendix B of this subpart after appendix B becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix B), the resulting quotient then being rounded off to the second decimal place.

(5) The annual energy use of all freezers, expressed in kilowatt-hours per year, shall be the following, rounded to the nearest kilowatt-hour per year:

(i) For freezers not having an anti-sweat heater switch, the representative average use cycle of 365 cycles per year multiplied by the average per-cycle energy consumption for the standard cycle in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 6.2 of appendix B1 of this subpart before appendix B becomes mandatory and 6.2 of appendix B of this subpart after appendix B becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix B), and

(ii) For freezers having an anti-sweat heater switch, the representative average use cycle of 365 cycles per year multiplied by half the sum of the average per-cycle energy consumption for the standard cycle and the average per-cycle energy consumption for a test cycle type with the anti-sweat heater switch in the position set at the factory just before shipping, each in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 6.2 of appendix B1 of this subpart before appendix B becomes mandatory and 6.2 of appendix B of this subpart after appendix B becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix B).

(6) Other useful measures of energy consumption for freezers shall be those measures the Secretary determines are likely to assist consumers in making purchasing decisions and are derived from the application of appendix B1 of this subpart before appendix B becomes mandatory and appendix B of this subpart after appendix B becomes mandatory (see the note at the beginning of appendix B).

(7) The following principles of interpretation should be applied to the test procedure. The intent of the energy test procedure is to simulate typical room conditions (approximately 70 °F (21 °C)) with door openings, by testing at 90 °F (32.2 °C) without door openings. Except for operating characteristics that are affected by ambient temperature (for example, compressor percent run time), the unit, when tested under this test procedure, shall operate in a manner equivalent to the unit in typical room conditions. The energy used by the unit shall be calculated when a calculation is provided by the test procedure. Energy consuming components that operate in typical room conditions (including as a result of door openings, or a function of humidity), and that are not exempted by this test procedure, shall operate in an equivalent manner during energy testing under this test procedure, or be accounted for by all calculations as provided for in the test procedure. If:

(i) A product contains energy consuming components that operate differently during the prescribed testing than they would during representative average consumer use and

(ii) Applying the prescribed test to that product would evaluate it in a manner that is unrepresentative of its true energy consumption (thereby providing materially inaccurate comparative data), a manufacturer must obtain a waiver in accordance with the relevant provisions of 10 CFR part 430. Examples:

A. Energy saving features that are designed to be activated by a lack of door openings hall not be functional during the energy test.

B. The defrost heater should not either function or turn off differently during the energy test than it would when in typical room conditions.

C. Electric heaters that would normally operate at typical room conditions with door openings should also operate during the energy test.

D. Energy used during adaptive defrost shall continue to be tested and adjusted per the calculation provided for in this test procedure.

(c) Dishwashers. (1) The Estimated Annual Operating Cost (EAOC) for dishwashers must be rounded to the nearest dollar per year and is defined as follows:

(i) When cold water (50 °F) is used,

(A) When using appendix C (see the note at the beginning of appendix C), for dishwashers having a truncated normal cycle as defined in section 1.15 of appendix C to this subpart, EAOC = (De × S) + (De × N × (M−(ED/2))).

(B) When using appendix C1 (see the note at the beginning of appendix C1), for dishwashers having a truncated normal cycle as defined in section 1.22 of appendix C1 to this subpart, EAOC = (De × ETLP) + (De × N × (M + MWS + EF−(ED/2))).

(C) When using appendix C (see the note at the beginning of appendix C), for dishwashers not having a truncated normal cycle, EAOC = (De × S) + (De × N × M).

(D) When using appendix C1 (see the note at the beginning of appendix C1), for dishwashers not having a truncated normal cycle, EAOC = (De × ETLP) + (De × N × (M + MWS + EF)).

Where,

De = the representative average unit cost of electrical energy, in dollars per kilowatt-hour, as provided by the Secretary,

S = the estimated annual standby energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per year and determined according to section 5.6 of appendix C to this subpart,

ETLP = the annual combined low-power mode energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per year and determined according to section 5.7 of appendix C1 to this subpart,

N = the representative average dishwasher use of 215 cycles per year,

M = the machine energy consumption per cycle for the normal cycle, as defined in section 1.6 of appendix C to this subpart, in kilowatt-hours and determined according to section 5.1 of appendix C to this subpart when using appendix C (see the note at the beginning of appendix C); the normal cycle is defined in section 1.12 of appendix C1 to this subpart, and the machine energy consumption per cycle in kilowatt-hours must be determined according to section 5.1.1 of appendix C1 to this subpart for non-soil-sensing dishwashers and section 5.1.2 of appendix C1 to this subpart for soil-sensing dishwashers when using appendix C1 (see the note at the beginning of appendix C1),

MWS = the machine energy consumption per cycle for water softener regeneration, in kilowatt-hours and determined according to section 5.1.3 of appendix C1 to this subpart,

EF = the fan-only mode energy consumption per cycle, in kilowatt-hours and determined according to section 5.2 of appendix C1 to this subpart, and

ED = the drying energy consumption, in kilowatt-hours and defined as energy consumed using the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse option of the normal cycle; ED is determined according to section 5.2 of appendix C to this subpart when using appendix C (see the note at the beginning of appendix C), and determined according to section 5.3 of appendix C1 to this subpart when using appendix C1 (see the note at the beginning of appendix C1),

(E) Manufacturers calculating EAOC pursuant to paragraph (c)(1)(i)(A) of this section should calculate EAEU pursuant to paragraph (c)(2)(i)(A) of this section. Manufacturers calculating EAOC pursuant to paragraphs (c)(1)(i)(B) of this section should calculate EAEU pursuant to paragraph (c)(2)(i)(B) of this section. Manufacturers calculating EAOC pursuant to paragraph (c)(1)(i)(C) of this section should calculate EAEU pursuant to paragraph (c)(2)(ii)(A) of this section. Manufacturers calculating EAOC pursuant to paragraph (c)(1)(i)(D) of this section should calculate EAEU pursuant to paragraph (c)(2)(ii)(B) of this section.

(ii) When electrically-heated water (120 °F or 140 °F) is used,

(A) When using appendix C (see the note at the beginning of appendix C), for dishwashers having a truncated normal cycle as defined in section 1.15 of appendix C to this subpart, EAOC = (De × S) + (De × N × (M−(ED/2))) + (De × N × W).

(B) When using appendix C1 (see the note at the beginning of appendix C1), for dishwashers having a truncated normal cycle as defined in section 1.22 of appendix C1 to this subpart, EAOC = (De × ETLP) + (De × N × (M + MWS + EF−(ED/2))) + (De × N × (W + WWS)).

(C) When using appendix C (see the note at the beginning of appendix C), for dishwashers not having a truncated normal cycle, EAOC = (De × S) + (De × N × M) + (De × N × W).

(D) When using appendix C1 (see the note at the beginning of appendix C1), for dishwashers not having a truncated normal cycle, EAOC = (De × ETLP) + (De × N × (M + MWS + EF)) + (De × N × (W + WWS)).

Where,

De, S, ETLP, N, M, MWS, EF, and ED, are defined in paragraph (c)(1)(i) of this section,

W = the water energy consumption per cycle for the normal cycle as defined in section 1.6 of appendix C to this subpart, in kilowatt-hours and determined according to section 5.4 of appendix C to this subpart when using appendix C (see the note at the beginning of appendix C); when using appendix C1 (see the note at the beginning of appendix C1), the normal cycle is as defined in section 1.12 of appendix C1 to this subpart, and the water energy consumption per cycle in kilowatt-hours is determined according to section 5.5.1.1 of appendix C1 to this subpart for dishwashers that operate with a nominal 140 °F inlet water temperature and section 5.5.2.1 of appendix C1 to this subpart for dishwashers that operate with a nominal inlet water temperature of 120 °F, and

WWS = the water softener regeneration water energy consumption per cycle in kilowatt-hours and determined according to section 5.5.1.2 of appendix C1 to this subpart for dishwashers that operate with a nominal 140 °F inlet water temperature and section 5.5.2.2 of appendix C1 to this subpart for dishwashers that operate with a nominal inlet water temperature of 120 °F.

(E) Manufacturers calculating EAOC pursuant to paragraph (c)(1)(ii)(A) of this section should calculate EAEU pursuant to paragraph (c)(2)(i)(A) of this section. Manufacturers calculating EAOC pursuant to paragraphs (c)(1)(ii)(B) of this section should calculate EAEU pursuant to paragraph (c)(2)(i)(B) of this section. Manufacturers calculating EAOC pursuant to paragraph (c)(1)(ii)(C) of this section should calculate EAEU pursuant to paragraph (c)(2)(ii)(A) of this section. Manufacturers calculating EAOC pursuant to paragraph (c)(1)(ii)(D) of this section should calculate EAEU pursuant to paragraph (c)(2)(ii)(B) of this section.

(iii) When gas-heated or oil-heated water is used,

(A) When using appendix C (see the note at the beginning of appendix C), for dishwashers having a truncated normal cycle as defined in section 1.15 of appendix C to this subpart, EAOCg = (De × S) + (De × N × (M−(ED/2))) + (Dg × N × Wg).

(B) When using appendix C1 (see the note at the beginning of appendix C1), for dishwashers having a truncated normal cycle as defined in section 1.22 of appendix C1 to this subpart, EAOCg = (De × ETLP) + (De × N × (M + MWS + EF−(ED/2))) + (Dg × N × (Wg + WWSg)).

(C) When using appendix C (see the note at the beginning of appendix C), for dishwashers not having a truncated normal cycle, EAOCg = (De × S) + (De × N × M) + (Dg × N × Wg).

(D) When using appendix C1 (see the note at the beginning of appendix C1), for dishwashers not having a truncated normal cycle, EAOCg = (De × ETLP) + (De × N × (M + MWS + EF)) + (Dg × N × (Wg + WWSg)).

Where,

De, S, ETLP, N, M, MWS, EF, and ED are defined in paragraph (c)(1)(i) of this section,

Dg = the representative average unit cost of gas or oil, as appropriate, in dollars per Btu, as provided by the Secretary,

Wg = the water energy consumption per cycle for the normal cycle as defined in section 1.6 of appendix C to this subpart, in Btus and determined according to section 5.5 of appendix C to this subpart when using appendix C (see the note at the beginning of appendix C); when using appendix C1 (see the note at the beginning of appendix C1), the normal cycle is as defined in section 1.12 of appendix C1 to this subpart, and the water energy consumption per cycle in Btus is determined according to section 5.6.1.1 of appendix C1 to this subpart for dishwashers that operate with a nominal 140 °F inlet water temperature and section 5.6.2.1 of appendix C1 to this subpart for dishwashers that operate with a nominal inlet water temperature of 120 °F and

WWSg = the water softener regeneration energy consumption per cycle in Btu per cycle and determined according to section 5.6.1.2 of appendix C1 to this subpart for dishwashers that operate with a nominal 140 °F inlet water temperature and section 5.6.2.2 of appendix C1 to this subpart for dishwashers that operate with a nominal inlet water temperature of 120 °F.

(E) Manufacturers calculating EAOC pursuant to paragraph (c)(1)(iii)(A) of this section should calculate EAEU pursuant to paragraph (c)(2)(i)(A) of this section. Manufacturers calculating EAOC pursuant to paragraphs (c)(1)(iii)(B) of this section should calculate EAEU pursuant to paragraph (c)(2)(i)(B) of this section. Manufacturers calculating EAOC pursuant to paragraph (c)(1)(iii)(C) of this section should calculate EAEU pursuant to paragraph (c)(2)(ii)(A) of this section. Manufacturers calculating EAOC pursuant to paragraph (c)(1)(iii)(D) of this section should calculate EAEU pursuant to paragraph (c)(2)(ii)(B) of this section.

(2) The estimated annual energy use, EAEU, expressed in kilowatt-hours per year must be rounded to the nearest kilowatt-hour per year and is defined as follows:

(i) When using appendix C (see the note at the beginning of appendix C), for dishwashers having a truncated normal cycle as defined in section 1.15 of appendix C to this subpart and when using appendix C1 (see the note at the beginning of appendix C), as defined in section 1.22 of appendix C1 to this subpart,

(A) EAEU = (M−(ED/2) + W) × N + S may be used for units manufactured:

(1) Before April 29, 2013 to make representations of energy efficiency; and

(2) Before the compliance date of any amended standards to demonstrate compliance.

(B) EAEU = (M + MWS + EF−(ED/2) + W + WWS) × N + (ETLP) must be used for units manufactured:

(1) On or after April 29, 2013 to make representations of energy efficiency; and

(2) On or after the compliance date of any amended standards to demonstrate compliance.

Where,

M, MWS, S, ED, N, EF, and ETLP are defined in paragraph (c)(1)(i) of this section, and W and WWS, are defined in paragraph (c)(1)(ii) of this section.

(C) Manufacturers calculating EAEU pursuant to paragraph (c)(2)(i)(A) of this section should calculate EAOC pursuant to paragraph (c)(1)(i)(A), (c)(1)(ii)(A), or (c)(1)(iii)(A) of this section, as appropriate. Manufacturers calculating EAEU pursuant to paragraph (c)(2)(i)(B) of this section should calculate EAOC pursuant to paragraph (c)(1)(i)(B), (c)(1)(ii)(B), or (c)(1)(iii)(B) of this section, as appropriate.

(ii) For dishwashers not having a truncated normal cycle:

(A) EAEU = (M + W) × N + S may be used for units manufactured:

(1) Before April 29, 2013 to make representations of energy efficiency; and

(2) Before the compliance date of any amended standards to demonstrate compliance.

(B) EAEU = (M + MWS + EF + W + WWS) × N + ETLP must be used for units manufactured:

(1) On or after April 29, 2013 to make representations of energy efficiency; and

(2) On or after the compliance date of any amended standards to demonstrate compliance.

Where,

M, MWS, S, N, EF, and ETLP are defined in paragraph (c)(1)(i) of this section, and W and WWS are defined in paragraph (c)(1)(ii) of this section.

(C) Manufacturers calculating EAEU pursuant to paragraph (c)(2)(ii)(A) of this section should calculate EAOC pursuant to paragraph (c)(1)(i)(C), (c)(1)(ii)(C), or (c)(1)(iii)(C) of this section, as appropriate. Manufacturers calculating EAEU pursuant to paragraph (c)(2)(ii)(B) of this section should calculate EAOC pursuant to paragraph (c)(1)(i)(D), (c)(1)(ii)(D), or (c)(1)(iii)(D) of this section, as appropriate.

(3) When using appendix C (see the note at the beginning of appendix C), the water consumption, V, expressed in gallons per cycle and defined in section 5.3 of appendix C to this subpart, and when using appendix C1 (see the note at the beginning of appendix C1), water consumption, V, and the sum of the water consumption, V, and the water consumption during water softener regeneration, VWS, expressed in gallons per cycle and defined in section 5.4 of appendix C1 to this subpart, must be rounded to one decimal place.

(i) Water consumption, V, may be measured for units manufactured:

(A) Before April 29, 2013 to make representations of energy efficiency; and

(B) Before the compliance date of any amended standards to demonstrate compliance.

(ii) Manufacturers calculating water consumption pursuant to paragraph (c)(3)(i) of this section should calculate EAOC as described in paragraph (c)(1)(i)(A), (c)(1)(i)(C), (c)(1)(ii)(A), (c)(1)(ii)(C), (c)(1)(iii)(A), or (c)(1)(iii)(C) of this section, as appropriate. Manufacturers calculating water consumption pursuant to paragraph (c)(3)(i) of this section should calculate EAEU as described in paragraph (c)(2)(i)(A) or (c)(2)(ii)(A) of this section, as appropriate.

(iii) The sum of the water consumption, V, and the water consumption during water softener regeneration, VWS, must be measured for units manufactured:

(A) On or after April 29, 2013 to make representations of energy efficiency; and

(B) On or after the compliance date of any amended standards to demonstrate compliance.

(C) Manufacturers calculating water consumption pursuant to paragraph (c)(3)(iii) of this section should calculate EAOC as described in paragraph (c)(1)(i)(B), (c)(1)(i)(D), (c)(1)(ii)(B), (c)(1)(ii)(D), (c)(1)(iii)(B), or (c)(1)(iii)(D) of this section, as appropriate. Manufacturers calculating water consumption pursuant to paragraph (c)(3)(iii) of this section should calculate EAEU as described in paragraph (c)(2)(i)(B) or (c)(2)(ii)(B) of this section, as appropriate.

(4) Other useful measures of energy consumption for dishwashers are those which the Secretary determines are likely to assist consumers in making purchasing decisions and which are derived from the application of appendix C and appendix C1 to this subpart.

(d) Clothes dryers. (1) The estimated annual operating cost for clothes dryers shall be—

(i) For an electric clothes dryer, the product of the following three factors:

(A) The representative average-use cycle of 283 cycles per year,

(B) The per-cycle combined total energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per-cycle, determined according to 4.6 of appendix D1 to this subpart, and

(C) The representative average unit cost of electrical energy in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided by the Secretary, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year, and

(ii) For a gas clothes dryer, the product of the representative average-use cycle of 283 cycles per year times the sum of:

(A) The product of the per-cycle gas dryer electric energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 4.2 of appendix D1 to this subpart, times the representative average unit cost of electrical energy in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided by the Secretary plus,

(B) The product of the per-cycle gas dryer gas energy consumption, in Btus per cycle, determined according to 4.3 of appendix D1 to this subpart, times the representative average unit cost for natural gas or propane, as appropriate, in dollars per Btu as provided by the Secretary, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year plus,

(C) The product of the per-cycle standby mode and off mode energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to 4.5 of appendix D1 to this subpart, times the representative average unit cost of electrical energy in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided by the Secretary.

(2) The energy factor, expressed in pounds of clothes per kilowatt-hour, for clothes dryers shall be either the quotient of a 3-pound bone-dry test load for compact dryers, as defined by 2.7.1 of appendix D to this subpart before the date that appendix D1 becomes mandatory, or the quotient of a 7-pound bone-dry test load for standard dryers, as defined by 2.7.2 of appendix D to this subpart before the date that appendix D1 becomes mandatory, as applicable, divided by the clothes dryer energy consumption per cycle, as determined according to 4.1 for electric clothes dryers and 4.6 for gas clothes dryers of appendix D to this subpart before the date that appendix D1 becomes mandatory, the resulting quotient then being rounded off to the nearest hundredth (.01). Upon the date that appendix D1 to this subpart becomes mandatory, the energy factor is determined in accordance with 4.7 of appendix D1, the result then being rounded off to the nearest hundredth (.01).

(3) Upon the date that appendix D1 to this subpart becomes mandatory, the combined energy factor is determined in accordance with 4.8 of appendix D1, the result then being rounded off to the nearest hundredth (.01).

(4) Other useful measures of energy consumption for clothes dryers shall be those measures of energy consumption for clothes dryers which the Secretary determines are likely to assist consumers in making purchasing decisions and which are derived from the application of appendix D to this subpart before the date that appendix D1 becomes mandatory and appendix D1 upon the date that appendix D1 to this subpart becomes mandatory.

(e) Water Heaters. (1) The estimated annual operating cost for water heaters shall be—

(i) For a gas or oil water heater, the product of the annual energy consumption, determined according to section 6.1.8 or 6.2.5 of appendix E of this subpart, times the representative average unit cost of gas or oil, as appropriate, in dollars per Btu as provided by the Secretary, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year.

(ii) For an electric water heater, the product of the annual energy consumption, determined according to section 6.1.8 or 6.2.5 of appendix E of this subpart, times the representative average unit cost of electricity in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided by the Secretary, divided by 3412 Btu per kilowatt-hour, the resulting quotient then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year.

(2) The energy factor for the water heaters shall be—

(i) For a gas or oil water heater, as determined by section 6.1.7 or 6.2.4 of appendix E of this subpart rounded off to the nearest 0.01.

(ii) For an electric water heater, as determined by section 6.1.7 or 6.2.4 of appendix E of this subpart rounded off to the nearest 0.01.

(3) Other useful measures of energy consumption for water heaters shall be those measures of energy consumption for water heaters which the Secretary determines are likely to assist consumers in making purchasing decisions and which are derived from the application of appendix E of this subpart.

(4) The alternative uniform test method for measuring the energy consumption of untested water heaters shall be that set forth in section 7.0 of appendix E of this subpart.

(f) Room air conditioners. (1) The estimated annual operating cost for room air conditioners, expressed in dollars per year, shall be determined by multiplying the following three factors:

(i) The combined annual energy consumption for room air conditioners, expressed in kilowatt-hours per year, as determined in accordance with paragraph (f)(4) of this section, and

(ii) A representative average unit cost of electrical energy in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided by the Secretary, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year.

(2) The energy efficiency ratio for room air conditioners, expressed in Btus per watt-hour, shall be the quotient of:

(i) The cooling capacity in Btus per hour as determined in accordance with 5.1 of appendix F to this subpart divided by:

(ii) The electrical input power in watts as determined in accordance with 5.2 of appendix F to this subpart, the resulting quotient then being rounded off to the nearest 0.1 Btu per watt-hour.

(3) The average annual energy consumption for room air conditioners, expressed in kilowatt-hours per year, shall be determined by multiplying together the following two factors:

(i) Electrical input power in kilowatts as determined in accordance with 5.2 of appendix F to this subpart, and

(ii) The representative average-use cycle of 750 hours of compressor operation per year, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest kilowatt-hour per year.

(4) The combined annual energy consumption for room air conditioners, expressed in kilowatt-hours per year, shall be the sum of:

(i) The average annual energy consumption as determined in accordance with paragraph (f)(4) of this section, and

(ii) The standby mode and off mode energy consumption, as determined in accordance with 5.3 of appendix F to this subpart, the resulting sum then being rounded off to the nearest kilowatt-hour per year.

(5) The combined energy efficiency ratio for room air conditioners, expressed in Btu's per watt-hour, shall be the quotient of:

(i) The cooling capacity in Btus per hour as determined in accordance with 5.1 of appendix F to this subpart multiplied by the representative average-use cycle of 750 hours of compressor operation per year, divided by

(ii) The combined annual energy consumption as determined in accordance with paragraph (f)(4) of this section multiplied by a conversion factor of 1,000 to convert kilowatt-hours to watt-hours, the resulting quotient then being rounded off to the nearest 0.1 Btu per watt-hour.

(g) Unvented home heating equipment. (1) The estimated annual operating cost for primary electric heaters, shall be the product of: (i) The average annual electric energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per year, determined according to section 3.1 of appendix G of this subpart and (ii) the representative average unit cost in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year.

(2) The estimated regional annual operating cost for primary electric heaters, shall be the product of: (i) The regional annual electric energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per year for primary heaters determined according to section 3.2 of appendix G of this subpart and (ii) the representative average unit cost in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year.

(3) The estimated operating cost per million Btu output shall be—

(i) For primary and supplementary electric heaters and unvented gas and oil heaters without an auxiliary electric system, the product of: (A) One million; and (B) the representative unit cost in dollars per Btu for natural gas, propane, or oil, as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act as appropriate, or the quotient of the representative unit cost in dollars per kilowatt-hour, as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act, divided by 3,412 Btu per kilowatt hour, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest 0.01 dollar per million Btu output; and

(ii) For unvented gas and oil heaters with an auxiliary electric system, the product of: (A) The quotient of one million divided by the rated output in Btu's per hour as determined in 3.4 of appendix G of this subpart; and (B) the sum of: (1) The product of the maximum fuel input in Btu's per hour as determined in 2.2. of this appendix times the representative unit cost in dollars per Btu for natural gas, propane, or oil, as appropriate, as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act, plus (2) the product of the maximum auxiliary electric power in kilowatts as determined in 2.1 of appendix G of this subpart times the representative unit cost in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act, the resulting quantity shall be rounded off to the nearest 0.01 dollar per million Btu output.

(4) The rated output for unvented heaters is the rated output as determined according to either sections 3.3 or 3.4 of appendix G of this subpart, as appropriate, with the result being rounded to the nearest 100 Btu per hour.

(5) Other useful measures of energy consumption for unvented home heating equipment shall be those measures of energy consumption for unvented home heating equipment which the Secretary determines are likely to assist consumers in making purchasing decisions and which are derived from the application of appendix G of this subpart.

(h) Television sets. The power consumption of a television set, expressed in watts, including on mode, standby mode, and off mode power consumption values, shall be measured in accordance with sections 7.1, 7.3, and 7.4 of appendix H of this subpart respectively. The annual energy consumption, expressed in kilowatt-hours per year, shall be measured in accordance with section 8 of appendix H of this subpart.

(i) Kitchen ranges and ovens. (1) The estimated annual operating cost for conventional ranges, conventional cooking tops, and conventional ovens shall be the sum of the following products:

(i) The total integrated annual electrical energy consumption for any electrical energy usage, in kilowatt-hours (kWhs) per year, times the representative average unit cost for electricity, in dollars per kWh, as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act; plus

(ii) The total annual gas energy consumption for any natural gas usage, in British thermal units (Btus) per year, times the representative average unit cost for natural gas, in dollars per Btu, as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act; plus

(iii) The total annual gas energy consumption for any propane usage, in Btus per year, times the representative average unit cost for propane, in dollars per Btu, as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act. The total annual energy consumption for conventional ranges, conventional cooking tops, and conventional ovens shall be as determined according to sections 4.3, 4.2.2, and 4.1.2, respectively, of appendix I to this subpart. For conventional gas cooking tops, total integrated annual electrical energy consumption shall be equal to ECTSO, defined in section 4.2.2.2.4 of appendix I to this subpart. The estimated annual operating cost shall be rounded off to the nearest dollar per year.

(2) The cooking efficiency for conventional cooking tops and conventional ovens shall be the ratio of the cooking energy output for the test to the cooking energy input for the test, as determined according to sections 4.2.1 and 4.1.3, respectively, of appendix I to this subpart. The final cooking efficiency values shall be rounded off to three significant digits.

(3) The standby power for microwave ovens shall be determined according to 3.2.3 of appendix I to this subpart. The standby power shall be rounded off to the nearest 0.1 watt.

(4) The energy factor for conventional ranges, conventional cooking tops, and conventional ovens shall be the ratio of the annual useful cooking energy output to the total annual energy input, as determined according to sections 4.3, 4.2.3.1, and 4.1.4.1, respectively, of appendix I to this subpart. The final energy factor values shall be rounded off to three significant digits.

(5) The integrated energy factor for conventional ranges, conventional cooking tops, and conventional ovens shall be the ratio of the annual useful cooking energy output to the total integrated annual energy input, as determined according to sections 4.3, 4.2.3.2, and 4.1.4.2, respectively, of appendix I to this subpart. The final integrated energy factor values shall be rounded off to three significant digits.

(6) There shall be two estimated annual operating costs, two cooking efficiencies, and two energy factors for convertible cooking appliances—

(i) An estimated annual operating cost, a cooking efficiency, and an energy factor which represent values for those three measures of energy consumption for the operation of the appliance with natural gas; and

(ii) An estimated annual operating cost, a cooking efficiency, and an energy factor which represent values for those three measures of energy consumption for the operation of the appliance with LP-gas.

(7) There shall be two integrated energy factors for convertible cooking appliances—

(i) An integrated energy factor which represents the value for this measure of energy consumption for the operation of the appliance with natural gas; and

(ii) An integrated energy factor which represents the value for this measure of energy consumption for the operation of the appliance with LP-gas.

(8) The estimated annual operating cost for convertible cooking appliances which represents natural gas usage, as described in paragraph (i)(6)(i) of this section, shall be determined according to paragraph (i)(1) of this section using the total annual gas energy consumption for natural gas times the representative average unit cost for natural gas.

(9) The estimated annual operating cost for convertible cooking appliances which represents LP-gas usage, as described in paragraph (i)(6)(ii) of this section, shall be determined according to paragraph (i)(1) of this section using the representative average unit cost for propane times the total annual energy consumption of the test gas, either propane or natural gas.

(10) The cooking efficiency for convertible cooking appliances which represents natural gas usage, as described in paragraph (i)(6)(i) of this section, shall be determined according to paragraph (i)(2) of this section when the appliance is tested with natural gas.

(11) The cooking efficiency for convertible cooking appliances which represents LP-gas usage, as described in paragraph (i)(6)(ii) of this section, shall be determined according to paragraph (i)(2) of this section, when the appliance is tested with either natural gas or propane.

(12) The energy factor for convertible cooking appliances which represents natural gas usage, as described in paragraph (i)(6)(i) of this section, shall be determined according to paragraph (i)(4) of this section when the appliance is tested with natural gas.

(13) The integrated energy factor for convertible cooking appliances which represents natural gas usage, as described in paragraph (i)(7)(i) of this section, shall be determined according to paragraph (i)(5) of this section when the appliance is tested with natural gas.

(14) The energy factor for convertible cooking appliances which represents LP-gas usage, as described in paragraph (i)(6)(ii) of this section, shall be determined according to paragraph (i)(4) of this section when the appliance is tested with either natural gas or propane.

(15) The integrated energy factor for convertible cooking appliances which represents LP-gas usage, as described in paragraph (i)(7)(ii) of this section, shall be determined according to paragraph (i)(5) of this section when the appliance is tested with natural gas or propane.

(16) Other useful measures of energy consumption for conventional ranges, conventional cooking tops, and conventional ovens shall be those measures of energy consumption which the Secretary determines are likely to assist consumers in making purchasing decisions and which are derived from the application of appendix I to this subpart.

(j) Clothes washers. (1) The estimated annual operating cost for automatic and semi-automatic clothes washers must be rounded off to the nearest dollar per year and is defined as follows:

(i) When using appendix J1 (see the note at the beginning of appendix J1),

(A) When electrically heated water is used,

(N1 × ETE1 × CKWH)

Where:

N1 = the representative average residential clothes washer use of 392 cycles per year according to appendix J1,

ETE1 = the total per-cycle energy consumption when electrically heated water is used, in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to section 4.1.7 of appendix J1, and

CKWH = the representative average unit cost, in dollars per kilowatt-hour, as provided by the Secretary.

(B) When gas-heated or oil-heated water is used,

(N1 × ((MET1 × CKWH) + (HETG1 × CBTU)))

Where:

N1 and CKWH are defined in paragraph (j)(1)(i)(A) of this section,

MET1 = the total weighted per-cycle machine electrical energy consumption, in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to section 4.1.6 of appendix J1,

HETG1 = the total per-cycle hot water energy consumption using gas-heated or oil-heated water, in Btu per cycle, determined according to section 4.1.4 of appendix J1, and

CBTU = the representative average unit cost, in dollars per Btu for oil or gas, as appropriate, as provided by the Secretary.

(ii) When using appendix J2 (see the note at the beginning of appendix J2),

(A) When electrically heated water is used,

(N2 × (ETE2 + ETSO) × CKWH)

Where:

N2 = the representative average residential clothes washer use of 295 cycles per year according to appendix J2,

ETE2 = the total per-cycle energy consumption when electrically heated water is used, in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to section 4.1.7 of appendix J2,

ETSO = the per-cycle combined low-power mode energy consumption, in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to section 4.4 of appendix J2, and

CKWH = the representative average unit cost, in dollars per kilowatt-hour, as provided by the Secretary.

(B) When gas-heated or oil-heated water is used,

(N2 × ((MET2 + ETSO) × CKWH) + (HETG2 × CBTU))

Where:

N2 and ETSO are defined in (j)(1)(ii)(A) of this section,

MET2 = the total weighted per-cycle machine electrical energy consumption, in kilowatt-hours per cycle, determined according to section 4.1.6 of appendix J2,

CKWH = the representative average unit cost, in dollars per kilowatt-hour, as provided by the Secretary,

HETG2 = the total per-cycle hot water energy consumption using gas-heated or oil-heated water, in Btu per cycle, determined according to section 4.1.4 of appendix J2,

CBTU = the representative average unit cost, in dollars per Btu for oil or gas, as appropriate, as provided by the Secretary.

(2)(i) The modified energy factor for automatic and semi-automatic clothes washers is determined according to section 4.4 of appendix J1 (when using appendix J1) and section 4.5 of appendix J2 (when using appendix J2). The result shall be rounded off to the nearest 0.01 cubic foot per kilowatt-hour per cycle.

(ii) The integrated modified energy factor for automatic and semi-automatic clothes washers is determined according to section 4.6 of appendix J2 (when using appendix J2). The result shall be rounded off to the nearest 0.01 cubic foot per kilowatt-hour per cycle.

(3) Other useful measures of energy consumption for automatic or semi-automatic clothes washers shall be those measures of energy consumption which the Secretary determines are likely to assist consumers in making purchasing decisions and which are derived from the application of appendix J1 or appendix J2, as appropriate. In addition, the annual water consumption of a clothes washer can be determined as:

(i) When using appendix J1, the product of the representative average-use of 392 cycles per year and the total weighted per-cycle water consumption in gallons per cycle determined according to section 4.2.2 of appendix J1. The water factor can be determined according to section 4.2.3 of appendix J1, with the result rounded off to the nearest 0.1 gallons per cycle per cubic foot. The remaining moisture content can be determined according to section 3.8 of appendix J1, with the result rounded off to the nearest 0.1 percent.

(ii) When using appendix J2, the product of the representative average-use of 295 cycles per year and the total weighted per-cycle water consumption for all wash cycles, in gallons per cycle, determined according to section 4.2.11 of appendix J2. The water factor can be determined according to section 4.2.12 of appendix J2, with the result rounded off to the nearest 0.1 gallons per cycle per cubic foot. The integrated water factor can be determined according to section 4.2.13 of appendix J2, with the result rounded off to the nearest 0.1 gallons per cycle per cubic foot. The remaining moisture content can be determined according to section 3.8 of appendix J2, with the result rounded off to the nearest 0.1 percent.

(k)-(l) [Reserved]

(m) Central Air Conditioners and heat pumps. (1) The estimated annual operating cost for cooling-only units and air-source heat pumps shall be one of the following:

(i) For cooling-only units or the cooling portion of the estimated annual operating cost for air-source heat pumps which provide both heating and cooling, the product of:

(A) The quotient of the cooling capacity, in Btu's per hour, determined from the steady-state wet-coil test (A or A2 Test), as described in section 3.2 of appendix M to this subpart, divided by the seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER), in Btu's per watt-hour, determined from section 4.1 of appendix M to this subpart;

(B) The representative average use cycle for cooling of 1,000 hours per year;

(C) A conversion factor of 0.001 kilowatt per watt; and

(D) The representative average unit cost of electricity in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year.

(ii) For air-source heat pumps which provide only heating or the heating portion of the estimated annual operating cost for air-source heat pumps which provide both heating and cooling, the product of:

(A) The quotient of the standardized design heating requirement, in Btu's per hour, nearest to the heating Region IV minimum design heating requirement, determined in section 4.2 of appendix M to this subpart, divided by the heating seasonal performance factor (HSPF), in Btu's per watt-hour, calculated for heating Region IV corresponding to the above-mentioned standardized design heating requirement and determined in section 4.2 of appendix M to this subpart;

(B) The representative average use cycle for heating of 2,080 hours per year;

(C) The adjustment factor of 0.77 which serves to adjust the calculated design heating requirement and heating load hours to the actual load experienced by a heating system;

(D) A conversion factor of 0.001 kilowatt per watt; and

(E) The representative average unit cost of electricity in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year.

(iii) For air-source heat pumps which provide both heating and cooling, the estimated annual operating cost is the sum of the quantity determined in paragraph (m)(1)(i) of this section added to the quantity determined in paragraph (m)(1)(ii) of this section.

(2) The estimated regional annual operating cost for cooling-only units and for air-source heat pumps shall be one of the following:

(i) For cooling-only units or the cooling portion of the estimated regional annual operating cost for air-source heat pumps which provide both heating and cooling, the product of:

(A) The quotient of the cooling capacity, in Btu's per hour, determined from the steady-state wet-coil test (A or A2 Test), as described in section 3.2 of appendix M to this subpart, divided by the seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER), in Btu's per watt-hour, determined from section 4.1 of appendix M to this subpart;

(B) The estimated number of regional cooling load hours per year determined from Figure 3 in section 4.3 of appendix M to this subpart;

(C) A conversion factor of 0.001 kilowatts per watt; and

(D) The representative average unit cost of electricity in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year.

(ii) For air-source heat pumps which provide only heating or the heating portion of the estimated regional annual operating cost for air-source heat pumps which provide both heating and cooling, the product of:

(A) The estimated number of regional heating load hours per year determined from Figure 2 in section 4.3 of appendix M to this subpart;

(B) The quotient of the standardized design heating requirement, in Btu's per hour, for the appropriate generalized climatic region of interest (i.e., corresponding to the regional heating load hours from “A”) and determined in section 4.2 of appendix M to this subpart, divided by the heating seasonal performance factor (HSPF), in Btu's per watt-hour, calculated for the appropriate generalized climatic region of interest and corresponding to the above-mentioned standardized design heating requirement while being determined in section 4.2 of appendix M to this subpart;

(C) The adjustment factor of 0.77 which serves to adjust the calculated design heating requirement and heating load hours to the actual load experienced by a heating system;

(D) A conversion factor of 0.001 kilowatts per watt; and

(E) The representative average unit cost of electricity in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year.

(iii) For air-source heat pumps which provide both heating and cooling, the estimated regional annual operating cost is the sum of the quantity determined in paragraph (m)(3)(i) of this section added to the quantity determined in paragraph (m)(3)(ii) of this section.

(3) The measure(s) of efficiency of performance for cooling-only units and air-source heat pumps shall be one or more of the following:

(i) The cooling mode efficiency measure for cooling-only units and air-source heat pumps which provide cooling shall be the seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER), in Btu's per watt-hour, determined according to section 4.1 of appendix M to this subpart, rounded off to the nearest 0.05.

(ii) The heating mode efficiency measure for air-source heat pumps shall be the heating seasonal performance factors (HSPF), in Btu's per watt-hour, determined according to section 4.2 of appendix M to this subpart for each applicable standardized design heating requirement within each climatic region, rounded off to the nearest 0.05.

(iii) The annual efficiency measure for air-source heat pumps which provide heating and cooling, shall be the annual performance factors (APF), in Btu's per watt-hour, determined according to section 4.3 of appendix M to this subpart for each standardized design heating requirement within each climatic region, rounded off to the nearest 0.05.

(4) The average off mode power consumption for central air conditioners and central air conditioning heat pumps shall be determined according to appendix M of this subpart. Round the average off mode power consumption to the nearest watt.

(5) Other useful measures of energy consumption for central air conditioners shall be those measures of energy consumption which the Secretary of Energy determines are likely to assist consumers in making purchasing decisions and which are derived from the application of appendix M to this subpart.

(6) All measures of energy consumption must be determined by the test method as set forth in appendix M to this subpart; or by an alternative rating method set forth in §430.24(m)(4) as approved by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in accordance with §430.24(m)(5).

(n) Furnaces. (1) The estimated annual operating cost for furnaces is the sum of: (i) The product of the average annual fuel energy consumption, in Btu's per year for gas or oil furnaces or in kilowatt-hours per year for electric furnaces, determined according to section 10.2.2 or 10.3 of appendix N of this subpart, respectively, and the representative average unit cost in dollars per Btu for gas or oil, or dollars per kilowatt-hour for electric, as appropriate, as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act, plus (ii) the product of the average annual auxiliary electric energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per year determined according to section 10.2.3 of appendix N of this subpart, and the representative average unit cost in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act, the resulting sum then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year. (For furnaces which operate with variable inputs, an estimated annual operating cost is to be calculated for each degree of oversizing specified in section 10 of appendix N of this subpart.)

(2) The annual fuel utilization efficiency for furnaces, expressed in percent, is the ratio of the annual fuel output of useful energy delivered to the heated space to the annual fuel energy input to the furnace determined according to section 10.1 of appendix N of this subpart for gas and oil furnaces and determined in accordance with section 11.1 of the American National Standards Institute/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ANSI/ASHRAE) Standard 103-1993 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3) for electric furnaces. Round the annual fuel utilization efficiency to the nearest whole percentage point.

(3) The estimated regional annual operating cost for furnaces is the sum of: (i) The product of the regional annual fuel energy consumption in Btu's per year for gas or oil furnaces or in kilowatt-hours per year for electric furnaces, determined according to section 10.5.1 or 10.5.3 of appendix N of this subpart, respectively, and the representative average unit cost in dollars per Btu for gas or oil, or dollars per kilowatt-hour for electric, as appropriate, as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act, plus (ii) the product of the regional annual auxiliary electrical energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per year, determined according to section 10.5.2 of appendix N of this subpart, and the representative average unit cost in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act, the resulting sum then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year.

(4) The energy factor for furnaces, expressed in percent, is the ratio of annual fuel output of useful energy delivered to the heated space to the total annual energy input to the furnace determined according to section 10.4 of appendix N of this subpart.

(5) The average standby mode and off mode electrical power consumption for furnaces shall be determined according to section 8.6 of appendix N of this subpart. Round the average standby mode and off mode electrical power consumption to the nearest watt.

(6) Other useful measures of energy consumption for furnaces shall be those measures of energy consumption which the Secretary determines are likely to assist consumers in making purchasing decisions and which are derived from the application of appendix N of this subpart.

(o) Vented home heating equipment. (1) The annual fuel utilization efficiency for vented home heating equipment, expressed in percent, which is the ratio of the annual fuel output of useful energy delivered to the heated space to the annual fuel energy input to the vented heater, shall be determined either according to section 4.1.17 of appendix O of this subpart for vented heaters without either manual controls or thermal stack dampers; according to section 4.2.6 of appendix O of this subpart for vented heaters equipped with manual controls; or according to section 4.3.7 of appendix O of this subpart for vented heaters equipped with thermal stack dampers.

(2) The estimated annual operating cost for vented home heating equipment is the sum of: (i) The product of the average annual fuel energy consumption, in Btu's per year for natural gas, propane, or oil fueled vented home heating equipment, determined according to section 4.6.2 of appendix O of this subpart, and the representative average unit cost in dollars per Btu for natural gas, propane, or oil, as appropriate, as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act; plus (ii) The product of the average annual auxiliary electric energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per year determined according to section 4.6.3 of appendix O of this subpart, and the representative average unit cost in dollars per kilowatt-hours as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act, the resulting sum then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year.

(3) The estimated operating cost per million Btu output for gas or oil vented home heating equipment with an auxiliary electric system shall be the product of: (A) The quotient of one million Btu divided by the sum of: (1) The product of the maximum fuel input in Btu's per hour as determined in 3.1.1 or 3.1.2 of appendix 0 of this subpart times the annual fuel utilization efficiency in percent as determined in 4.1.17, 4.2.6, or 4.3.7 of this appendix as appropriate divided by 100, plus (2) the product of the maximum electric power in watts as determined in 3.1.3 of appendix 0 of this subpart times the quantity 3.412; and (B) of the sum of: (1) the product of the maximum fuel input in Btu's per hour as determined in 3.1.1 of this appendix times the representative unit cost in dollars per Btu for natural gas, propane, or oil, as appropriate, as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act; plus (2) the product of the maximum auxiliary electric power in kilowatts as determined in 3.1.3 of appendix O of this subpart times the representative unit cost in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act, the resulting quantity shall be rounded off to the nearest 0.01 dollar per million Btu output.

(4) Other useful measures of energy consumption for vented home heating equipment shall be those measures of energy consumption which the Secretary determines are likely to assist consumers in making purchasing decisions and which are derived from the application of appendix O of this subpart.

(p) Pool heaters. (1) The estimated annual operating cost for pool heaters is the sum of:

(i) The product of the average annual fuel energy consumption, in Btu's per year, of natural gas or oil fueled pool heaters, determined according to section 5.2 of appendix P of this subpart, and the representative average unit cost in dollars per Btu for natural gas or oil, as appropriate, as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act; plus

(ii) The product of the average annual auxiliary electric energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per year determined according to section 5.3 of appendix P of this subpart, and the representative average unit cost in dollars per kilowatt-hours as provided pursuant to section 323(b)(2) of the Act, the resulting sum then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year.

(2) The thermal efficiency of pool heaters, expressed as a percent, shall be determined in accordance with section 4 of appendix P to this subpart.

(q) Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts. (1) The Estimated Annual Energy Consumption (EAEC) for fluorescent lamp ballasts, expressed in kilowatt-hours per year, shall be the product of:

(i) The input power in kilowatts as determined in accordance with section 3.1.3.1 of appendix Q to this subpart; and

(ii) The representative average use cycle of 1,000 hours per year, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest kilowatt-hour per year.

(2) Ballast Efficacy Factor (BEF) shall be as determined in section 4.2 of appendix Q of this subpart.

(3) The Estimated Annual Operating Cost (EAOC) for fluorescent lamp ballasts, expressed in dollars per year, shall be the product of:

(i) The representative average unit energy cost of electricity in dollars per kilowatt-hour as provided by the Secretary,

(ii) The representative average use cycle of 1,000 hours per year, and

(iii) The input power in kilowatts as determined in accordance with section 3.1.3.1 of appendix Q to this subpart, the resulting product then being rounded off to the nearest dollar per year.

(4) Standby power consumption of certain fluorescent lamp ballasts shall be measured in accordance with section 3.2 of appendix Q to this subpart.

(r) General service fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps, and incandescent reflector lamps. (1) The estimated annual energy consumption for general service fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps, and incandescent reflector lamps, expressed in kilowatt-hours per year, shall be the product of the input power in kilowatts as determined in accordance with section 4 of appendix R to this subpart and an average annual use specified by the manufacturer, with the resulting product rounded off to the nearest kilowatt-hour per year. Manufacturers must provide a clear and accurate description of the assumptions used for the estimated annual energy consumption.

(2) The lamp efficacy for general service fluorescent lamps shall be equal to the average lumen output divided by the average lamp wattage as determined in section 4 of appendix R of this subpart, with the resulting quotient rounded off to the nearest tenth of a lumen per watt.

(3) The lamp efficacy for general service incandescent lamps shall be equal to the average lumen output divided by the average lamp wattage as determined in section 4 of appendix R of this subpart, with the resulting quotient rounded off to the nearest tenth of a lumen per watt.

(4) The lamp efficacy for incandescent reflector lamps shall be equal to the average lumen output divided by the average lamp wattage as determined in section 4 of appendix R of this subpart, with the resulting quotient rounded off to the nearest tenth of a lumen per watt.

(5) The color rendering index of a general service fluorescent lamp shall be tested and determined in accordance with section 4.4 of appendix R of this subpart and rounded off to the nearest unit.

(6) The rated lifetime for general service incandescent lamps shall be measured in accordance with test procedures described in section 4.2 of Appendix R of this chapter. A lamp shall be compliant with standards if greater than 50 percent of the sample size specified in §429.27 meets the minimum rated lifetime as specified by energy conservations standards for general service incandescent lamps.

(s) Faucets. The maximum permissible water use allowed for lavatory faucets, lavatory replacement aerators, kitchen faucets, and kitchen replacement aerators, expressed in gallons and liters per minute (gpm and L/min), shall be measured in accordance to section 2(a) of appendix S of this subpart. The maximum permissible water use allowed for metering faucets, expressed in gallons and liters per cycle (gal/cycle and L/cycle), shall be measured in accordance to section 2(a) of appendix S of this subpart.

(t) Showerheads. The maximum permissible water use allowed for showerheads, expressed in gallons and liters per minute (gpm and L/min), shall be measured in accordance to section 2(b) of appendix S of this subpart.

(u) Water closets. The maximum permissible water use allowed for water closets, expressed in gallons and liters per flush (gpf and Lpf), shall be measured in accordance to section 3(a) of appendix T of this subpart.

(v) Urinals. The maximum permissible water use allowed for urinals, expressed in gallons and liters per flush (gpf and Lpf), shall be measured in accordance to section 3(b) of appendix T of this subpart.

(w) Ceiling fans. The airflow and airflow efficiency for ceiling fans, expressed in cubic feet per minute (CFM) and CFM per watt (CFM/watt), respectively, shall be measured in accordance with section 4 of appendix U of this subpart.

(x) Ceiling fan light kits. The efficacy, expressed in lumens per watt (lumens/watt), for ceiling fan light kits with sockets for medium screw base lamps or pin-based fluorescent lamps shall be measured in accordance with section 4 of appendix V of this subpart.

(y) Medium Base Compact Fluorescent Lamps. The initial efficacy, lumen maintenance at 1,000 hours, lumen maintenance at 40-percent of rated life, rapid cycle stress test, and lamp life shall be measured in accordance with section 4 of appendix W of this subpart.

(z) Dehumidifiers. (1) When measuring the energy factor for dehumidifiers (see the note at the beginning of appendix X to this subpart), expressed in liters per kilowatt hour (L/kWh), energy factor shall be measured in accordance with section 4.1 of appendix X to this subpart.

(2) When measuring the integrated energy factor for dehumidifiers (see the note at the beginning of appendix X to this subpart), expressed in L/kWh, integrated energy factor shall be determined according to paragraph 5.2 of appendix X to this subpart.

(aa) Battery Chargers. Upon the effective date of any energy conservation standard for battery chargers governing active and maintenance mode energy consumption, the 24-hour energy consumption of a battery charger in active and maintenance modes, expressed in watt-hours, and the power consumption of a battery charger in maintenance mode, expressed in watts, shall be measured in accordance with section 5.10 of appendix Y of this subpart. The power consumption of a battery charger in standby mode and off mode, expressed in watts, shall be measured in accordance with sections 5.11 and 5.12, respectively, of appendix Y of this subpart.

(bb) External Power Supplies. The energy consumption of an external power supply, including active-mode efficiency expressed as a percentage and the no-load, off, and standby mode energy consumption levels expressed in watts, shall be measured in accordance with section 4 of appendix Z of this subpart.

(cc) Furnace Fans. The energy consumption of a single unit of a furnace fan basic model expressed in watts per 1000 cubic feet per minute (cfm) to the nearest integer shall be calculated in accordance with Appendix AA of this subpart.

[42 FR 27898, June 1, 1977]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §430.23, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys.gov.

§430.24   [Reserved]

§430.25   Laboratory Accreditation Program.

Testing for fluorescent lamp ballasts performed in accordance with appendix Q1 to this subpart shall comply with this §430.25. The testing for general service fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps, and incandescent reflector lamps shall be performed in accordance with Appendix R to this subpart. The testing for medium base compact fluorescent lamps shall be performed in accordance with Appendix W of this subpart. This testing, with the exception of lifetime testing of general service incandescent lamps, shall be conducted by test laboratories accredited by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) or by an accrediting organization recognized by NVLAP. NVLAP is a program of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S. Department of Commerce. NVLAP standards for accreditation of laboratories that test for compliance with standards for fluorescent lamp ballast luminous efficiency (BLE), lamp efficacy, lamp lifetime, and fluorescent lamp CRI are set forth in 15 CFR part 285. A manufacturer's or importer's own laboratory, if accredited, may conduct the applicable testing. Testing for BLE may also be conducted by laboratories accredited by Underwriters Laboratories or Council of Canada. Testing for fluorescent lamp ballasts performed in accordance with Appendix Q to this subpart is not required to be conducted by test laboratories accredited by NVLAP or an accrediting organization recognized by NVLAP.

[77 FR 4216, Jan. 27, 2012]

§430.27   Petitions for waiver and applications for interim waiver.

(a)(1) Any interested person may submit a petition to waive for a particular basic model any requirements of §430.23, or of any appendix to this subpart, upon the grounds that the basic model contains one or more design characteristics which either prevent testing of the basic model according to the prescribed test procedures, or the prescribed test procedures may evaluate the basic model in a manner so unrepresentative of its true energy consumption characteristics, or water consumption characteristics (in the case of faucets, showerheads, water closets, and urinals) as to provide materially inaccurate comparative data.

(2) Any interested person who has submitted a Petition for Waiver as provided in this subpart may also file an Application for Interim Waiver of the applicable test procedure requirements.

(b)(1) A Petition for Waiver shall be submitted either electronically to AS_Waiver_Requests@ee.doe.gov or by mail, in triplicate, to U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Test Procedure Waiver, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW., Mailstop EE-2J, Washington, DC 20585-0121. Each Petition for Waiver shall:

(2) An Application for Interim Waiver shall be submitted in triplicate, with the required three copies of the Petition for Waiver, to the Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy. Each Application for Interim Waiver shall reference the Petition for Waiver by identifying the particular basic model(s) for which a waiver and temporary exception are being sought. Each Application for Interim Waiver shall demonstrate likely success of the Petition for Waiver and shall address what economic hardship and/or competitive disadvantage is likely to result absent a favorable determination on the Application for Interim Waiver. Each Application for Interim Waiver shall be signed by the applicant or by an authorized representative.

(c)(1) Each petitioner, after filing a Petition for Waiver with DOE, and after the Petition for Waiver has been published in the Federal Register, shall, within five working days of such publication, notify in writing all known manufacturers of domestically marketed units of the same product type (as listed in section 322(a) of the Act) and shall include in the notice a statement that DOE has published in the Federal Register on a certain date the Petition for Waiver and supporting documents from which confidential information, if any, as determined by DOE, has been deleted in accordance with 10 CFR 1004.11. Each petitioner, in complying with the requirements of this paragraph, shall file with DOE a statement certifying the names and addresses of each person to whom a notice of the Petition for Waiver has been sent.

(2) Each applicant for Interim Waiver, whether filing jointly with, or subsequent to, a Petition for Waiver with DOE, shall concurrently notify in writing all known manufacturers of domestically marketed units of the same product type (as listed in Section 322(a) of the Act) and shall include in the notice a copy of the Petition for Waiver and a copy of the Application for Interim Waiver. In complying with this section, each applicant shall in the written notification include a statement that the Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy will receive and consider timely written comments on the Application for Interim Waiver. Each applicant, upon filing an Application for Interim Waiver, shall in complying with the requirements of this paragraph certify to DOE that a copy of these documents have been sent to all known manufacturers of domestically marked units of the same product type (as listed in section 322(a) of the Act). Such certification shall include the names and addresses of such persons. Each applicant also shall comply with the provisions of paragraph (c)(1) of this section with respect to the petition for waiver.

(d) Any person submitting written comments to DOE with respect to an Application for Interim Waiver shall also send a copy of the comments to the applicant.

(e) If administratively feasible, applicant shall be notified in writing of the disposition of the Application for Interim Waiver within 15 business days of receipt of the application. Notice of DOE's determination on the Application for Interim Waiver shall be published in the Federal Register.

(f) The filing of an Application for Interim Waiver shall not constitute grounds for noncompliance with any requirements of this subpart, until an Interim Waiver has been granted.

(g) An Interim Waiver from test procedure requirements will be granted by the Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy if it is determined that the applicant will experience economic hardship if the Application for Interim Waiver is denied, if it appears likely that the Petition for Waiver will be granted, and/or the Assistant Secretary determines that it would be desirable for public policy reasons to grant immediate relief pending a determination on the Petition for Waiver.

(h) An interim waiver will terminate 180 days after issuance or upon the determination on the Petition for Waiver, whichever occurs first. An interim waiver may be extended by DOE for 180 days. Notice of such extension and/or any modification of the terms or duration of the interim waiver shall be published in the Federal Register, and shall be based on relevant information contained in the record and any comments received subsequent to issuance of the interim waiver.

(i) Following publication of the Petition for Waiver in the Federal Register, a petitioner may, within 10 working days of receipt of a copy of any comments submitted in accordance with paragraph (b)(1) of this section, submit a rebuttal statement to the Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy. A petitioner may rebut more than one response in a single rebuttal statement.

(j) The petitioner shall be notified in writing as soon as practicable of the disposition of each Petition for Waiver. The Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy shall issue a decision on the petition as soon as is practicable following receipt and review of the Petition for Waiver and other applicable documents, including, but not limited to, comments and rebuttal statements.

(k) The filing of a Petition for Waiver shall not constitute grounds for noncompliance with any requirements of this subpart, until a waiver or interim waiver has been granted.

(l) Waivers will be granted by the Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, if it is determined that the basic model for which the waiver was requested contains a design characteristic which either prevents testing of the basic model according to the prescribed test procedures, or the prescribed test procedures may evaluate the basic model in a manner so unrepresentative of its true energy consumption characteristics, or water consumption characteristics (in the case of faucets, showerheads, water closets, and urinals) as to provide materially inaccurate comparative data. Waivers may be granted subject to conditions, which may include adherence to alternate test procedures specified by the Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy. The Assistant Secretary shall consult with the Federal Trade Commission prior to granting any waiver, and shall promptly publish in the Federal Register notice of each waiver granted or denied, and any limiting conditions of each waiver granted.

(m) Within one year of the granting of any waiver, the Department of Energy will publish in the Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to amend its regulations so as to eliminate any need for the continuation of such waiver. As soon thereafter as practicable, the Department of Energy will publish in the Federal Register a final rule. Such waiver will terminate on the effective date of such final rule.

(n) In order to exhaust administrative remedies, any person aggrieved by an action under this section must file an appeal with the DOE's Office of Hearings and Appeals as provided in 10 CFR part 1003, subpart C.

[51 FR 42826, Nov. 26, 1986, as amended at 60 FR 15017, Mar. 21, 1995; 63 FR 13316, Mar. 18, 1998; 76 FR 12502, Mar. 7, 2011]

Appendix A to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Electric Refrigerators and Electric Refrigerator-Freezers

Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 22349, Apr. 21, 2014.

The provisions of appendix A shall apply to all products manufactured on or after the effective date of any amended standards promulgated by DOE pursuant to Section 325(b)(4) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (to be codified at 42 U.S.C. 6295(b)(4)).

1. Definitions

Section 3, Definitions, of HRF-1-2008 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) applies to this test procedure.

1.1 “Adjusted total volume” means the sum of:

(i) The fresh food compartment volume as defined in HRF-1-2008 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) in cubic feet, and

(ii) The product of an adjustment factor and the net freezer compartment volume as defined in HRF-1-2008 in cubic feet.

1.2 “All-refrigerator” means an electric refrigerator that does not include a compartment for the freezing and long time storage of food at temperatures below 32 °F (0.0 °C). It may include a compartment of 0.50 cubic-foot capacity (14.2 liters) or less for the freezing and storage of ice.

1.3 “Anti-sweat heater” means a device incorporated into the design of a refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer to prevent the accumulation of moisture on the exterior or interior surfaces of the cabinet.

1.4 “Anti-sweat heater switch” means a user-controllable switch or user interface which modifies the activation or control of anti-sweat heaters.

1.5 “Automatic defrost” means a system in which the defrost cycle is automatically initiated and terminated, with resumption of normal refrigeration at the conclusion of the defrost operation. The system automatically prevents the permanent formation of frost on all refrigerated surfaces. Nominal refrigerated food temperatures are maintained during the operation of the automatic defrost system.

1.6 “Automatic icemaker” means a device, that can be supplied with water without user intervention, either from a pressurized water supply system or by transfer from a water reservoir located inside the cabinet, that automatically produces, harvests, and stores ice in a storage bin, with means to automatically interrupt the harvesting operation when the ice storage bin is filled to a pre-determined level.

1.7 “Cycle” means the period of 24 hours for which the energy use of an electric refrigerator or electric refrigerator-freezer is calculated as though the consumer activated compartment temperature controls were set to maintain the standardized temperatures (see section 3.2).

1.8 “Cycle type” means the set of test conditions having the calculated effect of operating an electric refrigerator or electric refrigerator-freezer for a period of 24 hours, with the consumer activated controls other than those that control compartment temperatures set to establish various operating characteristics.

1.9 “Defrost cycle type” means a distinct sequence of control whose function is to remove frost and/or ice from a refrigerated surface. There may be variations in the defrost control sequence such as the number of defrost heaters energized. Each such variation establishes a separate distinct defrost cycle type. However, defrost achieved regularly during the compressor off-cycles by warming of the evaporator without active heat addition is not a defrost cycle type.

1.10 “Externally vented refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer” means an electric refrigerator or electric refrigerator-freezer that has an enclosed condenser or an enclosed condenser/compressor compartment and a set of air ducts for transferring the exterior air from outside the building envelope into, through, and out of the refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer cabinet; is capable of mixing exterior air with the room air before discharging into, through, and out of the condenser or condenser/compressor compartment; may include thermostatically controlled dampers or controls that mix the exterior and room air at low outdoor temperatures and exclude exterior air when the outdoor air temperature is above 80 °F (26.7 °C) or the room air temperature; and may have a thermostatically actuated exterior air fan.

1.11 “HRF-1-2008” means AHAM Standard HRF-1-2008, Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers, Energy and Internal Volume of Refrigerating Appliances (2008), including Errata to Energy and Internal Volume of Refrigerating Appliances, Correction Sheet issued November 17, 2009. Only sections of HRF-1-2008 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) specifically referenced in this test procedure are part of this test procedure. In cases where there is a conflict, the language of the test procedure in this appendix takes precedence over HRF-1-2008.

1.12 “Long-time automatic defrost” means an automatic defrost system whose successive defrost cycles are separated by 14 hours or more of compressor operating time.

1.13 “Separate auxiliary compartment” means a freezer compartment or a fresh food compartment of a refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer having more than two compartments that is not the first freezer compartment or the first fresh food compartment. Access to a separate auxiliary compartment is through a separate exterior door or doors rather than through the door or doors of another compartment. Separate auxiliary compartments may be convertible (e.g., from fresh food to freezer). Separate auxiliary freezer compartments may not be larger than the first freezer compartment and separate auxiliary fresh food compartments may not be larger than the first fresh food compartment, but such size restrictions do not apply to separate auxiliary convertible compartments.

1.14 “Special compartment” means any compartment other than a butter conditioner, without doors directly accessible from the exterior, and with separate temperature control (such as crispers convertible to meat keepers) that is not convertible from fresh food temperature range to freezer temperature range.

1.15 “Stabilization period” means the total period of time during which steady-state conditions are being attained or evaluated.

1.16 “Standard cycle” means the cycle type in which the anti-sweat heater control, when provided, is set in the highest energy-consuming position.

1.17 “Variable anti-sweat heater control” means an anti-sweat heater control that varies the average power input of the anti-sweat heater(s) based on operating condition variable(s) and/or ambient condition variable(s).

1.18 “Variable defrost control” means an automatic defrost system in which successive defrost cycles are determined by an operating condition variable or variables other than solely compressor operating time. This includes any electrical or mechanical device performing this function. A control scheme that changes the defrost interval from a fixed length to an extended length (without any intermediate steps) is not considered a variable defrost control. A variable defrost control feature should predict the accumulation of frost on the evaporator and react accordingly. Therefore, the times between defrost should vary with different usage patterns and include a continuum of lengths of time between defrosts as inputs vary.

2. Test Conditions

2.1 Ambient Temperature. The ambient temperature shall be 90.0 ±1 °F (32.2 ±0.6 °C) during the stabilization period and the test period.

2.2 Operational Conditions. The electric refrigerator or electric refrigerator-freezer shall be installed and its operating conditions maintained in accordance with HRF-1-2008, (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), section 5.3 through section 5.5.5.5 (excluding section 5.5.5.4). Exceptions and clarifications to the cited sections of HRF-1-2008 are noted in sections 2.3 through 2.8, and 5.1 of this test procedure.

2.3 Anti-Sweat Heaters. The anti-sweat heater switch is to be on during one test and off during a second test. In the case of an electric refrigerator-freezer equipped with variable anti-sweat heater control, the standard cycle energy use shall be the result of the calculation described in 6.2.3.

2.4 Conditions for Automatic Defrost Refrigerator-Freezers. For automatic defrost refrigerator-freezers, the freezer compartments shall not be loaded with any frozen food packages during testing. Cylindrical metallic masses of dimensions 1.12 ±0.25 inches (2.9 ±0.6 cm) in diameter and height shall be attached in good thermal contact with each temperature sensor within the refrigerated compartments. All temperature measuring sensor masses shall be supported by low-thermal-conductivity supports in such a manner to ensure that there will be at least 1 inch (2.5 cm) of air space separating the thermal mass from contact with any interior surface or hardware inside the cabinet. In case of interference with hardware at the sensor locations specified in section 5.1, the sensors shall be placed at the nearest adjacent location such that there will be a 1-inch air space separating the sensor mass from the hardware.

2.5 Conditions for All-Refrigerators. There shall be no load in the freezer compartment during the test.

2.6 The cabinet and its refrigerating mechanism shall be assembled and set up in accordance with the printed consumer instructions supplied with the cabinet. Set-up of the refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer shall not deviate from these instructions, unless explicitly required or allowed by this test procedure. Specific required or allowed deviations from such set-up include the following:

(a) Connection of water lines and installation of water filters are not required;

(b) Clearance requirements from surfaces of the product shall be as described in section 2.8 of this appendix;

(c) The electric power supply shall be as described in HRF-1-2008 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), section 5.5.1;

(d) Temperature control settings for testing shall be as described in section 3 below. Settings for convertible compartments and other temperature-controllable or special compartments shall be as described in section 2.7 of this appendix;

(e) The product does not need to be anchored or otherwise secured to prevent tipping during energy testing;

(f) All the product's chutes and throats required for the delivery of ice shall be free of packing, covers, or other blockages that may be fitted for shipping or when the icemaker is not in use; and

(g) Ice storage bins shall be emptied of ice.

For cases in which set-up is not clearly defined by this test procedure, manufacturers must submit a petition for a waiver (see section 7).

2.7 Compartments that are convertible (e.g., from fresh food to freezer) shall be operated in the highest energy use position. For the special case of convertible separate auxiliary compartments, this means that the compartment shall be treated as a freezer compartment or a fresh food compartment, depending on which of these represents higher energy use. Special compartments shall be tested with controls set to provide the coldest temperature. However, for special compartments in which temperature control is achieved using the addition of heat (including resistive electric heating, refrigeration system waste heat, or heat from any other source, but excluding the transfer of air from another part of the interior of the product) for any part of the controllable temperature range of that compartment, the product energy use shall be determined by averaging two sets of tests. The first set of tests shall be conducted with such special compartments at their coldest settings, and the second set of tests shall be conducted with such special compartments at their warmest settings. The requirements for the warmest or coldest temperature settings of this section do not apply to features or functions associated with temperature control (such as fast chill compartments) that are initiated manually and terminated automatically within 168 hours.

2.8 The space between the back of the cabinet and a vertical surface (the test room wall or simulated wall) shall be the minimum distance in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. However, the clearance shall not be greater than 2 inches (51 mm) from the plane of the cabinet's back panel to the vertical surface. If permanent rear spacers extend further than this distance, the appliance shall be located with the spacers in contact with the vertical surface.

2.9 Steady-State Condition. Steady-state conditions exist if the temperature measurements in all measured compartments taken at 4-minute intervals or less during a stabilization period are not changing at a rate greater than 0.042 °F (0.023 °C) per hour as determined by the applicable condition of A or B, described below.

A. The average of the measurements during a 2-hour period if no cycling occurs or during a number of complete repetitive compressor cycles occurring through a period of no less than 2 hours is compared to the average over an equivalent time period with 3 hours elapsing between the two measurement periods.

B. If A above cannot be used, the average of the measurements during a number of complete repetitive compressor cycles occurring through a period of no less than 2 hours and including the last complete cycle before a defrost period (or if no cycling occurs, the average of the measurements during the last 2 hours before a defrost period) are compared to the same averaging period before the following defrost period.

2.10 Exterior Air for Externally Vented Refrigerator or Refrigerator-Freezer. An exterior air source shall be provided with adjustable temperature and pressure capabilities. The exterior air temperature shall be adjustable from 30 ±1 °F (1.7 ±0.6 °C) to 90 ±1 °F (32.2 ±0.6 °C).

2.10.1 Air Duct. The exterior air shall pass from the exterior air source to the test unit through an insulated air duct.

2.10.2 Air Temperature Measurement. The air temperature entering the condenser or condenser/compressor compartment shall be maintained to ±3 °F (1.7 °C) during the stabilization and test periods and shall be measured at the inlet point of the condenser or condenser/compressor compartment (“condenser inlet”). Temperature measurements shall be taken from at least three temperature sensors or one sensor per 4 square inches (25.8 square cm) of the air duct cross-sectional area, whichever is greater, and shall be averaged. For a unit that has a condenser air fan, a minimum of three temperature sensors at the condenser fan discharge shall be required. Temperature sensors shall be arranged to be at the centers of equally divided cross-sectional areas. The exterior air temperature, at its source, shall be measured and maintained to ±1 °F (0.6 °C) during the test period. The temperature measuring devices shall have an error no greater than ±0.5 °F (±0.3 °C). Measurements of the air temperature during the test period shall be taken at regular intervals not to exceed 4 minutes.

2.10.3 Exterior Air Static Pressure. The exterior air static pressure at the inlet point of the unit shall be adjusted to maintain a negative pressure of 0.20 ±0.05 water column (62 Pascals ±12.5 Pascals) for all air flow rates supplied to the unit. The pressure sensor shall be located on a straight duct with a distance of at least 7.5 times the diameter of the duct upstream and a distance of at least 3 times the diameter of the duct downstream. There shall be four static pressure taps at 90° angles apart. The four pressures shall be averaged by interconnecting the four pressure taps. The air pressure measuring instrument shall have an error no greater than 0.01” water column (2.5 Pascals).

3. Test Control Settings

3.1 Model with no User Operable Temperature Control. A test shall be performed to measure the compartment temperatures and energy use. A second test shall be performed with the temperature control electrically short circuited to cause the compressor to run continuously.

3.2 Models with User Operable Temperature Control. Testing shall be performed in accordance with one of the following sections using the following standardized temperatures:

All-Refrigerator: 39 °F (3.9 °C) fresh food compartment temperature;

Refrigerator: 15 °F (−9.4 °C) freezer compartment temperature, 39 °F (3.9 °C) fresh food compartment temperature;

Refrigerator-Freezer: 0 °F (−17.8 °C) freezer compartment temperature, 39 °F (3.9 °C) fresh food compartment temperature.

For the purposes of comparing compartment temperatures with standardized temperatures, as described in sections 3.2.1 and 3.2.2, the freezer compartment temperature shall be as specified in section 5.1.4, and the fresh food compartment temperature shall be as specified in section 5.1.3.

3.2.1 A first test shall be performed with all compartment temperature controls set at their median position midway between their warmest and coldest settings. For mechanical control systems, knob detents shall be mechanically defeated if necessary to attain a median setting. For electronic control systems, the test shall be performed with all compartment temperature controls set at the average of the coldest and warmest settings—if there is no setting equal to this average, the setting closest to the average shall be used. If there are two such settings equally close to the average, the higher of these temperature control settings shall be used. A second test shall be performed with all controls set at their warmest setting or all controls set at their coldest setting (not electrically or mechanically bypassed). For all-refrigerators, this setting shall be the appropriate setting that attempts to achieve compartment temperatures measured during the two tests which bound (i.e., one is above and one is below) the standardized temperature for all-refrigerators. For refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers, the second test shall be conducted with all controls at their coldest setting, unless all compartment temperatures measured during the first part of the test are lower than the standardized temperatures, in which case the second test shall be conducted with all controls at their warmest setting. Refer to Table 1 for all-refrigerators or Table 2 for refrigerators with freezer compartments and refrigerator-freezers to determine which test results to use in the energy consumption calculation. If any compartment is warmer than its standardized temperature for a test with all controls at their coldest position, the tested unit fails the test and cannot be rated.

Table 1—Temperature Settings for All-Refrigerators

First testSecond testEnergy calculation based on:
SettingsResultsSettingsResults
MidLowWarmLowSecond Test Only.
   HighFirst and Second Tests.
   HighColdLowFirst and Second Tests.
   HighNo Energy Use Rating.

Table 2—Temperature Settings for Refrigerators With Freezer Compartments and Refrigerator-Freezers

First testSecond testEnergy calculation based on:
SettingsResultsSettingsResults
Fzr Mid FF MidFzr Low FF LowFzr Warm FF WarmFzr Low FF LowSecond Test Only.
   Fzr Low FF HighFirst and Second Tests.
   Fzr High FF LowFirst and Second Tests.
   Fzr High FF HighFirst and Second Tests.
   Fzr Low FF HighFzr Cold FF ColdFzr Low FF HighNo Energy Use Rating.
   Fzr Low FF LowFirst and Second Tests.
   Fzr High FF LowFzr Cold FF ColdFzr High FF LowNo Energy Use Rating.
   Fzr Low FF LowFirst and Second Tests.
   Fzr High FF HighFzr Cold FF ColdFzr Low FF LowFirst and Second Tests.
   Fzr Low FF HighNo Energy Use Rating.
   Fzr High FF LowNo Energy Use Rating.
   Fzr High FF HighNo Energy Use Rating.

Notes: Fzr = Freezer Compartment, FF = Fresh Food Compartment.

3.2.2 Alternatively, a first test may be performed with all temperature controls set at their warmest setting. If all compartment temperatures are below the appropriate standardized temperatures, then the result of this test alone will be used to determine energy consumption. If this condition is not met, then the unit shall be tested in accordance with 3.2.1.

3.2.3 Temperature Settings for Separate Auxiliary Convertible Compartments. For separate auxiliary convertible compartments tested as freezer compartments, the median setting shall be within 2 °F (1.1 °C) of the standardized temperature, and the warmest setting shall be above 5 °F (−15 °C). For separate auxiliary convertible compartments tested as fresh food compartments, the median setting shall be within 2 °F (1.1 °C) of the standardized temperature, and the coldest setting shall be below 34 °F (1.1 °C). For compartments where control settings are not expressed as particular temperatures, the measured temperature of the convertible compartment rather than the settings shall meet the specified criteria.

4. Test Period

Tests shall be performed by establishing the conditions set forth in section 2, and using the control settings set forth in section 3.

4.1 Nonautomatic Defrost. If the model being tested has no automatic defrost system, the test time period shall start after steady-state conditions have been achieved and be no less than 3 hours in duration. During the test period, the compressor motor shall complete two or more whole compressor cycles. (A compressor cycle is a complete “on” and a complete “off” period of the motor). If no “off” cycling will occur, as determined during the stabilization period, the test period shall be 3 hours. If incomplete cycling occurs (i.e. less than two compressor cycles during a 24-hour period), the results of the 24-hour period shall be used.

4.2 Automatic Defrost. If the model being tested has an automatic defrost system, the test time period shall start after steady-state conditions have been achieved and be from one point during a defrost period to the same point during the next defrost period. If the model being tested has a long-time automatic defrost system, the alternative provisions of 4.2.1 may be used. If the model being tested has a variable defrost control, the provisions of section 4.2.2 shall apply. If the model has a dual compressor system with automatic defrost for both systems, the provisions of 4.2.3 shall apply. If the model being tested has long-time automatic or variable defrost control involving multiple defrost cycle types, such as for a product with a single compressor and two or more evaporators in which the evaporators are defrosted at different frequencies, the provisions of section 4.2.4 shall apply. If the model being tested has multiple defrost cycle types for which compressor run time between defrosts is a fixed time of less than 14 hours for all such cycle types, and for which the compressor run time between defrosts for different defrost cycle types are equal to or multiples of each other, the test time period shall be from one point of the defrost cycle type with the longest compressor run time between defrosts to the same point during the next occurrence of this defrost cycle type. For such products not using the section 4.2.4 procedures, energy consumption shall be calculated as described in section 5.2.1.1.

4.2.1 Long-time Automatic Defrost. If the model being tested has a long-time automatic defrost system, the two-part test described in this section may be used. The first part is a stable period of compressor operation that includes no portions of the defrost cycle, such as precooling or recovery, that is otherwise the same as the test for a unit having no defrost provisions (section 4.1). The second part is designed to capture the energy consumed during all of the events occurring with the defrost control sequence that are outside of stable operation.

4.2.1.1 Cycling Compressor System. For a system with a cycling compressor, the second part of the test starts at the termination of the last regular compressor “on” cycle. The average temperatures of the fresh food and freezer compartments measured from the termination of the previous compressor “on” cycle to the termination of the last regular compressor “on” cycle must both be within 0.5 °F (0.3 °C) of their average temperatures measured for the first part of the test. If any compressor cycles occur prior to the defrost heater being energized that cause the average temperature in either compartment to deviate from its average temperature for the first part of the test by more than 0.5 °F (0.3 °C), these compressor cycles are not considered regular compressor cycles and must be included in the second part of the test. As an example, a “precooling” cycle, which is an extended compressor cycle that lowers the temperature(s) of one or both compartments prior to energizing the defrost heater, must be included in the second part of the test. The test period for the second part of the test ends at the termination of the first regular compressor “on” cycle after both compartment temperatures have fully recovered to their stable conditions. The average temperatures of the compartments measured from this termination of the first regular compressor “on” cycle until the termination of the next regular compressor “on” cycle must both be within 0.5 °F (0.3 °C) of their average temperatures measured for the first part of the test. See Figure 1.

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4.2.1.2 Non-cycling Compressor System. For a system with a non-cycling compressor, the second part of the test starts at a time before defrost during stable operation when the temperatures of both fresh food and freezer compartments are within 0.5 °F (0.3 °C) of their average temperatures measured for the first part of the test. The second part stops at a time after defrost during stable operation when the temperatures of both compartments are within 0.5 °F (0.3 °C) of their average temperatures measured for the first part of the test. See Figure 2.

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4.2.2 Variable Defrost Control. If the model being tested has a variable defrost control system, the test shall consist of the same two parts as the test for long-time automatic defrost (section 4.2.1).

4.2.3 Dual Compressor Systems with Automatic Defrost. If the model being tested has separate compressor systems for the refrigerator and freezer sections, each with its own automatic defrost system, then the two-part method in 4.2.1 shall be used. The second part of the method will be conducted separately for each automatic defrost system. The components (compressor, fan motors, defrost heaters, anti-sweat heaters, etc.) associated with each system will be identified and their energy consumption will be separately measured during each test.

4.2.4 Systems with Multiple Defrost Frequencies. This section applies to models with long-time automatic or variable defrost control with multiple defrost cycle types, such as models with single compressors and multiple evaporators in which the evaporators have different defrost frequencies. The two-part method in 4.2.1 shall be used. The second part of the method will be conducted separately for each distinct defrost cycle type.

5. Test Measurements

5.1 Temperature Measurements. Temperature measurements shall be made at the locations prescribed in Figures 5.1 and 5.2 of HRF-1-2008 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and shall be accurate to within ±0.5 °F (0.3 °C). No freezer temperature measurements need be taken in an all-refrigerator model.

If the interior arrangements of the cabinet do not conform with those shown in Figure 5.1 and 5.2 of HRF-1-2008, the product may be tested by relocating the temperature sensors from the locations specified in the figures to avoid interference with hardware or components within the cabinet, in which case the specific locations used for the temperature sensors shall be noted in the test data records maintained by the manufacturer in accordance with 10 CFR 429.14, and the certification report shall indicate that non-standard sensor locations were used.

5.1.1 Measured Temperature. The measured temperature of a compartment is to be the average of all sensor temperature readings taken in that compartment at a particular point in time. Measurements shall be taken at regular intervals not to exceed 4 minutes.

5.1.2 Compartment Temperature. The compartment temperature for each test period shall be an average of the measured temperatures taken in a compartment during the test period as defined in section 4. For long-time automatic defrost models, compartment temperatures shall be those measured in the first part of the test period specified in section 4.2.1. For models with variable defrost controls, compartment temperatures shall be those measured in the first part of the test period specified in section 4.2.2.

5.1.3 Fresh Food Compartment Temperature. The fresh food compartment temperature shall be calculated as:

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Where:

R is the total number of applicable fresh food compartments, which include the first fresh food compartment and any number of separate auxiliary fresh food compartments (including separate auxiliary convertible compartments tested as fresh food compartments in accordance with section 2.7);

TRi is the compartment temperature of fresh food compartment “i” determined in accordance with section 5.1.2; and

VRi is the volume of fresh food compartment “i”.

5.1.4 Freezer Compartment Temperature. The freezer compartment temperature shall be calculated as:

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Where:

F is the total number of applicable freezer compartments, which include the first freezer compartment and any number of separate auxiliary freezer compartments (including separate auxiliary convertible compartments tested as freezer compartments in accordance with section 2.7);

TFi is the compartment temperature of freezer compartment “i” determined in accordance with section 5.1.2; and

VFi is the volume of freezer compartment “i”.

5.2 Energy Measurements

5.2.1 Per-Day Energy Consumption. The energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day, ET, for each test period shall be the energy expended during the test period as specified in section 4 adjusted to a 24-hour period. The adjustment shall be determined as follows.

5.2.1.1 Nonautomatic and Automatic Defrost Models. The energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day shall be calculated equivalent to:

ET = EP × 1440/T

Where:

ET = test cycle energy expended in kilowatt-hours per day;

EP = energy expended in kilowatt-hours during the test period;

T = length of time of the test period in minutes; and

1440 = conversion factor to adjust to a 24-hour period in minutes per day.

5.2.1.2 Long-time Automatic Defrost. If the two-part test method is used, the energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day shall be calculated equivalent to:

ET = (1440 × EP1/T1) + (EP2 − (EP1 × T2/T1)) × (12/CT)

Where:

ET and 1440 are defined in 5.2.1.1;

EP1 = energy expended in kilowatt-hours during the first part of the test;

EP2 = energy expended in kilowatt-hours during the second part of the test;

T1 and T2 = length of time in minutes of the first and second test parts respectively;

CT = defrost timer run time or compressor run time between defrosts in hours required to cause it to go through a complete cycle, rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour; and

12 = factor to adjust for a 50-percent run time of the compressor in hours per day.

5.2.1.3 Variable Defrost Control. The energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day shall be calculated equivalent to:

ET = (1440 × EP1/T1) + (EP2 − (EP1 × T2/T1)) × (12/CT),

Where:

1440 is defined in 5.2.1.1 and EP1, EP2, T1, T2, and 12 are defined in 5.2.1.2;

CT = (CTL × CTM)/(F × (CTM − CTL) + CTL);

CTL = least or shortest compressor run time between defrosts in hours rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour (greater than or equal to 6 but less than or equal to 12 hours);

CTM = maximum compressor run time between defrosts in hours rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour (greater than CTL but not more than 96 hours);

F = ratio of per day energy consumption in excess of the least energy and the maximum difference in per-day energy consumption and is equal to 0.20.

For variable defrost models with no values for CTL and CTM in the algorithm, the default values of 6 and 96 shall be used, respectively.

5.2.1.4 Dual Compressor Systems with Dual Automatic Defrost. The two-part test method in section 4.2.4 must be used, and the energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day shall be calculated equivalent to:

ET = (1440 × EP1/T1) + (EP2F − (EPF × T2/T1)) × (12/CTF) + (EP2R − (EPR × T3/T1)) × (12/CTR)

Where:

1440, EP1, T1, EP2, 12, and CT are defined in 5.2.1.2;

EPF = freezer system energy in kilowatt-hours expended during the first part of the test;

EP2F = freezer system energy in kilowatt-hours expended during the second part of the test for the freezer system;

EPR = refrigerator system energy in kilowatt-hours expended during the first part of the test;

EP2R = refrigerator system energy in kilowatt-hours expended during the second part of the test for the refrigerator system;

T2 and T3 = length of time in minutes of the second test part for the freezer and refrigerator systems respectively;

CTF = compressor run time between freezer defrosts (in hours rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour); and

CTR = compressor run time between refrigerator defrosts (in hours rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour).

5.2.1.5 Long-time or Variable Defrost Control for Systems with Multiple Defrost cycle Types. The energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day shall be calculated equivalent to:

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Where:

1440 is defined in 5.2.1.1 and EP1, T1, and 12 are defined in 5.2.1.2;

i is a variable that can equal 1, 2, or more that identifies the distinct defrost cycle types applicable for the refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer;

EP2i = energy expended in kilowatt-hours during the second part of the test for defrost cycle type i;

T2i = length of time in minutes of the second part of the test for defrost cycle type i;

CTi is the compressor run time between instances of defrost cycle type i, for long-time automatic defrost control equal to a fixed time in hours rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour, and for variable defrost control equal to

(CTLi × CTMi)/(F × (CTMi − CTLi) + CTLi);

CTLi = least or shortest compressor run time between instances of defrost cycle type i in hours rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour (CTL for the defrost cycle type with the longest compressor run time between defrosts must be greater than or equal to 6 but less than or equal to 12 hours);

CTMi = maximum compressor run time between instances of defrost cycle type i in hours rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour (greater than CTLi but not more than 96 hours);

For cases in which there are more than one fixed CT value (for long-time defrost models) or more than one CTM and/or CTL value (for variable defrost models) for a given defrost cycle type, an average fixed CT value or average CTM and CTL values shall be selected for this cycle type so that 12 divided by this value or values is the frequency of occurrence of the defrost cycle type in a 24 hour period, assuming 50% compressor run time.

F = default defrost energy consumption factor, equal to 0.20.

For variable defrost models with no values for CT Li and CTMi in the algorithm, the default values of 6 and 96 shall be used, respectively.

D is the total number of distinct defrost cycle types.

5.3  Volume Measurements. The electric refrigerator or electric refrigerator-freezer total refrigerated volume, VT, shall be measured in accordance with HRF-1-2008, (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), section 3.30 and sections 4.2 through 4.3, and be calculated equivalent to:

VT = VF + VFF

Where:

VT = total refrigerated volume in cubic feet,

VF = freezer compartment volume in cubic feet, and

VFF = fresh food compartment volume in cubic feet.

In the case of refrigerators or refrigerator-freezers with automatic icemakers, the volume occupied by the automatic icemaker, including its ice storage bin, is to be included in the volume measurement.

5.4 Externally Vented Refrigerator or Refrigerator-Freezer Units. All test measurements for the externally vented refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer shall be made in accordance with the requirements of other sections of this appendix, except as modified in this section or other sections expressly applicable to externally vented refrigerators or refrigerator-freezers.

5.4.1 Operability of “Thermostatic” and “Mixing of Air” Controls. Before conducting energy consumption tests, the operability of thermostatic controls that permit the mixing of exterior and ambient air when exterior air temperatures are less than 60 °F (15.6 °C) must be verified. The operability of such controls shall be verified by operating the unit under ambient air temperature of 90 °F (32.2 °C) and exterior air temperature of 45 °F (7.2 °C). If the inlet air entering the condenser or condenser/compressor compartment is maintained at 60 ±3 °F (15.6 ±1.7 °C), energy consumption of the unit shall be measured under 5.4.2.2 and 5.4.2.3. If the inlet air entering the condenser or condenser/compressor compartment is not maintained at 60 ±3 °F (15.6 ±1.7 °C), energy consumption of the unit shall also be measured under 5.4.2.4.

5.4.2 Energy Consumption Tests.

5.4.2.1 Correction Factor Test. To enable calculation of a correction factor, K, two full cycle tests shall be conducted to measure energy consumption of the unit with air mixing controls disabled and the condenser inlet air temperatures set at 90 °F (32.2 °C) and 80 °F (26.7 °C). Both tests shall be conducted with all compartment temperature controls set at the position midway between their warmest and coldest settings and the anti-sweat heater switch off. Record the energy consumptions ec90 and ec80, in kWh/day.

5.4.2.2 Energy Consumption at 90 °F. The unit shall be tested at 90 °F (32.2 °C) exterior air temperature to record the energy consumptions (e90)i in kWh/day. For a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, the value i corresponds to each of the two states of the compartment temperature control positions.

5.4.2.3 Energy Consumption at 60 °F. The unit shall be tested at 60 °F (26.7 °C) exterior air temperature to record the energy consumptions (e60)i in kWh/day. For a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, the value i corresponds to each of the two states of the compartment temperature control positions.

5.4.2.4 Energy Consumption if Mixing Controls do not Operate Properly. If the operability of temperature and mixing controls has not been verified as required under 5.4.1, the unit shall be tested at 50 °F (10.0 °C) and 30 °F (-1.1 °C) exterior air temperatures to record the energy consumptions (e50)i and (e30)i. For a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, the value i corresponds to each of the two states of the compartment temperature control positions.

6. Calculation of Derived Results From Test Measurements

6.1 Adjusted Total Volume.

6.1.1 Electric Refrigerators. The adjusted total volume, VA, for electric refrigerators under test shall be defined as:

VA = (VF × CR) + VFF

Where:

VA = adjusted total volume in cubic feet;

VF and VFF are defined in 5.3; and

CR = dimensionless adjustment factor of 1.47 for refrigerators other than all-refrigerators, or 1.0 for all-refrigerators.

6.1.2 Electric Refrigerator-Freezers. The adjusted total volume, VA, for electric refrigerator-freezers under test shall be calculated as follows:

VA = (VF × CRF) + VFF

Where:

VF and VFF are defined in 5.3 and VA is defined in 6.1.1, and

CRF = dimensionless adjustment factor of 1.76.

6.2 Average Per-Cycle Energy Consumption.

6.2.1 All-Refrigerator Models. The average per-cycle energy consumption for a cycle type, E, is expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle to the nearest one hundredth (0.01) kilowatt-hour and shall depend upon the temperature attainable in the fresh food compartment as shown below.

6.2.1.1 If the fresh food compartment temperature is always below 39.0 °F (3.9 °C), the average per-cycle energy consumption shall be equivalent to:

E = ET1

Where:

ET is defined in 5.2.1; and

The number 1 indicates the test period during which the highest fresh food compartment temperature is measured.

6.2.1.2 If one of the fresh food compartment temperatures measured for a test period is greater than 39.0 °F (3.9 °C), the average per-cycle energy consumption shall be equivalent to:

E = ET1 + ((ET2 − ET1) × (39.0 − TR1)/(TR2 − TR1))

Where:

ET is defined in 5.2.1;

TR = fresh food compartment temperature determined according to 5.1.3 in degrees F;

The numbers 1 and 2 indicate measurements taken during the first and second test period as appropriate; and

39.0 = standardized fresh food compartment temperature in degrees F.

6.2.2 Refrigerators and Refrigerator-Freezers. The average per-cycle energy consumption for a cycle type, E, is expressed in kilowatt-hours per-cycle to the nearest one hundredth (0.01) kilowatt-hour and shall be defined in one of the following ways as applicable.

6.2.2.1 If the fresh food compartment temperature is at or below 39 °F (3.9 °C) in both tests and the freezer compartment temperature is at or below 15 °F (-9.4 °C) in both tests of a refrigerator or at or below 0 °F (-17.8 °C) in both tests of a refrigerator-freezer, the per-cycle energy consumption shall be:

E = ET1 + IET

Where:

ET is defined in 5.2.1;

IET, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle, equals 0.23 for a product with an automatic icemaker and otherwise equals 0 (zero); and

The number 1 indicates the test period during which the highest freezer compartment temperature was measured.

6.2.2.2 If the conditions of 6.2.2.1 do not exist, the per-cycle energy consumption shall be defined by the higher of the two values calculated by the following two formulas:

E = ET1 + ((ET2 − ET1) × (39.0 − TR1)/(TR2 − TR1)) + IET

and

E = ET1 + ((ET2 − ET1) × (k − TF1)/(TF2 − TF1)) + IET

Where:

E is defined in 6.2.1.1;

ET is defined in 5.2.1;

IET is defined in 6.2.2.1;

TR and the numbers 1 and 2 are defined in 6.2.1.2;

TF = freezer compartment temperature determined according to 5.1.4 in degrees F;

39.0 is a specified fresh food compartment temperature in degrees F; and

k is a constant 15.0 for refrigerators or 0.0 for refrigerator-freezers, each being standardized freezer compartment temperatures in degrees F.

6.2.3 Variable Anti-Sweat Heater Models. The standard cycle energy consumption of an electric refrigerator-freezer with a variable anti-sweat heater control (Estd), expressed in kilowatt-hours per day, shall be calculated equivalent to:

Estd = E + (Correction Factor) where E is determined by 6.2.1.1, 6.2.1.2, 6.2.2.1, or 6.2.2.2, whichever is appropriate, with the anti-sweat heater switch in the “off” position or, for a product without an anti-sweat heater switch, the anti-sweat heater in its lowest energy use state.

Correction Factor = (Anti-sweat Heater Power × System-loss Factor) × (24 hrs/1 day) × (1 kW/1000 W)

Where:

Anti-sweat Heater Power = 0.034 * (Heater Watts at 5%RH)

+ 0.211 * (Heater Watts at 15%RH)

+ 0.204 * (Heater Watts at 25%RH)

+ 0.166 * (Heater Watts at 35%RH)

+ 0.126 * (Heater Watts at 45%RH)

+ 0.119 * (Heater Watts at 55%RH)

+ 0.069 * (Heater Watts at 65%RH)

+ 0.047 * (Heater Watts at 75%RH)

+ 0.008 * (Heater Watts at 85%RH)

+ 0.015 * (Heater Watts at 95%RH)

Heater Watts at a specific relative humidity = the nominal watts used by all heaters at that specific relative humidity, 72 °F (22.2 °C) ambient, and DOE reference temperatures of fresh food (FF) average temperature of 39 °F (3.9 °C) and freezer (FZ) average temperature of 0 °F (−17.8 °C).

System-loss Factor = 1.3.

6.3 Externally vented refrigerator or refrigerator-freezers. Per-cycle energy consumption measurements for an externally vented refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer shall be calculated in accordance with the requirements of this appendix, as modified in sections 6.3.1-6.3.7.

6.3.1 Correction Factor. The correction factor, K, shall be calculated as:

K = ec90/ec80

Where:

ec90 and ec80 are measured in section 5.4.2.1.

6.3.2 Combining Test Results of Different Settings of Compartment Temperature Controls. For a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, follow the calculation procedures of 6.2 to combine the test results for energy consumption of the unit at different temperature control settings for each condenser inlet air temperature tested under 5.4.2.2, 5.4.2.3, and 5.4.2.4, where applicable, (e90)i, (e60)i, (e50)i, and (e30)i. The combined values, 90, 60, 50, and 30, where applicable, are expressed in kWh/day.

6.3.3 Energy Consumption Corrections. For a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, adjust the energy consumptions 90, 60, 50, and 30 calculated in 6.3.2 by multiplying the correction factor K to obtain the corrected energy consumptions per day in kWh/day:

E90 = K × 90,

E60 = K × 60,

E50 = K × 50, and

E30 = K × 30

Where:

K is determined under section 6.3.1; and 90, 60, 50, and 30 are determined under section 6.3.2.

6.3.4 Energy Profile Equation. For a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, calculate the energy consumption EX, in kWh/day, at a specific exterior air temperature between 80 °F (26.7 °C) and 60 °F (26.7 °C) using the following equation:

EX = E60 + (E90 − E60) × (TX − 60)/30

Where:

TX is the exterior air temperature in °F;

60 is the exterior air temperature in °F for the test of section 5.4.2.3;

30 is the difference between 90 and 60;

E60 and E90 are determined in section 6.3.3.

6.3.5 Energy Consumption at 80 °F (26.7 °C), 75 °F (23.9 °C) and 65 °F (18.3 °C). For a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, calculate the energy consumptions at 80 °F (26.7 °C), 75 °F (23.9 °C) and 65 °F (18.3 °C) exterior air temperatures, E80, E75 and E65, respectively, in kWh/day, using the equation in 6.3.4.

6.3.6 National Average Per-Cycle Energy Consumption. For a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, calculate the national average energy consumption, EN, in kWh/day, using one of the following equations:

EN = 0.523 × E60 + 0.165 × E65 + 0.181 × E75 + 0.131 × E80, for units not tested under section 5.4.2.4; and

EN = 0.257 × E30 + 0.266 × E50 + 0.165 × E65 + 0.181 × E75 + 0.131 × E80, for units tested under section 5.4.2.4

Where:

E30, E50, and E60 are defined in 6.3.3;

E65, E75, and E80 are defined in 6.3.5;

and

the coefficients 0.523, 0.165, 0.181, 0.131, 0.257 and 0.266 are weather-associated weighting factors.

6.3.7 Regional Average Per-Cycle Energy Consumption. If regional average per-cycle energy consumption is required to be calculated for a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, calculate the regional average per-cycle energy consumption, ER, in kWh/day, for the regions in Figure 3. Use one of the following equations and the coefficients in Table A:

ER = a1 × E60 + c × E65 + d × E75 + e × E80, for a unit that is not required to be tested under section 5.4.2.4; or

ER = a × E30 + b × E50 + c × E65 + d × E75 + e × E80, for a unit tested under section 5.4.2.4

Where:

E30, E50, and E60 are defined in section 6.3.3;

E65, E75, and E80 are defined in section 6.3.5; and

a1, a, b, c, d, and e are weather-associated weighting factors for the regions, as specified in Table A.

Table A—Coefficients for Calculating Regional Average per-Cycle Energy Consumption

[Weighting factors]

Regionsa1abcde
I0.2820.0390.2440.1940.3260.198
II0.4860.1940.2930.1910.1930.129
III0.5840.3020.2820.1780.1590.079
IV0.6640.4200.2440.1610.1210.055
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7. Test Procedure Waivers

To the extent that the procedures contained in this appendix do not provide a means for determining the energy consumption of a refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer, a manufacturer must obtain a waiver under 10 CFR 430.27 to establish an acceptable test procedure for each such product. Such instances could, for example, include situations where the test set-up for a particular refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer basic model is not clearly defined by the provisions of section 2. For details regarding the criteria and procedures for obtaining a waiver, please refer to 10 CFR 430.27.

[75 FR 78851, Dec. 16, 2010, as amended at 76 FR 12502, Mar. 7, 2011; 76 FR 24781, May 2, 2011; 77 FR 3574, Jan. 25, 2012]

Appendix A1 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Electric Refrigerators and Electric Refrigerator-Freezers

The provisions of appendix A1 shall apply to all products manufactured prior to the effective date of any amended standards promulgated by DOE pursuant to Section 325(b)(4) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (to be codified at 42 U.S.C. 6295(b)(4)).

1. Definitions

Section 3, Definitions, of HRF-1-1979 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) applies to this test procedure.

1.1 “Adjusted total volume” means the sum of (i) the fresh food compartment volume as defined in HRF-1-1979 in cubic feet, and (ii) the product of an adjustment factor and the net freezer compartment volume as defined in HRF-1-1979, in cubic feet.

1.2 “All-refrigerator” means an electric refrigerator which does not include a compartment for the freezing and long time storage of food at temperatures below 32 °F (0.0 °C). It may include a compartment of 0.50 cubic feet capacity (14.2 liters) or less for the freezing and storage of ice.

1.3 “Anti-sweat heater” means a device incorporated into the design of a refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer to prevent the accumulation of moisture on exterior or interior surfaces of the cabinet.

1.4 “Anti-sweat heater switch” means a user-controllable switch or user interface which modifies the activation or control of anti-sweat heaters.

1.5 “Automatic defrost” means a system in which the defrost cycle is automatically initiated and terminated, with resumption of normal refrigeration at the conclusion of the defrost operation. The system automatically prevents the permanent formation of frost on all refrigerated surfaces. Nominal refrigerated food temperatures are maintained during the operation of the automatic defrost system.

1.6 “Automatic icemaker” means a device that can be supplied with water without user intervention, either from a pressurized water supply system or by transfer from a water reservoir located inside the cabinet, that automatically produces, harvests, and stores ice in a storage bin, with means to automatically interrupt the harvesting operation when the ice storage bin is filled to a pre-determined level.

1.7 “Cycle” means the period of 24 hours for which the energy use of an electric refrigerator or electric refrigerator-freezer is calculated as though the consumer activated compartment temperature controls were set to maintain the standardized temperatures (see section 3.2).

1.8 “Cycle type” means the set of test conditions having the calculated effect of operating an electric refrigerator or electric refrigerator-freezer for a period of 24 hours, with the consumer activated controls other than those that control compartment temperatures set to establish various operating characteristics.

1.9 “Defrost cycle type” means a distinct sequence of control whose function is to remove frost and/or ice from a refrigerated surface. There may be variations in the defrost control sequence such as the number of defrost heaters energized. Each such variation establishes a separate distinct defrost cycle type. However, defrost achieved regularly during the compressor off-cycles by warming of the evaporator without active heat addition is not a defrost cycle type.

1.10 “Externally vented refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer” means an electric refrigerator or electric refrigerator-freezer that has an enclosed condenser or an enclosed condenser/compressor compartment and a set of air ducts for transferring the exterior air from outside the building envelope into, through, and out of the refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer cabinet; is capable of mixing exterior air with the room air before discharging into, through, and out of the condenser or condenser/compressor compartment; may include thermostatically controlled dampers or controls that mix the exterior and room air at low outdoor temperatures and exclude exterior air when the outdoor air temperature is above 80 °F (26.7 °C) or the room air temperature; and may have a thermostatically actuated exterior air fan.

1.11 “HRF-1-1979” means the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers standard for household refrigerators, combination refrigerator-freezers, and household freezers, also approved as an American National Standard as a revision of ANSI B 38.1-1970. Only sections of HRF-1-1979 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) specifically referenced in this test procedure are part of this test procedure. In cases where there is a conflict, the language of the test procedure in this appendix takes precedence over HRF-1-1979.

1.12 “Long-time Automatic Defrost” means an automatic defrost system where successive defrost cycles are separated by 14 hours or more of compressor-operating time.

1.13 “Separate auxiliary compartment” means a freezer compartment or a fresh food compartment of a refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer having more than two compartments that is not the first freezer compartment or the first fresh food compartment. Access to a separate auxiliary compartment is through a separate exterior door or doors rather than through the door or doors of another compartment. Separate auxiliary compartments may be convertible (e.g., from fresh food to freezer). Separate auxiliary freezer compartments may not be larger than the first freezer compartment and separate auxiliary fresh food compartments may not be larger than the first fresh food compartment, but such size restrictions do not apply to separate auxiliary convertible compartments.

1.14 “Special compartment” means any compartment other than a butter conditioner, without doors directly accessible from the exterior, and with separate temperature control (such as crispers convertible to meat keepers) that is not convertible from fresh food temperature range to freezer temperature range.

1.15 “Stabilization Period” means the total period of time during which steady-state conditions are being attained or evaluated.

1.16 “Standard cycle” means the cycle type in which the anti-sweat heater control, when provided, is set in the highest energy consuming position.

1.17 “Variable anti-sweat heater control” means an anti-sweat heater control that varies the average power input of the anti-sweat heater(s) based on operating condition variable(s) and/or ambient condition variable(s).

1.18 “Variable defrost control” means an automatic defrost system in which successive defrost cycles are determined by an operating condition variable or variables other than solely compressor operating time. This includes any electrical or mechanical device performing this function. A control scheme that changes the defrost interval from a fixed length to an extended length (without any intermediate steps) is not considered a variable defrost control. A variable defrost control feature should predict the accumulation of frost on the evaporator and react accordingly. Therefore, the times between defrost should vary with different usage patterns and include a continuum of lengths of time between defrosts as inputs vary.

2. Test Conditions

2.1 Ambient Temperature. The ambient temperature shall be 90.0 ±1 °F (32.2 ±0.6 °C) during the stabilization period and the test period.

2.2 Operational Conditions. The electric refrigerator or electric refrigerator-freezer shall be installed and its operating conditions maintained in accordance with HRF-1-1979, (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), section 7.2 through section 7.4.3.3, except that the vertical ambient temperature gradient at locations 10 inches (25.4 cm) out from the centers of the two sides of the unit being tested is to be maintained during the test. Unless the area is obstructed by shields or baffles, the gradient is to be maintained from 2 inches (5.1 cm) above the floor or supporting platform to a height 1 foot (30.5 cm) above the unit under test. Defrost controls are to be operative. Other exceptions and provisions to the cited sections of HRF-1-1979 are noted in sections 2.3 through 2.8, and 5.1 of this appendix.

2.3 Anti-Sweat Heaters.

The anti-sweat heater switch is to be on during one test and off during a second test. In the case of an electric refrigerator-freezer with variable anti-sweat heater control, the standard cycle energy use shall be the result of the calculation described in 6.2.3.

2.4 Conditions for Automatic Defrost Refrigerator-Freezers. For automatic defrost refrigerator-freezers, the freezer compartments shall not be loaded with any frozen food packages during testing. Cylindrical metallic masses of dimensions 1.12 ±0.25 inches (2.9 ±0.6 cm) in diameter and height shall be attached in good thermal contact with each temperature sensor within the refrigerated compartments. All temperature measuring sensor masses shall be supported by low-thermal-conductivity supports in such a manner to ensure that there will be at least 1 inch (2.5 cm) of air space separating the thermal mass from contact with any interior surface or hardware inside the cabinet. In case of interference with hardware at the sensor locations specified in section 5.1, the sensors shall be placed at the nearest adjacent location such that there will be a 1-inch air space separating the sensor mass from the hardware.

2.5 Conditions for all-refrigerators. There shall be no load in the freezer compartment during the test.

2.6 The cabinet and its refrigerating mechanism shall be assembled and set up in accordance with the printed consumer instructions supplied with the cabinet. Set-up of the refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer shall not deviate from these instructions, unless explicitly required or allowed by this test procedure. Specific required or allowed deviations from such set-up include the following:

(a) Connection of water lines and installation of water filters are not required;

(b) Clearance requirements from surfaces of the product shall be as described in section 2.8 below;

(c) The electric power supply shall be as described in HRF-1-1979 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) section 7.4.1;

(d) Temperature control settings for testing shall be as described in section 3 below. Settings for convertible compartments and other temperature-controllable or special compartments shall be as described in section 2.7 of this appendix;

(e) The product does not need to be anchored or otherwise secured to prevent tipping during energy testing; and

(f) All the product's chutes and throats required for the delivery of ice shall be free of packing, covers, or other blockages that may be fitted for shipping or when the icemaker is not in use.

For cases in which set-up is not clearly defined by this test procedure, manufacturers must submit a petition for a waiver (see section 7).

2.7 Compartments that are convertible (e.g., from fresh food to freezer) shall be operated in the highest energy use position. For the special case of convertible separate auxiliary compartments, this means that the compartment shall be treated as a freezer compartment or a fresh food compartment, depending on which of these represents higher energy use. Special compartments shall be tested with controls set to provide the coldest temperature. This requirement for the coldest temperature does not apply to features or functions associated with temperature control (such as fast chill compartments) that are initiated manually and terminated automatically within 168 hours.

2.8 The space between the back of the cabinet and a vertical surface (the test room wall or simulated wall) shall be the minimum distance in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.

2.9 Steady State Condition. Steady state conditions exist if the temperature measurements in all measured compartments taken at four minute intervals or less during a stabilization period are not changing at a rate greater than 0.042 °F. (0.023 °C.) per hour as determined by the applicable condition of A or B.

A. The average of the measurements during a two hour period if no cycling occurs or during a number of complete repetitive compressor cycles through a period of no less than two hours is compared to the average over an equivalent time period with three hours elapsed between the two measurement periods.

B. If A above cannot be used, the average of the measurements during a number of complete repetitive compressor cycles through a period of no less than two hours and including the last complete cycle prior to a defrost period, or if no cycling occurs, the average of the measurements during the last two hours prior to a defrost period; are compared to the same averaging period prior to the following defrost period.

2.10 Exterior air for externally vented refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer. An exterior air source shall be provided with adjustable temperature and pressure capabilities. The exterior air temperature shall be adjustable from 35 ±1 °F (1.7 ±0.6 °C) to 90 ±1 °F (32.2 ±0.6 °C).

2.10.1 Air duct. The exterior air shall pass from the exterior air source to the test unit through an insulated air duct.

2.10.2 Air temperature measurement. The air temperature entering the condenser or condenser/compressor compartment shall be maintained to ±3 °F (1.7 °C) during the stabilization and test periods and shall be measured at the inlet point of the condenser or condenser/compressor compartment (“condenser inlet”). Temperature measurements shall be taken from at least three temperature sensors or one sensor per 4 square inches of the air duct cross sectional area, whichever is greater, and shall be averaged. For a unit that has a condenser air fan, a minimum of three temperature sensors at the condenser fan discharge shall be required. Temperature sensors shall be arranged to be at the centers of equally divided cross sectional areas. The exterior air temperature, at its source, shall be measured and maintained to ±1 °F (0.6 °C) during the test period. The temperature measuring devices shall have an error not greater than ±0.5 °F (±0.3 °C). Measurements of the air temperature during the test period shall be taken at regular intervals not to exceed four minutes.

2.10.3 Exterior air static pressure. The exterior air static pressure at the inlet point of the unit shall be adjusted to maintain a negative pressure of 0.20 ±0.05 water column (62 Pa ±12.5 Pa) for all air flow rates supplied to the unit. The pressure sensor shall be located on a straight duct with a distance of at least 7.5 times the diameter of the duct upstream and a distance of at least 3 times the diameter of the duct downstream. There shall be four static pressure taps at 90° angles apart. The four pressures shall be averaged by interconnecting the four pressure taps. The air pressure measuring instrument shall have an error not greater than 0.01 water column (2.5 Pa).

3. Test Control Settings

3.1 Model with no user operable temperature control. A test shall be performed during which the compartment temperatures and energy use shall be measured. A second test shall be performed with the temperature control electrically short circuited to cause the compressor to run continuously.

3.2 Model with User Operable Temperature Control. Testing shall be performed in accordance with one of the following sections using the standardized temperatures of:

All-Refrigerator: 38 °F (3.3 °C) fresh food compartment temperature;

Refrigerator: 15 °F (−9.4 °C) freezer compartment temperature, 45 °F (7.2 °C) fresh food compartment temperature;

Refrigerator-Freezer: 5 °F (−15 °C) freezer compartment temperature, 45 °F (7.2 °C) fresh food compartment temperature.

For the purposes of comparing compartment temperatures with standardized temperatures, as described in sections 3.2.1 through 3.2.3, the freezer compartment temperature shall be as specified in section 5.1.4, and the fresh food compartment temperature shall be as specified in section 5.1.3.

3.2.1 A first test shall be performed with all compartment temperature controls set at their median position midway between their warmest and coldest settings. For mechanical control systems, knob detents shall be mechanically defeated if necessary to attain a median setting. For electronic control systems, the test shall be performed with all compartment temperature controls set at the average of the coldest and warmest settings—if there is no setting equal to this average, the setting closest to the average shall be used. If there are two such settings equally close to the average, the higher of these temperature control settings shall be used. A second test shall be performed with all controls set at their warmest setting or all controls set at their coldest setting (not electrically or mechanically bypassed). For all-refrigerators, this setting shall be the appropriate setting that attempts to achieve compartment temperatures measured during the two tests which bound (i.e., one is above and one is below) the standardized temperature for all-refrigerators. For refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers, the second test shall be conducted with all controls at their coldest setting, unless all compartment temperatures measured during the first part of the test are lower than the standardized temperatures, in which case the second test shall be conducted with all controls at their warmest setting. If (a) the measured temperature of any compartment with all controls set at their coldest settings is above its standardized temperature, a third test shall be performed with all controls set at their warmest settings and the result of this test shall be used with the result of the test performed with all controls set at their coldest settings to determine energy consumption. If (b) the measured temperatures of all compartments with all controls set at their warmest settings are below their standardized temperatures then the result of this test alone will be used to determine energy consumption. If neither (a) nor (b) occur, then the results of the first two tests shall be used to determine energy consumption.

3.2.2 Alternatively, a first test may be performed with all temperature controls set at their warmest setting. If the measured temperatures of all compartments for this test are below their standardized temperatures then the result of this test alone will be used to determine energy consumption. If this condition is not met, then the unit shall be tested in accordance with 3.2.1 of this appendix.

3.2.3 Alternatively, a first test may be performed with all temperature controls set at their coldest setting. If the measured temperature of any compartment for this test is above its standardized temperature, a second test shall be performed with all controls set at their warmest settings and the result of this test shall be used with the result of the test performed with all controls set at their coldest settings to determine energy consumption. If this condition is not met, then the unit shall be tested in accordance with 3.2.1 of this appendix.

3.2.4 Temperature Settings for Separate Auxiliary Convertible Compartments. For separate auxiliary convertible compartments tested as freezer compartments, the median setting shall be within 2 °F (1.1 °C) of the standardized temperature, and the warmest setting shall be above 10 °F (−12.2 °C). For separate auxiliary convertible compartments tested as fresh food compartments, the median setting shall be within 2 °F (1.1 °C) of the standardized temperature, and the coldest setting shall be below 40 °F (4.4 °C). For compartments where control settings are not expressed as particular temperatures, the measured temperature of the convertible compartment rather than the settings shall meet the specified criteria.

4. Test Period

Tests shall be performed by establishing the conditions set forth in section 2, and using the control settings set forth in section 3.

4.1 Nonautomatic Defrost. If the model being tested has no automatic defrost system, the test time period shall start after steady-state conditions have been achieved and be no less than 3 hours in duration. During the test period, the compressor motor shall complete two or more whole compressor cycles. (A compressor cycle is a complete “on” and a complete “off” period of the motor). If no “off” cycling will occur, as determined during the stabilization period, the test period shall be 3 hours. If incomplete cycling occurs (i.e. less than two compressor cycles during a 24-hour period), the results of the 24-hour period shall be used.

4.2 Automatic Defrost. If the model being tested has an automatic defrost system, the test time period shall start after steady-state conditions have been achieved and be from one point during a defrost period to the same point during the next defrost period. If the model being tested has a long-time automatic defrost system, the alternative provisions of 4.2.1 may be used. If the model being tested has a variable defrost control, the provisions of section 4.2.2 shall apply. If the model has a dual compressor system with automatic defrost for both systems, the provisions of 4.2.3 shall apply.

4.2.1 Long-time Automatic Defrost. If the model being tested has a long-time automatic defrost system, the test time period may consist of two parts. The first part would be the same as the test for a unit having no defrost provisions (section 4.1). The second part would start when a defrost cycle is initiated when the compressor “on” cycle is terminated prior to start of the defrost heater and terminates at the second turn “on” of the compressor or 4 hours from the initiation of the defrost heater, whichever comes first. See diagram in Figure 1 to this section.

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4.2.2 Variable Defrost Control. If the model being tested has a variable defrost control system, the test shall consist of the same two parts as the test for long-time automatic defrost (section 4.2.1).

4.2.3 Dual Compressor Systems with Automatic Defrost. If the model being tested has separate compressor systems for the refrigerator and freezer sections, each with its own automatic defrost system, then the two-part method in 4.2.1 shall be used. The second part of the method will be conducted separately for each automatic defrost system. The components (compressor, fan motors, defrost heaters, anti-sweat heaters, etc.) associated with each system will be identified and their energy consumption will be separately measured during each test.

5. Test Measurements

5.1 Temperature Measurements. Temperature measurements shall be made at the locations prescribed in Figures 7.1 and 7.2 of HRF-1-1979 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and shall be accurate to within ±0.5 °F (0.3 °C). No freezer temperature measurements need be taken in an all-refrigerator model. If the interior arrangements of the cabinet do not conform with those shown in Figure 7.1 and 7.2 of HRF-1-1979, the product may be tested by relocating the temperature sensors from the locations specified in the figures to avoid interference with hardware or components within the cabinet, in which case the specific locations used for the temperature sensors shall be noted in the test data records maintained by the manufacturer in accordance with 10 CFR 429.14, and the certification report shall indicate that non-standard sensor locations were used.

5.1.1 Measured Temperature. The measured temperature of a compartment is to be the average of all sensor temperature readings taken in that compartment at a particular time. Measurements shall be taken at regular intervals not to exceed four minutes.

5.1.2 Compartment Temperature. The compartment temperature for each test period shall be an average of the measured temperatures taken in a compartment during one or more complete compressor cycles. One compressor cycle is one complete motor “on” and one complete motor “off” period. For long-time automatic defrost models, compartment temperatures shall be those measured in the first part of the test period specified in section 4.2.1. For models with variable defrost controls, compartment temperatures shall be those measured in the first part of the test period specified in section 4.2.2.

5.1.2.1 The number of complete compressor cycles over which the measured temperatures in a compartment are to be averaged to determine compartment temperature shall be equal to the number of minutes between measured temperature readings, rounded up to the next whole minute or a number of complete compressor cycles over a time period exceeding 1 hour, whichever is greater. One of the compressor cycles shall be the last complete compressor cycle during the test period.

5.1.2.2 If no compressor cycling occurs, the compartment temperature shall be the average of the measured temperatures taken during the last 32 minutes of the test period.

5.1.2.3 If incomplete compressor cycling occurs, the compartment temperatures shall be the average of the measured temperatures taken during the last three hours of the last complete compressor “on” period.

5.1.3 Fresh Food Compartment Temperature. The fresh food compartment temperature shall be calculated as:

eCFR graphic er02my11.090.gif

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Where:

R is the total number of applicable fresh food compartments, which include the first fresh food compartment and any number of separate auxiliary fresh food compartments (including separate auxiliary convertible compartments tested as fresh food compartments in accordance with section 2.7);

TRi is the compartment temperature of fresh food compartment “i” determined in accordance with section 5.1.2; and

VRi is the volume of fresh food compartment “i”.

5.1.4 Freezer Compartment Temperature. The freezer compartmenttemperature shall be calculated as:

eCFR graphic er02my11.091.gif

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Where:

F is the total number of applicable freezer compartments, which include the first freezer compartment and any number of separate auxiliary freezer compartments (including separate auxiliary convertible compartments tested as freezer compartments in accordance with section 2.7);

TFi is the compartment temperature of freezer compartment “i” determined in accordance with section 5.1.2; and

VFi is the volume of freezer compartment “i”.

5.2 Energy Measurements

5.2.1 Per-day Energy Consumption. The energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day for each test period shall be the energy expended during the test period as specified in section 4 adjusted to a 24-hour period. The adjustment shall be determined as follows:

5.2.1.1 Nonautomatic and Automatic Defrost Models. The energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day shall be calculated equivalent to:

ET = EP × 1440/T

Where:

ET = test cycle energy expended in kilowatt-hours per day;

EP = energy expended in kilowatt-hours during the test period;

T = length of time of the test period in minutes; and

1440 = conversion factor to adjust to a 24-hour period in minutes per day.

5.2.1.2 Long-time Automatic Defrost. If the two-part test method is used, the energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day shall be calculated equivalent to:

ET = (1440 × EP1/T1) + (EP2 − (EP1 × T2/T1)) × (12/CT)

Where:

ET and 1440 are defined in 5.2.1.1;

EP1 = energy expended in kilowatt-hours during the first part of the test;

EP2 = energy expended in kilowatt-hours during the second part of the test;

T1 and T2 = length of time in minutes of the first and second test parts respectively;

CT = defrost timer run time or compressor run time between defrosts in hours required to cause it to go through a complete cycle, rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour; and

12 = factor to adjust for a 50-percent run time of the compressor in hours per day.

5.2.1.3 Variable Defrost Control. The energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day shall be calculated equivalent to:

ET = (1440 × EP1/T1) + (EP2 − (EP1 × T2/T1)) × (12/CT),

Where:

1440 is defined in 5.2.1.1 and EP1, EP2, T1, T2, and 12 are defined in 5.2.1.2;

CT = (CTL × CTM)/(F × (CTM − CTL) + CTL);

CTL = least or shortest compressor run time between defrosts in hours rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour (greater than or equal to 6 but less than or equal to 12 hours);

CTM = maximum compressor run time between defrosts in hours rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour (greater than CTL but not more than 96 hours);

F = ratio of per day energy consumption in excess of the least energy and the maximum difference in per-day energy consumption and is equal to 0.20;

For variable defrost models with no values for CTL and CTM in the algorithm, the default values of 12 and 84 shall be used, respectively.

5.2.1.4 Dual Compressor Systems with Dual Automatic Defrost. The two-part test method in section 4.1.2.4 must be used, and the energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day shall be calculated equivalent to:

ET = (1440 × EP1/T1) + (EP2F − (EPF × T2/T1)) × (12/CTF) + (EP2R − (EPR × T3/T1)) × (12/CTR)

Where:

1440, EP1, T1, EP2, 12, and CT are defined in 5.2.1.2;

EPF = freezer system energy in kilowatt-hours expended during the first part of the test;

EP2F = freezer system energy in kilowatt-hours expended during the second part of the test for the freezer system;

EPR = refrigerator system energy in kilowatt-hours expended during the first part of the test;

EP2R = refrigerator system energy in kilowatt-hours expended during the second part of the test for the refrigerator system;

T2 and T3 = length of time in minutes of the second test part for the freezer and refrigerator systems respectively;

CTF = compressor run time between freezer defrosts (in hours rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour); and

CTR = compressor run time between refrigerator defrosts (in hours rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour).

5.3 Volume measurements. The electric refrigerator or electric refrigerator-freezer total refrigerated volume, VT, shall be measured in accordance with HRF-1-1979, section 3.20 and sections 4.2 through 4.3 and be calculated equivalent to:

VT=VF+VFF

where

VT=total refrigerated volume in cubic feet,

VF=freezer compartment volume in cubic feet, and

VFF=fresh food compartment volume in cubic feet.

5.4 Externally vented refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer units. All test measurements for the externally vented refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer shall be made in accordance with the requirements of other sections of this appendix, except as modified in this section 5.4 or other sections expressly applicable to externally vented refrigerators or refrigerator-freezers.

5.4.1 Operability of thermostatic and mixing of air controls. Prior to conducting energy consumption tests, the operability of thermostatic controls that permit the mixing of exterior and ambient air when exterior air temperatures are less than 60 °F must be verified. The operability of such controls shall be verified by operating the unit under ambient air temperature of 90 °F and exterior air temperature of 45 °F. If the inlet air entering the condenser or condenser/compressor compartment is maintained at 60 °F, plus or minus three degrees, energy consumption of the unit shall be measured under 5.4.2.2 and 5.4.2.3. If the inlet air entering the condenser or condenser/compressor compartment is not maintained at 60 °F, plus or minus three degrees, energy consumption of the unit shall also be measured under 5.4.2.4.

5.4.2 Energy consumption tests.

5.4.2.1 Correction factor test. To enable calculation of a correction factor, K, two full cycle tests shall be conducted to measure energy consumption of the unit with air mixing controls disabled and the condenser inlet air temperatures set at 90 °F (32.2 °C) and 80 °F (26.7 °C). Both tests shall be conducted with all compartment temperature controls set at the position midway between their warmest and coldest settings and the anti-sweat heater switch off. Record the energy consumptions ec90 and ec80, in kWh/day.

5.4.2.2 Energy consumption at 90 °F. The unit shall be tested at 90 °F (32.2 °C) exterior air temperature to record the energy consumptions (e90)i in kWh/day. For a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, i corresponds to each of the two states of the compartment temperature control positions.

5.4.2.3 Energy consumption at 60 °F. The unit shall be tested at 60 °F (26.7 °C) exterior air temperature to record the energy consumptions (e60)i in kWh/day. For a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, i corresponds to each of the two states of the compartment temperature control positions.

5.4.2.4 Energy consumption if mixing controls do not operate properly. If the operability of temperature and mixing controls has not been verified as required under 5.4.1, the unit shall be tested at 50 °F (10.0 °C) and 30 °F (−1.1 °C) exterior air temperatures to record the energy consumptions (e50)i and (e30)i. For a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, i corresponds to each of the two states of the compartment temperature control positions.

6. Calculation of Derived Results from Test Measurements

6.1 Adjusted Total Volume.

6.1.1 Electric refrigerators. The adjusted total volume, VA, for electric refrigerators under test shall be defined as:

VA=(VF×CR)+VFF

where

VA=adjusted total volume in cubic feet,

VF and VFF are defined in 5.3, and

CR=adjustment factor of 1.44 for refrigerators other than all-refrigerators, or 1.0 for all-refrigerators, dimensionless,

6.1.2 Electric refrigerator-freezers. The adjusted total volume, VA, for electric refrigerator-freezers under test shall be calculated as follows:

VA=(VF×CRF)+VFF

where

VF and VFF are defined in 5.3 and VA is defined in 6.1.1,

CRF=adjustment factor of 1.63, dimensionless,

6.2 Average Per-Cycle Energy consumption.

6.2.1 All-refrigerator Models. The average per-cycle energy consumption for a cycle type is expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle to the nearest one hundredth (0.01) kilowatt-hour and shall depend upon the temperature attainable in the fresh food compartment as shown below.

6.2.1.1 If the fresh food compartment temperature is always below 38.0 °F. (3.3 °C.), the average per-cycle energy consumption shall be equivalent to:

E=ET1

where

E=Total per-cycle energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day,

ET is defined in 5.2.1, and Number 1 indicates the test period during which the highest fresh food compartment temperature is measured.

6.2.1.2 If one of the fresh food compartment temperatures measured for a test period is greater than 38.0 °F (3.3 °C), the average per-cycle energy consumption shall be equivalent to:

E = ET1 + ((ET2−ET1) × (38.0 − TR1)/(TR2 − TR1))

Where:

E is defined in 6.2.1.1;

ET is defined in 5.2.1;

TR = Fresh food compartment temperature determined according to 5.1.3 in degrees F;

The numbers 1 and 2 indicate measurements taken during the first and second test period as appropriate; and

38.0 = Standardized fresh food compartment temperature in degrees F.

6.2.2 Refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers. The average per-cycle energy consumption for a cycle type is expressed in kilowatt-hours per-cycle to the nearest one hundredth (0.01) kilowatt-hour and shall be defined in the applicable following manner.

6.2.2.1 If the fresh food compartment temperature is always at or below 45 °F. (7.2 °C.) in both of the tests and the freezer compartment temperature is always at or below 15 °F. (−9.4 °C.) in both tests of a refrigerator or at or below 5 °F. (−15 °C.) in both tests of a refrigerator-freezer, the per-cycle energy consumption shall be:

E=ET1

where

E is defined in 6.2.1.1,

ET is defined in 5.2.1, and

Number 1 indicates the test period during which the highest freezer compartment temperature was measured.

6.2.2.2 If the conditions of 6.2.2.1 do not exist, the per-cycle energy consumption shall be defined by the higher of the two values calculated by the following two formulas:

E = ET1 + ((ET2−ET1) × (45.0 − TR1)/(TR2 − TR1))

and

E = ET1 + ((ET2 − ET1) × (k − TF1)/(TF2 − TF1))

Where:

E is defined in 6.2.1.1;

ET is defined in 5.2.1;

TR and numbers 1 and 2 are defined in 6.2.1.2;

TF = Freezer compartment temperature determined according to 5.1.4 in degrees F;

45.0 is a specified fresh food compartment temperature in degrees F; and

k is a constant 15.0 for refrigerators or 5.0 for refrigerator-freezers each being standardized freezer compartment temperature in degrees F.

6.2.3 Variable Anti-Sweat Heater Models. The standard cycle energy consumption of an electric refrigerator-freezer with a variable anti-sweat heater control (Estd), expressed in kilowatt-hours per day, shall be calculated equivalent to:

Estd = E + (Correction Factor) where E is determined by 6.2.1.1, 6.2.1.2, 6.2.2.1, or 6.2.2.2, whichever is appropriate, with the anti-sweat heater switch in the “off” position or, for products without anti-sweat heater switches, the anti-sweat heater in its lowest energy use state.

Correction Factor = (Anti-sweat Heater Power × System-loss Factor) × (24 hrs/1 day) × (1 kW/1000 W)

Where:

Anti-sweat Heater Power = 0.034 * (Heater Watts at 5%RH)

+ 0.211 * (Heater Watts at 15%RH)

+ 0.204 * (Heater Watts at 25%RH)

+ 0.166 * (Heater Watts at 35%RH)

+ 0.126 * (Heater Watts at 45%RH)

+ 0.119 * (Heater Watts at 55%RH)

+ 0.069 * (Heater Watts at 65%RH)

+ 0.047 * (Heater Watts at 75%RH)

+ 0.008 * (Heater Watts at 85%RH)

+ 0.015 * (Heater Watts at 95%RH)

Heater Watts at a specific relative humidity = the nominal watts used by all heaters at that specific relative humidity, 72 °F (22.2 °C) ambient, and DOE reference temperatures of fresh food (FF) average temperature of 45 °F (7.2 °C) and freezer (FZ) average temperature of 5 °F (−15 °C).

System-loss Factor = 1.3

6.3 Externally vented refrigerator or refrigerator-freezers. Per-cycle energy consumption measurements for the externally vented refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer shall be calculated in accordance with the requirements of this appendix, as modified in sections 6.3.1-6.3.7.

6.3.1 Correction factor. A correction factor, K, shall be calculated as:

K = ec90/ec80

where ec90 and ec80 = the energy consumption test results as determined under 5.4.2.1.

6.3.2 Combining test results of different settings of compartment temperature controls. For a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, follow the calculation procedures of 6.2 to combine the test results for energy consumption of the unit at different temperature control settings for each condenser inlet air temperature tested under 5.4.2.2, 5.4.2.3, and 5.4.2.4, where applicable, (e90)i, (e60)i, (e50)i, and (e30)i. The combined values are ε90, ε60, ε50, and ε30, where applicable, in kWh/day.

6.3.3 Energy consumption corrections. For a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, the energy consumptions ε90, ε60, ε50, and ε30 calculated in 6.3.2 shall be adjusted by multiplying the correction factor K to obtain the corrected energy consumptions per day, in kWh/day:

E90 = K × ε90,

E60 = K × ε60

E50 = K × ε50, and

E30 = K × ε30

where,

K is determined under section 6.3.1, and ε90, ε60, ε50, and ε30 are determined under section 6.3.2.

6.3.4 Energy profile equation. For a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, the energy consumption EX, in kWh/day, at a specific exterior air temperature between 80 °F (26.7 °C) and 60 °F (26.7 °C) shall be calculated by the following equation:

EX = a + bTX,

where,

TX = exterior air temperature in °F;

a = 3E60−2E90, in kWh/day;

b = (E90−E60)/30, in kWh/day per °F.

6.3.5 Energy consumption at 80 °F (26.7 °C), 75 °F (23.9 °C) and 65 °F (18.3 °C). For a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, calculate the energy consumptions at 80 °F (26.7 °C), 75 °F (23.9 °C) and 65 °F (18.3 °C) exterior air temperatures, E80, E75 and E65, respectively, in kWh/day, using the equation in 6.3.4.

6.3.6 National average per cycle energy consumption. For a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, calculate the national average energy consumption, EN, in kWh/day, using one of the following equations:

EN = 0.523 × E60 + 0.165 × E65 + 0.181 × E75 + 0.131 × E80, for units not tested under 5.4.2.4,

EN = 0.257 × E30 + 0.266 × E50 + 0.165 × E65 + 0.181 × E75 + 0.131 × E80, for units tested under 5.4.2.4,

where,

E30, E50, and E60 are defined in 6.3.3,

E65, E75, and E80 are defined in 6.3.5, and

the coefficients are weather associated weighting factors.

6.3.7 Regional average per cycle energy consumption. If regional average per cycle energy consumption is required to be calculated, for a given setting of the anti-sweat heater, calculate the regional average per cycle energy consumption, ER, in kWh/day, for the regions in figure 1 using one of the following equations and the coefficients in the table A:

ER = a1 × E60 + c × E65 + d × E75 + e × E80, for a unit that is not required to be tested under 5.4.2.4,

ER = a × E30 + b × E50 + c × E65 + d × E75 + e × E80, for a unit tested under 5.4.2.4,

where:

E30, E50, and E60 are defined in 6.3.3,

E65, E75, and E80 are defined in 6.3.5, and

a1, a, b, c, d, e are weather associated weighting factors for the Regions, as specified in Table A:

Table A—Coefficients for Calculating Regional Average per Cycle Energy Consumption

[Weighting Factors]

Regionsa1abcde
I0.2820.0390.2440.1940.3260.198
II0.4860.1940.2930.1910.1930.129
III0.5840.3020.2820.1780.1590.079
IV0.6640.4200.2440.1610.1210.055
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7. Test Procedure Waivers

To the extent that the procedures contained in this appendix do not provide a means for determining the energy consumption of a refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer, a manufacturer must obtain a waiver under 10 CFR 430.27 to establish an acceptable test procedure for each such product. Such instances could, for example, include situations where the test set-up for a particular refrigerator or refrigerator-freezer basic model is not clearly defined by the provisions of section 2. For details regarding the criteria and procedures for obtaining a waiver, please refer to 10 CFR 430.27.

[47 FR 34526, Aug. 10, 1982; 48 FR 13013, Mar. 29, 1983, as amended at 54 FR 36240, Aug. 31, 1989; 54 FR 38788, Sept. 20, 1989; 62 FR 47539, 47540, Sept. 9, 1997; 68 FR 10960, Mar. 7, 2003; 75 FR 78860, Dec. 16, 2010; 76 FR 12502, Mar. 7, 2011; 76 FR 24781, May 2, 2011]

Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Freezers

Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 22354, Apr. 21, 2014.

The provisions of appendix B shall apply to all products manufactured on or after the effective date of any amended standards promulgated by DOE pursuant to Section 325(b)(4) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (to be codified at 42 U.S.C. 6295(b)(4)).

1. Definitions

Section 3, Definitions, of HRF-1-2008 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) applies to this test procedure.

1.1 “Adjusted total volume” means the product of the freezer volume as defined in HRF-1-2008 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) in cubic feet multiplied by an adjustment factor.

1.2 “Anti-sweat heater” means a device incorporated into the design of a freezer to prevent the accumulation of moisture on exterior or interior surfaces of the cabinet.

1.3 “Anti-sweat heater switch” means a user-controllable switch or user interface which modifies the activation or control of anti-sweat heaters.

1.4 “Automatic defrost” means a system in which the defrost cycle is automatically initiated and terminated, with resumption of normal refrigeration at the conclusion of defrost operation. The system automatically prevents the permanent formation of frost on all refrigerated surfaces. Nominal refrigerated food temperatures are maintained during the operation of the automatic defrost system.

1.5 “Automatic icemaker” means a device that can be supplied with water without user intervention, either from a pressurized water supply system or by transfer from a water reservoir, that automatically produces, harvests, and stores ice in a storage bin, with means to automatically interrupt the harvesting operation when the ice storage bin is filled to a pre-determined level.

1.6 “Cycle” means the period of 24 hours for which the energy use of a freezer is calculated as though the consumer-activated compartment temperature controls were set to maintain the standardized temperature (see section 3.2).

1.7 “Cycle type” means the set of test conditions having the calculated effect of operating a freezer for a period of 24 hours with the consumer-activated controls other than the compartment temperature control set to establish various operating characteristics.

1.8 “HRF-1-2008” means AHAM Standard HRF-1-2008, Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers, Energy and Internal Volume of Refrigerating Appliances (2008), including Errata to Energy and Internal Volume of Refrigerating Appliances, Correction Sheet issued November 17, 2009. Only sections of HRF-1-2008 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) specifically referenced in this test procedure are part of this test procedure. In cases where there is a conflict, the language of the test procedure in this appendix takes precedence over HRF-1-2008.

1.9 “Long-time automatic defrost” means an automatic defrost system where successive defrost cycles are separated by 14 hours or more of compressor operating time.

1.10 “Quick freeze” means an optional feature on freezers that is initiated manually. It bypasses the thermostat control and operates continually until the feature is terminated either manually or automatically.

1.11 “Separate auxiliary compartment” means a freezer compartment other than the first freezer compartment of a freezer having more than one compartment. Access to a separate auxiliary compartment is through a separate exterior door or doors rather than through the door or doors of another compartment. Separate auxiliary freezer compartments may not be larger than the first freezer compartment.

1.12 “Special compartment” means any compartment without doors directly accessible from the exterior, and with separate temperature control that is not convertible from fresh food temperature range to freezer temperature range.

1.13 “Stabilization period” means the total period of time during which steady-state conditions are being attained or evaluated.

1.14 “Standard cycle” means the cycle type in which the anti-sweat heater switch, when provided, is set in the highest energy-consuming position.

1.15 “Variable defrost control” means an automatic defrost system in which successive defrost cycles are determined by an operating condition variable or variables other than solely compressor operating time. This includes any electrical or mechanical device performing this function. A control scheme that changes the defrost interval from a fixed length to an extended length (without any intermediate steps) is not considered a variable defrost control. A variable defrost control feature should predict the accumulation of frost on the evaporator and react accordingly. Therefore, the times between defrost should vary with different usage patterns and include a continuum of lengths of time between defrosts as inputs vary.

2. Test Conditions

2.1 Ambient Temperature. The ambient temperature shall be 90.0 ±1.0 °F (32.2 ±0.6 °C) during the stabilization period and the test period.

2.2 Operational Conditions. The freezer shall be installed and its operating conditions maintained in accordance with HRF-1-2008, (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), sections 5.3 through section 5.5.5.5 (but excluding sections 5.5.5.2 and 5.5.5.4). The quick freeze option shall be switched off except as specified in section 3.1. Additional clarifications are noted in sections 2.3 through 2.6.

2.3 Anti-Sweat Heaters. The anti-sweat heater switch is to be on during one test and off during a second test. In the case of an electric freezer with variable anti-sweat heater control, the standard cycle energy use shall be the result of the calculation described in 6.2.2.

2.4 The cabinet and its refrigerating mechanism shall be assembled and set up in accordance with the printed consumer instructions supplied with the cabinet. Set-up of the freezer shall not deviate from these instructions, unless explicitly required or allowed by this test procedure. Specific required or allowed deviations from such set-up include the following:

(a) Connection of water lines and installation of water filters are not required;

(b) Clearance requirements from surfaces of the product shall be as described in section 2.6 below;

(c) The electric power supply shall be as described in HRF-1-2008 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) section 5.5.1;

(d) Temperature control settings for testing shall be as described in section 3 of this appendix. Settings for special compartments shall be as described in section 2.5 of this appendix;

(e) The product does not need to be anchored or otherwise secured to prevent tipping during energy testing;

(f) All the product's chutes and throats required for the delivery of ice shall be free of packing, covers, or other blockages that may be fitted for shipping or when the icemaker is not in use; and

(g) Ice storage bins shall be emptied of ice.

For cases in which set-up is not clearly defined by this test procedure, manufacturers must submit a petition for a waiver (see section 7).

2.5 Special compartments shall be tested with controls set to provide the coldest temperature. However, for special compartments in which temperature control is achieved using the addition of heat (including resistive electric heating, refrigeration system waste heat, or heat from any other source, but excluding the transfer of air from another part of the interior of the product) for any part of the controllable temperature range of that compartment, the product energy use shall be determined by averaging two sets of tests. The first set of tests shall be conducted with such special compartments at their coldest settings, and the second set of tests shall be conducted with such special compartments at their warmest settings. The requirements for the warmest or coldest temperature settings of this section do not apply to features or functions associated with temperature control (such as quick freeze) that are initiated manually and terminated automatically within 168 hours.

2.6 The space between the back of the cabinet and a vertical surface (the test room wall or simulated wall) shall be the minimum distance in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. However, the clearance shall not be greater than 2 inches (51 mm) from the plane of the cabinet's back panel to the vertical surface. If permanent rear spacers extend further than this distance, the appliance shall be located with the spacers in contact with the vertical surface.

2.7 Steady State Condition. Steady-state conditions exist if the temperature measurements taken at 4-minute intervals or less during a stabilization period are not changing at a rate greater than 0.042 °F (0.023 °C) per hour as determined by the applicable condition of A or B described below.

A—The average of the measurements during a 2-hour period if no cycling occurs or during a number of complete repetitive compressor cycles occurring through a period of no less than 2 hours is compared to the average over an equivalent time period with 3 hours elapsing between the two measurement periods.

B—If A above cannot be used, the average of the measurements during a number of complete repetitive compressor cycles occurring through a period of no less than 2 hours and including the last complete cycle before a defrost period (or if no cycling occurs, the average of the measurements during the last 2 hours before a defrost period) are compared to the same averaging period before the following defrost period.

3. Test Control Settings

3.1 Model with No User Operable Temperature Control. A test shall be performed during which the compartment temperature and energy use shall be measured. A second test shall be performed with the temperature control electrically short circuited to cause the compressor to run continuously. If the model has the quick freeze option, this option must be used to bypass the temperature control.

3.2 Model with User Operable Temperature Control. Testing shall be performed in accordance with one of the following sections using the standardized temperature of 0.0 °F (−17.8 °C).

For the purposes of comparing compartment temperatures with standardized temperatures, as described in sections 3.2.1 and 3.2.2, the freezer compartment temperature shall be as specified in section 5.1.3.

3.2.1 A first test shall be performed with all temperature controls set at their median position midway between their warmest and coldest settings. For mechanical control systems, knob detents shall be mechanically defeated if necessary to attain a median setting. For electronic control systems, the test shall be performed with all compartment temperature controls set at the average of the coldest and warmest settings—if there is no setting equal to this average, the setting closest to the average shall be used. If there are two such settings equally close to the average, the higher of these temperature control settings shall be used. A second test shall be performed with all controls set at either their warmest or their coldest setting (not electrically or mechanically bypassed), whichever is appropriate, to attempt to achieve compartment temperatures measured during the two tests which bound (i.e., one is above and one is below) the standardized temperature. If the compartment temperatures measured during these two tests bound the standardized temperature, then these test results shall be used to determine energy consumption. If the compartment temperature measured with all controls set at their coldest setting is above the standardized temperature, the tested unit fails the test and cannot be rated. If the compartment temperature measured with all controls set at their warmest setting is below the standardized temperature, then the result of this test alone will be used to determine energy consumption. Also see Table 1 below, which summarizes these requirements.

Table 1—Temperature Settings for Freezers

First testSecond testEnergy calculation based on:
SettingsResultsSettingsResults
MidLowWarmLowSecond Test Only.
   HighFirst and Second Tests.
   HighColdLowFirst and Second Tests.
   HighNo Energy Use Rating.

3.2.2 Alternatively, a first test may be performed with all temperature controls set at their warmest setting. If the compartment temperature is below the standardized temperature, then the result of this test alone will be used to determine energy consumption. If this condition is not met, then the unit shall be tested in accordance with section 3.2.1.

4. Test Period

Tests shall be performed by establishing the conditions set forth in section 2 and using the control settings as set forth in section 3 above.

4.1 Nonautomatic Defrost. If the model being tested has no automatic defrost system, the test time period shall start after steady-state conditions have been achieved and be no less than 3 hours in duration. During the test period, the compressor motor shall complete two or more whole compressor cycles. (A compressor cycle is a complete “on” and a complete “off” period of the motor.) If no “off” cycling will occur, as determined during the stabilization period, the test period shall be 3 hours. If incomplete cycling occurs (less than two compressor cycles during a 24-hour period), the results of the 24-hour period shall be used.

4.2 Automatic Defrost. If the model being tested has an automatic defrost system, the test time period shall start after steady-state conditions have been achieved and be from one point during a defrost period to the same point during the next defrost period. If the model being tested has a long-time automatic defrost system, the alternate provisions of 4.2.1 may be used. If the model being tested has a variable defrost control, the provisions of 4.2.2 shall apply.

4.2.1 Long-time Automatic Defrost. If the model being tested has a long-time automatic defrost system, the two-part test described in this section may be used. The first part is a stable period of compressor operation that includes no portions of the defrost cycle, such as precooling or recovery, that is otherwise the same as the test for a unit having no defrost provisions (section 4.1). The second part is designed to capture the energy consumed during all of the events occurring with the defrost control sequence that are outside of stable operation.

4.2.1.1 Cycling Compressor System. For a system with a cycling compressor, the second part of the test starts at the termination of the last regular compressor “on” cycle. The average temperature of the compartment measured from the termination of the previous compressor “on” cycle to the termination of the last regular compressor “on” cycle must be within 0.5 °F (0.3 °C) of the average temperature of the compartment measured for the first part of the test. If any compressor cycles occur prior to the defrost heater being energized that cause the average temperature in the compartment to deviate from the average temperature for the first part of the test by more than 0.5 °F (0.3 °C), these compressor cycles are not considered regular compressor cycles and must be included in the second part of the test. As an example, a “precooling” cycle, which is an extended compressor cycle that lowers the compartment temperature prior to energizing the defrost heater, must be included in the second part of the test. The test period for the second part of the test ends at the termination of the first regular compressor “on” cycle after the compartment temperatures have fully recovered to their stable conditions. The average temperature of the compartment measured from this termination of the first regular compressor “on” cycle until the termination of the next regular compressor “on” cycle must be within 0.5 °F (0.3 °C) of the average temperature of the compartment measured for the first part of the test. See Figure 1.

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4.2.1.2 Non-cycling Compressor System. For a system with a non-cycling compressor, the second part of the test starts at a time before defrost during stable operation when the compartment temperature is within 0.5 °F (0.3 °C) of the average temperature of the compartment measured for the first part of the test. The second part stops at a time after defrost during stable operation when the compartment temperature is within 0.5 °F (0.3 °C) of the average temperature of the compartment measured for the first part of the test. See Figure 2.

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4.2.2 Variable Defrost Control. If the model being tested has a variable defrost control system, the test shall consist of the same two parts as the test for long-time automatic defrost (section 4.2.1).

5. Test Measurements

5.1 Temperature Measurements. Temperature measurements shall be made at the locations prescribed in Figure 5-2 of HRF-1-2008 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and shall be accurate to within ±0.5 °F (0.3 °C).

If the interior arrangements of the cabinet do not conform with those shown in Figure 5.2 of HRF-1-2008, the product may be tested by relocating the temperature sensors from the locations specified in the figures to avoid interference with hardware or components within the cabinet, in which case the specific locations used for the temperature sensors shall be noted in the test data records maintained by the manufacturer in accordance with 10 CFR 429.14, and the certification report shall indicate that non-standard sensor locations were used.

5.1.1 Measured Temperature. The measured temperature is to be the average of all sensor temperature readings taken at a particular point in time. Measurements shall be taken at regular intervals not to exceed 4 minutes.

5.1.2 Compartment Temperature. The compartment temperature for each test period shall be an average of the measured temperatures taken during the test period as defined in section 4. For long-time automatic defrost models, compartment temperature shall be that measured in the first part of the test period specified in section 4.2.1. For models with variable defrost controls, compartment temperatures shall be those measured in the first part of the test period specified in section 4.2.2.

5.1.3 Freezer Compartment Temperature. The freezer compartment temperature shall be calculated as:

eCFR graphic er16de10.017.gif

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Where:

F is the total number of applicable freezer compartments, which include the first freezer compartment and any number of separate auxiliary freezer compartments;

TFi is the compartment temperature of freezer compartment “i” determined in accordance with section 5.1.2; and

VFi is the volume of freezer compartment “i”.

5.2 Energy Measurements:

5.2.1 Per-Day Energy Consumption. The energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day for each test period shall be the energy expended during the test period as specified in section 4 adjusted to a 24-hour period. The adjustment shall be determined as follows:

5.2.1.1 Nonautomatic and Automatic Defrost Models. The energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day shall be calculated equivalent to:

ET = (EP × 1440 × K)/T

Where:

ET = test cycle energy expended in kilowatt-hours per day;

EP = energy expended in kilowatt-hours during the test period;

T = length of time of the test period in minutes;

1440 = conversion factor to adjust to a 24-hour period in minutes per day; and

K = dimensionless correction factor of 0.7 for chest freezers and 0.85 for upright freezers to adjust for average household usage.

5.2.1.2 Long-time Automatic Defrost. If the two-part test method is used, the energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day shall be calculated equivalent to:

ET = (1440 × K × EP1/T1) + (EP2−(EP1 × T2/T1)) × K × (12/CT)

Where:

ET, 1440, and K are defined in section 5.2.1.1;

EP1 = energy expended in kilowatt-hours during the first part of the test;

EP2 = energy expended in kilowatt-hours during the second part of the test;

CT = defrost timer run time or compressor run time between defrosts in hours required to cause it to go through a complete cycle, rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour;

12 = conversion factor to adjust for a 50 percent run time of the compressor in hours per day; and

T1 and T2 = length of time in minutes of the first and second test parts respectively.

5.2.1.3 Variable Defrost Control. The energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day shall be calculated equivalent to:

ET = (1440 × K × EP1/T1) + (EP2−(EP1 × T2/T1)) × K × (12/CT),

Where:

ET, K, and 1440 are defined in section 5.2.1.1;

EP1, EP2, T1, T2, and 12 are defined in section 5.2.1.2;

CT = (CTL × CTM)/(F × (CTM−CTL) + CTL)

Where:

CTL = least or shortest compressor run time between defrosts in hours rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour (greater than or equal to 6 hours but less than or equal to 12 hours);

CTM = maximum compressor run time between defrosts in hours rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour (greater than CTL but not more than 96 hours);

F = ratio of per day energy consumption in excess of the least energy and the maximum difference in per-day energy consumption and is equal to 0.20.

For variable defrost models with no values for CTL and CTM in the algorithm, the default values of 6 and 96 shall be used, respectively.

5.3 Volume Measurements. The total refrigerated volume, VT, shall be measured in accordance with HRF-1-2008, (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), section 3.30 and sections 4.2 through 4.3.

In the case of freezers with automatic icemakers, the volume occupied by the automatic icemaker, including its ice storage bin, is to be included in the volume measurement.

6. Calculation of Derived Results From Test Measurements

6.1 Adjusted Total Volume. The adjusted total volume, VA, for freezers under test shall be defined as:

VA = VT × CF

Where:

VA = adjusted total volume in cubic feet;

VT = total refrigerated volume in cubic feet; and

CF = dimensionless correction factor of 1.76.

6.2 Average Per-Cycle Energy Consumption

6.2.1 The average per-cycle energy consumption for a cycle type is expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle to the nearest one hundredth (0.01) kilowatt-hour and shall depend on the compartment temperature attainable as shown below.

6.2.1.1 If the compartment temperature is always below 0.0 °F (−17.8 °C), the average per-cycle energy consumption shall be equivalent to:

E = ET1 + IET

Where:

E = total per-cycle energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day;

ET is defined in 5.2.1;

The number 1 indicates the test period during which the highest compartment temperature is measured; and

IET, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle, equals 0.23 for a product with an automatic icemaker and otherwise equals 0 (zero).

6.2.1.2 If one of the compartment temperatures measured for a test period is greater than 0.0 °F (17.8 °C), the average per-cycle energy consumption shall be equivalent to:

E = ET1 + ((ET2 − ET1) × (0.0 − TF1)/(TF2 − TF1)) + IET

Where:

E and IET are defined in 6.2.1.1 and ET is defined in 5.2.1;

TF = freezer compartment temperature determined according to 5.1.3 in degrees F;

The numbers 1 and 2 indicate measurements taken during the first and second test period as appropriate; and

0.0 = standardized compartment temperature in degrees F.

6.2.2 Variable Anti-Sweat Heater Models. The standard cycle energy consumption of an electric freezer with a variable anti-sweat heater control (Estd), expressed in kilowatt-hours per day, shall be calculated equivalent to:

Estd = E + (Correction Factor) where E is determined by 6.2.1.1, or 6.2.1.2, whichever is appropriate, with the anti-sweat heater switch in the “off” position or, for a product without an anti-sweat heater switch, the anti-sweat heater in its lowest energy use state.

Correction Factor = (Anti-sweat Heater Power × System-loss Factor) × (24 hrs/1 day) × (1 kW/1000 W)

Where:

Anti-sweat Heater Power = 0.034 * (Heater Watts at 5%RH)

+ 0.211 * (Heater Watts at 15%RH)

+ 0.204 * (Heater Watts at 25%RH)

+ 0.166 * (Heater Watts at 35%RH)

+ 0.126 * (Heater Watts at 45%RH)

+ 0.119 * (Heater Watts at 55%RH)

+ 0.069 * (Heater Watts at 65%RH)

+ 0.047 * (Heater Watts at 75%RH)

+ 0.008 * (Heater Watts at 85%RH)

+ 0.015 * (Heater Watts at 95%RH)

Heater Watts at a specific relative humidity = the nominal watts used by all heaters at that specific relative humidity, 72 °F ambient (22.2 °C), and DOE reference freezer (FZ) average temperature of 0 °F (−17.8 °C).

System-loss Factor = 1.3

7. Test Procedure Waivers

To the extent that the procedures contained in this appendix do not provide a means for determining the energy consumption of a freezer, a manufacturer must obtain a waiver under 10 CFR 430.27 to establish an acceptable test procedure for each such product. Such instances could, for example, include situations where the test set-up for a particular freezer basic model is not clearly defined by the provisions of section 2. For details regarding the criteria and procedures for obtaining a waiver, please refer to 10 CFR 430.27.

[75 FR 78866, Dec. 16, 2010, as amended at 76 FR 12502, Mar. 7, 2011; 76 FR 24781, May 2, 2011; 77 FR 3577, Jan. 25, 2012]

Appendix B1 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Freezers

The provisions of appendix B1 shall apply to all products manufactured prior to the effective date of any amended standards promulgated by DOE pursuant to Section 325(b)(4) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (to be codified at 42 U.S.C. 6295(b)(4)).

1. Definitions

Section 3, Definitions, of HRF-1-1979 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) applies to this test procedure.

1.1 Adjusted total volume” means the product of, (1) the freezer volume as defined in HRF-1-1979 in cubic feet, times (2) an adjustment factor.

1.2 “Anti-sweat heater” means a device incorporated into the design of a freezer to prevent the accumulation of moisture on exterior or interior surfaces of the cabinet.

1.3 “Anti-sweat heater switch” means a user-controllable switch or user interface which modifies the activation or control of anti-sweat heaters.

1.4 “Automatic Defrost” means a system in which the defrost cycle is automatically initiated and terminated, with resumption of normal refrigeration at the conclusion of defrost operation. The system automatically prevents the permanent formation of frost on all refrigerated surfaces. Nominal refrigerated food temperatures are maintained during the operation of the automatic defrost system.

1.5 “Cycle” means the period of 24 hours for which the energy use of a freezer is calculated as though the consumer-activated compartment temperature controls were set to maintain the standardized temperature (see section 3.2).

1.6 “Cycle type” means the set of test conditions having the calculated effect of operating a freezer for a period of 24 hours with the consumer-activated controls other than the compartment temperature control set to establish various operating characteristics.

1.7 “HRF-1-1979” means the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers standard for household refrigerators, combination refrigerator-freezers, and household freezers, also approved as an American National Standard as a revision of ANSI B 38.1-1970. Only sections of HRF-1-1979 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) specifically referenced in this test procedure are part of this test procedure. In cases where there is a conflict, the language of the test procedure in this appendix takes precedence over HRF-1-1979.

1.8 “Long-time Automatic Defrost” means an automatic defrost system where successive defrost cycles are separated by 14 hours or more of compressor-operating time.

1.9 “Quick freeze” means an optional feature on freezers that is initiated manually. It bypasses the thermostat control and operates continually until the feature is terminated either manually or automatically.

1.10 “Separate auxiliary compartment” means a freezer compartment other than the first freezer compartment of a freezer having more than one compartment. Access to a separate auxiliary compartment is through a separate exterior door or doors rather than through the door or doors of another compartment. Separate auxiliary freezer compartments may not be larger than the first freezer compartment.

1.11 “Special compartment” means any compartment without doors directly accessible from the exterior, and with separate temperature control that is not convertible from fresh food temperature range to freezer temperature range.

1.12 “Stabilization Period” means the total period of time during which steady-state conditions are being attained or evaluated.

1.13 “Standard cycle” means the cycle type in which the anti-sweat heater switch, when provided, is set in the highest energy consuming position.

1.14 “Variable defrost control” means an automatic defrost system in which successive defrost cycles are determined by an operating condition variable or variables other than solely compressor operating time. This includes any electrical or mechanical device performing this function. A control scheme that changes the defrost interval from a fixed length to an extended length (without any intermediate steps) is not considered a variable defrost control. A variable defrost control feature should predict the accumulation of frost on the evaporator and react accordingly. Therefore, the times between defrost should vary with different usage patterns and include a continuum of lengths of time between defrosts as inputs vary.

2. Test Conditions.

2.1 Ambient Temperature. The ambient temperature shall be 90.0 ±1.0 °F (32.2 ±0.6 °C) during the stabilization period and the test period.

2.2 Operational Conditions. The freezer shall be installed and its operating conditions maintained in accordance with HRF-1-1979, (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), section 7.2 through section 7.4.3.3 (but excluding section 7.4.3.2), except that the vertical ambient gradient at locations 10 inches (25.4 cm) out from the centers of the two sides of the unit being tested is to be maintained during the test. Unless the area is obstructed by shields or baffles, the gradient is to be maintained from 2 inches (5.1 cm) above the floor or supporting platform to a height 1 foot (30.5 cm) above the unit under test. Defrost controls are to be operative. The quick freeze option shall be switched off except as specified in section 3.1. Additional clarifications are noted in sections 2.3 through 2.6.

2.3 Anti-Sweat Heaters. The anti-sweat heater switch is to be on during one test and off during a second test. In the case of an electric freezer equipped with variable anti-sweat heater control, the standard cycle energy use shall be the result of the calculation described in 6.2.2.

2.4 The cabinet and its refrigerating mechanism shall be assembled and set up in accordance with the printed consumer instructions supplied with the cabinet. Set-up of the freezer shall not deviate from these instructions, unless explicitly required or allowed by this test procedure. Specific required or allowed deviations from such set-up include the following:

(a) Connection of water lines and installation of water filters are not required;

(b) Clearance requirements from surfaces of the product shall be as specified in section 2.6 below;

(c) The electric power supply shall be as described in HRF-1-1979 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) section 7.4.1;

(d) Temperature control settings for testing shall be as described in section 3 of this appendix. Settings for special compartments shall be as described in section 2.5 of this appendix;

(e) The product does not need to be anchored or otherwise secured to prevent tipping during energy testing; and

(f) All the product's chutes and throats required for the delivery of ice shall be free of packing, covers, or other blockages that may be fitted for shipping or when the icemaker is not in use.

For cases in which set-up is not clearly defined by this test procedure, manufacturers must submit a petition for a waiver (see section 7).

2.5 Special compartments shall be tested with controls set to provide the coldest temperature. This requirement for the coldest temperature does not apply to features or functions (such as quick freeze) that are initiated manually and terminated automatically within 168 hours.

2.6 The space between the back of the cabinet and a vertical surface (the test room wall or simulated wall) shall be the minimum distance in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.

2.7 Steady State Condition. Steady state conditions exist if the temperature measurements taken at four minute intervals or less during a stabilization period are not changing at a rate greater than 0.042 °F. (0.023 °C.) per hour as determined by the applicable condition of A or B.

A—The average of the measurements during a two hour period if no cycling occurs or during a number of complete repetitive compressor cycles through a period of no less than two hours is compared to the average over an equivalent time period with three hours elapsed between the two measurement periods.

B—If A above cannot be used, the average of the measurements during a number of complete repetitive compressor cycles through a period of no less than two hours and including the last complete cycle prior to a defrost period, or if no cycling occurs, the average of the measurements during the last two hours prior to a defrost period; are compared to the same averaging period prior to the following defrost period.

3. Test Control Settings.

3.1 Model with No User Operable Temperature Control. A test shall be performed during which the compartment temperature and energy use shall be measured. A second test shall be performed with the temperature control electrically short circuited to cause the compressor to run continuously. If the model has the quick freeze option, this option must be used to bypass the temperature control.

3.2 Model with User Operable Temperature Control. Testing shall be performed in accordance with one of the following sections using the standardized temperature of 0.0 °F (−17.8 °C).

For the purposes of comparing compartment temperatures with standardized temperatures, as described in sections 3.2.1 through 3.2.3, the freezer compartment temperature shall be as specified in section 5.1.3.

3.2.1 A first test shall be performed with all temperature controls set at their median position midway between their warmest and coldest settings. For mechanical control systems, knob detents shall be mechanically defeated if necessary to attain a median setting. For electronic control systems, the test shall be performed with all compartment temperature controls set at the average of the coldest and warmest settings—if there is no setting equal to this average, the setting closest to the average shall be used. If there are two such settings equally close to the average, the higher of these temperature control settings shall be used. If the compartment temperature measured during the first test is higher than the standardized temperature, the second test shall be conducted with the controls set at the coldest settings. If the compartment temperature measured during the first test is lower than the standardized temperature, the second test shall be conducted with the controls set at the warmest settings. If the compartment temperatures measured during these two tests bound the standardized temperature, then these test results shall be used to determine energy consumption. If the compartment temperature measured with all controls set at their coldest settings is above the standardized temperature, a third test shall be performed with all controls set at their warmest settings and the result of this test shall be used with the result of the test performed with all controls set at their coldest settings to determine energy consumption. If the compartment temperature measured with all controls set at their warmest settings is below the standardized temperature, then the result of this test alone will be used to determine energy consumption.

3.2.2 Alternatively, a first test may be performed with all temperature controls set at their warmest setting. If the compartment temperature is below the standardized temperature, then the result of this test alone will be used to determine energy consumption. If the above condition is not met, then the unit shall be tested in accordance with 3.2.1 above.

3.2.3 Alternatively, a first test may be performed with all temperature controls set at their coldest setting. If the compartment temperature is above the standardized temperature, a second test shall be performed with all controls set at their warmest setting and the results of these two tests shall be used to determine energy consumption. If the above condition is not met, then the unit shall be tested in accordance with 3.2.1 above.

4. Test Period

Tests shall be performed by establishing the conditions set forth in section 2 and using the control settings as set forth in section 3 of this appendix.

4.1 Nonautomatic Defrost. If the model being tested has no automatic defrost system, the test time period shall start after steady-state conditions have been achieved and be no less than 3 hours in duration. During the test period, the compressor motor shall complete two or more whole compressor cycles. A compressor cycle is a complete “on” and a complete “off” period of the motor. If no “off” cycling will occur, as determined during the stabilization period, the test period shall be 3 hours. If incomplete cycling occurs (less than two compressor cycles during a 24-hour period), the results of the 24-hour period shall be used.

4.2 Automatic Defrost. If the model being tested has an automatic defrost system, the test time period shall start after steady-state conditions have been achieved and be from one point during a defrost period to the same point during the next defrost period. If the model being tested has a long-time automatic defrost system, the alternate provisions of 4.2.1 may be used. If the model being tested has a variable defrost control, the provisions of 4.2.2 shall apply.

4.2.1 Long-time Automatic Defrost. If the model being tested has a long-time automatic defrost system, the two-part test described in this section may be used. The first part is the same as the test for a unit having no defrost provisions (section 4.1). The second part would start when a defrost is initiated when the compressor “on” cycle is terminated prior to start of the defrost heater and terminates at the second turn “on” of the compressor or 4 hours from the initiation of the defrost heater, whichever comes first.

4.2.2 Variable Defrost Control. If the model being tested has a variable defrost control system, the test shall consist of the same two parts as the test for long-time automatic defrost (section 4.2.1).

5. Test Measurements

5.1 Temperature Measurements. Temperature measurements shall be made at the locations prescribed in Figure 7.2 of HRF-1-1979 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and shall be accurate to within ±0.5 °F (0.3 °C). If the interior arrangements of the cabinet do not conform with those shown in Figure 7.2 of HRF-1-1979, the product may be tested by relocating the temperature sensors from the locations specified in the figures to avoid interference with hardware or components within the cabinet, in which case the specific locations used for the temperature sensors shall be noted in the test data records maintained by the manufacturer in accordance with 10 CFR 429.14, and the certification report shall indicate that non-standard sensor locations were used.

5.1.1 Measured Temperature. The measured temperature is to be the average of all sensor temperature readings taken at a particular time. Measurements shall be taken at regular intervals not to exceed four minutes.

5.1.2 Compartment Temperature. The compartment temperature for each test period shall be an average of the measured temperatures taken during one or more complete compressor cycles. One compressor cycle is one complete motor “on” and one complete motor “off” period. For long-time automatic defrost models, compartment temperature shall be that measured in the first part of the test period specified in 4.2.1. For models equipped with variable defrost controls, compartment temperatures shall be those measured in the first part of the test period specified in 4.2.2.

5.1.2.1 The number of complete compressor motor cycles over which the measured temperatures in a compartment are to be averaged to determine compartment temperature shall be equal to the number of minutes between measured temperature readings rounded up to the next whole minute or a number of complete cycles over a time period exceeding one hour. One of the compressor cycles shall be the last complete compressor cycle during the test period before start of the defrost control sequence for products with automatic defrost.

5.1.2.2 If no compressor motor cycling occurs, the compartment temperature shall be the average of the measured temperatures taken during the last thirty-two minutes of the test period.

5.1.2.3 If incomplete cycling occurs (less than one compressor cycle), the compartment temperature shall be the average of all readings taken during the last 3 hours of the last complete compressor “on” period.

5.1.3 Freezer Compartment Temperature. The freezer compartment temperature shall be calculated as:

eCFR graphic er02my11.092.gif

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Where:

F is the total number of applicable freezer compartments, which include the first freezer compartment and any number of separate auxiliary freezer compartments;

TFi is the compartment temperature of freezer compartment “i” determined in accordance with section 5.1.2; and

VFi is the volume of freezer compartment “i”.

5.2 Energy Measurements:

5.2.1 Per-day Energy Consumption. The energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day for each test period shall be the energy expended during the test period as specified in section 4.1 adjusted to a 24 hour period.

The adjustment shall be determined as follows:

5.2.1.1 Nonautomatic and automatic defrost models. The energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day shall be calculated equivalent to:

ET = (EP × 1440 × K) / T where

ET = test cycle energy expended in kilowatt-hours per day,

EP = energy expended in kilowatt-hours during the test period.

T = length of time of the test period in minutes,

1440 = conversion factor to adjust to a 24 hour period in minutes per day, and

K = correction factor of 0.7 for chest freezers and 0.85 for upright freezers to adjust for average household usage, dimensionless.

5.2.1.2 Long-time Automatic Defrost. If the two part test method is used, the energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day shall be calculated equivalent to:

ET = (1440 × K × EP1/T1) + (EP2−EP1 × T2/T1)) × K × (12/CT)

Where:

ET, 1440, and K are defined in section 5.2.1.1;

EP1 = energy expended in kilowatt-hours during the first part of the test;

EP2 = energy expended in kilowatt-hours during the second part of the test;

CT = defrost timer run time or compressor run time between defrosts in hours required to cause it to go through a complete cycle, rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour;

12 = conversion factor to adjust for a 50 percent run time of the compressor in hours per day; and

T1 and T2 = length of time in minutes of the first and second test parts respectively.

5.2.1.3 Variable Defrost Control. The energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day shall be calculated equivalent to:

ET = (1440 × K × EP1/T1) + (EP2−(EP1 × T2/T1)) × K × (12/CT),

Where:

ET, K, and 1440 are defined in section 5.2.1.1 and EP1, EP2, T1, T2, and 12 are defined in section 5.2.1.2.

CT = (CTL × CTM)/(F× (CTM−CTL) + CTL)

Where:

CTL = least or shortest compressor run time between defrosts in hours rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour (greater than or equal to 6 hours but less than or equal to 12 hours);

CTM = maximum compressor run time between defrosts in hours rounded to the nearest tenth of an hour (greater than CTL but not more than 96 hours);

F = ratio of per day energy consumption in excess of the least energy and the maximum difference in per-day energy consumption and is equal to 0.20.

For variable defrost models with no values for CTL and CTM in the algorithm, the default values of 12 and 84 shall be used, respectively.

5.3 Volume measurements. The total refrigerated volume, VT, shall be measured in accordance with HRF-1-1979, section 3.20 and section 5.1 through 5.3.

6. Calculation of Derived Results From Test Measurements.

6.1 Adjusted Total Volume. The adjusted total volume, VA, for freezers under test shall be defined as:

VA=VT× CF

where

VA=adjusted total volume in cubic feet,

VT=total refrigerated volume in cubic feet, and

CF=Correction factor of 1.73, dimensionless.

6.2 Average Per Cycle Energy Consumption:

6.2.1 The average per-cycle energy consumption for a cycle type is expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle to the nearest one hundredth (0.01) kilowatt-hour and shall depend upon the compartment temperature attainable as shown below.

6.2.1.1 If the compartment temperature is always below 0.0 °F. (−17.8 °C.), the average per-cycle energy consumption shall be equivalent to:

E=ET1

where

E=Total per-cycle energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per day.

ET is defined in 5.2.1, and

Number 1 indicates the test period during which the highest compartment temperature is measured.

6.2.1.2 If one of the compartment temperatures measured for a test period is greater than 0.0 °F (17.8 °C), the average per-cycle energy consumption shall be equivalent to:

E = ET1 + ((ET2 − ET1) × (0.0 − TF1)/(TF2 − TF1))

Where:

E is defined in 6.2.1.1;

ET is defined in 5.2.1;

TF = freezer compartment temperature determined according to 5.1.3 in degrees F;

The numbers 1 and 2 indicate measurements taken during the first and second test period as appropriate; and

0.0 = Standardized compartment temperature in degrees F.

6.2.2 Variable Anti-Sweat Heater Models. The standard cycle energy consumption of an electric freezer with a variable anti-sweat heater control (Estd), expressed in kilowatt-hours per day, shall be calculated equivalent to:

Estd = E + (Correction Factor) where E is determined by 6.2.1.1, or 6.2.1.2, whichever is appropriate, with the anti-sweat heater switch in the “off” position or, for a product without an anti-sweat heater switch, the anti-sweat heater in its lowest energy use state.

Correction Factor = (Anti-sweat Heater Power × System-loss Factor) × (24 hrs/1 day) × (1 kW/1000 W)

Where:

Anti-sweat Heater Power = 0.034 * (Heater Watts at 5%RH)

+ 0.211 * (Heater Watts at 15%RH)

+ 0.204 * (Heater Watts at 25%RH)

+ 0.166 * (Heater Watts at 35%RH)

+ 0.126 * (Heater Watts at 45%RH)

+ 0.119 * (Heater Watts at 55%RH)

+ 0.069 * (Heater Watts at 65%RH)

+ 0.047 * (Heater Watts at 75%RH)

+ 0.008 * (Heater Watts at 85%RH)

+ 0.015 * (Heater Watts at 95%RH)

Heater Watts at a specific relative humidity = the nominal watts used by all heaters at that specific relative humidity, 72 °F (22.2 °C) ambient, and DOE reference freezer (FZ) average temperature of 0 °F (−17.8 °C).

System-loss Factor = 1.3.

7. Test Procedure Waivers

To the extent that the procedures contained in this appendix do not provide a means for determining the energy consumption of a freezer, a manufacturer must obtain a waiver under 10 CFR 430.27 to establish an acceptable test procedure for each such product. Such instances could, for example, include situations where the test set-up for a particular freezer basic model is not clearly defined by the provisions of section 2. For details regarding the criteria and procedures for obtaining a waiver, please refer to 10 CFR 430.27.

[47 FR 34528, Aug. 10, 1982; 48 FR 13013, Mar. 29, 1983, as amended at 54 FR 36241, Aug. 31, 1989; 54 FR 38788, Sept. 20, 1989; 75 FR 78871, Dec. 16, 2010; 76 FR 12502, Mar. 7, 2011; 76 FR 24782, May 2, 2011]

Appendix C to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Dishwashers

Note: Prior to the compliance date for any amended energy conservation standards that incorporate standby mode and off mode energy consumption (May 30, 2013 unless the direct final rule published on May 30, 2012 is withdrawn), manufacturers may use either Appendix C or Appendix C1 to certify compliance with existing DOE energy conservation standards and to make any representations related to energy and/or water consumption of dishwashers, with the following exception. If the compliance date is after April 29, 2013, manufacturers that make representations related to standby mode and off mode energy consumption must use Appendix C1 for any representations made after April 29, 2013 of the energy and/or water consumption of these products, consistent with the requirements of 42 U.S.C. 6293(c)(2).

After the compliance date for any amended energy conservation standards that incorporate standby mode and off mode energy consumption (May 30, 2013 unless the direct final rule published on May 30, 2012 is withdrawn), all dishwashers shall be tested using the provisions of Appendix C1 to certify compliance with amended energy conservation standards and to make any representations related to energy and/or water consumption, with the following exception. If the compliance date is before April 29, 2013, manufacturers may use Appendix C for any representations until April 29, 2013 of energy and/or water consumption of these products, consistent with the requirements of 42 U.S.C. 6293(c)(2).

1. Definitions

1.1 AHAM means the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers.

1.2 Compact dishwasher means a dishwasher that has a capacity of less than eight place settings plus six serving pieces as specified in ANSI/AHAM DW-1-1992 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), using the test load specified in section 2.7.1 of this appendix.

1.3 Cycle means a sequence of operations of a dishwasher which performs a complete dishwashing function, and may include variations or combinations of washing, rinsing, and drying.

1.4 Cycle type means any complete sequence of operations capable of being preset on the dishwasher prior to the initiation of machine operation.

1.5 Non-soil-sensing dishwasher means a dishwasher that does not have the ability to adjust automatically any energy consuming aspect of a wash cycle based on the soil load of the dishes.

1.6 Normal cycle means the cycle type recommended by the manufacturer for completely washing a full load of normally soiled dishes including the power-dry feature.

1.7 Power-dry feature means the introduction of electrically generated heat into the washing chamber for the purpose of improving the drying performance of the dishwasher.

1.8 Preconditioning cycle means any cycle that includes a fill, circulation, and drain to ensure that the water lines and sump area of the pump are primed.

1.9 Sensor heavy response means, for standard dishwashers, the set of operations in a soil-sensing dishwasher for completely washing a load of dishes, four place settings of which are soiled according to ANSI/AHAM DW-1-1992 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and as additionally specified in section 2.7.2 of this appendix. For compact dishwashers, this definition is the same, except that two soiled place settings are used instead of four.

1.10 Sensor light response means, for both standard and compact dishwashers, the set of operations in a soil-sensing dishwasher for completely washing a load of dishes, one place setting of which is soiled with half of the gram weight of soils for each item specified in a single place setting according to ANSI/AHAM DW-1-1992 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and as additionally specified in section 2.7.2 of this appendix.

1.11 Sensor medium response means, for standard dishwashers, the set of operations in a soil-sensing dishwasher for completely washing a load of dishes, two place settings of which are soiled according to ANSI/AHAM DW-1-1992 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and as additionally specified in section 2.7.2 of this appendix. For compact dishwashers, this definition is the same, except that one soiled place setting is used.

1.12 Soil-sensing dishwasher means a dishwasher that has the ability to adjust any energy consuming aspect of a wash cycle based on the soil load of the dishes.

1.13 Standard dishwasher means a dishwasher that has a capacity equal to or greater than eight place settings plus six serving pieces as specified in ANSI/AHAM DW-1-1992 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), using the test load specified in section 2.7.1 of this appendix.

1.14 Standby mode means the lowest power consumption mode which cannot be switched off or influenced by the user and that may persist for an indefinite time when the dishwasher is connected to the main electricity supply and used in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.

1.15 Truncated normal cycle means the normal cycle interrupted to eliminate the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse operation.

1.16 Truncated sensor heavy response means the sensor heavy response interrupted to eliminate the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse operation.

1.17 Truncated sensor light response means the sensor light response interrupted to eliminate the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse operation.

1.18 Truncated sensor medium response means the sensor medium response interrupted to eliminate the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse operation.

1.19 Water-heating dishwasher means a dishwasher which, as recommended by the manufacturer, is designed for heating cold inlet water (nominal 50 °F) or designed for heating water with a nominal inlet temperature of 120 °F. Any dishwasher designated as water-heating (50 °F or 120 °F inlet water) must provide internal water heating to above 120 °F in at least one wash phase of the normal cycle.

2. Testing conditions:

2.1 Installation Requirements. Install the dishwasher according to the manufacturer's instructions. A standard or compact under-counter or under-sink dishwasher must be tested in a rectangular enclosure constructed of nominal 0.374 inch (9.5 mm) plywood painted black. The enclosure must consist of a top, a bottom, a back, and two sides. If the dishwasher includes a counter top as part of the appliance, omit the top of the enclosure. Bring the enclosure into the closest contact with the appliance that the configuration of the dishwasher will allow.

2.2 Electrical energy supply.

2.2.1 Dishwashers that operate with an electrical supply of 115 volts. Maintain the electrical supply to the dishwasher at 115 volts ±2 percent and within 1 percent of the nameplate frequency as specified by the manufacturer.

2.2.2 Dishwashers that operate with an electrical supply of 240 volts. Maintain the electrical supply to the dishwasher at 240 volts ±2 percent and within 1 percent of its nameplate frequency as specified by the manufacturer.

2.3 Water temperature. Measure the temperature of the water supplied to the dishwasher using a temperature measuring device as specified in section 3.1 of this appendix.

2.3.1 Dishwashers to be tested at a nominal 140 °F inlet water temperature. Maintain the water supply temperature at 140° ±2 °F.

2.3.2 Dishwashers to be tested at a nominal 120 °F inlet water temperature. Maintain the water supply temperature at 120° ±2 °F.

2.3.3 Dishwashers to be tested at a nominal 50 °F inlet water temperature. Maintain the water supply temperature at 50° ±2 °F.

2.4 Water pressure. Using a water pressure gauge as specified in section 3.4 of this appendix, maintain the pressure of the water supply at 35 ±2.5 pounds per square inch gauge (psig) when the water is flowing.

2.5 Ambient and machine temperature. Using a temperature measuring device as specified in section 3.1 of this appendix, maintain the room ambient air temperature at 75° ±5 °F, and ensure that the dishwasher and the test load are at room ambient temperature at the start of each test cycle.

2.6 Test Cycle and Load.

2.6.1 Non-soil-sensing dishwashers to be tested at a nominal inlet temperature of 140 °F. These units must be tested on the normal cycle and truncated normal cycle without a test load if the dishwasher does not heat water in the normal cycle.

2.6.2 Non-soil-sensing dishwashers to be tested at a nominal inlet temperature of 50 °F or 120 °F. These units must be tested on the normal cycle with a clean load of eight place settings plus six serving pieces, as specified in section 2.7.1 of this appendix. If the capacity of the dishwasher, as stated by the manufacturer, is less than eight place settings, then the test load must be the stated capacity.

2.6.3 Soil-sensing dishwashers to be tested at a nominal inlet temperature of 50 °F, 120 °F, or 140 °F. These units must be tested first for the sensor heavy response, then tested for the sensor medium response, and finally for the sensor light response with the following combinations of soiled and clean test loads.

2.6.3.1 For tests of the sensor heavy response, as defined in section 1.9 of this appendix:

(A) For standard dishwashers, the test unit is to be loaded with a total of eight place settings plus six serving pieces as specified in section 2.7.1 of this appendix. Four of the eight place settings must be soiled according to ANSI/AHAM DW-1-1992 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3) and as additionally specified in section 2.7.2 of this appendix, while the remaining place settings, serving pieces, and all flatware are not soiled.

(B) For compact dishwashers, the test unit is to be loaded with four place settings plus six serving pieces as specified in section 2.7.1 of this appendix. Two of the four place settings must be soiled according to ANSI/AHAM DW-1-1992 and as additionally specified in section 2.7.2 of this appendix, while the remaining place settings, serving pieces, and all flatware are not soiled.

2.6.3.2 For tests of the sensor medium response, as defined in section 1.11 of this appendix:

(A) For standard dishwashers, the test unit is to be loaded with a total of eight place settings plus six serving pieces as specified in section 2.7.1 of this appendix. Two of the eight place settings must be soiled according to ANSI/AHAM DW-1-1992 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3) and as additionally specified in section 2.7.2 of this appendix, while the remaining place settings, serving pieces, and all flatware are not soiled.

(B) For compact dishwashers, the test unit is to be loaded with four place settings plus six serving pieces as specified in section 2.7.1 of this appendix. One of the four place settings must be soiled according to ANSI/AHAM DW-1-1992 and as additionally specified in section 2.7.2 of this appendix, while the remaining place settings, serving pieces, and all flatware are not soiled.

2.6.3.3 For tests of the sensor light response, as defined in section 1.10 of this appendix:

(A) For standard dishwashers, the test unit is to be loaded with a total of eight place settings plus six serving pieces as specified in section 2.7.1 of this appendix. One of the eight place settings must be soiled with half of the soil load specified for a single place setting according to ANSI/AHAM DW-1-1992 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3) and as additionally specified in section 2.7.2 of this appendix, while the remaining place settings, serving pieces, and all flatware are not soiled.

(B) For compact dishwashers, the test unit is to be loaded with four place settings plus six serving pieces as specified in section 2.7.1 of this appendix. One of the four place settings must be soiled with half of the soil load specified for a single place setting according to ANSI/AHAM DW-1-1992 and as additionally specified in section 2.7.2 of this appendix, while the remaining place settings, serving pieces, and all flatware are not soiled.

2.7 Test load.

2.7.1 Test load items.

Dishware/glassware/flatware itemPrimary sourceDescriptionPrimary No.Alternate sourceAlternate source No.
Dinner PlateCorning Comcor®/Corelle®10 inch Dinner Plate6003893
Bread and Butter PlateCorning Comcor®/Corelle®6.75 inch Bread & Butter6003887Arzberg8500217100 or 2000-00001-0217-1
Fruit BowlCorning Comcor®/Corelle®10 oz. Dessert Bowl6003899Arzberg3820513100
CupCorning Comcor®/Corelle®8 oz. Ceramic Cup6014162Arzberg1382-00001-4732
SaucerCorning Comcor®/Corelle®6 inch Saucer6010972Arzberg1382-00001-4731
Serving BowlCorning Comcor®/Corelle®1 qt. Serving Bowl6003911
PlatterCorning Comcor®/Corelle®9.5 inch Oval Platter6011655
Glass—Iced TeaLibbey551 HT
Flatware—KnifeOneida®—Accent2619KPVFWMF—Gastro 080012.0803.6047
Flatware—Dinner ForkOneida®—Accent2619FRSFWMF—Signum 190012.1905.6040
Flatware—Salad ForkOneida®—Accent2619FSLFWMF—Signum 190012.1964.6040
Flatware—TeaspoonOneida®—Accent2619STSFWMF—Signum 190012.1910.6040
Flatware—Serving ForkOneida®—Flight2865FCMWMF—Signum 190012.1902.6040
Flatware—Serving SpoonOneida®—Accent2619STBFWMF—Signum 190012.1904.6040

2.7.2 Soils. The soils shall be as specified in ANSI/AHAM DW-1-1992 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3), except for the following substitutions.

2.7.2.1 Margarine. The margarine shall be Fleischmann's Original stick margarine.

2.7.2.2 Coffee. The coffee shall be Folgers Classic Decaf.

2.8 Detergent. Use half the quantity of detergent specified according to ANSI/AHAM DW-1-1992 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3), using Cascade with the Grease Fighting Power of Dawn powder as the detergent formulation.

2.9 Testing requirements. Provisions in this appendix pertaining to dishwashers that operate with a nominal inlet temperature of 50 °F or 120 °F apply only to water-heating dishwashers as defined in section 1.19 of this appendix.

2.10 Preconditioning requirements. Precondition the dishwasher by establishing the testing conditions set forth in sections 2.1 through 2.5 of this appendix. Set the dishwasher to the preconditioning cycle as defined in section 1.8 of this appendix, without using a test load, and initiate the cycle.

3. Instrumentation

Test instruments must be calibrated annually.

3.1 Temperature measuring device. The device must have an error no greater than ±1 °F over the range being measured.

3.2 Timer. Time measurements for each monitoring period shall be accurate to within 2 seconds.

3.3 Water meter. The water meter must have a resolution of no larger than 0.1 gallons and a maximum error no greater than ±1.5 percent of the measured flow rate for all water temperatures encountered in the test cycle.

3.4 Water pressure gauge. The water pressure gauge must have a resolution of one pound per square inch (psi) and must have an error no greater than 5 percent of any measured value over the range of 35 ±2.5 psig.

3.5 Watt-hour meter. The watt-hour meter must have a resolution of 1 watt-hour or less and a maximum error of no more than 1 percent of the measured value for any demand greater than 50 watts.

3.6 Standby wattmeter. The standby wattmeter must have a resolution of 0.1 watt or less, a maximum error of no more than 1 percent of the measured value, and must be capable of operating within the stated tolerances for input voltages up to 5 percent total harmonic distortion. The standby wattmeter must be capable of operating at frequencies from 47 hertz through 63 hertz. Power measurements must have a crest factor of 3 or more at currents of 2 amps RMS or less.

3.7 Standby watt-hour meter. The standby watt-hour meter must meet all the requirements of the standby wattmeter and must accumulate watt-hours at a minimum power level of 20 milliwatts.

4. Test Cycle and Measurements

4.1 Test cycle. Perform a test cycle by establishing the testing conditions set forth in section 2 of this appendix, setting the dishwasher to the cycle type to be tested, initiating the cycle, and allowing the cycle to proceed to completion.

4.2 Machine electrical energy consumption. Measure the machine electrical energy consumption, M, expressed as the number of kilowatt-hours of electricity consumed by the machine during the entire test cycle, using a water supply temperature as set forth in section 2.3 of this appendix and using a watt-hour meter as specified in section 3.5 of this appendix.

4.3 Water consumption. Measure the water consumption, V, expressed as the number of gallons of water delivered to the machine during the entire test cycle, using a water meter as specified in section 3.3 of this appendix.

4.4 Standby power. Connect the dishwasher to a standby wattmeter or a standby watt-hour meter as specified in sections 3.6 and 3.7, respectively, of this appendix. Select the conditions necessary to achieve operation in the standby mode as defined in section 1.14 of this appendix. Monitor the power consumption but allow the dishwasher to stabilize for at least 5 minutes. Then monitor the power consumption for at least an additional 5 minutes. If the power level does not change by more than 5 percent from the maximum observed value during the later 5 minutes and there is no cyclic or pulsing behavior of the load, the load can be considered stable. For stable operation, standby power, Sm, can be recorded directly from the standby watt meter in watts or accumulated using the standby watt-hour meter over a period of at least 5 minutes. For unstable operation, the energy must be accumulated using the standby watt-hour meter over a period of at least 5 minutes and must capture the energy use over one or more complete cycles. Calculate the average standby power, Sm, expressed in watts by dividing the accumulated energy consumption by the duration of the measurement period.

5. Calculation of Derived Results From Test Measurements

5.1 Machine energy consumption.

5.1.1 Machine energy consumption for non-soil-sensing electric dishwashers. Take the value recorded in section 4.2 of this appendix as the per-cycle machine electrical energy consumption. Express the value, M, in kilowatt-hours per cycle.

5.1.2 Machine energy consumption for soil-sensing electric dishwashers. The machine energy consumption for the sensor normal cycle, M, is defined as:

M = (Mhr×Fhr) + (Mmr×Fmr) + (Mlr×Flr)

where,

Mhr = the value recorded in section 4.2 of this appendix for the test of the sensor heavy response, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle,

Mmr = the value recorded in section 4.2 of this appendix for the test of the sensor medium response, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle,

Mlr = the value recorded in section 4.2 of this appendix for the test of the sensor light response, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle,

Fhr = the weighting factor based on consumer use of heavy response = 0.05,

Fmr = the weighting factor based on consumer use of medium response = 0.33,

Flr = the weighting factor based on consumer use of light response = 0.62.

5.2 Drying energy.

5.2.1 Drying energy consumption for non-soil-sensing electric dishwashers. Calculate the amount of energy consumed using the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse option of the normal cycle. Express the value, ED, in kilowatt-hours per cycle.

5.2.2 Drying energy consumption for soil-sensing electric dishwashers. The drying energy consumption, ED, for the sensor normal cycle is defined as:

ED = (EDhr + EDmr + EDlr)/3

Where,

EDhr = energy consumed using the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse option of the sensor heavy response, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle,

EDmr = energy consumed using the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse option of the sensor medium response, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle,

EDlr = energy consumed using the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse option of the sensor light response, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle.

5.3 Water consumption.

5.3.1 Water consumption for non-soil-sensing dishwashers using electrically heated, gas-heated, or oil-heated water.

Take the value recorded in section 4.3 of this appendix as the per-cycle water energy consumption. Express the value, V, in gallons per cycle.

5.3.2 Water consumption for soil-sensing dishwashers using electrically heated, gas-heated, or oil-heated water.

The water consumption for the sensor normal cycle, V, is defined as:

V = (Vhr×Fhr) + (Vmr×Fmr) + (Vlr×Flr)

Where,

Vhr = the value recorded in section 4.3 of this appendix for the test of the sensor heavy response, expressed in gallons per cycle,

Vmr = the value recorded in section 4.3 of this appendix for the test of the sensor medium response, expressed in gallons per cycle,

Vlr = the value recorded in section 4.3 of this appendix for the test of the sensor light response, expressed in gallons per cycle,

Fhr = the weighting factor based on consumer use of heavy response = 0.05,

Fmr = the weighting factor based on consumer use of medium response = 0.33,

Flr = the weighting factor based on consumer use of light response = 0.62.

5.4 Water energy consumption for non-soil-sensing or soil-sensing dishwashers using electrically heated water.

5.4.1 Dishwashers that operate with a nominal 140 °F inlet water temperature, only. Calculate the water energy consumption, W, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

W = V × T × K

where,

V = water consumption in gallons per cycle, as determined in section 5.3.1 of this appendix for non-soil-sensing dishwashers and section 5.3.2 of this appendix for soil-sensing dishwashers,

T = nominal water heater temperature rise = 90 °F, and

K = specific heat of water in kilowatt-hours per gallon per degree Fahrenheit = 0.0024.

5.4.2 Dishwashers that operate with a nominal inlet water temperature of 120 °F. Calculate the water energy consumption, W, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

W = V × T × K

where,

V = water consumption in gallons per cycle, as determined in section 5.3.1 of this appendix for non-soil-sensing dishwashers and section 5.3.2 of this appendix for soil-sensing dishwashers,

T = nominal water heater temperature rise = 70 °F, and

K = specific heat of water in kilowatt-hours per gallon per degree Fahrenheit = 0.0024,

5.5 Water energy consumption per cycle using gas-heated or oil-heated water.

5.5.1 Dishwashers that operate with a nominal 140 °F inlet water temperature, only. Calculate the water energy consumption using gas-heated or oil-heated water, Wg, expressed in Btu's per cycle and defined as:

Wg = V × T × C/e

where,

V = water consumption in gallons per cycle, as determined in section 5.3.1 of this appendix for non-soil-sensing dishwashers and section 5.3.2 of this appendix for soil-sensing dishwashers,

T = nominal water heater temperature rise = 90 °F,

C = specific heat of water in Btu's per gallon per degree Fahrenheit = 8.2, and

e = nominal gas or oil water heater recovery efficiency = 0.75,

5.5.2 Dishwashers that operate with a nominal inlet water temperature of 120 °F. Calculate the water energy consumption using gas-heated or oil-heated water, Wg, expressed in Btu's per cycle and defined as:

Wg = V × T × C/e

where,

V = water consumption in gallons per cycle, as determined in section 5.3.1 of this appendix for non-soil-sensing dishwashers and section 5.3.2 of this appendix for soil-sensing dishwashers,

T = nominal water heater temperature rise = 70 °F,

C = specific heat of water in Btu's per gallon per degree Fahrenheit = 8.2, and

e = nominal gas or oil water heater recovery efficiency = 0.75.

5.6 Annual standby energy consumption. Calculate the estimated annual standby energy consumption. First determine the number of standby hours per year, Hs, defined as:

Hs = H−(N×L).

Where,

H = the total number of hours per year = 8766 hours per year,

N = the representative average dishwasher use of 215 cycles per year,

L = the average of the duration of the normal cycle and truncated normal cycle, for non-soil-sensing dishwashers with a truncated normal cycle; the duration of the normal cycle, for non-soil-sensing dishwashers without a truncated normal cycle; the average duration of the sensor light response, truncated sensor light response, sensor medium response, truncated sensor medium response, sensor heavy response, and truncated sensor heavy response, for soil-sensing dishwashers with a truncated cycle option; the average duration of the sensor light response, sensor medium response, and sensor heavy response, for soil-sensing dishwashers without a truncated cycle option.

Then calculate the estimated annual standby power use, S, expressed in kilowatt-hours per year and defined as:

S = Sm×((Hs)/1000)

Where,

Sm = the average standby power in watts as determined in section 4.4 of this appendix.

[68 FR 51900, Aug. 29, 2003, as amended at 77 FR 65980, Oct. 31, 2012]

Appendix C1 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Dishwashers

Note: Prior to the compliance date for any amended energy conservation standards that incorporate standby mode and off mode energy consumption (May 30, 2013 unless the direct final rule published on May 30, 2012 is withdrawn), manufacturers may use either Appendix C or Appendix C1 to certify compliance with existing DOE energy conservation standards and to make any representations related to energy and/or water consumption of dishwashers, with the following exception. If the compliance date is after April 29, 2013, manufacturers that make representations related to standby mode and off mode energy consumption must use Appendix C1 for any representations made after April 29, 2013 of the energy and/or water consumption of these products, consistent with the requirements of 42 U.S.C. 6293(c)(2).

After the compliance date for any amended energy conservation standards that incorporate standby mode and off mode energy consumption (May 30, 2013 unless the direct final rule published on May 30, 2012 is withdrawn), all dishwashers shall be tested using the provisions of Appendix C1 to certify compliance with amended energy conservation standards and to make any representations related to energy and/or water consumption, with the following exception. If the compliance date is before April 29, 2013, manufacturers may use Appendix C for any representations until April 29, 2013 of energy and/or water consumption of these products, consistent with the requirements of 42 U.S.C. 6293(c)(2).

1. Definitions

1.1 Active mode means a mode in which the dishwasher is connected to a mains power source, has been activated, and is performing one of the main functions of washing, rinsing, or drying (when a drying process is included) dishware, glassware, eating utensils, and most cooking utensils by chemical, mechanical, and/or electrical means, or is involved in functions necessary for these main functions, such as admitting water into the dishwasher, pumping water out of the dishwasher, circulating air, or regenerating an internal water softener.

1.2 AHAM means the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers.

1.3 Combined low-power mode means the aggregate of available modes other than active mode.

1.4 Compact dishwasher means a dishwasher that has a capacity of less than eight place settings plus six serving pieces as specified in ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), using the test load specified in section 2.7 of this appendix.

1.5 Cycle means a sequence of operations of a dishwasher which performs a complete dishwashing function, and may include variations or combinations of washing, rinsing, and drying.

1.6 Cycle finished mode means a standby mode which provides continuous status display following operation in active mode.

1.7 Cycle type means any complete sequence of operations capable of being preset on the dishwasher prior to the initiation of machine operation.

1.8 Fan-only mode means an active mode that is not user-selectable, and in which a fan circulates air for a finite period of time after the end of the cycle, where the end of the cycle is indicated to the consumer by means of a display, indicator light, or audible signal.

1.9 IEC 62301 means the standard published by the International Electrotechnical Commission, titled “Household electrical appliances-Measurement of standby power,” Publication 62301 (Edition 2.0, 2011-01) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

1.10 Inactive mode means a standby mode that facilitates the activation of active mode by remote switch (including remote control), internal sensor, or timer, or that provides continuous status display.

1.11 Non-soil-sensing dishwasher means a dishwasher that does not have the ability to adjust automatically any energy consuming aspect of the normal cycle based on the soil load of the dishes.

1.12 Normal cycle means the cycle type, including washing and drying temperature options, recommended in the manufacturer's instructions for daily, regular, or typical use to completely wash a full load of normally soiled dishes including the power-dry feature. If no cycle or more than one cycle is recommended in the manufacturer's instructions for daily, regular, or typical use to completely wash a full load of normally soiled dishes, the most energy intensive of these cycles shall be considered the normal cycle. In the absence of a manufacturer recommendation on washing and drying temperature options, the highest energy consumption options must be selected.

1.13 Off mode means a mode in which the dishwasher is connected to a mains power source and is not providing any active mode or standby mode function, and where the mode may persist for an indefinite time. An indicator that only shows the user that the product is in the off position is included within the classification of an off mode.

1.14 Power-dry feature means the introduction of electrically-generated heat into the washing chamber for the purpose of improving the drying performance of the dishwasher.

1.15 Preconditioning cycle means a normal cycle run with no test load to ensure that the water lines and sump area of the pump are primed.

1.16 Sensor heavy response means, for standard dishwashers, the set of operations in a soil-sensing dishwasher for completely washing a load of dishes, four place settings of which are soiled according to ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and as additionally specified in section 2.7 of this appendix. For compact dishwashers, this definition is the same, except that two soiled place settings are used instead of four.

1.17 Sensor light response means, for both standard and compact dishwashers, the set of operations in a soil-sensing dishwasher for completely washing a load of dishes, one place setting of which is soiled with half of the gram weight of soils for each item specified in a single place setting according to ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and as additionally specified in section 2.7 of this appendix.

1.18 Sensor medium response means, for standard dishwashers, the set of operations in a soil-sensing dishwasher for completely washing a load of dishes, two place settings of which are soiled according to ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and as additionally specified in section 2.7 of this appendix. For compact dishwashers, this definition is the same, except that one soiled place setting is used instead of two.

1.19 Soil-sensing dishwasher means a dishwasher that has the ability to adjust any energy-consuming aspect of the normal cycle based on the soil load of the dishes.

1.20 Standard dishwasher means a dishwasher that has a capacity equal to or greater than eight place settings plus six serving pieces as specified in ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), using the test load specified in section 2.7 of this appendix.

1.21 Standby mode means a mode in which the dishwasher is connected to a mains power source and offers one or more of the following user-oriented or protective functions which may persist for an indefinite time: (a) To facilitate the activation of other modes (including activation or deactivation of active mode) by remote switch (including remote control), internal sensor, or timer; (b) continuous functions, including information or status displays (including clocks) or sensor-based functions. A timer is a continuous clock function (which may or may not be associated with a display) that provides regular scheduled tasks (e.g., switching) and that operates on a continuous basis.

1.22 Truncated normal cycle means the normal cycle interrupted to eliminate the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse operation.

1.23 Truncated sensor heavy response means the sensor heavy response interrupted to eliminate the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse operation.

1.24 Truncated sensor light response means the sensor light response interrupted to eliminate the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse operation.

1.25 Truncated sensor medium response means the sensor medium response interrupted to eliminate the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse operation.

1.26 Water-heating dishwasher means a dishwasher which, as recommended by the manufacturer, is designed for heating cold inlet water (nominal 50 °F) or designed for heating water with a nominal inlet temperature of 120 °F. Any dishwasher designated as water-heating (50 °F or 120 °F inlet water) must provide internal water heating to above 120 °F in a least one wash phase of the normal cycle.

1.27 Water-softening dishwasher means a dishwasher which incorporates a water softening system that periodically consumes additional water and energy during the cycle to regenerate.

2. Testing Conditions

2.1 Installation requirements. Install the dishwasher according to the manufacturer's instructions, including drain height. If the manufacture does not provide instructions for a specific drain height, the drain height shall be 20 inches. The racks shall be positioned according to the manufacturer recommendation for washing a full load of normally soiled dishes, or in the absence of a recommendation, the racks shall be maintained in the as-shipped position. The rinse aid container shall remain empty. A standard or compact under-counter or under-sink dishwasher must be tested in a rectangular enclosure constructed of nominal 0.374 inch (9.5 mm) plywood painted black. The enclosure must consist of a top, a bottom, a back, and two sides. If the dishwasher includes a counter top as part of the appliance, omit the top of the enclosure. Bring the enclosure into the closest contact with the appliance that the configuration of the dishwasher will allow. For standby mode and off mode testing, these products shall also be installed in accordance with Section 5, Paragraph 5.2 of IEC 62301 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), disregarding the provisions regarding batteries and the determination, classification, and testing of relevant modes.

2.2 Electrical energy supply.

2.2.1 Dishwashers that operate with an electrical supply of 115 volts. Maintain the electrical supply to the dishwasher at 115 volts ±2 percent and within 1 percent of the nameplate frequency as specified by the manufacturer. Maintain a continuous electrical supply to the unit throughout testing, including the preconditioning cycles, specified in section 2.9 of this appendix, and in between all test cycles.

2.2.2 Dishwashers that operate with an electrical supply of 240 volts. Maintain the electrical supply to the dishwasher at 240 volts ±2 percent and within 1 percent of the nameplate frequency as specified by the manufacturer. Maintain a continuous electrical supply to the unit throughout testing, including the preconditioning cycles, specified in section 2.9 of this appendix, and in between all test cycles.

2.2.3 Supply voltage waveform. For the standby mode and off mode testing, maintain the electrical supply voltage waveform indicated in Section 4, Paragraph 4.3.2 of IEC 62301 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

2.3 Water temperature. Measure the temperature of the water supplied to the dishwasher using a temperature measuring device as specified in section 3.1 of this appendix.

2.3.1 Dishwashers to be tested at a nominal 140 °F inlet water temperature. Maintain the water supply temperature at 140° ±2 °F.

2.3.2 Dishwashers to be tested at a nominal 120 °F inlet water temperature. Maintain the water supply temperature at 120° ±2 °F.

2.3.3 Dishwashers to be tested at a nominal 50 °F inlet water temperature. Maintain the water supply temperature at 50° ±2 °F.

2.4 Water pressure. Using a water pressure gauge as specified in section 3.4 of this appendix, maintain the pressure of the water supply at 35 ±2.5 pounds per square inch gauge (psig) when the water is flowing. The pressure shall be achieved within 2 seconds of opening the water supply valve.

2.5 Ambient temperature.

2.5.1 Active mode ambient and machine temperature. Using a temperature measuring device as specified in section 3.1 of this appendix, maintain the room ambient air temperature at 75° ±5 °F and ensure that the dishwasher and the test load are at room ambient temperature at the start of each test cycle.

2.5.2 Standby mode and off mode ambient temperature. For standby mode and off mode testing, maintain room ambient air temperature conditions as specified in Section 4, Paragraph 4.2 of IEC 62301 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

2.6 Test cycle and load.

2.6.1 Non-soil-sensing dishwashers to be tested at a nominal inlet temperature of 140 °F. All non-soil-sensing dishwashers to be tested according to section 4.1 of this appendix at a nominal inlet temperature of 140 °F must be tested on the normal cycle and truncated normal cycle without a test load if the dishwasher does not heat water in the normal cycle.

2.6.2 Non-soil-sensing dishwashers to be tested at a nominal inlet temperature of 50 °F or 120 °F. All non-soil-sensing dishwashers to be tested according to section 4.1 of this appendix at a nominal inlet temperature of 50 °F or 120 °F must be tested on the normal cycle with a clean load of eight place settings plus six serving pieces, as specified in section 2.7 of this appendix. If the capacity of the dishwasher, as stated by the manufacturer, is less than eight place settings, then the test load must be the stated capacity.

2.6.3 Soil-sensing dishwashers to be tested at a nominal inlet temperature of 50 °F, 120 °F, or 140 °F. All soil-sensing dishwashers shall be tested according to section 4.1 of this appendix on the normal cycle. The dishwasher shall be tested first for the sensor heavy response, then tested for the sensor medium response, and finally for the sensor light response with the following combinations of soiled and clean test loads.

2.6.3.1 For tests of the sensor heavy response, as defined in section 1.16 of this appendix:

(A) For standard dishwashers, the test unit is to be loaded with a total of eight place settings plus six serving pieces as specified in section 2.7 of this appendix. Four of the eight place settings, except for the flatware, must be soiled according to sections 5.3 through 5.7 of ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3) and as additionally specified in sections 2.7.4 and 2.7.5 of this appendix, while the remaining place settings, serving pieces, and all flatware are not soiled. The test load is to be loaded in the dishwasher according to section 5.8 of ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010.

(B) For compact dishwashers, the test unit is to be loaded with four place settings plus six serving pieces as specified in section 2.7 of this appendix. Two of the four place settings, except for the flatware, must be soiled according to sections 5.3 through 5.7 of ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010 and as additionally specified in sections 2.7.4 and 2.7.5 of this appendix, while the remaining place settings, serving pieces, and all flatware are not soiled. The test load is to be loaded in the dishwasher according to section 5.8 of ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010.

2.6.3.2 For tests of the sensor medium response, as defined in section 1.18 of this appendix:

(A) For standard dishwashers, the test unit is to be loaded with a total of eight place settings plus six serving pieces as specified in section 2.7 of this appendix. Two of the eight place settings, except for the flatware, must be soiled according to sections 5.3 through 5.7 of ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3) and as additionally specified in sections 2.7.4 and 2.7.5 of this appendix, while the remaining place settings, serving pieces, and all flatware are not soiled. The test load is to be loaded in the dishwasher according to section 5.8 of ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010.

(B) For compact dishwashers, the test unit is to be loaded with four place settings plus six serving pieces as specified in section 2.7 of this appendix. One of the four place settings, except for the flatware, must be soiled according to sections 5.3 through 5.7 of ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010 and as additionally specified in sections 2.7.4 and 2.7.5 of this appendix, while the remaining place settings, serving pieces, and all flatware are not soiled. The test load is to be loaded in the dishwasher according to section 5.8 of ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010.

2.6.3.3 For tests of the sensor light response, as defined in section 1.17 of this appendix:

(A) For standard dishwashers, the test unit is to be loaded with a total of eight place settings plus six serving pieces as specified in section 2.7 of this appendix. One of the eight place settings, except for the flatware, must be soiled with half of the soil load specified for a single place setting according to sections 5.3 through 5.7 of ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3) and as additionally specified in sections 2.7.4 and 2.7.5 of this appendix, while the remaining place settings, serving pieces, and all flatware are not soiled. The test load is to be loaded in the dishwasher according to section 5.8 of ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010.

(B) For compact dishwashers, the test unit is to be loaded with four place settings plus six serving pieces as specified in section 2.7 of this appendix. One of the four place settings, except for the flatware, must be soiled with half of the soil load specified for a single place setting according to sections 5.3 through 5.7 of ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010 and as additionally specified in sections 2.7.4 and 2.7.5 of this appendix, while the remaining place settings, serving pieces, and all flatware are not soiled. The test load is to be loaded in the dishwasher according to section 5.8 of ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010.

2.7 Test load.

2.7.1 Test load items.

Dishware/glassware/flatware itemPrimary sourceDescriptionPrimary No.Alternate sourceAlternate source No.
Dinner PlateCorning Comcor®/Corelle®10 inch Dinner Plate6003893
Bread and Butter PlateCorning Comcor®/Corelle®6.75 inch Bread & Butter6003887Arzberg8500217100 or 2000-00001-0217-1
Fruit BowlCorning Comcor®/Corelle®10 oz. Dessert Bowl6003899Arzberg3820513100
CupCorning Comcor®/Corelle®8 oz. Ceramic Cup6014162Arzberg1382-00001-4732
SaucerCorning Comcor®/Corelle®6 inch Saucer6010972Arzberg1382-00001-4731
Serving BowlCorning Comcor®/Corelle®1 qt. Serving Bowl6003911
PlatterCorning Comcor®/Corelle®9.5 inch Oval Platter6011655
Glass—Iced TeaLibbey551 HT
Flatware—KnifeOneida®—Accent2619KPVFWMF—Gastro 080012.0803.6047
Flatware—Dinner ForkOneida®—Accent2619FRSFWMF—Signum 190012.1905.6040
Flatware—Salad ForkOneida®—Accent2619FSLFWMF—Signum 190012.1964.6040
Flatware—TeaspoonOneida®—Accent2619STSFWMF—Signum 190012.1910.6040
Flatware—Serving ForkOneida®—Flight2865FCMWMF—Signum 190012.1902.6040
Flatware—Serving SpoonOneida®—Accent2619STBFWMF—Signum 190012.1904.6040

2.7.2 Place setting. A place setting shall consist of one cup, one saucer, one dinner plate, one bread and butter plate, one fruit bowl, one iced tea glass, one dinner fork, one salad fork, one knife, and two teaspoons.

2.7.3 Serving pieces. Serving pieces shall consist of two serving bowls, one platter, one serving fork, and two serving spoons.

2.7.4 Soils. The soils shall be as specified in section 5.4 of ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3), except for the following substitutions.

2.7.4.1 Margarine. The margarine shall be Fleischmann's Original stick margarine.

2.7.4.2 Coffee. The coffee shall be Folgers Classic Decaf.

2.7.5 Soil Preparation. Soils shall be prepared according to section 5.5 of ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3), with the following additional specifications.

2.7.5.1 Milk. The nonfat dry milk shall be reconstituted before mixing with the oatmeal and potatoes. It shall be reconstituted with water by mixing 23 cup of nonfat dry milk with 2 cups of water until well mixed. The reconstituted milk may be stored for use over the course of 1 day.

2.7.5.2 Instant mashed potatoes. The potato mixture shall be applied within 30 minutes of preparation.

2.7.5.3 Ground beef. The 1-pound packages of ground beef shall be stored frozen for no more than 6 months.

2.8 Testing requirements. Provisions in this appendix pertaining to dishwashers that operate with a nominal inlet temperature of 50 °F or 120 °F apply only to water-heating dishwashers as defined in section 1.26 of this appendix.

2.9 Preconditioning requirements. Precondition the dishwasher twice by establishing the testing conditions set forth in sections 2.1 through 2.5 of this appendix. For each preconditioning, set the dishwasher to the preconditioning cycle as defined in section 1.15 of this appendix, without using a test load, and initiate the cycle. During the second preconditioning, measure the prewash fill water volume, Vpw, if any, and the main wash fill water volume, Vmw.

2.10 Detergent. Use half the quantity of detergent specified according to section 4.1 of ANSI/AHAM DW-1-2010 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3), using Cascade with the Grease Fighting Power of Dawn powder as the detergent formulation. Determine the amount of detergent (in grams) to be added to the prewash compartment (if provided) or elsewhere in the dishwasher (if recommended by the manufacturer) and the main wash compartment according to sections 2.10.1 and 2.10.2 of this appendix.

2.10.1 Prewash Detergent Dosing. If the cycle setting for the test cycle includes prewash, determine the quantity of dry prewash detergent, Dpw, in grams (g) that results in 0.25 percent concentration by mass in the prewash fill water as:

Dpw = Vpw × ρ × k × 0.25/100

where,

Vpw = the prewash fill volume of water in gallons,

ρ = water density = 8.343 pounds (lb)/gallon for dishwashers to be tested at a nominal inlet water temperature of 50 °F (10 °C), 8.250 lb/gallon for dishwashers to be tested at a nominal inlet water temperature of 120 °F (49 °C), and 8.205 lb/gallon for dishwashers to be tested at a nominal inlet water temperature of 140 °F (60 °C), and

k = conversion factor from lb to g = 453.6 g/lb.

2.10.2 Main Wash Detergent Dosing. Determine the quantity of dry main wash detergent, Dmw, in grams (g) that results in 0.25 percent concentration by mass in the main wash fill water as:

Dmw = Vmw × ρ × k × 0.25/100

where,

Vmw = the main wash fill volume of water in gallons, and

ρ, and k are defined in section 2.10.1 of this appendix.

3. Instrumentation

Test instruments must be calibrated annually.

3.1 Temperature measuring device. The device must have an error no greater than ±1 °F over the range being measured.

3.2 Timer. Time measurements for each monitoring period shall be accurate to within 2 seconds.

3.3 Water meter. The water meter must have a resolution of no larger than 0.1 gallons and a maximum error no greater than ±1.5 percent of the measured flow rate for all water temperatures encountered in the test cycle.

3.4 Water pressure gauge. The water pressure gauge must have a resolution of one pound per square inch (psi) and must have an error no greater than 5 percent of any measured value over the range of 35 ±2.5 psig.

3.5 Watt-hour meter. The watt-hour meter must have a resolution of .1 watt-hour or less and a maximum error of no more than 1 percent of the measured value for any demand greater than 5 watts.

3.6 Standby mode and off mode watt meter. The watt meter used to measure standby mode and off mode power consumption shall meet the requirements specified in Section 4, Paragraph 4.4 of IEC 62301 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3).

4. Test Cycle and Measurements

4.1 Active mode cycle. Perform a test cycle by establishing the testing conditions set forth in section 2 of this appendix, setting the dishwasher to the cycle type to be tested according to section 2.6.1, 2.6.2, or 2.6.3 of this appendix, initiating the cycle, and allowing the cycle to proceed to completion.

4.1.1 Machine electrical energy consumption. Measure the machine electrical energy consumption, M, expressed as the number of kilowatt-hours of electricity consumed by the machine during the entire test cycle, using a water supply temperature as set forth in section 2.3 of this appendix and using a watt-hour meter as specified in section 3.5 of this appendix.

4.1.2 Fan electrical energy consumption. If the dishwasher is capable of operation in fan-only mode, measure the fan electrical energy consumption, MF, expressed as the number of kilowatt-hours of electricity consumed by the machine for the duration of fan-only mode, using a watt-hour meter as specified in section 3.5 of this appendix. Alternatively, if the duration of fan-only mode is known, the watt-hours consumed may be measured for a period of 10 minutes in fan-only mode, using a watt-hour meter as specified in section 3.5 of this appendix. Multiply this value by the time in minutes that the dishwasher remains in fan-only mode, LF, and divide by 10,000 to obtain MF. The alternative approach may be used only if the resulting MF is representative of energy use during the entire fan-only mode.

4.1.3 Water consumption. Measure the water consumption, V, expressed as the number of gallons of water delivered to the machine during the entire test cycle, using a water meter specified in section 3.3 of this appendix.

4.2 Standby mode and off mode power. Connect the dishwasher to a standby mode and off mode watt meter as specified in section 3.6 of this appendix. Establish the testing conditions set forth in sections 2.1, 2.2, and 2.5.2 of this appendix. For dishwashers that take some time to enter a stable state from a higher power state as discussed in Section 5, Paragraph 5.1, note 1 of IEC 62301 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), allow sufficient time for the dishwasher to reach the lower power state before proceeding with the test measurement. Follow the test procedure specified in Section 5, Paragraph 5.3.2 of IEC 62301 for testing in each possible mode as described in sections 4.2.1 and 4.2.2 of this appendix.

4.2.1 If the dishwasher has an inactive mode, as defined in section 1.10 of this appendix, measure and record the average inactive mode power of the dishwasher, PIA, in watts.

4.2.2 If the dishwasher has an off mode, as defined in section 1.13 of this appendix, measure and record the average off mode power, POM, in watts.

5. Calculation of Derived Results From Test Measurements

5.1 Machine energy consumption.

5.1.1 Machine energy consumption for non-soil-sensing electric dishwashers. Take the value recorded in section 4.1.1 of this appendix as the per-cycle machine electrical energy consumption. Express the value, M, in kilowatt-hours per cycle.

5.1.2 Machine energy consumption for soil-sensing electric dishwashers. The machine energy consumption for the sensor normal cycle, M, is defined as:

M = (Mhr × Fhr) + (Mmr × Fmr) + (Mlr × Flr)

where,

Mhr = the value recorded in section 4.1.1 of this appendix for the test of the sensor heavy response, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle,

Mmr = the value recorded in section 4.1.1 of this appendix for the test of the sensor medium response, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle,

Mlr = the value recorded in section 4.1.1 of this appendix for the test of the sensor light response, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle,

Fhr = the weighting factor based on consumer use of heavy response = 0.05,

Fmr = the weighting factor based on consumer use of medium response = 0.33, and

Flr = the weighting factor based on consumer use of light response = 0.62.

5.1.3 Machine energy consumption during water softener regeneration for water-softening dishwashers. The machine energy consumption for water softener regeneration, MWS, is defined as:

MWS = MWScycle × NWS/N

where,

MWScycle = the reported value of the additional machine electrical energy consumption required for water softener regeneration during a cycle including water softener regeneration, expressed in kilowatt-hours,

NWS = the reported representative average number of water softener regeneration cycles per year, and

N = the representative average dishwasher use of 215 cycles per year.

5.2 Fan-only mode energy consumption.

5.2.1 Electrical energy consumption for fan-only mode for non-soil-sensing electric dishwashers. Take the value recorded in section 4.1.2 of this appendix as the per-cycle electrical energy consumption for fan-only mode. Express the value, EF, in kilowatt-hours per cycle. If the dishwasher is not capable of operation in fan-only mode, EF = 0.

5.2.2 Electrical energy consumption for fan-only mode for soil-sensing electric dishwashers. The fan-only mode electrical energy consumption, EF, for the sensor normal cycle is defined as:

EF = (EFhr + EFmr + EFlr)/3

where,

EFhr = the value recorded in section 4.1.2 of this appendix for the test of the sensor heavy response, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle,

EFmr = the value recorded in section 4.1.2 of this appendix for the test of the sensor medium response, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle,

EFlr = the value recorded in section 4.1.2 of this appendix for the test of the sensor light response, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle,

If the dishwasher is not capable of operation in fan-only mode, EF = 0.

5.3 Drying energy.

5.3.1 Drying energy consumption for non-soil-sensing electric dishwashers. Calculate the amount of energy consumed using the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse option of the normal cycle. Express the value, ED, in kilowatt-hours per cycle.

5.3.2 Drying energy consumption for soil-sensing electric dishwashers. The drying energy consumption, ED, for the sensor normal cycle is defined as:

ED = (EDhr + EDmr + EDlr)/3

where,

EDhr = energy consumed using the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse option of the sensor heavy response, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle,

EDmr = energy consumed using the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse option of the sensor medium response, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle,

EDlr = energy consumed using the power-dry feature after the termination of the last rinse option of the sensor light response, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle,

5.4 Water consumption.

5.4.1 Water consumption for non-soil-sensing electric dishwashers using electrically heated, gas-heated, or oil-heated water. Take the value recorded in section 4.1.3 of this appendix as the per-cycle water consumption. Express the value, V, in gallons per cycle.

5.4.2 Water consumption for soil-sensing electric dishwashers using electrically heated, gas-heated, or oil-heated water. The water consumption for the sensor normal cycle, V, is defined as:

V = (Vhr × Fhr) + (Vmr × Fmr) + (Vlr × Flr)

where,

Vhr = the value recorded in section 4.1.3 of this appendix for the test of the sensor heavy response, expressed in gallons per cycle,

Vmr = the value recorded in section 4.1.3 of this appendix for the test of the sensor medium response, expressed in gallons per cycle,

Vlr = the value recorded in section 4.1.3 of this appendix for the test of the sensor light response, expressed in gallons per cycle,

Fhr = the weighting factor based on consumer use of heavy response = 0.05,

Fmr = the weighting factor based on consumer use of medium response = 0.33, and

Flr = the weighting factor based on consumer use of light response = 0.62.

5.4.3 Water consumption during water softener regeneration for water-softening dishwashers using electrically heated, gas-heated, or oil-heated water. The water consumption for water softener regeneration, VWS, is defined as:

VWS = VWScycle × NWS/N

where,

VWScycle = the reported value of the additional water consumption required for water softener regeneration during a cycle including water softener regeneration, expressed in gallons per cycle,

NWS = the reported representative average number of water softener regeneration cycles per year, and

N = the representative average dishwasher use of 215 cycles per year.

5.5 Water energy consumption for non-soil-sensing or soil-sensing dishwashers using electrically heated water.

5.5.1 Dishwashers that operate with a nominal 140 °F inlet water temperature, only.

5.5.1.1 Calculate the water energy consumption, W, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

W = V × T × K

where,

V = water consumption in gallons per cycle, as determined in section 5.4.1 of this appendix for non-soil-sensing dishwashers and section 5.4.2 of this appendix for soil-sensing dishwashers,

T = nominal water heater temperature rise = 90 °F, and

K = specific heat of water in kilowatt-hours per gallon per degree Fahrenheit = 0.0024.

5.5.1.2 For water-softening dishwashers, calculate the water softener regeneration water energy consumption, WWS, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

WWS = VWS × T × K

where,

VWS = water consumption during water softener regeneration in gallons per cycle which includes regeneration, as determined in section 5.4.3 of this appendix,

T = nominal water heater temperature rise = 90 °F, and

K = specific heat of water in kilowatt-hours per gallon per degree Fahrenheit = 0.0024.

5.5.2 Dishwashers that operate with a nominal inlet water temperature of 120 °F.

5.5.2.1 Calculate the water energy consumption, W, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

W = V × T × K

where,

V = water consumption in gallons per cycle, as determined in section 5.4.1 of this appendix for non-soil-sensing dishwashers and section 5.4.2 of this appendix for soil-sensing dishwashers,

T = nominal water heater temperature rise = 70 °F, and

K = specific heat of water in kilowatt-hours per gallon per degree Fahrenheit = 0.0024,

5.5.2.2 For water-softening dishwashers, calculate the water softener regeneration water energy consumption, WWS, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

WWS = VWS × T × K

where,

VWS = water consumption during water softener regeneration in gallons per cycle which includes regeneration, as determined in section 5.4.3 of this appendix,

T = nominal water heater temperature rise = 70 °F, and

K = specific heat of water in kilowatt-hours per gallon per degree Fahrenheit = 0.0024.

5.6 Water energy consumption per cycle using gas-heated or oil-heated water.

5.6.1 Dishwashers that operate with a nominal 140 °F inlet water temperature, only.

5.6.1.1 Calculate the water energy consumption using gas-heated or oil-heated water, Wg, expressed in Btu's per cycle and defined as:

Wg = V × T × C / e

where,

V = water consumption in gallons per cycle, as determined in section 5.4.1 of this appendix for non-soil-sensing dishwashers and section 5.4.2 of this appendix for soil-sensing dishwashers,

T = nominal water heater temperature rise = 90 °F,

C = specific heat of water in Btu's per gallon per degree Fahrenheit = 8.2, and

e = nominal gas or oil water heater recovery efficiency = 0.75,

5.6.1.2 For water-softening dishwashers, calculate the water softener regeneration water energy consumption, WWSg, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

WWSg = VWS × T × C/e

where,

VWS = water consumption during water softener regeneration in gallons per cycle which includes regeneration, as determined in section 5.4.3 of this appendix,

T = nominal water heater temperature rise = 90 °F,

C = specific heat of water in Btu's per gallon per degree Fahrenheit = 8.2, and

e = nominal gas or oil water heater recovery efficiency = 0.75.

5.6.2 Dishwashers that operate with a nominal 120 °F inlet water temperature, only.

5.6.2.1 Calculate the water energy consumption using gas-heated or oil-heated water, Wg, expressed in Btu's per cycle and defined as:

Wg = V × T × C/e

where,

V = water consumption in gallons per cycle, as determined in section 5.4.1 of this appendix for non-soil-sensing dishwashers and section 5.4.2 of this appendix for soil-sensing dishwashers,

T = nominal water heater temperature rise = 70 °F,

C = specific heat of water in Btu's per gallon per degree Fahrenheit = 8.2, and

e = nominal gas or oil water heater recovery efficiency = 0.75.

5.6.2.2 For water-softening dishwashers, calculate the water softener regeneration water energy consumption, WWSg, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

WWSg = VWS × T × C/e

where,

VWS = water consumption during water softener regeneration in gallons per cycle which includes regeneration, as determined in section 5.4.3 of this appendix,

T = nominal water heater temperature rise = 70 °F,

C = specific heat of water in Btu's per gallon per degree Fahrenheit = 8.2, and

e = nominal gas or oil water heater recovery efficiency = 0.75.

5.7 Annual combined low-power mode energy consumption. Calculate the annual combined low-power mode energy consumption for dishwashers, ETLP, expressed in kilowatt-hours per year, according to the following:

ETLP = [(PIA × SIA) + (POM × SOM)] × K

where:

PIA = dishwasher inactive mode power, in watts, as measured in section 4.2.1 of this appendix for dishwashers capable of operating in inactive mode; otherwise, PIA = 0,

POM = dishwasher off mode power, in watts, as measured in section 4.2.2 of this appendix for dishwashers capable of operating in off mode; otherwise, POM = 0,

SIA = annual hours in inactive mode as defined as SLP if no off mode is possible, [SLP/2] if both inactive mode and off mode are possible, and 0 if no inactive mode is possible,

SOM = annual hours in off mode as defined as SLP if no inactive mode is possible, [SLP/2] if both inactive mode and off mode are possible, and 0 if no off mode is possible,

SLP = combined low-power annual hours for all available modes other than active mode as defined as [H − (N × (L + LF))] for dishwashers capable of operating in fan-only mode; otherwise, SLP = 8,465,

H = the total number of hours per year = 8766 hours per year,

N = the representative average dishwasher use of 215 cycles per year,

L = the average of the duration of the normal cycle and truncated normal cycle, for non-soil-sensing dishwashers with a truncated normal cycle; the duration of the normal cycle, for non-soil-sensing dishwashers without a truncated normal cycle; the average duration of the sensor light response, truncated sensor light response, sensor medium response, truncated sensor medium response, sensor heavy response, and truncated sensor heavy response, for soil-sensing dishwashers with a truncated cycle option; the average duration of the sensor light response, sensor medium response, and sensor heavy response, for soil-sensing dishwashers without a truncated cycle option,

LF = the duration of the fan-only mode for the normal cycle for non-soil-sensing dishwashers; the average duration of the fan-only mode for sensor light response, sensor medium response, and sensor heavy response for soil-sensing dishwashers, and

K = 0.001 kWh/Wh conversion factor for watt-hours to kilowatt-hours.

[77 FR 65982, Oct. 31, 2012]

Appendix D to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Clothes Dryers

Note: Effective February 10, 2014, manufacturers must make representations of energy efficiency, including certifications of compliance, using appendix D. Compliance with DOE's amended standards for clothes dryers, and corresponding use of the test procedures at appendix D1 for all representations, including certifications of compliance, is required as of January 1, 2015. Manufacturers must use a single appendix for all representations, including certifications of compliance, and may not use appendix D for certain representations and appendix D1 for other representations. The procedures in appendix D2 need not be performed to determine compliance with energy conservation standards for clothes dryers at this time. However, manufacturers may elect to use the amended appendix D, D1 or D2 early.

1. Definitions

1.1 “AHAM” means the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers.

1.2 “Bone dry” means a condition of a load of test clothes which has been dried in a dryer at maximum temperature for a minimum of 10 minutes, removed and weighed before cool down, and then dried again for 10-minute periods until the final weight change of the load is 1 percent or less.

1.3 “Compact” or compact size” means a clothes dryer with a drum capacity of less than 4.4 cubic feet.

1.4 “Cool down” means that portion of the clothes drying cycle when the added gas or electric heat is terminated and the clothes continue to tumble and dry within the drum.

1.5 “Cycle” means a sequence of operation of a clothes dryer which performs a clothes drying operation, and may include variations or combinations of the functions of heating, tumbling and drying.

1.6 “Drum capacity” means the volume of the drying drum in cubic feet.

1.7 “HLD-1” means the test standard promulgated by AHAM and titled “AHAM Performance Evaluation Procedure for Household Tumble Type Clothes Dryers”, June 1974, and designated as HLD-1.

1.8 “HLD-2EC” means the test standard promulgated by AHAM and titled “Test Method for Measuring Energy Consumption of Household Tumble Type Clothes Dryers,” December 1975, and designated as HLD-2EC.

1.9 “Standard size” means a clothes dryer with a drum capacity of 4.4 cubic feet or greater.

1.10 “Moisture content” means the ratio of the weight of water contained by the test load to the bone-dry weight of the test load, expressed as a percent.

1.11 “Automatic termination control” means a dryer control system with a sensor which monitors either the dryer load temperature or its moisture content and with a controller which automatically terminates the drying process. A mark or detent which indicates a preferred automatic termination control setting must be present if the dryer is to be classified as having an “automatic termination control.” A mark is a visible single control setting on one or more dryer controls.

1.12 “Temperature sensing control” means a system which monitors dryer exhaust air temperature and automatically terminates the dryer cycle.

1.13 “Moisture sensing control” means a system which utilizes a moisture sensing element within the dryer drum that monitors the amount of moisture in the clothes and automatically terminates the dryer cycle.

2. Testing Conditions

2.1 Installation. Install the clothes dryer in accordance with manufacturer's instructions as shipped with the unit. If the manufacturer's instructions do not specify the installation requirements for a certain component, it shall be tested in the as-shipped condition. The dryer exhaust shall be restricted by adding the AHAM exhaust simulator described in 3.3.5 of HLD-1. All external joints should be taped to avoid air leakage. Disconnect all lights, such as task lights, that do not provide any information related to the drying process on the clothes dryer and that do not consume more than 10 watts during the clothes dryer test cycle. Control setting indicator lights showing the cycle progression, temperature or dryness settings, or other cycle functions that cannot be turned off during the test cycle shall not be disconnected during the active mode test cycle.

2.2 Ambient temperature and humidity. Maintain the room ambient air temperature at 75 ±3 °F and the room relative humidity at 50±10 percent relative humidity.

2.3 Energy supply.

2.3.1 Electrical supply. Maintain the electrical supply at the clothes dryer terminal block within 1 percent of 120/240 or 120/208Y or 120 volts as applicable to the particular terminal block wiring system and within 1 percent of the nameplate frequency as specified by the manufacturer. If the dryer has a dual voltage conversion capability, conduct test at the highest voltage specified by the manufacturer.

2.3.2 Gas supply.

2.3.2.1 Natural gas. Maintain the gas supply to the clothes dryer at a normal inlet test pressure immediately ahead of all controls at 7 to 10 inches of water column. If the clothes dryer is equipped with a gas appliance pressure regulator, the regulator outlet pressure at the normal test pressure shall be within ±10 percent of the value recommended by the manufacturer in the installation manual, on the nameplate sticker, or wherever the manufacturer makes such a recommendation for the basic model. The hourly Btu rating of the burner shall be maintained within ±5 percent of the rating specified by the manufacturer. If the requirement to maintain the hourly Btu rating of the burner within ±5 percent of the rating specified by the manufacturer cannot be achieved under the allowable range in gas inlet test pressure, the orifice of the gas burner should be modified as necessary to achieve the required Btu rating. The natural gas supplied should have a heating value of approximately 1,025 Btus per standard cubic foot. The actual heating value, Hn2, in Btus per standard cubic foot, for the natural gas to be used in the test shall be obtained either from measurements made by the manufacturer conducting the test using a standard continuous flow calorimeter as described in section 2.4.6 or by the purchase of bottled natural gas whose Btu rating is certified to be at least as accurate a rating as could be obtained from measurements with a standard continuous flow calorimeter as described in section 2.4.6.

2.3.2.2 Propane gas. Maintain the gas supply to the clothes dryer at a normal inlet test pressure immediately ahead of all controls at 11 to 13 inches of water column. If the clothes dryer is equipped with a gas appliance pressure regulator, the regulator outlet pressure at the normal test pressure shall be within ±10 percent of the value recommended by the manufacturer in the installation manual, on the nameplate sticker, or wherever the manufacturer makes such a recommendation for the basic model. The hourly Btu rating of the burner shall be maintained within ±5 percent of the rating specified by the manufacturer. If the requirement to maintain the hourly Btu rating of the burner within ±5 percent of the rating specified by the manufacturer cannot be achieved under the allowable range in gas inlet test pressure, the orifice of the gas burner should be modified as necessary to achieve the required Btu rating. The propane gas supplied should have a heating value of approximately 2,500 Btus per standard cubic foot. The actual heating value, Hp, in Btus per standard cubic foot, for the propane gas to be used in the test shall be obtained either from measurements made by the manufacturer conducting the test using a standard continuous flow calorimeter as described in section 2.4.6 or by the purchase of bottled gas whose Btu rating is certified to be at least as accurate a rating as could be obtained from measurement with a standard continuous calorimeter as described in section 2.4.6.

2.4 Instrumentation. Perform all test measurements using the following instruments as appropriate.

2.4.1 Weighing scale for test cloth. The scale shall have a range of 0 to a maximum of 60 pounds with a resolution of at least 0.2 ounces and a maximum error no greater than 0.3 percent of any measured value within the range of 3 to 15 pounds.

2.4.1.2 Weighing scale for drum capacity measurements. The scale should have a range of 0 to a maximum of 600 pounds with resolution of 0.50 pounds and a maximum error no greater than 0.5 percent of the measured value.

2.4.2 Kilowatt-hour meter. The kilowatt-hour meter shall have a resolution of 0.001 kilowatt-hours and a maximum error no greater than 0.5 percent of the measured value.

2.4.3 Gas meter. The gas meter shall have a resolution of 0.001 cubic feet and a maximum error no greater than 0.5 percent of the measured value.

2.4.4 Dry and wet bulb psychrometer. The dry and wet bulb psychrometer shall have an error no greater than ±1 °F. A relative humidity meter with a maximum error tolerance expressed in °F equivalent to the requirements for the dry and wet bulb psychrometer or with a maximum error tolerance of ±2 percent relative humidity would be acceptable for measuring the ambient humidity.

2.4.5 Temperature. The temperature sensor shall have an error no greater than ±1 °F.

2.4.6 Standard Continuous Flow Calorimeter. The Calorimeter shall have an operating range of 750 to 3,500 Btu per cubic feet. The maximum error of the basic calorimeter shall be no greater than 0.2 percent of the actual heating value of the gas used in the test. The indicator readout shall have a maximum error no greater than 0.5 percent of the measured value within the operating range and a resolution of 0.2 percent of the full scale reading of the indicator instrument.

2.5 Lint trap. Clean the lint trap thoroughly before each test run.

2.6 Test cloths.

2.6.1 Energy test cloth. The energy test cloth shall be clean and consist of the following:

(a) Pure finished bleached cloth, made with a momie or granite weave, which is a blended fabric of 50 percent cotton and 50 percent polyester and weighs within +10 percent of 5.75 ounces per square yard after test cloth preconditioning and has 65 ends on the warp and 57 picks on the fill. The individual warp and fill yarns are a blend of 50 percent cotton and 50 percent polyester fibers.

(b) Cloth material that is 24 inches by 36 inches and has been hemmed to 22 inches by 34 inches before washing. The maximum shrinkage after five washes shall not be more than four percent on the length and width.

(c) The number of test runs on the same energy test cloth shall not exceed 25 runs.

2.6.2 Energy stuffer cloths. The energy stuffer cloths shall be made from energy test cloth material and shall consist of pieces of material that are 12 inches by 12 inches and have been hemmed to 10 inches by 10 inches before washing. The maximum shrinkage after five washes shall not be more than four percent on the length and width. The number of test runs on the same energy stuffer cloth shall not exceed 25 runs after test cloth preconditioning.

2.6.3 Test Cloth Preconditioning.

A new test cloth load and energy stuffer cloths shall be treated as follows:

(1) Bone dry the load to a weight change of ±1 percent, or less, as prescribed in Section 1.2.

(2) Place test cloth load in a standard clothes washer set at the maximum water fill level. Wash the load for 10 minutes in soft water (17 parts per million hardness or less), using 6.0 grams of AHAM Standard Test Detergent, IIA, per gallon of water. Wash water temperature is to controlled at 140°±5 °F (60° ±2.7 °C). Rinse water temperature is to be controlled at 100° ±5 °F (37.7 ±2.7 °C).

(3) Rinse the load again at the same water temperature.

(4) Bone dry the load as prescribed in Section 1.2 and weigh the load.

(5) This procedure is repeated until there is a weight change of one percent or less.

(6) A final cycle is to be a hot water wash with no detergent, followed by two warm water rinses.

2.7 Test loads.

2.7.1 Compact size dryer load. Prepare a bone-dry test load of energy cloths which weighs 3.00 pounds ±.03 pounds. Adjustments to the test load to achieve the proper weight can be made by the use of energy stuffer cloths, with no more than five stuffer cloths per load. Dampen the load by agitating it in water whose temperature is 100° ±5 °F and consists of 0 to 17 parts per million hardness for approximately two minutes in order to saturate the fabric. Then, extract water from the wet test load by spinning the load until the moisture content of the load is between 66.5 percent to 73.5 percent of the bone-dry weight of the test load.

2.7.2 Standard size dryer load. Prepare a bone-dry test load of energy cloths which weighs 7.00 pounds ±.07 pounds. Adjustments to the test load to achieve the proper weight can be made by the use of energy stuffer cloths, with no more than five stuffer cloths per load. Dampen the load by agitating it in water whose temperature is 100° ±5 °F and consists of 0 to 17 parts per million hardness for approximately two minutes in order to saturate the fabric. Then, extract water from the wet test load by spinning the load until the moisture content of the load is between 66.5 percent to 73.5 percent of the bone-dry weight of the test load.

2.7.3 Method of loading. Load the energy test cloths by grasping them in the center, shaking them to hang loosely and then dropping them in the dryer at random.

2.8 Clothes dryer preconditioning. Before any test cycle, operate the dryer without a test load in the non-heat mode for 15 minutes or until the discharge air temperature is varying less than 1 °F for 10 minutes, which ever is longer, in the test installation location with the ambient conditions within the specified rest condition tolerances of 2.2.

3. Test Procedures and Measurements

3.1 Drum Capacity. Measure the drum capacity by sealing all openings in the drum except the loading port with a plastic bag, and ensure that all corners and depressions are filled and that there are no extrusions of the plastic bag through any openings in the interior of the drum. Support the dryer's rear drum surface on a platform scale to prevent deflection of the dryer, and record the weight of the empty dryer. Fill the drum with water to a level determined by the intersection of the door plane and the loading port (i.e., the uppermost edge of the drum that is in contact with the door seal). Record the temperature of the water and then the weight of the dryer with the added water and then determine the mass of the water in pounds. Add the appropriate volume to account for any space in the drum interior not measured by water fill (e.g., the space above the uppermost edge of the drum within a curved door) and subtract the appropriate volume to account for space that is measured by water fill but cannot be used when the door is closed (e.g., space occupied by the door when closed). The drum capacity is calculated as follows:

C = w/d ±volume adjustment

C = capacity in cubic feet.

w = mass of water in pounds.

d = density of water at the measured temperature in pounds per cubic foot.

3.2 Dryer loading. Load the dryer as specified in 2.7.

3.3 Test cycle. Operate the clothes dryer at the maximum temperature setting and, if equipped with a timer, at the maximum time setting. Any other optional cycle settings that do not affect the temperature or time settings shall be tested in the as-shipped position. If the clothes dryer does not have a separate temperature setting selection on the control panel, the maximum time setting should be used for the drying test cycle. Dry the test load until the moisture content of the test load is between 2.5 percent and 5.0 percent of the bone-dry weight of the test load, but do not permit the dryer to advance into cool down. If required, reset the timer or automatic dry control.

3.4 Data recording. Record for each test cycle:

3.4.1 Bone-dry weight of the test load described in 2.7.

3.4.2 Moisture content of the wet test load before the test, as described in 2.7.

3.4.3 Moisture content of the dry test load obtained after the test described in 3.3.

3.4.4 Test room conditions, temperature and percent relative humidity described in 2.2.

3.4.5 For electric dryers—the total kilowatt-hours of electric energy, Et, consumed during the test described in 3.3.

3.4.6 For gas dryers:

3.4.6.1 Total kilowatt-hours of electrical energy, Ete, consumed during the test described in 3.3.

3.4.6.2 Cubic feet of gas per cycle, Etg, consumed during the test described in 3.3.

3.4.6.3 On gas dryers using a continuously burning pilot light—the cubic feet of gas, Epg, consumed by the gas pilot light in one hour.

3.4.6.4 Correct the gas heating value, GEF, as measured in 2.3.2.1 and 2.3.2.2, to standard pressure and temperature conditions in accordance with U.S. Bureau of Standards, circular C417, 1938. A sample calculation is illustrated in appendix E of HLD-1.

3.5 Test for automatic termination field use factor credits. Credit for automatic termination can be claimed for those dryers which meet the requirements for either temperature-sensing control, 1.12, or moisture sensing control, 1.13, and having present the appropriate mark or detent feed defined in 1.11.

4. Calculation of Derived Results From Test Measurements

4.1 Total per-cycle electric dryer energy consumption. Calculate the total electric dryer energy consumption per cycle, Ece expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

Ece = [66/WwWd)]×Ett×FU

Et = the energy recorded in 3.4.5.

66=an experimentally established value for the percent reduction in the moisture content of the test load during a laboratory test cycle expressed as a percent.

FU=Field use factor.

=1.18 for time termination control systems.

=1.04 for automatic control systems which meet the requirements of the definitions for automatic termination controls in 1.11.1, 1.12 and 1.13.

Ww = the moisture content of the wet test load as recorded in 3.4.2.

Wd = the moisture content of the dry test load as recorded in 3.4.3.

4.2 Per-cycle gas dryer electrical energy consumption. Calculate the gas dryer electrical energy consumption per cycle, Ege, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

Ege = [66/(Ww−Wd)]×Ete×FU

Ete = the energy recorded in 3.4.6.1

FU, 66, Ww, Wd as defined in 4.1

4.3 Per-cycle gas dryer gas energy consumption. Calculate the gas dryer gas energy consumption per cycle, Ege. expressed in Btu's per cycle as defined as:

Egg = [66/(Ww−Wd)]×Etg×FU×GEF

Etg = the energy recorded in 3.4.6.2

GEF = corrected gas heat value (Btu per cubic feet) as defined in 3.4.6.4

FU, 66, Ww Wd as defined in 4.1

4.4 Per-cycle gas dryer continuously burning pilot light gas energy consumption. Calculate the gas dryer continuously burning pilot light gas energy consumption per cycle, Eup expressed in Btu's per cycle and defined as:

Eup = Epg×(8760−140/416)×GEF

Epg = the energy recorded in 3.4.6.3

8760=number of hours in a year

416=representative average number of clothes dryer cycles in a year

140=estimated number of hours that the continuously burning pilot light is on during the operation of the clothes dryer for the representative average use cycle for clothes dryers (416 cycles per year)

GEF as defined in 4.3

4.5 Total per-cycle gas dryer gas energy consumption expressed in Btu's. Calculate the total gas dryer energy consumption per cycle, Eg, expressed in Btu's per cycle and defined as:

Eg = Egg+Eup

Egg as defined in 4.3

Eup as defined in 4.4

4.6 Total per-cycle gas dryer energy consumption expressed in kilowatt-hours. Calculate the total gas dryer energy consumption per cycle, Ecg, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

Ecg = Ege+(Eg/3412 Btu/k Wh)

Ege as defined in 4.2

Eg as defined in 4.5

[46 FR 27326, May 19, 1981, as amended at 76 FR 1032, Jan. 6, 2011; 78 FR 49644, Aug. 14, 2013]

Appendix D1 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Clothes Dryers

Note: Effective February 10, 2014, manufacturers must make representations of energy efficiency, including certifications of compliance, using appendix D. Compliance with DOE's amended standards for clothes dryers, and corresponding use of the test procedures at appendix D1 for all representations, including certifications of compliance, is required as of January 1, 2015. Manufacturers must use a single appendix for all representations, including certifications of compliance, and may not use appendix D for certain representations and appendix D1 for other representations. The procedures in appendix D2 need not be performed to determine compliance with energy conservation standards for clothes dryers at this time. However, manufacturers may elect to use the amended appendix D, D1, or D2 early.

1. Definitions

1.1 “Active mode” means a mode in which the clothes dryer is connected to a main power source, has been activated and is performing the main function of tumbling the clothing with or without heated or unheated forced air circulation to remove moisture from the clothing, remove wrinkles or prevent wrinkling of the clothing, or both.

1.2 “AHAM” means the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers.

1.3 “AHAM HLD-1” means the test standard published by the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers, titled “Household Tumble Type Clothes Dryers” (2009), AHAM HLD-1-2009 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

1.4 “Automatic termination control” means a dryer control system with a sensor which monitors either the dryer load temperature or its moisture content and with a controller which automatically terminates the drying process. A mark, detent, or other visual indicator or detent which indicates a preferred automatic termination control setting must be present if the dryer is to be classified as having an “automatic termination control.” A mark is a visible single control setting on one or more dryer controls.

1.5 “Bone dry” means a condition of a load of test clothes which has been dried in a dryer at maximum temperature for a minimum of 10 minutes, removed, and weighed before cool down, and then dried again for 10-minute periods until the final weight change of the load is 1 percent or less.

1.6 “Compact” or “compact size” means a clothes dryer with a drum capacity of less than 4.4 cubic feet.

1.7 “Conventional clothes dryer” means a clothes dryer that exhausts the evaporated moisture from the cabinet.

1.8 “Cool down” means that portion of the clothes drying cycle when the added gas or electric heat is terminated and the clothes continue to tumble and dry within the drum.

1.9 “Cycle” means a sequence of operation of a clothes dryer which performs a clothes drying operation, and may include variations or combinations of the functions of heating, tumbling, and drying.

1.10 “Drum capacity” means the volume of the drying drum in cubic feet.

1.11 “IEC 62301” (Second Edition) means the test standard published by the International Electrotechnical Commission (“IEC”) titled “Household electrical appliances—Measurement of standby power,” Publication 62301 (Edition 2.0 2011-01) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

1.12 “Inactive mode” means a standby mode that facilitates the activation of active mode by remote switch (including remote control), internal sensor, or timer, or that provides continuous status display.

1.13 “Moisture content” means the ratio of the weight of water contained by the test load to the bone-dry weight of the test load, expressed as a percent.

1.14 “Moisture sensing control” means a system which utilizes a moisture sensing element within the dryer drum that monitors the amount of moisture in the clothes and automatically terminates the dryer cycle.

1.15 “Off mode” means a mode in which the clothes dryer is connected to a main power source and is not providing any active or standby mode function, and where the mode may persist for an indefinite time. An indicator that only shows the user that the product is in the off position is included within the classification of an off mode.

1.16 “Standard size” means a clothes dryer with a drum capacity of 4.4 cubic feet or greater.

1.17 “Standby mode” means any product modes where the energy using product is connected to a main power source and offers one or more of the following user-oriented or protective functions which may persist for an indefinite time:

(a) To facilitate the activation of other modes (including activation or deactivation of active mode) by remote switch (including remote control), internal sensor, or timer.

(b) Continuous functions, including information or status displays (including clocks) or sensor-based functions. A timer is a continuous clock function (which may or may not be associated with a display) that provides regular scheduled tasks (e.g., switching) and that operates on a continuous basis.

1.18 “Temperature sensing control” means a system which monitors dryer exhaust air temperature and automatically terminates the dryer cycle.

1.19 “Ventless clothes dryer” means a clothes dryer that uses a closed-loop system with an internal condenser to remove the evaporated moisture from the heated air. The moist air is not discharged from the cabinet.

2. Testing Conditions

2.1 Installation.

2.1.1 All clothes dryers. For both conventional clothes dryers and ventless clothes dryers, as defined in sections 1.7 and 1.19 of this appendix, install the clothes dryer in accordance with manufacturer's instructions as shipped with the unit. If the manufacturer's instructions do not specify the installation requirements for a certain component, it shall be tested in the as-shipped condition. Where the manufacturer gives the option to use the dryer both with and without a duct, the dryer shall be tested without the exhaust simulator described in section 3.3.5.1 of AHAM HLD-1 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3). All external joints should be taped to avoid air leakage. For drying testing, disconnect all lights, such as task lights, that do not provide any information related to the drying process on the clothes dryer and that do not consume more than 10 watts during the clothes dryer test cycle. Control setting indicator lights showing the cycle progression, temperature or dryness settings, or other cycle functions that cannot be turned off during the test cycle shall not be disconnected during the active mode test cycle. For standby and off mode testing, the clothes dryer shall also be installed in accordance with section 5, paragraph 5.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), disregarding the provisions regarding batteries and the determination, classification, and testing of relevant modes. For standby and off mode testing, all lighting systems shall remain connected.

2.1.2 Conventional clothes dryers. For conventional clothes dryers, as defined in section 1.7 of this appendix, the dryer exhaust shall be restricted by adding the AHAM exhaust simulator described in section 3.3.5.1 of AHAM HLD-1 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

2.1.3 Ventless clothes dryers. For ventless clothes dryers, as defined in section 1.19, the dryer shall be tested without the AHAM exhaust simulator. If the manufacturer gives the option to use a ventless clothes dryer, with or without a condensation box, the dryer shall be tested with the condensation box installed. For ventless clothes dryers, the condenser unit of the dryer must remain in place and not be taken out of the dryer for any reason between tests.

2.2 Ambient temperature and humidity.

2.2.1 For drying testing, maintain the room ambient air temperature at 75 ±3 °F and the room relative humidity at 50 ±10 percent relative humidity.

2.2.2 For standby and off mode testing, maintain room ambient air temperature conditions as specified in section 4, paragraph 4.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3)

2.3 Energy supply.

2.3.1 Electrical supply. Maintain the electrical supply at the clothes dryer terminal block within 1 percent of 120/240 or 120/208Y or 120 volts as applicable to the particular terminal block wiring system and within 1 percent of the nameplate frequency as specified by the manufacturer. If the dryer has a dual voltage conversion capability, conduct the test at the highest voltage specified by the manufacturer.

2.3.1.1 Supply voltage waveform. For the clothes dryer standby mode and off mode testing, maintain the electrical supply voltage waveform indicated in section 4, paragraph 4.3.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3). If the power measuring instrument used for testing is unable to measure and record the total harmonic content during the test measurement period, it is acceptable to measure and record the total harmonic content immediately before and after the test measurement period.

2.3.2 Gas supply.

2.3.2.1 Natural gas. Maintain the gas supply to the clothes dryer immediately ahead of all controls at a pressure of 7 to 10 inches of water column. If the clothes dryer is equipped with a gas appliance pressure regulator for which the manufacturer specifies an outlet pressure, the regulator outlet pressure shall be within ±10 percent of the value recommended by the manufacturer in the installation manual, on the nameplate sticker, or wherever the manufacturer makes such a recommendation for the basic model. The hourly Btu rating of the burner shall be maintained within ±5 percent of the rating specified by the manufacturer. If the requirement to maintain the hourly Btu rating of the burner within ±5 percent of the rating specified by the manufacturer cannot be achieved under the allowable range in gas inlet test pressure, the orifice of the gas burner should be modified as necessary to achieve the required Btu rating. The natural gas supplied should have a heating value of approximately 1,025 Btus per standard cubic foot. The actual heating value, Hn2, in Btus per standard cubic foot, for the natural gas to be used in the test shall be obtained either from measurements made by the manufacturer conducting the test using a standard continuous flow calorimeter as described in section 2.4.6 or by the purchase of bottled natural gas whose Btu rating is certified to be at least as accurate a rating as could be obtained from measurements with a standard continuous flow calorimeter as described in section 2.4.6.

2.3.2.2 Propane gas. Maintain the gas supply to the clothes dryer immediately ahead of all controls at a pressure of 11 to 13 inches of water column. If the clothes dryer is equipped with a gas appliance pressure regulator for which the manufacturer specifies an outlet pressure, the regulator outlet pressure shall be within ±10 percent of the value recommended by the manufacturer in the installation manual, on the nameplate sticker, or wherever the manufacturer makes such a recommendation for the basic model. The hourly Btu rating of the burner shall be maintained within ±5 percent of the rating specified by the manufacturer. If the requirement to maintain the hourly Btu rating of the burner within ±5 percent of the rating specified by the manufacturer cannot be achieved under the allowable range in gas inlet test pressure, the orifice of the gas burner should be modified as necessary to achieve the required Btu rating. The propane gas supplied should have a heating value of approximately 2,500 Btus per standard cubic foot. The actual heating value, Hp, in Btus per standard cubic foot, for the propane gas to be used in the test shall be obtained either from measurements made by the manufacturer conducting the test using a standard continuous flow calorimeter as described in section 2.4.6 or by the purchase of bottled gas whose Btu rating is certified to be at least as accurate a rating as could be obtained from measurement with a standard continuous calorimeter as described in section 2.4.6.

2.4 Instrumentation. Perform all test measurements using the following instruments as appropriate.

2.4.1 Weighing scale for test cloth. The scale shall have a range of 0 to a maximum of 60 pounds with a resolution of at least 0.2 ounces and a maximum error no greater than 0.3 percent of any measured value within the range of 3 to 15 pounds.

2.4.1.2 Weighing scale for drum capacity measurements. The scale should have a range of 0 to a maximum of 600 pounds with resolution of 0.50 pounds and a maximum error no greater than 0.5 percent of the measured value.

2.4.2 Kilowatt-hour meter. The kilowatt-hour meter shall have a resolution of 0.001 kilowatt-hours and a maximum error no greater than 0.5 percent of the measured value.

2.4.3 Gas meter. The gas meter shall have a resolution of 0.001 cubic feet and a maximum error no greater than 0.5 percent of the measured value.

2.4.4 Dry and wet bulb psychrometer. The dry and wet bulb psychrometer shall have an error no greater than ±1 °F. A relative humidity meter with a maximum error tolerance expressed in °F equivalent to the requirements for the dry and wet bulb psychrometer or with a maximum error tolerance of ±2 percent relative humidity would be acceptable for measuring the ambient humidity.

2.4.5 Temperature. The temperature sensor shall have an error no greater than ±1 °F.

2.4.6 Standard Continuous Flow Calorimeter. The calorimeter shall have an operating range of 750 to 3,500 Btu per cubic feet. The maximum error of the basic calorimeter shall be no greater than 0.2 percent of the actual heating value of the gas used in the test. The indicator readout shall have a maximum error no greater than 0.5 percent of the measured value within the operating range and a resolution of 0.2 percent of the full-scale reading of the indicator instrument.

2.4.7 Standby mode and off mode watt meter. The watt meter used to measure standby mode and off mode power consumption shall meet the requirements specified in section 4, paragraph 4.4 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3). If the power measuring instrument used for testing is unable to measure and record the crest factor, power factor, or maximum current ratio during the test measurement period, it is acceptable to measure the crest factor, power factor, and maximum current ratio immediately before and after the test measurement period.

2.5 Lint trap. Clean the lint trap thoroughly before each test run.

2.6 Test Clothes.

2.6.1 Energy test cloth. The energy test cloth shall be clean and consist of the following:

(a) Pure finished bleached cloth, made with a momie or granite weave, which is a blended fabric of 50-percent cotton and 50-percent polyester and weighs within +10 percent of 5.75 ounces per square yard after test cloth preconditioning, and has 65 ends on the warp and 57 picks on the fill. The individual warp and fill yarns are a blend of 50-percent cotton and 50-percent polyester fibers.

(b) Cloth material that is 24 inches by 36 inches and has been hemmed to 22 inches by 34 inches before washing. The maximum shrinkage after five washes shall not be more than 4 percent on the length and width.

(c) The number of test runs on the same energy test cloth shall not exceed 25 runs.

2.6.2 Energy stuffer cloths. The energy stuffer cloths shall be made from energy test cloth material, and shall consist of pieces of material that are 12 inches by 12 inches and have been hemmed to 10 inches by 10 inches before washing. The maximum shrinkage after five washes shall not be more than 4 percent on the length and width. The number of test runs on the same energy stuffer cloth shall not exceed 25 runs after test cloth preconditioning.

2.6.3 Test Cloth Preconditioning.

A new test cloth load and energy stuffer cloths shall be treated as follows:

(1) Bone dry the load to a weight change of ±1 percent, or less, as prescribed in section 1.5.

(2) Place the test cloth load in a standard clothes washer set at the maximum water fill level. Wash the load for 10 minutes in soft water (17 parts per million hardness or less), using 60.8 grams of AHAM standard test detergent Formula 3. Wash water temperature is to be controlled at 140 ° ±5 °F (60 ° ±2.7 °C). Rinse water temperature is to be controlled at 100 ° ±5 °F (37.7 ±2.7 °C).

(3) Rinse the load again at the same water temperature.

(4) Bone dry the load as prescribed in section 1.5 and weigh the load.

(5) This procedure is repeated until there is a weight change of 1 percent or less.

(6) A final cycle is to be a hot water wash with no detergent, followed by two warm water rinses.

2.7 Test loads.

2.7.1 Compact size dryer load. Prepare a bone-dry test load of energy cloths which weighs 3.00 pounds ±.03 pounds. Adjustments to the test load to achieve the proper weight can be made by the use of energy stuffer cloths, with no more than five stuffer cloths per load. Dampen the load by agitating it in water whose temperature is 60 °F ±5 °F and consists of 0 to 17 parts per million hardness for approximately 2 minutes in order to saturate the fabric. Then, extract water from the wet test load by spinning the load until the moisture content of the load is between 54.0-61.0 percent of the bone-dry weight of the test load.

2.7.2 Standard size dryer load. Prepare a bone-dry test load of energy cloths which weighs 8.45 pounds ±.085 pounds. Adjustments to the test load to achieve the proper weight can be made by the use of energy stuffer cloths, with no more than five stuffer cloths per load. Dampen the load by agitating it in water whose temperature is 60 °F ±5 °F and consists of 0 to 17 parts per million hardness for approximately 2 minutes in order to saturate the fabric. Then, extract water from the wet test load by spinning the load until the moisture content of the load is between 54.0-61.0 percent of the bone-dry weight of the test load.

2.7.3 Method of loading. Load the energy test cloths by grasping them in the center, shaking them to hang loosely, and then dropping them in the dryer at random.

2.8 Clothes dryer preconditioning.

2.8.1 Conventional clothes dryers. For conventional clothes dryers, before any test cycle, operate the dryer without a test load in the non-heat mode for 15 minutes or until the discharge air temperature is varying less than 1 °F for 10 minutes—whichever is longer—in the test installation location with the ambient conditions within the specified test condition tolerances of 2.2.

2.8.2 Ventless clothes dryers. For ventless clothes dryers, before any test cycle, the steady-state machine temperature must be equal to ambient room temperature described in 2.2.1. This may be done by leaving the machine at ambient room conditions for at least 12 hours between tests.

3. Test Procedures and Measurements

3.1 Drum Capacity. Measure the drum capacity by sealing all openings in the drum except the loading port with a plastic bag, and ensuring that all corners and depressions are filled and that there are no extrusions of the plastic bag through any openings in the interior of the drum. Support the dryer's rear drum surface on a platform scale to prevent deflection of the drum surface, and record the weight of the empty dryer. Fill the drum with water to a level determined by the intersection of the door plane and the loading port (i.e., the uppermost edge of the drum that is in contact with the door seal). Record the temperature of the water and then the weight of the dryer with the added water and then determine the mass of the water in pounds. Add the appropriate volume to account for any space in the drum interior not measured by water fill (e.g., the space above the uppermost edge of the drum within a curved door) and subtract the appropriate volume to account for space that is measured by water fill but cannot be used when the door is closed (e.g., space occupied by the door when closed). The drum capacity is calculated as follows:

C = w/d ±volume adjustment

C = capacity in cubic feet.

w = mass of water in pounds.

d = density of water at the measured temperature in pounds per cubic foot.

3.2 Dryer Loading. Load the dryer as specified in 2.7.

3.3 Test cycle. Operate the clothes dryer at the maximum temperature setting and, if equipped with a timer, at the maximum time setting. Any other optional cycle settings that do not affect the temperature or time settings shall be tested in the as-shipped position. If the clothes dryer does not have a separate temperature setting selection on the control panel, the maximum time setting should be used for the drying test cycle. Dry the load until the moisture content of the test load is between 2.5 and 5.0 percent of the bone-dry weight of the test load, at which point the test cycle is stopped, but do not permit the dryer to advance into cool down. If required, reset the timer to increase the length of the drying cycle. After stopping the test cycle, remove and weigh the test load. The clothes dryer shall not be stopped intermittently in the middle of the test cycle for any reason. Record the data specified by section 3.4 of this appendix. If the dryer automatically stops during a cycle because the condensation box is full of water, the test is stopped, and the test run is invalid, in which case the condensation box shall be emptied and the test re-run from the beginning. For ventless dryers, as defined in section 1.19 of this appendix, during the time between two cycles, the door of the dryer shall be closed except for loading (and unloading).

3.4 Data recording. Record for each test cycle:

3.4.1 Bone-dry weight of the test load described in 2.7.

3.4.2 Moisture content of the wet test load before the test, as described in 2.7.

3.4.3 Moisture content of the dry test load obtained after the test described in 3.3.

3.4.4 Test room conditions, temperature, and percent relative humidity described in 2.2.1.

3.4.5 For electric dryers—the total kilowatt-hours of electric energy, Et, consumed during the test described in 3.3.

3.4.6 For gas dryers:

3.4.6.1 Total kilowatt-hours of electrical energy, Ete, consumed during the test described in 3.3.

3.4.6.2 Cubic feet of gas per cycle, Etg, consumed during the test described in 3.3.

3.4.6.3 Correct the gas heating value, GEF, as measured in 2.3.2.1 and 2.3.2.2, to standard pressure and temperature conditions in accordance with U.S. Bureau of Standards, circular C417, 1938.

3.5 Test for automatic termination field use factor. The field use factor for automatic termination can be claimed for those dryers which meet the requirements for automatic termination control, defined in 1.4.

3.6 Standby mode and off mode power. Establish the testing conditions set forth in Section 2 “Testing Conditions” of this appendix. For clothes dryers that take some time to enter a stable state from a higher power state as discussed in Section 5, Paragraph 5.1, Note 1 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), allow sufficient time for the clothes dryer to reach the lower power state before proceeding with the test measurement. Follow the test procedure specified in section 5, paragraph 5.3.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) for testing in each possible mode as described in sections 3.6.1 and 3.6.2 of this appendix.

3.6.1 If a clothes dryer has an inactive mode, as defined in 1.12, measure and record the average inactive mode power of the clothes dryer, PIA, in watts.

3.6.2 If a clothes dryer has an off mode, as defined in 1.15, measure and record the average off mode power of the clothes dryer, POFF, in watts.

4. Calculation of Derived Results From Test Measurements

4.1 Total Per-cycle electric dryer energy consumption. Calculate the total electric dryer energy consumption per cycle, Ece, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

Ece = [53.5/(Ww−Wd)] × Ett × field use,

Where:

53.5 = an experimentally established value for the percent reduction in the moisture content of the test load during a laboratory test cycle expressed as a percent.

field use = field use factor.

= 1.18 for clothes dryers with time termination control systems only without any automatic termination control functions.

= 1.04 clothes dryers with automatic control systems that meet the requirements of the definition for automatic control systems in 1.4, 1.14 and 1.18, including those that also have a supplementary timer control, or that may also be manually controlled.

Ww = the moisture content of the wet test load as recorded in 3.4.2.

Wd = the moisture content of the dry test load as recorded in 3.4.3.

4.2 Per-cycle gas dryer electrical energy consumption. Calculate the gas dryer electrical energy consumption per cycle, Ege, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

Ege = [53.5/(Ww−Wd)] × Ete × field use,

Where:

Ete = the energy recorded in 3.4.6.1 field use, 53.5, Ww, Wd as defined in 4.1.

4.3 Per-cycle gas dryer gas energy consumption. Calculate the gas dryer gas energy consumption per cycle, Ege. expressed in Btus per cycle as defined as:

Egg = [53.5/(Ww − Wd)] × Etg × field use × GEF

Where:

Etg = the energy recorded in 3.4.6.2

GEF = corrected gas heat value (Btu per cubic feet) as defined in 3.4.6.3, field use, 53.5, Ww, Wd as defined in 4.1.

4.4 Total per-cycle gas dryer energy consumption expressed in kilowatt-hours. Calculate the total gas dryer energy consumption per cycle, Ecg, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

Ecg = Ege + (Egg/3412 Btu/kWh)

Where:

Ege as defined in 4.2

Egg as defined in 4.3

4.5 Per-cycle standby mode and off mode energy consumption. Calculate the dryer inactive mode and off mode energy consumption per cycle, ETSO, expressed in kWh per cycle and defined as:

ETSO = [(PIA × SIA) + (POFF × SOFF)] × K/283

Where:

PIA = dryer inactive mode power, in watts, as measured in section 3.6.1;

POFF = dryer off mode power, in watts, as measured in section 3.6.2.

If the clothes dryer has both inactive mode and off mode, SIA and SOFF both equal 8,620 ÷ 2 = 4,310, where 8,620 is the total inactive and off mode annual hours;

If the clothes dryer has an inactive mode but no off mode, the inactive mode annual hours, SIA, is equal to 8,620 and the off mode annual hours, SOFF, is equal to 0;

If the clothes dryer has an off mode but no inactive mode, SIA is equal to 0 and SOFF is equal to 8,620

Where:

K = 0.001 kWh/Wh conversion factor for watt-hours to kilowatt-hours; and

283 = representative average number of clothes dryer cycles in a year.

4.6 Per-cycle combined total energy consumption expressed in kilowatt-hours. Calculate the per-cycle combined total energy consumption, ECC, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined for an electric clothes dryer as:

ECC = Ece + ETSO

Where:

Ece = the energy recorded in section 4.1 of this appendix, and

ETSO = the energy recorded in section 4.5 of this appendix, and defined for a gas clothes dryer as:

ECC = Ecg + ETSO

Where:

Ecg = the energy recorded in section 4.4 of this appendix, and

ETSO = the energy recorded in section 4.5 of this appendix.

4.7 Energy Factor in pounds per kilowatt-hour. Calculate the energy factor, EF, expressed in pounds per kilowatt-hour and defined for an electric clothes dryer as:

EF = Wbonedry/Ece

Where:

Wbonedry = the bone dry test load weight recorded in 3.4.1, and

Ece = the energy recorded in 4.1, and

and defined for a gas clothes dryer as:

EF = Wbonedry/Ecg

Where:

Wbonedry = the bone dry test load weight recorded in 3.4.1, and

Ecg = the energy recorded in 4.4,

4.8 Combined Energy Factor in pounds per kilowatt-hour. Calculate the combined energy factor, CEF, expressed in pounds per kilowatt-hour and defined as:

CEF = Wbonedry/ECC

Where:

Wbonedry = the bone dry test load weight 3.4.1, and

ECC = the energy recorded in 4.6

[76 FR 1032, Jan. 6, 2011, as amended at 78 FR 49645, Aug. 14, 2013]

Appendix D2 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Clothes Dryers

Note: The procedures in appendix D2 need not be performed to determine compliance with energy conservation standards for clothes dryers at this time. Manufacturers may elect to use the amended appendix D2 early to show compliance with the January 1, 2015 energy conservation standards. Manufacturers must use a single appendix for all representations, including certifications of compliance, and may not use appendix D1 for certain representations and appendix D2 for other representations.

1. Definitions

1.1 “Active mode” means a mode in which the clothes dryer is connected to a main power source, has been activated and is performing the main function of tumbling the clothing with or without heated or unheated forced air circulation to remove moisture from the clothing, remove wrinkles or prevent wrinkling of the clothing, or both.

1.2 “AHAM” means the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers.

1.3 “AHAM HLD-1” means the test standard published by the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers, titled “Household Tumble Type Clothes Dryers,” (2009), AHAM HLD-1-2009 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

1.4 “Automatic termination control” means a dryer control system with a sensor which monitors either the dryer load temperature or its moisture content and with a controller which automatically terminates the drying process. A mark, detent, or other visual indicator or detent which indicates a preferred automatic termination control setting must be present if the dryer is to be classified as having an “automatic termination control.” A mark is a visible single control setting on one or more dryer controls.

1.5 “Automatic termination control dryer” means a clothes dryer which can be preset to carry out at least one sequence of operations to be terminated by means of a system assessing, directly or indirectly, the moisture content of the load. An automatic termination control dryer with supplementary timer or that may also be manually controlled shall be tested as an automatic termination control dryer.

1.6 “Bone dry” means a condition of a load of test clothes which has been dried in a dryer at maximum temperature for a minimum of 10 minutes, removed, and weighed before cool down, and then dried again for 10-minute periods until the final weight change of the load is 1 percent or less.

1.7 “Compact” or “compact size” means a clothes dryer with a drum capacity of less than 4.4 cubic feet.

1.8 “Conventional clothes dryer” means a clothes dryer that exhausts the evaporated moisture from the cabinet.

1.9 “Cool down” means that portion of the clothes drying cycle when the added gas or electric heat is terminated and the clothes continue to tumble and dry within the drum.

1.10 “Cycle” means a sequence of operation of a clothes dryer which performs a clothes drying operation, and may include variations or combinations of the functions of heating, tumbling, and drying.

1.11 “Drum capacity” means the volume of the drying drum in cubic feet.

1.12 “IEC 62301” (Second Edition) means the test standard published by the International Electrotechnical Commission (“IEC”) titled “Household electrical appliances—Measurement of standby power,” Publication 62301 (Edition 2.0 2011-01) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

1.13 “Inactive mode” means a standby mode that facilitates the activation of active mode by remote switch (including remote control), internal sensor, or timer, or that provides continuous status display.

1.14 “Moisture content” means the ratio of the weight of water contained by the test load to the bone-dry weight of the test load, expressed as a percent.

1.15 “Moisture sensing control” means a system which utilizes a moisture sensing element within the dryer drum that monitors the amount of moisture in the clothes and automatically terminates the dryer cycle.

1.16 “Off mode” means a mode in which the clothes dryer is connected to a main power source and is not providing any active or standby mode function, and where the mode may persist for an indefinite time. An indicator that only shows the user that the product is in the off position is included within the clasification of an off mode.

1.17 “Standard size” means a clothes dryer with a drum capacity of 4.4 cubic feet or greater.

1.18 “Standby mode” means any product modes where the energy using product is connected to a mains power source and offers one or more of the following user-oriented or protective functions which may persist for an indefinite time:

(a) To facilitate the activation of other modes (including activation or deactivation of active mode) by remote switch (including remote control), internal sensor, or timer.

(b) Continuous functions, including information or status displays (including clocks) or sensor-based functions. A timer is a continuous clock function (which may or may not be associated with a display) that provides regular scheduled tasks (e.g., switching) and that operates on a continuous basis.

1.19 “Temperature sensing control” means a system which monitors dryer exhaust air temperature and automatically terminates the dryer cycle.

1.20 “Timer dryer” means a clothes dryer that can be preset to carry out at least one operation to be terminated by a timer, but may also be manually controlled, and does not include any automatic termination function.

1.21 “Ventless clothes dryer” means a clothes dryer that uses a closed-loop system with an internal condenser to remove the evaporated moisture from the heated air. The moist air is not discharged from the cabinet.

2. Testing Conditions

2.1 Installation.

2.1.1 All clothes dryers. For both conventional clothes dryers and ventless clothes dryers, as defined in sections 1.8 and 1.21 of this appendix, install the clothes dryer in accordance with manufacturer's instructions as shipped with the unit. If the manufacturer's instructions do not specify the installation requirements for a certain component, it shall be tested in the as-shipped condition. Where the manufacturer gives the option to use the dryer both with and without a duct, the dryer shall be tested without the exhaust simulator described in section 3.3.5.1 of AHAM HLD-1 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3). All external joints should be taped to avoid air leakage. For drying testing, disconnect all lights, such as task lights, that do not provide any information related to the drying process on the clothes dryer and that do not consume more than 10 watts during the clothes dryer test cycle. Control setting indicator lights showing the cycle progression, temperature or dryness settings, or other cycle functions that cannot be turned off during the test cycle shall not be disconnected during the active mode test cycle. For standby and off mode testing, the clothes dryer shall also be installed in accordance with section 5, paragraph 5.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), disregarding the provisions regarding batteries and the determination, classification, and testing of relevant modes. For standby and off mode testing, all lighting systems shall remain connected.

2.1.2 Conventional clothes dryers. For conventional clothes dryers, as defined in section 1.8 of this appendix, the dryer exhaust shall be restricted by adding the AHAM exhaust simulator described in section 3.3.5.1 of AHAM HLD-1 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

2.1.3 Ventless clothes dryers. For ventless clothes dryers, as defined in section 1.21, the dryer shall be tested without the AHAM exhaust simulator. If the manufacturer gives the option to use a ventless clothes dryer, with or without a condensation box, the dryer shall be tested with the condensation box installed. For ventless clothes dryers, the condenser unit of the dryer must remain in place and not be taken out of the dryer for any reason between tests.

2.2 Ambient temperature and humidity.

2.2.1 For drying testing, maintain the room ambient air temperature at 75 ±3 F and the room relative humidity at 50 ±10 percent relative humidity.

2.2.2 For standby and off mode testing, maintain room ambient air temperature conditions as specified in section 4, paragraph 4.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

2.3 Energy supply.

2.3.1 Electrical supply. Maintain the electrical supply at the clothes dryer terminal block within 1 percent of 120/240 or 120/208Y or 120 volts as applicable to the particular terminal block wiring system and within 1 percent of the nameplate frequency as specified by the manufacturer. If the dryer has a dual voltage conversion capability, conduct the test at the highest voltage specified by the manufacturer.

2.3.1.1 Supply voltage waveform. For the clothes dryer standby mode and off mode testing, maintain the electrical supply voltage waveform indicated in section 4, paragraph 4.3.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3). If the power measuring instrument used for testing is unable to measure and record the total harmonic content during the test measurement period, it is acceptable to measure and record the total harmonic content immediately before and after the test measurement period.

2.3.2 Gas supply.

2.3.2.1 Natural gas. Maintain the gas supply to the clothes dryer immediately ahead of all controls at a pressure of 7 to 10 inches of water column. If the clothes dryer is equipped with a gas appliance pressure regulator for which the manufacturer specifies an outlet pressure, the regulator outlet pressure shall be within ±10 percent of the value recommended by the manufacturer in the installation manual, on the nameplate sticker, or wherever the manufacturer makes such a recommendation for the basic model. The hourly Btu rating of the burner shall be maintained within ±5 percent of the rating specified by the manufacturer. If the requirement to maintain the hourly Btu rating of the burner within ±5 percent of the rating specified by the manufacturer cannot be achieved under the allowable range in gas inlet test pressure, the orifice of the gas burner should be modified as necessary to achieve the required Btu rating. The natural gas supplied should have a heating value of approximately 1,025 Btus per standard cubic foot. The actual heating value, Hn2, in Btus per standard cubic foot, for the natural gas to be used in the test shall be obtained either from measurements made by the manufacturer conducting the test using a standard continuous flow calorimeter as described in section 2.4.6 or by the purchase of bottled natural gas whose Btu rating is certified to be at least as accurate a rating as could be obtained from measurements with a standard continuous flow calorimeter as described in section 2.4.6.

2.3.2.2 Propane gas. Maintain the gas supply to the clothes dryer immediately ahead of all controls at a pressure of 11 to 13 inches of water column. If the clothes dryer is equipped with a gas appliance pressure regulator for which the manufacturer specifies an outlet pressure, the regulator outlet pressure shall be within ±10 percent of the value recommended by the manufacturer in the installation manual, on the nameplate sticker, or wherever the manufacturer makes such a recommendation for the basic model. The hourly Btu rating of the burner shall be maintained within ±5 percent of the rating specified by the manufacturer. If the requirement to maintain the hourly Btu rating of the burner within ±5 percent of the rating specified by the manufacturer cannot be achieved under the allowable range in gas inlet test pressure, the orifice of the gas burner should be modified as necessary to achieve the required Btu rating. The propane gas supplied should have a heating value of approximately 2,500 Btus per standard cubic foot. The actual heating value, Hp, in Btus per standard cubic foot, for the propane gas to be used in the test shall be obtained either from measurements made by the manufacturer conducting the test using a standard continuous flow calorimeter as described in section 2.4.6 or by the purchase of bottled gas whose Btu rating is certified to be at least as accurate a rating as could be obtained from measurement with a standard continuous calorimeter as described in section 2.4.6.

2.4 Instrumentation. Perform all test measurements using the following instruments as appropriate.

2.4.1 Weighing scale for test cloth. The scale shall have a range of 0 to a maximum of 60 pounds with a resolution of at least 0.2 ounces and a maximum error no greater than 0.3 percent of any measured value within the range of 3 to 15 pounds.

2.4.1.2 Weighing scale for drum capacity measurements. The scale should have a range of 0 to a maximum of 600 pounds with resolution of 0.50 pounds and a maximum error no greater than 0.5 percent of the measured value.

2.4.2 Kilowatt-hour meter. The kilowatt-hour meter shall have a resolution of 0.001 kilowatt-hours and a maximum error no greater than 0.5 percent of the measured value.

2.4.3 Gas meter. The gas meter shall have a resolution of 0.001 cubic feet and a maximum error no greater than 0.5 percent of the measured value.

2.4.4 Dry and wet bulb psychrometer. The dry and wet bulb psychrometer shall have an error no greater than ±1 °F. A relative humidity meter with a maximum error tolerance expressed in °F equivalent to the requirements for the dry and wet bulb psychrometer or with a maximum error tolerance of ±2 percent relative humidity would be acceptable for measuring the ambient humidity.

2.4.5 Temperature. The temperature sensor shall have an error no greater than ±1 °F.

2.4.6 Standard Continuous Flow Calorimeter. The calorimeter shall have an operating range of 750 to 3,500 Btu per cubic foot. The maximum error of the basic calorimeter shall be no greater than 0.2 percent of the actual heating value of the gas used in the test. The indicator readout shall have a maximum error no greater than 0.5 percent of the measured value within the operating range and a resolution of 0.2 percent of the full-scale reading of the indicator instrument.

2.4.7 Standby mode and off mode watt meter. The watt meter used to measure standby mode and off mode power consumption shall meet the requirements specified in section 4, paragraph 4.4 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3). If the power measuring instrument used for testing is unable to measure and record the crest factor, power factor, or maximum current ratio during the test measurement period, it is acceptable to measure the crest factor, power factor, and maximum current ratio immediately before and after the test measurement period.

2.5 Lint trap. Clean the lint trap thoroughly before each test run.

2.6 Test Cloths.

2.6.1 Energy test cloth. The energy test cloth shall be clean and consist of the following:

(a) Pure finished bleached cloth, made with a momie or granite weave, which is a blended fabric of 50-percent cotton and 50-percent polyester and weighs within +10 percent of 5.75 ounces per square yard after test cloth preconditioning, and has 65 ends on the warp and 57 picks on the fill. The individual warp and fill yarns are a blend of 50-percent cotton and 50-percent polyester fibers.

(b) Cloth material that is 24 inches by 36 inches and has been hemmed to 22 inches by 34 inches before washing. The maximum shrinkage after five washes shall not be more than 4 percent on the length and width.

(c) The number of test runs on the same energy test cloth shall not exceed 25 runs.

2.6.2 Energy stuffer cloths. The energy stuffer cloths shall be made from energy test cloth material, and shall consist of pieces of material that are 12 inches by 12 inches and have been hemmed to 10 inches by 10 inches before washing. The maximum shrinkage after five washes shall not be more than 4 percent on the length and width. The number of test runs on the same energy stuffer cloth shall not exceed 25 runs after test cloth preconditioning.

2.6.3 Test Cloth Preconditioning.

A new test cloth load and energy stuffer cloths shall be treated as follows:

(1) Bone dry the load to a weight change of ±1 percent, or less, as prescribed in section 1.6 of this appendix.

(2) Place the test cloth load in a standard clothes washer set at the maximum water fill level. Wash the load for 10 minutes in soft water (17 parts per million hardness or less), using 60.8 grams of AHAM standard test detergent Formula 3. Wash water temperature should be maintained at 140 °F ±5 °F (60 °C ±2.7 °C). Rinse water temperature is to be controlled at 100 °F ±5 °F (37.7 °C ±2.7 °C).

(3) Rinse the load again at the same water temperature.

(4) Bone dry the load as prescribed in section 1.6 of this appendix and weigh the load.

(5) This procedure is repeated until there is a weight change of 1 percent or less.

(6) A final cycle is to be a hot water wash with no detergent, followed by two warm water rinses.

2.7 Test loads.

2.7.1 Compact size dryer load. Prepare a bone-dry test load of energy cloths that weighs 3.00 pounds ±.03 pounds. The test load can be adjusted to achieve proper weight by adding energy stuffer cloths, but no more than five stuffer cloths may be added per load. Dampen the load by agitating it in water whose temperature is 60 °F ±5 °F and consists of 0 to 17 parts per million hardness for approximately 2 minutes to saturate the fabric. Then, extract water from the wet test load by spinning the load until the moisture content of the load is between 52.5 and 57.5 percent of the bone-dry weight of the test load. Make a final mass adjustment, such that the moisture content is 57.5 percent ±0.33 percent by adding water uniformly distributed among all of the test clothes in a very fine spray using a spray bottle.

2.7.2 Standard size dryer load. Prepare a bone-dry test load of energy cloths that weighs 8.45 pounds ±.085 pounds. The test load can be adjusted to achieve proper weight by adding stuffer cloths, but no more than five stuffer cloths may be added per load. Dampen the load by agitating it in water whose temperature is 60 °F ±5 °F and consists of 0 to 17 parts per million hardness for approximately 2 minutes to saturate the fabric. Then, extract water from the wet test load by spinning the load until the moisture content of the load is between 52.5 and 57.5 percent of the bone-dry weight of the test load. Make a final mass adjustment, such that the moisture content is 57.5 percent ±0.33 percent by adding water uniformly distributed among all of the test clothes in a very fine spray using a spray bottle.

2.7.3 Method of loading. Load the energy test cloths by grasping them in the center, shaking them to hang loosely, and then dropping them in the dryer at random.

2.8 Clothes dryer preconditioning.

2.8.1 Conventional clothes dryers. For conventional clothes dryers, before any test cycle, operate the dryer without a test load in the non-heat mode for 15 minutes or until the discharge air temperature is varying less than 1 °F for 10 minutes—whichever is longer—in the test installation location with the ambient conditions within the specified test condition tolerances of 2.2.

2.8.2 Ventless clothes dryers. For ventless clothes dryers, before any test cycle, the steady-state machine temperature must be equal to ambient room temperature described in 2.2.1. This may be done by leaving the machine at ambient room conditions for at least 12 hours between tests.

3. Test Procedures and Measurements

3.1 Drum Capacity. Measure the drum capacity by sealing all openings in the drum except the loading port with a plastic bag, and ensuring that all corners and depressions are filled and that there are no extrusions of the plastic bag through any openings in the interior of the drum. Support the dryer's rear drum surface on a platform scale to prevent deflection of the drum surface, and record the weight of the empty dryer. Fill the drum with water to a level determined by the intersection of the door plane and the loading port (i.e., the uppermost edge of the drum that is in contact with the door seal). Record the temperature of the water and then the weight of the dryer with the added water and then determine the mass of the water in pounds. Add the appropriate volume to account for any space in the drum interior not measured by water fill (e.g., the space above the uppermost edge of the drum within a curved door) and subtract the appropriate volume to account for the space that is measured by water fill but cannot be used when the door is closed (e.g., space occupied by the door when closed). The drum capacity is calculated as follows:

C= w/d ±volume adjustment

C = capacity in cubic feet.

w = mass of water in pounds.

d = density of water at the measured temperature in pounds per cubic foot.

3.2 Dryer Loading. Load the dryer as specified in 2.7.

3.3 Test cycle.

3.3.1 Timer dryers. For timer dryers, as defined in section 1.20 of this appendix, operate the clothes dryer at the maximum temperature setting and, if equipped with a timer, at the maximum time setting. Any other optional cycle settings that do not affect the temperature or time settings shall be tested in the as-shipped position. If the clothes dryer does not have a separate temperature setting selection on the control panel, the maximum time setting should be used for the drying test cycle. Dry the load until the moisture content of the test load is between 1 and 2.5 percent of the bone-dry weight of the test load, at which point the test cycle is stopped, but do not permit the dryer to advance into cool down. If required, reset the timer to increase the length of the drying cycle. After stopping the test cycle, remove and weigh the test load. The clothes dryer shall not be stopped intermittently in the middle of the test cycle for any reason. Record the data specified by section 3.4 of this appendix. If the dryer automatically stops during a cycle because the condensation box is full of water, the test is stopped, and the test run is invalid, in which case the condensation box shall be emptied and the test re-run from the beginning. For ventless dryers, as defined in section 1.21 of this appendix, during the time between two cycles, the door of the dryer shall be closed except for loading (and unloading).

3.3.2 Automatic termination control dryers. For automatic termination control dryers, as defined in section 1.5 of this appendix, a “normal” program shall be selected for the test cycle. For dryers that do not have a “normal” program, the cycle recommended by the manufacturer for drying cotton or linen clothes shall be selected. Where the drying temperature setting can be chosen independently of the program, it shall be set to the maximum. Where the dryness level setting can be chosen independently of the program, it shall be set to the “normal” or “medium” dryness level setting. If such designation is not provided, then the dryness level shall be set at the mid-point between the minimum and maximum settings. Any other optional cycle settings that do not affect the program, temperature or dryness settings shall be tested in the as-shipped position. Operate the clothes dryer until the completion of the programmed cycle, including the cool down period. The cycle shall be considered complete when the dryer indicates to the user that the cycle has finished (by means of a display, indicator light, audible signal, or other signal) and the heater and drum/fan motor shuts off for the final time. If the clothes dryer is equipped with a wrinkle prevention mode (i.e., that continuously or intermittently tumbles the clothes dryer drum after the clothes dryer indicates to the user that the cycle has finished) that is activated by default in the as-shipped position or if manufacturers' instructions specify that the feature is recommended to be activated for normal use, the cycle shall be considered complete after the end of the wrinkle prevention mode. After the completion of the test cycle, remove and weigh the test load. Record the data specified in section 3.4 of this appendix. If the final moisture content is greater than 2 percent, the test shall be invalid and a new run shall be conducted using the highest dryness level setting. If the dryer automatically stops during a cycle because the condensation box is full of water, the test is stopped, and the test run is invalid, in which case the condensation box shall be emptied and the test re-run from the beginning. For ventless dryers, during the time between two cycles, the door of the dryer shall be closed except for loading (and unloading).

3.4 Data recording. Record for each test cycle:

3.4.1 Bone-dry weight of the test load described in 2.7.

3.4.2 Moisture content of the wet test load before the test, as described in 2.7.

3.4.3 Moisture content of the dry test load obtained after the test described in 3.3.

3.4.4 Test room conditions, temperature, and percent relative humidity described in 2.2.1.

3.4.5 For electric dryers—the total kilowatt-hours of electric energy, Et, consumed during the test described in 3.3.

3.4.6 For gas dryers:

3.4.6.1 Total kilowatt-hours of electrical energy, Ete, consumed during the test described in 3.3.

3.4.6.2 Cubic feet of gas per cycle, Etg, consumed during the test described in 3.3.

3.4.6.3 Correct the gas heating value, GEF, as measured in 2.3.2.1 and 2.3.2.2, to standard pressure and temperature conditions in accordance with U.S. Bureau of Standards, circular C417, 1938.

3.4.7 The cycle settings selected, in accordance with section 3.3.2 of this appendix, for the automatic termination control dryer test.

3.5 Test for automatic termination field use factor. The field use factor for automatic termination can be claimed for those dryers which meet the requirements for automatic termination control, defined in 1.4.

3.6 Standby mode and off mode power. Establish the testing conditions set forth in Section 2 “Testing Conditions” of this appendix. For clothes dryers that take some time to enter a stable state from a higher power state as discussed in Section 5, Paragraph 5.1, Note 1 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), allow sufficient time for the clothes dryer to reach the lower power state before proceeding with the test measurement. Follow the test procedure specified in section 5, paragraph 5.3.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) for testing in each possible mode as described in sections 3.6.1 and 3.6.2 of this appendix.

3.6.1 If a clothes dryer has an inactive mode, as defined in section 1.13 of this appendix, measure and record the average inactive mode power of the clothes dryer, PIA, in watts.

3.6.2 If a clothes dryer has an off mode, as defined in section 1.16 of this appendix, measure and record the average off mode power of the clothes dryer, POFF, in watts.

4. Calculation of Derived Results From Test Measurements

4.1 Total per-cycle electric dryer energy consumption. Calculate the total electric dryer energy consumption per cycle, Ece, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

Ece = Et,

for automatic termination control dryers, and,

Ece = [55.5/(Ww− Wd)] × Et × field use,

for timer dryers

Where:

55.5 = an experimentally established value for the percent reduction in the moisture content of the test load during a laboratory test cycle expressed as a percent.

Et = the energy recorded in section 3.4.5 of this appendix

field use = 1.18, the field use factor for clothes dryers with time termination control systems only without any automatic termination control functions.

Ww = the moisture content of the wet test load as recorded in section 3.4.2 of this appendix.

Wd = the moisture content of the dry test load as recorded in section 3.4.3 of this appendix.

4.2 Per-cycle gas dryer electrical energy consumption. Calculate the gas dryer electrical energy consumption per cycle, Ege, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

Ege = Ete,

for automatic termination control dryers, and,

Ege = [55.5/(Ww −Wd)] × Ete × field use,

for timer dryers

Where:

Ete = the energy recorded in section 3.4.6.1 of this appendix.

field use, 55.5, Ww, Wd as defined in section 4.1 of this appendix.

4.3 Per-cycle gas dryer gas energy consumption. Calculate the gas dryer gas energy consumption per cycle, Ege, expressed in Btus per cycle and defined as:

Egg = Etg × GEF

for automatic termination control dryers, and,

Egg = [55.5/(Ww −Wd)] × Etg × field use × GEF

for timer dryers

Where:

Etg = the energy recorded in section 3.4.6.2 of this appendix.

GEF = corrected gas heat value (Btu per cubic foot) as defined in section 3.4.6.3 of this appendix,

field use, 55.5, Ww, Wd as defined in section 4.1 of this appendix.

4.4 Total per-cycle gas dryer energy consumption expressed in kilowatt-hours. Calculate the total gas dryer energy consumption per cycle, Ecg, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

Ecg = Ege + (Egg/3412 Btu/kWh)

Where:

Ege = the energy calculated in section 4.2 of this appendix

Egg = the energy calculated in section 4.3 of this appendix

4.5 Per-cycle standby mode and off mode energy consumption. Calculate the dryer inactive mode and off mode energy consumption per cycle, ETSO, expressed in kWh per cycle and defined as:

ETSO = [(PIA × SIA) + (POFF × SOFF)] × K/283

Where:

PIA = dryer inactive mode power, in watts, as measured in section 3.6.1;

POFF = dryer off mode power, in watts, as measured in section 3.6.2.

If the clothes dryer has both inactive mode and off mode, SIA and SOFF both equal 8,620 ÷ 2 = 4,310, where 8,620 is the total inactive and off mode annual hours;

If the clothes dryer has an inactive mode but no off mode, the inactive mode annual hours, SIA, is equal to 8,620 and the off mode annual hours, SOFF, is equal to 0;

If the clothes dryer has an off mode but no inactive mode, SIA is equal to 0 and SOFF is equal to 8,620

Where:

K = 0.001 kWh/Wh conversion factor for watt-hours to kilowatt-hours; and

283 = representative average number of clothes dryer cycles in a year.

4.6 Per-cycle combined total energy consumption expressed in kilowatt-hours. Calculate the per-cycle combined total energy consumption, ECC, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined for an electric clothes dryer as:

ECC = Ece + ETSO

Where:

Ece = the energy calculated in section 4.1 of this appendix, and

ETSO = the energy calculated in section 4.5 of this appendix, and defined for a gas clothes dryer as:

ECC = Ecg + ETSO

Where:

Ecg = the energy calculated in section 4.4 of this appendix, and

ETSO = the energy calculated in section 4.5 of this appendix.

4.7 Energy Factor in pounds per kilowatt-hour. Calculate the energy factor, EF, expressed in pounds per kilowatt-hour and defined for an electric clothes dryer as:

EF = Wbonedry/Ece

Where:

Wbonedry = the bone dry test load weight recorded in section 3.4.1 of this appendix, and

Ece = the energy calculated in section 4.1 of this appendix, and and defined for a gas clothes dryer as:

EF = Wbonedry/Ecg

Where:

Wbonedry = the bone dry test load weight recorded in section 3.4.1 of this appendix, and

Ecg = the energy calculated in section 4.4 of this appendix,

4.8 Combined Energy Factor in pounds per kilowatt-hour. Calculate the combined energy factor, CEF, expressed in pounds per kilowatt-hour and defined as:

CEF = Wbonedry/ECC

Where:

Wbonedry = the bone dry test load weight recorded in section 3.4.1 of this appendix, and

ECC = the energy calculated in section 4.6 of this appendix.

[78 FR 49647, Aug. 14, 2013]

Appendix E to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Water Heaters

1. Definitions

1.1 Cut-in means the time when or water temperature at which a water heater control or thermostat acts to increase the energy or fuel input to the heating elements, compressor, or burner.

1.2 Cut-out means the time when or water temperature at which a water heater control or thermostat acts to reduce to a minimum the energy or fuel input to the heating elements, compressor, or burner.

1.3 Design Power Rating means the nominal power rating that a water heater manufacturer assigns to a particular design of water heater, expressed in kilowatts or Btu (kJ) per hour as appropriate.

1.4 Energy Factor means a measure of water heater overall efficiency.

1.5 First-Hour Rating means an estimate of the maximum volume of “hot” water that a storage-type water heater can supply within an hour that begins with the water heater fully heated (i.e., with all thermostats satisfied). It is a function of both the storage volume and the recovery rate.

1.6 Heat Trap means a device which can be integrally connected or independently attached to the hot and/or cold water pipe connections of a water heater such that the device will develop a thermal or mechanical seal to minimize the recirculation of water due to thermal convection between the water heater tank and its connecting pipes.

1.7 Instantaneous Water Heaters

1.7.1 Electric Instantaneous Water Heater Reserved.

1.7.2 Gas Instantaneous Water Heater means a water heater that uses gas as the energy source, initiates heating based on sensing water flow, is designed to deliver water at a controlled temperature of less than 180 °F (82 °C), has an input greater than 50,000 Btu/h (53 MJ/h) but less than 200,000 Btu/h (210 MJ/h), and has a manufacturer's specified storage capacity of less than 2 gallons (7.6 liters). The unit may use a fixed or variable burner input.

1.8 Maximum gpm (L/min) Rating means the maximum gallons per minute (liters per minute) of hot water that can be supplied by an instantaneous water heater while maintaining a nominal temperature rise of 77 °F (42.8 °C) during steady state operation.

1.9 Rated Storage Volume means the water storage capacity of a water heater, in gallons (liters), as specified by the manufacturer.

1.10 Recovery Efficiency means the ratio of energy delivered to the water to the energy content of the fuel consumed by the water heater.

1.11 Standby means the time during which water is not being withdrawn from the water heater. There are two standby time intervals used within this test procedure: τstby,1 represents the elapsed time between the time at which the maximum mean tank temperature is observed after the sixth draw and subsequent recovery and the end of the 24-hour test; τstby,2 represents the total time during the 24-hour simulated use test when water is not being withdrawn from the water heater.

1.12 Storage-type Water Heaters

1.12.1 Electric Storage-type Water Heater means a water heater that uses electricity as the energy source, is designed to heat and store water at a thermostatically controlled temperature of less than 180 °F (82 °C), has a nominal input of 12 kilowatts (40,956 Btu/h) or less, and has a rated storage capacity of not less than 20 gallons (76 liters) nor more than 120 gallons (450 liters).

1.12.2 Gas Storage-type Water Heater means a water heater that uses gas as the energy source, is designed to heat and store water at a thermostatically controlled temperature of less than 180 °F (82 °C), has a nominal input of 75,000 Btu (79 MJ) per hour or less, and has a rated storage capacity of not less than 20 gallons (76 liters) nor more than 100 gallons (380 liters).

1.12.3 Heat Pump Water Heater means a water heater that uses electricity as the energy source, is designed to heat and store water at a thermostatically controlled temperature of less than 180 °F (82 °C), has a maximum current rating of 24 amperes (including the compressor and all auxiliary equipment such as fans, pumps, controls, and, if on the same circuit, any resistive elements) for an input voltage of 250 volts or less, and, if the tank is supplied, has a manufacturer's rated storage capacity of 120 gallons (450 liters) or less. Resistive elements used to provide supplemental heating may use the same circuit as the compressor if (1) an interlocking mechanism prevents concurrent compressor operation and resistive heating or (2) concurrent operation does not result in the maximum current rating of 24 amperes being exceeded. Otherwise, the resistive elements and the heat pump components must use separate circuits. A heat pump water heater may be sold by the manufacturer with or without a storage tank.

a. Heat Pump Water Heater with Storage Tank means an air-to-water heat pump sold by the manufacturer with an insulated storage tank as a packaged unit. The tank and heat pump can be an integral unit or they can be separated.

b. Heat Pump Water Heater without Storage Tank (also called Add-on Heat Pump Water Heater) means an air-to-water heat pump designed for use with a storage-type water heater or a storage tank that is not specified or supplied by the manufacturer.

1.12.4 Oil Storage-type Water Heater means a water heater that uses oil as the energy source, is designed to heat and store water at a thermostatically controlled temperature of less than 180 °F (82 °C), has a nominal energy input of 105,000 Btu/h (110 MJ/h) or less, and has a manufacturer's rated storage capacity of 50 gallons (190 liters) or less.

1.12.5 Storage-type Water Heater of More than 2 Gallons (7.6 Liters) and Less than 20 Gallons (76 Liters). Reserved.

1.13 ASHRAE Standard 41.1-86 means the standard published in 1986 by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc., and titled Standard Measurement Guide: Section on Temperature Measurements.

1.14 ASTM-D-2156-80 means the test standard published in 1980 by the American Society for Testing and Measurements and titled “Smoke Density in Flue Gases from Burning Distillate Fuels, Test Method for”.

1.15 Symbol Usage The following identity relationships are provided to help clarify the symbology used throughout this procedure:

Cp specific heat capacity of water

Eannual annual energy consumption of a water heater

Ef energy factor of a water heater

Fhr first-hour rating of a storage-type water heater

Fmax maximum gpm (L/min) rating of an instantaneous water heater rated at a temperature rise of 77 °F (42.8 °C) across the heater

i a subscript to indicate an ith draw during a test

Mi mass of water removed during the ith draw (i=1 to 6) of the 24-hr simulated use test

M*i for storage-type water heaters, mass of water removed during the ith draw (i=1 to n) during the first-hour rating test

M10m for instantaneous water heaters, mass of water removed continuously during a 10-minute interval in the maximum gpm (L/min) rating test

n for storage-type water heaters, total number of draws during the first-hour rating test

Q total fossil fuel and/or electric energy consumed during the entire 24-hr simulated use test

Qd daily water heating energy consumption adjusted for net change in internal energy

Qda adjusted daily water heating energy consumption with adjustment for variation of tank to ambient air temperature difference from nominal value

Qdm overall adjusted daily water heating energy consumption including Qda and QHWD

Qhr hourly standby losses

QHW daily energy consumption to heat water over the measured average temperature rise across the water heater

QHWD adjustment to daily energy consumption, Qhw, due to variation of the temperature rise across the water heater not equal to the nominal value of 77 °F (42.8 °C)

Qr energy consumption of fossil fuel or heat pump water heaters between thermostat (or burner) cut-out prior to the first draw and cut-out following the first draw of the 24-hr simulated use test

Qr, max energy consumption of a modulating instantaneous water heater between cut-out (burner) prior to the first draw and cut-out following the first draw of the 24-hr simulated use test

Qr, min energy consumption of a modulating instantaneous water heater from immediately prior to the fourth draw to burner cut-out following the fourth draw of the 24-hr simulated use test

Qstby total energy consumed by the water heater during the standby time interval τstby, 1

Qsu total fossil fueled and/or electric energy consumed from the beginning of the first draw to the thermostat (or burner) cut-out following the completion of the sixth draw during the 24-hr simulated use test

Tmin for modulating instantaneous water heaters, steady state outlet water temperature at the minimum fuel input rate

0 mean tank temperature at the beginning of the 24-hr simulated use test

24 mean tank temperature at the end of the 24-hr simulated use test

a, stby average ambient air temperature during standby periods of the 24-hr use test

del for instantaneous water heaters, average outlet water temperature during a 10-minute continuous draw interval in the maximum gpm (L/min) rating test

del, i average outlet water temperature during the ith draw of the 24-hr simulated use test

in for instantaneous water heaters, average inlet water temperature during a 10-minute continuous draw interval in the maximum gpm (L/min) rating test

in, i average inlet water temperature during the ith draw of the 24-hr simulated use test

max, 1 maximum measured mean tank temperature after cut-out following the first draw of the 24-hr simulated use test

stby average storage tank temperature during the standby period τstby, 2 of the 24-hr use test

su maximum measured mean tank temperature after cut-out following the sixth draw of the 24-hr simulated use test

t, stby average storage tank temperature during the standby period τstby, 1 of the 24-hr use test

T̅*del, i for storage-type water heaters, average outlet water temperature during the ith draw (i=1 to n) of the first-hour rating test

T*max, i for storage-type water heaters, maximum outlet water temperature observed during the ith draw (i=1 to n) of the first-hour rating test

T*min, i for storage-type water heaters, minimum outlet water temperature to terminate the ith draw during the first-hour rating test

UA standby loss coefficient of a storage-type water heater

Vi volume of water removed during the ith draw (i=1 to 6) of the 24-hr simulated use test

V*i volume of water removed during the ith draw (i=1 to n) during the first-hour rating test

V10m for instantaneous water heaters, volume of water removed continuously during a 10-minute interval in the maximum gpm (L/min) rating test

Vmax steady state water flow rate of an instantaneous water heater at the rated input to give a discharge temperature of 135 °F ±5 °F (57.2 °C ±2.8 °C)

Vmin steady state water flow rate of a modulating instantaneous water heater at the minimum input to give a discharge temperature of Tmin up to 135 °F ±5 °F (57.2 °C ±2.8 °C)

Vst measured storage volume of the storage tank

Wf weight of storage tank when completely filled with water

Wt tare weight of storage tank when completely empty of water

nr recovery efficiency

p density of water

τstby, 1 elapsed time between the time the maximum mean tank temperature is observed after the sixth draw and the end of the 24-hr simulated use test

τstby, 2 overall standby periods when no water is withdrawn during the 24-hr simulated use test

1.16 Tabletop water heater means a water heater in a rectangular box enclosure designed to slide into a kitchen countertop space with typical dimensions of 36 inches high, 25 inches deep and 24 inches wide.

2. Test Conditions

2.1 Installation Requirements. Tests shall be performed with the water heater and instrumentation installed in accordance with Section 4 of this appendix.

2.2 Ambient Air Temperature. The ambient air temperature shall be maintained between 65.0 °F and 70.0 °F (18.3 °C and 21.1 °C) on a continuous basis. For heat pump water heaters, the dry bulb temperature shall be maintained at 67.5 °F ±1 °F (19.7 °C ±0.6 °C) and, in addition, the relative humidity shall be maintained between 49% and 51%.

2.3 Supply Water Temperature. The temperature of the water being supplied to the water heater shall be maintained at 58 °F ±2 °F (14.4 °C ±1.1 °C) throughout the test.

2.4 Storage Tank Temperature. The average temperature of the water within the storage tank shall be set to 135 °F ±5 °F (57.2 °C ±2.8 °C).

2.5 Supply Water Pressure. During the test when water is not being withdrawn, the supply pressure shall be maintained between 40 psig (275 kPa) and the maximum allowable pressure specified by the water heater manufacturer.

2.6 Electrical and/or Fossil Fuel Supply.

2.6.1 Electrical. Maintain the electrical supply voltage to within ±1% of the center of the voltage range specified by the water heater and/or heat pump manufacturer.

2.6.2 Natural Gas. Maintain the supply pressure in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. If the supply pressure is not specified, maintain a supply pressure of 7-10 inches of water column (1.7-2.5 kPa). If the water heater is equipped with a gas appliance pressure regulator, the regulator outlet pressure shall be within ±10% of the manufacturer's specified manifold pressure. For all tests, use natural gas having a heating value of approximately 1,025 Btu per standard cubic foot (38,190 kJ per standard cubic meter).

2.6.3 Propane Gas. Maintain the supply pressure in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. If the supply pressure is not specified, maintain a supply pressure of 11-13 inches of water column (2.7-3.2 kPa). If the water heater is equipped with a gas appliance pressure regulator, the regulator outlet pressure shall be within ±10% of the manufacturer's specified manifold pressure. For all tests, use propane gas with a heating value of approximately 2,500 Btu per standard cubic foot (93,147 kJ per standard cubic meter).

2.6.4 Fuel Oil Supply. Maintain an uninterrupted supply of fuel oil. Use fuel oil having a heating value of approximately 138,700 Btu per gallon (38,660 kJ per liter).

3. Instrumentation

3.1 Pressure Measurements. Pressure-measuring instruments shall have an error no greater than the following values:

Item measuredInstrument accuracyInstrument precision
Gas pressure±0.1 inch of water column (±0.025 kPa)±0.05 inch of water column (±0.012 kPa).
Atmospheric pressure±0.1 inch of mercury column (±0.34 kPa)±0.05 inch of mercury column (±0.17 kPa).
Water pressure±1.0 pounds per square inch (±6.9 kPa)±0.50 pounds per square inch (±3.45 kPa).

3.2 Temperature Measurement

3.2.1 Measurement. Temperature measurements shall be made in accordance with the Standard Measurement Guide: Section on Temperature Measurements, ASHRAE Standard 41.1-86.

3.2.2 Accuracy and Precision. The accuracy and precision of the instruments, including their associated readout devices, shall be within the following limits:

Item measuredInstrument accuracyInstrument precision
Air dry bulb temperature±0.2 °F (±0.1 °C)±0.1 °F (±0.06 °C)
Air wet bulb temperature±0.2 °F (±0.1 °C)±0.1 °F (±0.06 °C)
Inlet and outlet water temperatures±0.2 °F (±0.1 °C)±0.1 °F (±0.06 °C)
Storage tank temperatures±0.5 °F (±0.3 °C)±0.25 °F (±0.14 °C)

3.2.3 Scale Division. In no case shall the smallest scale division of the instrument or instrument system exceed 2 times the specified precision.

3.2.4 Temperature Difference. Temperature difference between the entering and leaving water may be measured with any of the following:

a. A thermopile

b. Calibrated resistance thermometers

c. Precision thermometers

d. Calibrated thermistors

e. Calibrated thermocouples

f. Quartz thermometers

3.2.5 Thermopile Construction. If a thermopile is used, it shall be made from calibrated thermocouple wire taken from a single spool. Extension wires to the recording device shall also be made from that same spool.

3.2.6 Time Constant. The time constant of the instruments used to measure the inlet and outlet water temperatures shall be no greater than 5 seconds.

3.3 Liquid Flow Rate Measurement. The accuracy of the liquid flow rate measurement, using the calibration if furnished, shall be equal to or less than ±1% of the measured value in mass units per unit time.

3.4 Electric Energy. The electrical energy used shall be measured with an instrument and associated readout device that is accurate within ±1% of the reading.

3.5 Fossil Fuels. The quantity of fuel used by the water heater shall be measured with an instrument and associated readout device that is accurate within ±1% of the reading.

3.6 Mass Measurements. For mass measurements greater than or equal to 10 pounds (4.5 kg), a scale that is accurate within ±1% of the reading shall be used to make the measurement. For mass measurements less than 10 pounds (4.5 kg), the scale shall provide a measurement that is accurate within ±0.1 pound (0.045 kg).

3.7 Heating Value. The higher heating value of the natural gas, propane, or fuel oil shall be measured with an instrument and associated readout device that is accurate within ±1% of the reading. The heating value of natural gas and propane must be corrected for local temperature and pressure conditions.

3.8 Time. The elapsed time measurements shall be measured with an instrument that is accurate within ±0.5 seconds per hour.

3.9 Volume. Volume measurements shall be measured with an accuracy of ±2% of the total volume.

4. Installation

4.1 Water Heater Mounting. A water heater designed to be freestanding shall be placed on a 34 inch (2 cm) thick plywood platform supported by three 2 × 4 inch (5 cm × 10 cm) runners. If the water heater is not approved for installation on combustible flooring, suitable non-combustible material shall be placed between the water heater and the platform. Counter-top water heaters shall be placed against a simulated wall section. Wall-mounted water heaters shall be supported on a simulated wall in accordance with the manufacturer-published installation instructions. When a simulated wall is used, the recommended construction is 2 × 4 inch (5 cm × 10 cm) studs, faced with 34 inch (2 cm) plywood. For heat pump water heaters that are supplied with a storage tank, the two components, if not delivered as a single package, shall be connected in accordance with the manufacturer-published installation instructions and the overall system shall be placed on the above-described plywood platform. If installation instructions are not provided by the heat pump manufacturer, uninsulated 8 foot (2.4 m) long connecting hoses having an inside diameter of 58 inch (1.6 cm) shall be used to connect the storage tank and the heat pump water heater. With the exception of using the storage tank described in 4.10, the same requirements shall apply for heat pump water heaters that are supplied without a storage tank from the manufacturer. The testing of the water heater shall occur in an area that is protected from drafts.

4.2 Water Supply. Connect the water heater to a water supply capable of delivering water at conditions as specified in Sections 2.3 and 2.5 of this appendix.

4.3 Water Inlet and Outlet Configuration. For freestanding water heaters that are taller than 36 inches (91.4 cm), inlet and outlet piping connections shall be configured in a manner consistent with Figures 1 and 2. Inlet and outlet piping connections for wall-mounted water heaters shall be consistent with Figure 3. For freestanding water heaters that are 36 inches or less in height and not supplied as part of a counter-top enclosure (commonly referred to as an under-the-counter model), inlet and outlet piping shall be installed in a manner consistent with Figures 4, 5, and 6. For water heaters that are supplied with a counter-top enclosure, inlet and outlet piping shall be made in a manner consistent with Figures 7A and 7B, respectively. The vertical piping noted in Figures 7A and 7B shall be located (whether inside the enclosure or along the outside in a recessed channel) in accordance with the manufacturer-published installation instructions.

All dimensions noted in Figures 1 through 7 shall be achieved. All piping between the water heater and the inlet and outlet temperature sensors, noted as TIN and TOUT in the figures, shall be Type “L” hard copper having the same diameter as the connections on the water heater. Unions may be used to facilitate installation and removal of the piping arrangements. A pressure gauge and diaphragm expansion tank shall be installed in the supply water piping at a location upstream of the inlet temperature sensor. An appropriately rated pressure and temperature relief valve shall be installed on all water heaters at the port specified by the manufacturer. Discharge piping for the relief valve shall be non-metallic. If heat traps, piping insulation, or pressure relief valve insulation are supplied with the water heater, they shall be installed for testing. Except when using a simulated wall, clearance shall be provided such that none of the piping contacts other surfaces in the test room.

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4.4 Fuel and/or Electrical Power and Energy Consumption. Install one or more instruments which measure, as appropriate, the quantity and rate of electrical energy and/or fossil fuel consumption in accordance with Section 3. For heat pump water heaters that use supplemental resistive heating, the electrical energy supplied to the resistive element(s) shall be metered separately from the electrical energy supplied to the entire appliance or to the remaining components (e.g., compressor, fans, pumps, controls).

4.5 Internal Storage Tank Temperature Measurements. Install six temperature measurement sensors inside the water heater tank with a vertical distance of at least 4 inches (100 mm) between successive sensors. A temperature sensor shall be positioned at the vertical midpoint of each of the six equal volume nodes within the tank. Nodes designate the equal volumes used to evenly partition the total volume of the tank. As much as is possible, the temperature sensor should be positioned away from any heating elements, anodic protective devices, tank walls, and flue pipe walls. If the tank cannot accommodate six temperature sensors and meet the installation requirements specified above, install the maximum number of sensors which comply with the installation requirements. The temperature sensors shall be installed either through (1) the anodic device opening; (2) the relief valve opening; or (3) the hot water outlet. If installed through the relief valve opening or the hot water outlet, a tee fitting or outlet piping, as applicable, shall be installed as close as possible to its original location. If the relief valve temperature sensor is relocated, and it no longer extends into the top of the tank, a substitute relief valve that has a sensing element that can reach into the tank shall be installed. If the hot water outlet includes a heat trap, the heat trap shall be installed on top of the tee fitting. Added fittings shall be covered with thermal insulation having an R value between 4 and 8 h/ft °F/Btu (0.7 and 1.4 m °C/W).

4.6 Ambient Air Temperature Measurement. Install an ambient air temperature sensor at the vertical mid-point of the water heater and approximately 2 feet (610 mm) from the surface of the water heater. The sensor shall be shielded against radiation.

4.7 Inlet and Outlet Water Temperature Measurements. Install temperature sensors in the cold-water inlet pipe and hot-water outlet pipe as shown in Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7a and 7b, as applicable.

4.8 Flow Control. A valve shall be installed to provide flow as specified in sections 5.1.4.1 for storage tank water heaters and 5.2.1 for instantaneous water heaters.

4.9 Flue Requirements.

4.9.1 Gas-Fired Water Heaters. Establish a natural draft in the following manner. For gas-fired water heaters with a vertically discharging draft hood outlet, a 5-foot (1.5-meter) vertical vent pipe extension with a diameter equal to the largest flue collar size of the draft hood shall be connected to the draft hood outlet. For gas-fired water heaters with a horizontally discharging draft hood outlet, a 90-degree elbow with a diameter equal to the largest flue collar size of the draft hood shall be connected to the draft hood outlet. A 5-foot (1.5-meter) length of vent pipe shall be connected to the elbow and oriented to discharge vertically upward. Direct vent gas-fired water heaters shall be installed with venting equipment specified in the manufacturer's instructions using the minimum vertical and horizontal lengths of vent pipe recommended by the manufacturer.

4.9.2 Oil-Fired Water Heaters. Establish a draft at the flue collar at the value specified in the manufacturer's instructions. Establish the draft by using a sufficient length of vent pipe connected to the water heater flue outlet, and directed vertically upward. For an oil-fired water heater with a horizontally discharging draft hood outlet, a 90-degree elbow with a diameter equal to the largest flue collar size of the draft hood shall be connected to the draft hood outlet. A length of vent pipe sufficient to establish the draft shall be connected to the elbow fitting and oriented to discharge vertically upward. Direct-vent oil-fired water heaters should be installed with venting equipment as specified in the manufacturer's instructions, using the minimum vertical and horizontal lengths of vent pipe recommended by the manufacturer.

4.10 Heat Pump Water Heater Storage Tank. The tank to be used for testing a heat pump water heater without a tank supplied by the manufacturer (see Section 1.12.3b) shall be an electric storage-type water heater having a measured volume of 47.0 gallons ±1.0 gallon (178 liters ±3.8 liters); two 4.5 kW heating elements controlled in such a manner as to prevent both elements from operating simultaneously; and an energy factor greater than or equal to the minimum energy conservation standard (as determined in accordance with Section 6.1.7) and less than or equal to the sum of the minimum energy conservation standard and 0.02.

5. Test Procedures

5.1 Storage-type Water Heaters, Including Heat Pump Water Heaters.

5.1.1 Determination of Storage Tank Volume. Determine the storage capacity, Vst, of the water heater under test, in gallons (liters), by subtracting the tare weight—measured while the tank is empty—from the gross weight of the storage tank when completely filled with water (with all air eliminated and line pressure applied as described in section 2.5) and dividing the resulting net weight by the density of water at the measured temperature.

5.1.2 Setting the Thermostat.

5.1.2.1 Single Thermostat Tanks. Starting with a tank at the supply water temperature, initiate normal operation of the water heater. After cut-out, determine the mean tank temperature every minute until the maximum value is observed. Determine whether this maximum value for the mean tank temperature is within the range of 135 °F±5 °F (57.2 °C±2.8 °C). If not, turn off the water heater, adjust the thermostat, drain and refill the tank with supply water. Then, once again, initiate normal operation of the water heater, and determine the maximum mean tank temperature after cut-out. Repeat this sequence until the maximum mean tank temperature after cut-out is 135 °F±5 °F (57.2 °C±2.8 °C).

5.1.2.2 Tanks with Two or More Thermostats. Follow the same sequence as for a single thermostat tank, i.e. start at the supply water temperature, operate normally until cutout. Determine if the thermostat that controls the uppermost heating element yields a maximum water temperature of 135 °F±5 °F (57.2 °C±2.8 °C), as measured by the in-tank sensors that are positioned above the uppermost heating element. If the tank temperature at the thermostat is not within 135 °F±5 °F (57.2 °C±2.8 °C), turn off the water heater, adjust the thermostat, drain and refill the tank with supply water. The thermostat that controls the heating element positioned next highest in the tank shall then be set to yield a maximum water temperature of 135 °F±5 °F (57.2 °C±2.8 °C). This process shall be repeated until the thermostat controlling the lowest element is correctly adjusted. When adjusting the thermostat that controls the lowest element, the maximum mean tank temperature after cut-out, as determined using all the in-tank sensors, shall be 135 °F±5 °F (57.2 °C±2.8 °C). When adjusting all other thermostats, use only the in-tank temperature sensors positioned above the heating element in question to evaluate the maximum water temperature after cut-out.

For heat pump water heaters that control an auxiliary resistive element, the thermostat shall be set in accordance with the manufacturer's installation instructions.

5.1.3 Power Input Determination. For all water heaters except electric types having immersed heating elements, initiate normal operation and determine the power input, P, to the main burners (including pilot light power, if any) after 15 minutes of operation. If the water heater is equipped with a gas appliance pressure regulator, the regulator outlet pressure shall be set within ±10% of that recommended by the manufacturer. For oil-fired water heaters the fuel pump pressure shall be within ±10% of the manufacturer's specified pump pressure. All burners shall be adjusted to achieve an hourly Btu (kJ) rating that is within ±2% of the value specified by the manufacturer. For an oil-fired water heater, adjust the burner to give a CO2 reading recommended by the manufacturer and an hourly Btu (kJ) rating that is within ±2% of that specified by the manufacturer. Smoke in the flue may not exceed No. 1 smoke as measured by the procedure in ASTM-D-2156-80.

5.1.4 First-Hour Rating Test.

5.1.4.1 General. During hot water draws, remove water at a rate of 3.0±0.25 gallons per minute (11.4±0.95 liters per minute). Collect the water in a container that is large enough to hold the volume removed during an individual draw and suitable for weighing at the termination of each draw. Alternatively, a water meter may be used to directly measure the water volume(s) withdrawn.

5.1.4.2 Draw Initiation Criteria. Begin the first-hour rating test by imposing a draw on the storage-type water heater. After completion of this first draw, initiate successive draws based on the following criteria. For gas-and oil-fired water heaters, initiate successive draws when the thermostat acts to reduce the supply of fuel to the main burner. For electric water heaters having a single element or multiple elements that all operate simultaneously, initiate successive draws when the thermostat acts to reduce the electrical input supplied to the element(s). For electric water heaters having two or more elements that do not operate simultaneously, initiate successive draws when the applicable thermostat acts to reduce the electrical input to the element located vertically highest in the storage tank. For heat pump waters heaters that do not use supplemental resistive heating, initiate successive draws immediately after the electrical input to the compressor is reduced by the action of the water heater's thermostat. For heat pump waters heaters that use supplemental resistive heating, initiate successive draws immediately after the electrical input to the compressor or the uppermost resistive element is reduced by the action of the applicable water heater thermostat. This draw initiation criterion for heat pump water heaters that use supplemental resistive heating, however, shall only apply when the water located above the thermostat at cut-out is heated to 135 °F±5 °F (57.2 °C±2.8 °C).

5.1.4.3 Test Sequence. Establish normal water heater operation. If the water heater is not presently operating, initiate a draw. The draw may be terminated anytime after cut-in occurs. After cut-out occurs (i.e., all thermostats are satisfied), monitor the internal storage tank temperature sensors described in section 4.5 every minute.

Initiate a draw after a maximum mean tank temperature has been observed following cut-out. Record the time when the draw is initiated and designate it as an elapsed time of zero (τ* = 0). (The superscript * is used to denote variables pertaining to the first-hour rating test.) Record the outlet water temperature beginning 15 seconds after the draw is initiated and at 5-second intervals thereafter until the draw is terminated. Determine the maximum outlet temperature that occurs during this first draw and record it as T*max, 1. For the duration of this first draw and all successive draws, in addition, monitor the inlet temperature to the water heater to ensure that the required 58 °F±2 °F (14.4 °C±1.1 °C) test condition is met. Terminate the hot water draw when the outlet temperature decreases to T*max,1−25 °F (T*max,1−13.9 °C). Record this temperature as T*min,1. Following draw termination, determine the average outlet water temperature and the mass or volume removed during this first draw and record them as T̅*del,1 and M*1 or V*1, respectively.

Initiate a second and, if applicable, successive draw each time the applicable draw initiation criteria described in section 5.1.4.2 are satisfied. As required for the first draw, record the outlet water temperature 15 seconds after initiating each draw and at 5-second intervals thereafter until the draw is terminated. Determine the maximum outlet temperature that occurs during each draw and record it as T*max, i, where the subscript i refers to the draw number. Terminate each hot water draw when the outlet temperature decreases to T*max, i−25 °F (T*max, i−13.9 °C). Record this temperature as T*min, i. Calculate and record the average outlet temperature and the mass or volume removed during each draw (T̅*del, i and M*i or V*i, respectively). Continue this sequence of draw and recovery until one hour has elapsed, then shut off the electrical power and/or fuel supplied to the water heater.

If a draw is occurring at an elapsed time of one hour, continue this draw until the outlet temperature decreases to T*max, n−25 °F (T*max, n −13.9 °C), at which time the draw shall be immediately terminated. (The subscript n shall be used to denote quantities associated with the final draw.) If a draw is not occurring at an elapsed time of one hour, a final draw shall be imposed at one hour. This draw shall be immediately terminated when the outlet temperature first indicates a value less than or equal to the cut-off temperature used for the previous draw (T*min, n−1). For cases where the outlet temperature is close to T*min, n−1, the final draw shall proceed for a minimum of 30 seconds. If an outlet temperature greater than T*min, n−1 is not measured within 30 seconds, the draw shall be immediately terminated and zero additional credit shall be given towards first-hour rating (i.e., M*n = 0 or V*n = 0). After the final draw is terminated, calculate and record the average outlet temperature and the mass or volume removed during the draw (T̅*del, n and M*n or V*n, respectively).

5.1.5 24-Hour Simulated Use Test. During the simulated use test, a total of 64.±3 1.0 gallons (243±3.8 liters) shall be removed. This value is referred to as the daily hot water usage in the following text.

With the water heater turned off, fill the water heater with supply water and apply pressure as described in section 2.5. Turn on the water heater and associated heat pump unit, if present. After the cut-out occurs, the water heater may be operated for up to three cycles of drawing until cut-in, and then operating until cut-out, prior to the start of the test.

At this time, record the mean tank temperature (T̅o), and the electrical and/or fuel measurement readings, as appropriate. Begin the 24-hour simulated use test by withdrawing a volume from the water heater that equals one-sixth of the daily hot water usage. Record the time when this first draw is initiated and assign it as the test elapsed time (τ) of zero (0). Record the average storage tank and ambient temperature every 15 minutes throughout the 24-hour simulated use test unless a recovery or a draw is occurring. At elapsed time intervals of one, two, three, four, and five hours from τ = 0, initiate additional draws, removing an amount of water equivalent to one-sixth of the daily hot water usage with the maximum allowable deviation for any single draw being ±0.5 gallons (1.9 liters). The quantity of water withdrawn during the sixth draw shall be increased or decreased as necessary such that the total volume of water withdrawn equals 64.3 gallons ±1.0 gallon (243.4 liters ±3.8 liters).

All draws during the simulated use test shall be made at flow rates of 3.0 gallons ±0.25 gallons per minute (11.4 liters ±0.95 liters per minute). Measurements of the inlet and outlet temperatures shall be made 15 seconds after the draw is initiated and at every subsequent 5-second interval throughout the duration of each draw. The arithmetic mean of the hot water discharge temperature and the cold water inlet temperature shall be determined for each draw (T̅del, i and T̅in, i). Determine and record the net mass or volume removed (Mi or Vi), as appropriate, after each draw.

At the end of the recovery period following the first draw, record the maximum mean tank temperature observed after cut-out, T̅max, 1, and the energy consumed by an electric resistance, gas or oil-fired water heater, Qr. For heat pump water heaters, the total electrical energy consumed during the first recovery by the heat pump (including compressor, fan, controls, pump, etc.) and, if applicable, by the resistive element(s) shall be recorded as Qr.

At the end of the recovery period that follows the sixth draw, determine and record the total electrical energy and/or fossil fuel consumed since the beginning of the test, Qsu. In preparation for determining the energy consumed during standby, record the reading given on the electrical energy (watt-hour) meter, the gas meter, and/or the scale used to determine oil consumption, as appropriate. Record the maximum value of the mean tank temperature after cut-out as T̅su. Except as noted below, allow the water heater to remain in the standby mode until 24 hours have elapsed from the start of the test (i.e., since = 0). Prevent the water heater from beginning a recovery cycle during the last hour of the test by turning off the electric power to the electrical heating elements and heat pump, if present, or by turning down the fuel supply to the main burner at an elapsed time of 23 hours. If a recovery is taking place at an elapsed time of 23 hours, wait until the recovery is complete before reducing the electrical and/or fuel supply to the water heater. At 24 hours, record the mean tank temperature, T̅24, and the electric and/or fuel instrument readings. Determine the total fossil fuel or electrical energy consumption, as appropriate, for the entire 24-hour simulated use test, Q. Record the time interval between the time at which the maximum mean tank temperature is observed after the sixth draw and the end of the 24-hour test as stby, 1. Record the time during which water is not being withdrawn from the water heater during the entire 24-hour period as stby, 2.

5.2 Instantaneous Gas and Electric Water Heaters

5.2.1 Setting the Outlet Discharge Temperature. Initiate normal operation of the water heater at the full input rating for electric instantaneous water heaters and at the maximum firing rate specified by the manufacturer for gas instantaneous water heaters. Monitor the discharge water temperature and set to a value of 135 °F ±5 °F (57.2 °C ±2.8 °C) in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. If the water heater is not capable of providing this discharge temperature when the flow rate is 3.0 gallons ±0.25 gallons per minute (11.4 liters ±0.95 liters per minute), then adjust the flow rate as necessary to achieve the specified discharge water temperature. Record the corresponding flow rate as Vmax.

5.2.2 Additional Requirements for Variable Input Instantaneous Gas Water Heaters. If the instantaneous water heater incorporates a controller that permits operation at a reduced input rate, adjust the flow rate as necessary to achieve a discharge water temperature of 135 °F ±5 °F (57.2 °C ±2.8 °C) while maintaining the minimum input rate. Record the corresponding flow rate as Vmin. If an outlet temperature of 135 °F ±5 °F (57.2 °C ±2.8 °C) cannot be achieved at the minimum flow rate permitted by the instantaneous water heater, record the flow rate as Vmin and the corresponding outlet temperature as Tmin.

5.2.3 Maximum GPM Rating Test for Instantaneous Water Heaters. Establish normal water heater operation at the full input rate for electric instantaneous water heaters and at the maximum firing rate for gas instantaneous water heaters with the discharge water temperature set in accordance with Section 5.2.1. During the 10-minute test, either collect the withdrawn water for later measurement of the total mass removed, or alternatively, use a water meter to directly measure the water volume removed.

After recording the scale or water meter reading, initiate water flow throughout the water heater, record the inlet and outlet water temperatures beginning 15 seconds after the start of the test and at subsequent 5-second intervals throughout the duration of the test. At the end of 10 minutes, turn off the water. Determine the mass of water collected, M10m, in pounds (kilograms), or the volume of water, V10m, in gallons (liters).

5.2.4 24-hour Simulated Use Test for Gas Instantaneous Water Heaters.

5.2.4.1 Fixed Input Instantaneous Water Heaters. Establish normal operation with the discharge water temperature and flow rate set to values of 135 °F ±5 °F (57.2 °C ±2.8 °C) and Vmax per Section 5.2.1, respectively. With no draw occurring, record the reading given by the gas meter and/or the electrical energy meter as appropriate. Begin the 24-hour simulated use test by drawing an amount of water out of the water heater equivalent to one-sixth of the daily hot water usage. Record the time when this first draw is initiated and designate it as an elapsed time, τ, of 0. At elapsed time intervals of one, two, three, four, and five hours from τ = 0, initiate additional draws, removing an amount of water equivalent to one-sixth of the daily hot water usage, with the maximum allowable deviation for any single draw being ±0.5 gallons (1.9 liters). The quantity of water drawn during the sixth draw shall be increased or decreased as necessary such that the total volume of water withdrawn equals 64.3 gallons ±1.0 gallons (243.4 liters ±3.8 liters).

Measurements of the inlet and outlet water temperatures shall be made 15 seconds after the draw is initiated and at every 5-second interval thereafter throughout the duration of the draw. The arithmetic mean of the hot water discharge temperature and the cold water inlet temperature shall be determined for each draw. Record the scale used to measure the mass of the withdrawn water or the water meter reading, as appropriate, after each draw. At the end of the recovery period following the first draw, determine and record the fossil fuel or electrical energy consumed, Qr. Following the sixth draw and subsequent recovery, allow the water heater to remain in the standby mode until exactly 24 hours have elapsed since the start of the test (i.e., since τ = 0). At 24 hours, record the reading given by the gas meter and/or the electrical energy meter as appropriate. Determine the fossil fuel or electrical energy consumed during the entire 24-hour simulated use test and designate the quantity as Q.

5.2.4.2 Variable Input Instantaneous Water Heaters. If the instantaneous water heater incorporates a controller that permits continuous operation at a reduced input rate, the first three draws shall be conducted using the maximum flow rate, Vmax, while removing an amount of water equivalent to one-sixth of the daily hot water usage, with the maximum allowable deviation for any one of the three draws being ±0.5 gallons (1.9 liters). The second three draws shall be conducted at Vmin. If an outlet temperature of 135 °F ±5 °F (57.2 °C ±2.8 °C) could not be achieved at the minimum flow rate permitted by the instantaneous water heater, the last three draws should be lengthened such that the volume removed is:

eCFR graphic er11my98.001.gif

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or

eCFR graphic er11my98.002.gif

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where Tmin is the outlet water temperature at the flow rate Vmin as determined in Section 5.2.1, and where the maximum allowable variation for any one of the three draws is ±0.5 gallons (1.9 liters). The quantity of water withdrawn during the sixth draw shall be increased or decreased as necessary such that the total volume of water withdrawn equals (32.15 + 3÷V4,5,6) ±1.0 gallons

((121.7 + 3 ÷ V4,5,6) ±3.8 liters).

Measurements of the inlet and outlet water temperatures shall be made 5 seconds after a draw is initiated and at every 5-second interval thereafter throughout the duration of the draw. Determine the arithmetic mean of the hot water discharge temperature and the cold water inlet temperature for each draw. Record the scale used to measure the mass of the withdrawn water or the water meter reading, as appropriate, after each draw. At the end of the recovery period following the first draw, determine and record the fossil fuel or electrical energy consumed, Qr, max. Likewise, record the reading of the meter used to measure fossil fuel or electrical energy consumption prior to the fourth draw and at the end of the recovery period following the fourth draw, and designate the difference as Qr,min. Following the sixth draw and subsequent recovery, allow the water heater to remain in the standby mode until exactly 24 hours have elapsed since the start of the test (i.e., since τ=0). At 24 hours, record the reading given by the gas meter and/or the electrical energy meter, as appropriate. Determine the fossil fuel or electrical energy consumed during the entire 24-hour simulated use test and designate the quantity as Q.

6. Computations

6.1 Storage Tank and Heat Pump Water Heaters.

6.1.1 Storage Tank Capacity. The storage tank capacity is computed using the following:

eCFR graphic er11my98.003.gif

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Where:

Vst = the storage capacity of the water heater, gal (L).

Wf = the weight of the storage tank when completely filled with water, lb (kg).

Wt = the (tare) weight of the storage tank when completely empty, lb (kg).

ρ = the density of water used to fill the tank measured at the temperature of the water, lb/gal (kg/L).

6.1.2. First-Hour Rating Computation. For the case in which the final draw is initiated at or prior to an elapsed time of one hour, the first-hour rating shall be computed using,

eCFR graphic er11my98.004.gif

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Where:

n = the number of draws that are completed during the first-hour rating test.

V*i = the volume of water removed during the ith draw of the first-hour rating test, gal (L)

or, if the mass of water is being measured,

eCFR graphic er11my98.005.gif

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Where:

M*i = the mass of water removed during the ith draw of the first-hour rating test, lb (kg).

ρ = the water density corresponding to the average outlet temperature measured during the ith draw, (T̅*del, I), lb/gal (kg/L).

For the case in which a draw is not in progress at the elapsed time of one hour and a final draw is imposed at the elapsed time of one hour, the first-hour rating shall be calculated using

eCFR graphic er11my98.006.gif

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where n and V*i are the same quantities as defined above, and

V*n = the volume of water drawn during the nth (final) draw of the first-hour rating test, gal (L)

T̅*del,n−1 = the average water outlet temperature measured during the (n−1)th draw of the first-hour rating test, °F (°C).

T̅*del,n = the average water outlet temperature measured during the nth (final) draw of the first-hour rating test, °F (°C).

T̅*min,n−1 = the minimum water outlet temperature measured during the (n−1)th draw of the first-hour rating test, °F (°C).

6.1.3 Recovery Efficiency. The recovery efficiency for gas, oil, and heat pump storage-type water heaters is computed as:

eCFR graphic er11my98.007.gif

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Where:

M1 = total mass removed during the first draw of the 24-hour simulated use test, lb (kg), or, if the volume of water is being measured,

M1 = V1 ρ1

Where:

V1 = total volume removed during the first draw of the 24-hour simulated use test, gal (L).

ρ1 = density of the water at the water temperature measured at the point where the flow volume is measured, lb/gal (kg/L).

Cp1 = specific heat of the withdrawn water, (T̅del,1 + T̅in,1) 2, Btu/lb °F (kJ/kg °C).

del,1 = average water outlet temperature measured during the first draw of the 24-hour simulated use test, °F (°C).

in,1 = average water inlet temperature measured during the first draw of the 24-hour simulated use test, °F (°C).

Vst = as defined in section 6.1.1.

ρ2 = density of stored hot water, (T̅max,1 + T̅o)/2, lb/gal (kg/L).

Cp2 = specific heat of stored hot water evaluated at (T̅max,1 + T̅o) / 2, Btu/lb °F (kJ/kg2 °C).

max,1 = maximum mean tank temperature recorded after cut-out following the first draw of the 24-hour simulated use test, °F (°C).

o = maximum mean tank temperature recorded prior to the first draw of the 24-hour simulated use test, °F (°C).

Qr = the total energy used by the water heater between cut-out prior to the first draw and cut-out following the first draw, including auxiliary energy such as pilot lights, pumps, fans, etc., Btu (kJ). (Electrical auxiliary energy shall be converted to thermal energy using the following conversion: 1 kWh = 3,412 Btu.)

The recovery efficiency for electric water heaters with immersed heating elements is assumed to be 98%.

6.1.4 Hourly Standby Losses. The hourly standby energy losses are computed as:

eCFR graphic er11my98.008.gif

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Where:

Qhr = the hourly standby energy losses of the water heater, Btu/h (kJ/h).

Qstby = the total energy consumed by the water heater between the time at which the maximum mean tank temperature is observed after the sixth draw and the end of the 24-hour test period, Btu (kJ).

Vst = as defined in section 6.1.1.

ρ = density of stored hot water, (T̅24 + T̅su) / 2, lb/gal (kg/L).

Cp = specific heat of the stored water, (T̅24 + T̅su) / 2, Btu/lb÷°F (kJ/kg÷°C).

24 = the mean tank temperature at the end of the 24-hour simulated use test, °F (°C).

su = the maximum mean tank temperature observed after the sixth draw, °F (°C).

ηr = as defined in section 6.1.3.

τstby, 1 = elapsed time between the time at which the maximum mean tank temperature is observed after the sixth draw and the end of the 24-hour simulated use test, h.

The standby heat loss coefficient for the tank is computed as:

eCFR graphic er11my98.009.gif

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Where:

UA = standby heat loss coefficient of the storage tank, Btu/h÷°F (kJ/h÷°C).

Qhr = as defined in this section.

t, stby,1 = overall average storage tank temperature between the time when the maximum mean tank temperature is observed after the sixth draw and the end of the 24-hour simulated use test, °F (°C).

a, stby,1 = overall average ambient temperature between the time when the maximum mean tank temperature is observed after the sixth draw and the end of the 24-hour simulated use test, °F (°C).

6.1.5 Daily Water Heating Energy Consumption. The daily water heating energy consumption, Qd, is computed as:

eCFR graphic er11my98.010.gif

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Where:

Q = total energy used by the water heater during the 24-hour simulated use test including auxiliary energy such as pilot lights, pumps, fans, etc., Btu (kJ). (Electrical auxiliary energy shall be converted to thermal energy using the following conversion: 1 kWh = 3,412 Btu.)

Vst = as defined in section 6.1.1.

ρ= density of the stored hot water, (T̅24 + T̅o) / 2, lb/gal (kg/L).

Cp = specific heat of the stored water, (T̅24 + T̅o) / 2, Btu/lb÷°F (kJ/kg÷°C).

24 = mean tank temperature at the end of the 24-hour simulated use test, °F (°C).

o = mean tank temperature at the beginning of the 24-hour simulated use test, recorded one minute before the first draw is initiated, °F (°C).

ηr = as defined in section 6.1.3.

6.1.6 Adjusted Daily Water Heating Energy Consumption. The adjusted daily water heating energy consumption, Qda, takes into account that the temperature difference between the storage tank and surrounding ambient air may not be the nominal value of 67.5 °F (135 °F-67.5 °F) or 37.5 °C (57.2 °C-19.7 °C) due to the 10 °F (5.6 °C) allowable variation in storage tank temperature, 135 °F ±5 °F (57.2 °C ±2.8 °C), and the 5 °F (2.8 °C) allowable variation in surrounding ambient temperature 65 °F (18.3 °C) to 70 °F (21.1 °C). The adjusted daily water heating energy consumption is computed as:

Qda = QD[(T̅stby, 2a, stby,2) − (135 °F − 67.5 °F)] UAτstby, 2

or Qda = QD[(T̅stby, 2a, stby, 2) − (57.2 °C − 19.7 °C)] UAτstby, 2

Where:

Qda = the adjusted daily water heating energy consumption, Btu (kJ).

Qd = as defined in section 6.1.5.

stby, 2 = the mean tank temperature during the total standby portion, τstby, 2, of the 24-hour test, °F (°C).

a, stby, 2 = the average ambient temperature during the total standby portion, τstby, 2, of the 24-hour test, °F (°C).

UA = as defined in section 6.1.4.

τstby, 2 = the number of hours during the 24-hour simulated test when water is not being withdrawn from the water heater.

A modification is also needed to take into account that the temperature difference between the outlet water temperature and supply water temperature may not be equivalent to the nominal value of 77 °F (135 °F-58 °F) or 42.8 °C (57.2 °C-14.4 °C). The following equations adjust the experimental data to a nominal 77 °F (42.8 °C) temperature rise.

The energy used to heat water, Btu/day (kJ/day), may be computed as:

eCFR graphic er11my98.011.gif

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Where:

Mi = the mass withdrawn for the ith draw (i = 1 to 6), lb (kg).

Cpi = the specific heat of the water of the ith draw, Btu/lb÷ °F (kJ/kg÷ °C).

del, i = the average water outlet temperature measured during the ith draw (i=1 to 6), °F (°C).

in, i = the average water inlet temperature measured during the ith draw (i=1 to 6), °F (°C).

ηr = as defined in section 6.1.3.

The energy required to heat the same quantity of water over a 77 °F (42.8 °C) temperature rise, Btu/day (kJ/day), is:

eCFR graphic er11my98.012.gif

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The difference between these two values is:

QHWD = QHW, 77°−FQHW

or QHWD = QHW,42.8°−FQHW

which must be added to the adjusted daily water heating energy consumption value. Thus, the daily energy consumption value which takes into account that the temperature difference between the storage tank and ambient temperature may not be 67.5 °F (37.5 °C) and that the temperature rise across the storage tank may not be 77 °F (42.8 °C) is:

Qdm = Qda + QHWD

6.1.7 Energy Factor. The energy factor, Ef, is computed as:

eCFR graphic er11my98.013.gif

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or

eCFR graphic er11my98.014.gif

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Where:

Qdm = the modified daily water heating energy consumption as computed in accordance with section 6.1.6, Btu (kJ).

Mi = the mass withdrawn for the ith draw (i = 1 to 6), lb (kg).

Cpi = the specific heat of the water of the ith draw, Btu/lb °F (kJ/kg °C).

6.1.8 Annual Energy Consumption. The annual energy consumption for storage-type and heat pump water heaters is computed as:

Eannual = 365 × Qdm

Where:

Qdm = the modified daily water heating energy consumption as computed in accordance with section 6.1.6, Btu (kJ).

365 = the number of days in a year.

6.2 Instantaneous Water Heaters.

6.2.1 Maximum GPM (L/min) Rating Computation. Compute the maximum gpm (L/min) rating as:

eCFR graphic er11my98.015.gif

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which may be expressed as:

eCFR graphic er11my98.016.gif

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Where:

M10m = the mass of water collected during the 10-minute test, lb (kg).

del = the average delivery temperature, °F (°C).

in = the average inlet temperature, °F (°C).

ρ = the density of water at the average delivery temperature, lb/gal (kg/L).

If a water meter is used the maximum gpm (L/min) rating is computed as:

eCFR graphic er11my98.017.gif

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Where:

V10m = the volume of water measured during the 10-minute test, gal (L).

del = as defined in this section.

in = as defined in this section.

6.2.2 Recovery Efficiency

6.2.2.1 Fixed Input Instantaneous Water Heaters. The recovery efficiency is computed as:

eCFR graphic er11my98.018.gif

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Where:

M1 = total mass removed during the first draw of the 24-hour simulated use test, lb (kg), or, if the volume of water is being measured,

M1 = V1. ρ

Where:

V1 = total volume removed during the first draw of the 24-hour simulated use test, gal (L).

ρ= density of the water at the water temperature measured at the point where the flow volume is measured, lb/gal (kg/L).

Cp1 = specific heat of the withdrawn water, (T̅del,1 + Tin,1) / 2, Btu/lb °F (kJ/kg °C).

del, 1 = average water outlet temperature measured during the first draw of the 24-hour simulated use test, °F (°C).

in, 1 = average water inlet temperature measured during the first draw of the 24-hour simulated use test, °F (°C).

Qr = the total energy used by the water heater between cut-out prior to the first draw and cut-out following the first draw, including auxiliary energy such as pilot lights, pumps, fans, etc., Btu (kJ). (Electrical auxiliary energy shall be converted to thermal energy using the following conversion: 1 kWh = 3,412 Btu.)

6.2.2.2 Variable Input Instantaneous Water Heaters. For instantaneous water heaters that have a variable firing rate, two recovery efficiency values are computed, one at the maximum input rate and one at the minimum input rate. The recovery efficiency used in subsequent computations is taken as the average of these two values. The maximum recovery efficiency is computed as:

eCFR graphic er11my98.019.gif

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Where:

M1 = as defined in section 6.2.2.1.

Cp1 = as defined in section 6.2.2.1.

del, 1 = as defined in section 6.2.2.1.

in, 1 = as defined in section 6.2.2.1.

Qr, max = the total energy used by the water heater between burner cut-out prior to the first draw and burner cut-out following the first draw, including auxiliary energy such as pilot lights, Btu (kJ).

The minimum recovery efficiency is computed as:

eCFR graphic er11my98.020.gif

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Where:

M4 = the mass withdrawn during the fourth draw, lb (kg), or, if the volume of water is being measured,

M4 = V4 ρ

Where:

V4 = total volume removed during the first draw of the 24-hour simulated use test, gal (L).

ρ = as defined in 6.2.2.1

Cp4 = the specific heat of water, Btu/lb °F (kJ/kg °C).

del, 4 = the average delivery temperature for the fourth draw, °F (°C).

in, 4 = the average inlet temperature for the fourth draw, °F (°C).

Qr, min = the total energy consumed between the beginning of the fourth draw and burner cut-out following the fourth draw, including auxiliary energy such as pilot lights, Btu (kJ).

The recovery efficiency is computed as:

eCFR graphic er11my98.021.gif

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Where:

ηr,max = as calculated above.

ηr,min = as calculated above.

6.2.3 Daily Water Heating Energy Consumption. The daily water heating energy consumption, Qd, is computed as:

Qd = Q

Where:

Q = the energy used by the instantaneous water heater during the 24-hr simulated use test.

A modification is needed to take into account that the temperature difference between the outlet water temperature and supply water temperature may not be equivalent to the nominal value of 77 °F (135 °F−58 °F) or 42.8 °C (57.2 °C−14.4 °C). The following equations adjust the experimental data to a nominal 77 °F (42.8 °C) temperature rise.

The energy used to heat water may be computed as:

eCFR graphic er11my98.022.gif

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Where:

Mi = the mass withdrawn during the ith draw, lb (kg).

Cpi = the specific heat of water of the ith draw, Btu/lb °F (kJ/kg (°C).

del,i = the average delivery temperature of the ith draw, °F (°C).

in,i = the average inlet temperature of the ith draw, °F (°C).

ηr = as calculated in section 6.2.2.2.

The energy required to heat the same quantity of water over a 77 °F (42.8 °C) temperature rise is:

eCFR graphic er11my98.023.gif

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Where:

Mi = the mass withdrawn during the ith draw, lb (kg).

Cpi = the specific heat of water of the ith draw, Btu/lb °F (kJ/kg (°C).

ηr = as calculated above.

The difference between these two values is:

QHWD = QHW, 77 °FQHW

or QHWD = QHW, 42.8 °CQHW

which much be added to the daily water heating energy consumption value. Thus, the daily energy consumption value which takes into account that the temperature rise across the storage tank may not be 77 °F (42.8 °C) is:

Qdm = Qd + QHWD

6.2.4 Energy Factor. The energy factor, Ef, is computed as:

eCFR graphic er11my98.024.gif

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Where:

Qdm = the daily water heating energy consumption as computed in accordance with section 6.2.3, Btu (kJ).

Mi = the mass associated with the ith draw, lb (kg).

Cpi = the specific heat of water computed at a temperature of (58 °F + 135 °F) / 2, Btu/lb °F [(14.4 °C + 57.2 °C) / 2, kJ/kg °C].

6.2.5 Annual Energy Consumption. The annual energy consumption for instantaneous type water heaters is computed as:

Eannual = 365 × Qdm

Where:

Qdm = the modified daily energy consumption, Btu/day (kJ/day).

365 = the number of days in a year.

7. Ratings for Untested Models

In order to relieve the test burden on manufacturers who offer water heaters which differ only in fuel type or power input, ratings for untested models may be established in accordance with the following procedures. In lieu of the following procedures a manufacturer may elect to test the unit for which a rating is sought.

7.1 Gas Water Heaters. Ratings obtained for gas water heaters using natural gas can be used for an identical water heater which utilizes propane gas if the input ratings are within ±10%.

7.2 Electric Water Heaters

7.2.1 First-Hour Rating. If an electric storage-type water heater is available with more than one input rating, the manufacturer shall designate the standard input rating, and the water heater need only be tested with heating elements at the designated standard input ratings. The first-hour ratings for units having power input rating less than the designated standard input rating shall be assigned a first-hour rating equivalent to the first draw of the first-hour rating for the electric water heater with the standard input rating. For units having power inputs greater than the designated standard input rating, the first-hour rating shall be equivalent to that measured for the water heater with the standard input rating.

7.2.2 Energy Factor. The energy factor for identical electric storage-type water heaters, with the exception of heating element wattage, may use the energy factor obtained during testing of the water heater with the designated standard input rating.

[63 FR 26008, May 11, 1998; 63 FR 38738, July 20, 1998, as amended at 66 FR 4497, Jan. 17, 2001]

Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners

Note: Manufacturers are not required to use the test procedures and calculations that refer to standby mode and off mode energy consumption, (specifically, sections 2.2, 3.2, 4.2, and 5.3 of this appendix F) until the compliance date of any amended energy conservation standards for room air conditioners at 10 CFR 430.32(b).

1. Definitions.

1.1 “Active mode” means a mode in which the room air conditioner is connected to a mains power source, has been activated and is performing the main function of cooling or heating the conditioned space, or circulating air through activation of its fan or blower, with or without energizing active air-cleaning components or devices such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation, electrostatic filters, ozone generators, or other air-cleaning devices.

1.2 “ANSI/AHAM RAC-1” means the test standard published jointly by the American National Standards Institute and the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers, titled “Room Air Conditioners,” Standard RAC-1-2008 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

1.3 “ANSI/ASHRAE 16” means the test standard published jointly by the American National Standards Institute and the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers titled “Method of Testing for Rating Room Air Conditioners and Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners,” Standard 16-1983 (RA 2009) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

1.4 “IEC 62301” means the test standard published by the International Electrotechnical Commission, (“IEC”), titled “Household electrical appliances—Measurement of standby power,” Publication 62301 (first edition June 2005), (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

1.5 “Inactive mode” means a standby mode that facilitates the activation of active mode by remote switch (including remote control) or internal sensor or which provides continuous status display.

1.6 “Off mode” means a mode in which a room air conditioner is connected to a mains power source and is not providing any active or standby mode function and where the mode may persist for an indefinite time. An indicator that only shows the user that the product is in the off position is included within the clasification of an off mode.

1.7 “Standby mode” means any product modes where the where the energy using product is connected to a mains power source and offers one or more of the following user oriented or protective functions which may persist for an indefinite time:

(a) To facilitate the activation of other modes (including activation or deactivation of active mode) by remote switch (including remote control), internal sensor, or timer.

(b) Continuous functions, including information or status displays (including clocks) or sensor-based functions. A timer is a continuous clock function (which may or may not be associated with a display) that provides regular scheduled tasks (e.g., switching) and that operates on a continuous basis.

2. Test methods.

2.1 Cooling. The test method for testing room air conditioners in cooling mode shall consist of application of the methods and conditions in ANSI/AHAM RAC-1 sections 4, 5, 6.1, and 6.5 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), and in ANSI/ASHRAE 16 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

2.2 Standby and off modes. The method for testing room air conditioners in standby and off modes shall consist of application of the methods and conditions in IEC 62301 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), as modified by the requirements of this standard. The testing may be conducted in test facilities used for testing cooling performance. If testing is not conducted in such a facility, the test facility shall comply with IEC 62301 section 4.2.

3. Test conditions.

3.1 Cooling mode. Establish the test conditions described in sections 4 and 5 of ANSI/AHAM RAC-1 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and in accordance with ANSI/ASHRAE 16 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

3.2 Standby and off modes.

3.2.1 Test room conditions. Maintain the indoor test conditions as required by section 4.2 of IEC 62301 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3). If the standby and off mode testing is conducted in a facility that is also used for testing cooling performance, maintain the outdoor test conditions either as required by section 4.2 of IEC 62301 or as described in section 3.1. If the unit is equipped with an outdoor air ventilation damper, close this damper during testing.

3.2.2 Power supply. Maintain power supply conditions specified in section 4.3 of IEC 62301 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3). Use room air conditioner nameplate voltage and frequency as the basis for power supply conditions. Maintain power supply voltage waveform according to the requirements of section 4.4 of IEC 62301.

3.2.3 Watt meter. The watt meter used to measure standby mode and off mode power consumption of the room air conditioner shall have the resolution specified in section 4, paragraph 4.5 of IEC 62301 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3). The watt meter shall also be able to record a “true” average power specified in section 5, paragraph 5.3.2(a) of IEC 62301.

4. Measurements.

4.1 Cooling mode. Measure the quantities delineated in section 5 of ANSI/AHAM RAC-1 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

4.2 Standby and off modes. Establish the testing conditions set forth in section 3.2. Prior to the initiation of the test measurements, the room air conditioner shall also be installed in accordance with section 5, paragraph 5.2 of IEC 62301 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3). For room air conditioners that drop from a higher power state to a lower power state as discussed in section 5, paragraph 5.1, note 1 of IEC 62301, allow sufficient time for the room air conditioner to reach the lower power state before proceeding with the test measurement. Follow the test procedure specified in section 5, paragraph 5.3 of IEC 62301 for testing in each possible mode as described in 4.2.1 and 4.2.2, except allow the product to stabilize for 5 to 10 minutes and use an energy use measurement period of 5 minutes. For units in which power varies over a cycle, as described in section 5, paragraph 5.3.2 of IEC 62301, use the average power approach in paragraph 5.3.2(a).

4.2.1 If a room air conditioner has an inactive mode, as defined in 1.5, measure and record the average inactive mode power of the room air conditioner, PIA, in watts.

4.2.2 If a room air conditioner has an off mode, as defined in 1.6, measure and record the average off mode power of the room air conditioner, POFF, in watts.

5. Calculations.

5.1 Calculate the cooling capacity (expressed in Btu/hr) as required in section 6.1 of ANSI/AHAM RAC-1 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and in accordance with ANSI/ASHRAE 16 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

5.2 Determine the electrical power input (expressed in watts) as required by section 6.5 of ANSI/AHAM RAC-1 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) and in accordance with ANSI/ASHRAE 16 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

5.3 Standby mode and off mode annual energy consumption. Calculate the standby mode and off mode annual energy consumption for room air conditioners, ETSO, expressed in kilowatt-hours per year, according to the following:

ETSO = [(PIA × SIA) + (POFF × SOFF)] × K

Where:

PIA = room air conditioner inactive mode power, in watts, as measured in section 4.2.1

POFF = room air conditioner off mode power, in watts, as measured in section 4.2.2.

If the room air conditioner has both inactive mode and off mode, SIA and SOFF both equal 5,115 ÷ 2 = 2,557.5, where 5,115 is the total inactive and off mode annual hours;

If the room air conditioner has an inactive mode but no off mode, the inactive mode annual hours, SIA, is equal to 5,115 and the off mode annual hours, SOFF, is equal to 0;

If the room air conditioner has an off mode but no inactive mode, SIA is equal to 0 and SOFF is equal to STOT;

K = 0.001 kWh/Wh conversion factor for watt-hours to kilowatt-hours.

[76 FR 1035, Jan. 6, 2011]

Appendix G to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Unvented Home Heating Equipment

1. Testing conditions.

1.1 Installation.

1.1.1 Electric heater. Install heater according to manufacturer's instructions. Heaters shall be connected to an electrical supply circuit of nameplate voltage with a wattmeter installed in the circuit. The wattmeter shall have a maximum error not greater than one percent.

1.1.2 Unvented gas heater. Install heater according to manufacturer's instructions. Heaters shall be connected to a gas supply line with a gas displacement meter installed between the supply line and the heater according to manufacturer's specifications. The gas displacement meter shall have a maximum error not greater than one percent. Gas heaters with electrical auxiliaries shall be connected to an electrical supply circuit of nameplate voltage with a wattmeter installed in the circuit. The wattmeter shall have a maximum error not greater than one percent.

1.1.3 Unvented oil heater. Install heater according to manufacturer's instructions. Oil heaters with electric auxiliaries shall be connected to an electrical supply circuit of nameplate voltage with a wattmeter installed in the circuit. The wattmeter shall have a maximum error not greater than one percent.

1.2 Temperature regulating controls. All temperature regulating controls shall be shorted out of the circuit or adjusted so that they will not operate during the test period.

1.3 Fan controls. All fan controls shall be set at the highest fan speed setting.

1.4 Energy supply.

1.4.1 Electrical supply. Supply power to the heater within one percent of the nameplate voltage.

1.4.2 Natural gas supply. For an unvented gas heater utilizing natural gas, maintain the gas supply to the heater with a normal inlet test pressure immediately ahead of all controls at 7 to 10 inches of water column. The regulator outlet pressure at normal supply test pressure shall be approximately that recommended by the manufacturer. The natural gas supplied should have a higher heating value within ±5 percent of 1,025 Btu's per standard cubic foot. Determine the higher heating value, in Btu's per standard cubic foot, for the natural gas to be used in the test, with an error no greater than one percent. Alternatively, the test can be conducted using “bottled” natural gas of a higher heating value within ±5 percent of 1,025 Btu's per standard cubic foot as long as the actual higher heating value of the bottled natural gas has been determined with an error no greater than one percent as certified by the supplier.

1.4.3 Propane gas supply. For an unvented gas heater utilizing propane, maintain the gas supply to the heater with a normal inlet test pressure immediately ahead of all controls at 11 to 13 inches of water column. The regulator outlet pressure at normal supply test pressure shall be that recommended by the manufacturer. The propane supplied should have a higher heating value of within±5 percent of 2,500 Btu's per standard cubic foot. Determine the higher heating value in Btu's per standard foot, for the propane to be used in the test, with an error no greater than one percent. Alternatively, the test can be conducted using “bottled” propane of a higher heating value within ±5 percent of 2,500 Btu's per standard cubic foot as long as the actual higher heating value of the bottled propane has been determined with an error no greater than one percent as certified by the supplier.

1.4.4 Oil supply. For an unvented oil heater utilizing kerosene, determine the higher heating value in Btu's per gallon with an error no greater than one percent. Alternatively, the test can be conducted using a tested fuel of a higher heating value within ±5 percent of 137,400 Btu's per gallon as long as the actual higher heating value of the tested fuel has been determined with an error no greater than one percent as certified by the supplier.

1.5 Energy flow instrumentation. Install one or more energy flow instruments which measure, as appropriate and with an error no greater than one percent, the quantity of electrical energy, natural gas, propane gas, or oil supplied to the heater.

2. Testing and measurements.

2.1 Electric power measurement. Establish the test conditions set forth in section 1 of this appendix. Allow an electric heater to warm up for at least five minutes before recording the maximum electric power measurement from the wattmeter. Record the maximum electric power (PE) expressed in kilowatts.

Allow the auxiliary electrical system of a forced air unvented gas, propane, or oil heater to operate for at least five minutes before recording the maximum auxiliary electric power measurement from the wattmeter. Record the maximum auxiliary electric power (PA) expressed in kilowatts.

2.2 Natural gas, propane, and oil measurement. Establish the test conditions as set forth in section 1 of this appendix. A natural gas, propane, or oil heater shall be operated for one hour. Using either the nameplate rating or the energy flow instrumentation set forth in section 1.5 of this appendix and the fuel supply rating set forth in sections 1.4.2, 1.4.3, or 1.4.4 of this appendix, as appropriate, determine the maximum fuel input (PF) of the heater under test in Btu's per hour. The energy flow instrumentation shall measure the maximum fuel input with an error no greater than one percent.

2.3 Pilot light measurement. Except as provided in section 2.3.1 of this appendix, measure the energy input rate to the pilot light (Qp), with an error no greater than 3 percent, for unvented heaters so equipped.

2.3.1 The measurement of Qp is not required for unvented heaters where the pilot light is designed to be turned off by the user when the heater is not in use (i.e., for units where turning the control to the OFF position will shut off the gas supply to the burner(s) and the pilot light). This provision applies only if an instruction to turn off the unit is provided on the heater near the gas control value (e.g., by label) by the manufacturer.

2.4 Electrical standby mode power measurement. Except as provided in section 2.4.1 of this appendix, for all electric heaters and unvented heaters with electrical auxiliaries, measure the standby power (PW,SB) in accordance with the procedures in IEC 62301 Second Edition (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), with all electrical auxiliaries not activated. Voltage shall be as specified in section 1.4.1 Electrical supply of this appendix. The recorded standby power (PW,SB) shall be rounded to the second decimal place, and for loads greater than or equal to 10W, at least three significant figures shall be reported.

2.4.1 The measurement of PW,SB is not required for heaters designed to be turned off by the user when the heater is not in use (i.e., for units where turning the control to the OFF position will shut off the electrical supply to the heater). This provision applies only if an instruction to turn off the unit is provided on the heater (e.g., by label) by the manufacturer.

3. Calculations.

3.1 Annual energy consumption for primary electric heaters. For primary electric heaters, calculate the annual energy consumption (EE) expressed in kilowatt-hours per year and defined as:

EE = 2080(0.77)DHR

where:

2080 = national average annual heating load hours

0.77 = adjustment factor

DHR = design heating requirement and is equal to PE/1.2 in kilowatts.

PE = as defined in 2.1 of this appendix

1.2 = typical oversizing factor for primary electric heaters

3.2 Annual energy consumption for primary electric heaters by geographic region of the United States. For primary electric heaters, calculate the annual energy consumption by geographic region of the United States (ER) expressed in kilowatt-hours per year and defined as:

ER = HLH(0.77) (DHR)

where:

HLH = heating load hours for a specific region determined from Figure 1 of this appendix in hours

0.77 = as defined in 3.1 of this appendix

DHR = as defined in 3.1 of this appendix

3.3 Rated output for electric heaters. Calculate the rated output (Qout) for electric heaters, expressed in Btu's per hour, and defined as:

Qout = PE (3,412 Btu/kWh)

where:

PE = as defined in 2.1 of this appendix

3.4 Rated output for unvented heaters using either natural gas, propane, or oil. For unvented heaters using either natural gas, propane, or oil equipped without auxiliary electrical systems, the rated output (Qout), expressed in Btu's per hour, is equal to PF, as determined in section 2.2 of this appendix.

For unvented heaters using either natural gas, propane, or oil equipped with auxiliary electrical systems, calculate the rated output (Qout), expressed in Btu's per hour, and defined as:

Qout = PF + PA (3,412 Btu/kWh)

where:

PF = as defined in 2.2 of this appendix in Btu/hr

PA = as defined in 2.1 of this appendix in Btu/hr

eCFR graphic ec04oc91.002.gif

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(Energy Policy and Conservation Act, Pub. L. 94-163, as amended by Pub. L. 94-385; Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974, Pub. L. 93-275, as amended by Pub. L. 94-385; Department of Energy Organization Act, Pub. L. 95-91; E.O. 11790, 39 FR 23185)

[43 FR 20132, May 10, 1978. Redesignated and amended at 44 FR 37938, June 29, 1979; 49 FR 12157, Mar. 28, 1984; 77 FR 74571, Dec. 17, 2012]

Appendix H to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Power Consumption of Television Sets

Note: After April 23, 2014, any representations made with respect to the energy use or efficiency of televisions must be made in accordance with the results of testing pursuant to this appendix. Given that after April 23, 2014 representations with respect to the energy use or efficiency of televisions must be made in accordance with tests conducted pursuant to this appendix, manufacturers may wish to begin using this test procedure as soon as possible.

1. Scope

This appendix covers the test requirements used to measure the energy and power consumption of television sets that:

(i) Have a diagonal screen size of at least fifteen inches; and

(ii) Are powered by mains power (including TVs with auxiliary batteries but not TVs with main batteries).

2. Definitions and Symbols

2.1. Additional functions shall be defined using the additional functions definition in section 3.1.1 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3).

2.2. Auxiliary Battery means a battery capable of powering a clock or retaining TV settings but is incapable of powering the TV to produce dynamic video.

2.3. Brightest selectable preset picture setting means the preset picture setting in which the television produces the highest screen luminance within either the home or retail configuration.

2.4. Default picture setting means the preset picture setting that the TV enters into immediately after making a selection from the forced menu. If the TV does not have a forced menu, this is the as-shipped preset picture setting.

2.5. Forced menu means a series of menus which require the selection of initial settings before allowing the user to utilize primary functions. Within these menus contains an option to choose the viewing environment between retail and home configurations.

2.6. Home configuration means the TV configuration selected from the forced menu which is designed for typical consumer viewing and is recommended by the manufacturer for home environments.

2.7. IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 means the test standard published by the International Electrotechnical Commission, entitled “Methods of measurement of the power consumption of audio, video, and related equipment,” IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3).

2.8. IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 Blu-ray DiscTM Dynamic Broadcast-Content Video Signal means the test video content published by the International Electrotechnical Commission, entitled “IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0, video content_BD, video content for IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 on Blu-rayTM Disc,” IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3).

2.9. IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0 means the test standard published by the International Electrotechnical Commission, entitled “Household electrical appliances—Measurement of standby power,” IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3).

2.10. Illuminance means the luminous flux per unit area of light illuminating a given surface, expressed in units of lux (lx).

2.11. Luminance means the photometric measure of the luminous intensity per unit area of light traveling in a given direction, expressed in units of candelas per square meter (cd/m2).

2.12. Main battery means a battery capable of powering the TV to produce dynamic video without the support of mains power.

2.13. Off mode means the mode of operation in which the TV is connected to mains power, produces neither sound nor picture, and cannot be switched into any other mode of operation with the remote control unit, an internal signal, or external signal.

2.14. On mode means the mode of operation in which the TV is connected to mains power, and is capable of producing dynamic video.

2.15. Preset picture setting means a preprogrammed factory setting obtained from the TV menu with pre-determined picture parameters such as brightness, contrast, color, sharpness, etc. Preset picture settings can be selected within the home or retail mode.

2.16. Retail configuration means the TV configuration selected from the forced menu which is designed to highlight the TV's features in a retail environment. This configuration may display demos, disable configurable settings, or increase screen brightness in a manner which is not desirable for typical consumer viewing.

2.17. Special functions shall be defined using the definition in section 3.1.18 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3).

2.18. Standby-passive mode means the mode of operation in which the TV is connected to mains power, produces neither sound nor picture, and can be switched into another mode with only the remote control unit or an internal signal.

2.19. Standby-active, high mode means the mode of operation in which the TV is connected to mains power, produces neither sound nor picture, is exchanging/receiving data with/from an external source, and can be switched into another mode of operation with the remote control unit, an internal signal, or an external signal.

2.20. Standby-active, low mode means the mode of operation in which the TV is connected to mains power, produces neither sound nor picture, can be switched into another mode with the remote control unit or an internal signal, and can additionally be switched into another mode with an external signal.

2.21. Symbol usage. The following identity relationships are provided to help clarify the symbols used throughout this test procedure.

ABC—Automatic Brightness Control

AEC—Annual Energy Consumption

BD—Blu-ray DiscTM

DVD—Digital Versatile DiscTM

DVI—Digital Visual Interface

HDMI®—High Definition Multimedia Interface

Lbrightest—Screen luminance in brightest selectable preset picture setting within the home configuration

Ldefault—Screen luminance in default picture setting within the home configuration

Ldefault_retail—Screen luminance in default picture setting within the retail configuration

LAN—Local Area Network

Pon—Power consumed in on mode

P3—Average power consumed in on mode, ABC enabled, 3 lx

P12—Average power consumed in on mode, ABC enabled, 12 lx

P35—Average power consumed in on mode, ABC enabled, 35 lx

P100—Average power consumed in on mode, ABC enabled, 100 lx

Pstandby-passive—Power consumption in standby-passive mode

Pstandby-active, low—Power consumption in standby-active, low mode

Poff—Power consumption in off mode

STB—Set-top Box

THD—Total Harmonic Distortion

TV—Television Set

USB—Universal Serial Bus

W3—Percent weighting for on mode, ABC enabled, 3 lx

W12—Percent weighting for on mode, ABC enabled, 12 lx

W35—Percent weighting for on mode, ABC enabled, 35 lx

W100—Percent weighting for on mode, ABC enabled, 100 lx

WAN—Wide Area Network

3. Accuracy and Precision of Measurement Equipment

3.1. Voltage and Frequency. Set the test voltage and frequency to the rated electrical supply values of the region in accordance with Table 1 in section 4.3.1 of IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0

3.2. Power Supply Requirements. The TV power use shall be measured using a power supply that meets the specifications found in section 4.3.1 of IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3). The THD of the supply voltage shall not exceed 5%, inclusive to the 13th order harmonic, when the unit is under test.

3.3. Power Meter Requirements. The power measurement shall be carried out directly by means of a wattmeter, a wattmeter with averaging function, or a watt-hour meter by dividing the reading by the measuring time. For TVs where the input video signal varies over time, use a wattmeter with an averaging function to carry out the measurement.

3.3.1. The sampling rate of the watt-hour meter or wattmeter with averaging function shall be one measurement per second or more frequent.

3.3.2. The power measurement instrument shall measure and record the power factor and the real power consumed during all on mode tests at the same sampling rate.

3.3.3. Power measurements of 0.5 W or greater shall be made with an uncertainty of less than or equal to 2 percent (at the 95 percent confidence level). Measurements of power of less than 0.5 W shall be made with an uncertainty of less than or equal to 0.01 W (at the 95 percent confidence level). The power measurement instrument shall have a resolution of:

0.01 W or better for power measurements of 10 W or less;

0.1 W or better for power measurements of greater than 10 W up to 100 W;

1 W or better for power measurements of greater than 100 W.

3.4. Luminance Meter Requirements. Contact or non-contact luminance meters shall have an accuracy of ± 2 percent ± 2 digits of the digitally displayed value. Non-contact meters are also required to have an acceptance angle of 3 degrees or less.

3.5. Illuminance Meter Requirements. All illuminance meters shall have an accuracy of ± 2 percent ± 2 digits of the digitally displayed value.

3.6. Video Input Device. The video input device (i.e. BD player) shall be capable of decoding a BD signal. The video input device manufacturer shall be different from the manufacturer of the TV under test to prevent device interaction.

4. Test Room Set-Up

4.1. Ambient Temperature Conditions. For all testing, maintain ambient temperature conditions in accordance with in section 11.4.1 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3).

4.2. Ambient Relative Humidity Conditions. For all testing, maintain the ambient relative humidity between 10 and 80 percent.

4.3. Room Illuminance Level. All luminance testing (with a non-contact meter) and on mode testing (with ABC enabled by default) shall be performed in a room which measures less than or equal to 1.0 lx measured at the ABC sensor while the TV is in off or a standby mode. If the TV does not have an ABC sensor, measure at the bottom center of the TV bezel.

4.4. Installation. Install the TV in accordance with manufacturer's instructions.

4.5. TV Placement. TVs which have an ABC sensor enabled by default shall be placed at least 0.5 meters away from any wall surface (i.e. wall, ceiling, and floor). This does not include the furnishings which the TV may be placed on or the wall which the back of the TV faces. All four corners of the face of the TV shall be placed equidistant from a vertical reference plane (e.g. wall).

5. TV and Video Signal Configuration

5.1. Additional Functions. The TV shall be set up according to the requirements in section 11.4.5 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3).

5.2. Video Connection Priority. The TV and the video input device shall be connected using an HDMI input cable. If the TV does not have an HDMI input terminal, the specified input terminals shall be used in the following order: Component video, S-video, and Composite video.

5.3. Input Terminal. If the TV has multiple input terminals of the same type (i.e. HDMI 1, HDMI 2), testing shall only be performed using any input terminal designed for viewing live TV or dynamic content from a BD player or STB, not from an input designed for an alternative purpose. Examples 1 and 2 provide visual explanations of this requirement.

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5.4. Special Functions. The TV shall be set up according to the requirements in section 11.4.6 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3).

5.5. Special Function Configuration. If at any time during on mode operation a message prompt is displayed requesting the configuration of special functions, the most power consumptive configuration shall be selected. If it is unknown which configuration yields the most power consumptive state, verify the selection by measuring the power consumption of each possible configuration.

Note: The selection of the home or retail configuration within the forced menu is not considered the configuration of a special function, and is therefore exempt from this requirement.

5.6. On Mode Picture Setting. Ensure that the TV is in the default picture setting within the home configuration for all on mode tests. This picture setting shall only be changed as instructed by the luminance test.

5.7. Video Aspect Ratio. The input video signal shall be configured in accordance with section 11.4.9 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3)

5.8. Frame Rate. The video frame rate shall be selected in accordance with section 11.4.10 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3)

5.9. Sound level. The TV sound level shall be configured in accordance with section 11.4.11 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3)

5.10. Network Connection Configuration.

5.10.1. Network Connections and Capabilities. Network connections should be listed in the user manual. If no connections are specified in the user manual, verify that the TV does not have network capabilities by checking for the absence of physical connections and the absence of network settings in the menu. If the TV has the capability to be connected to a network but was not shipped with a required piece of hardware (e.g. wireless adapter), that connection type shall not be tested.

5.10.2. Network Configuration. If the TV is network enabled, connect it to a LAN in on mode and prior to being placed into standby mode. The LAN shall allow devices to ping other devices on the network but will not allow access to a WAN. If the TV has multiple network connections (e.g., Wi-Fi and Ethernet), the TV shall be configured and connected to a single network source in accordance with the hierarchy of connections listed in Table 1 of this section.

Table 1—Network Connection Hierarchy

Priority Network connection type
1Wi-Fi (Institution of Electrical and Electronics Engineers—IEEE 802.11-20072)
2Ethernet (IEEE 802.3). If the TV supports Energy Efficient Ethernet (IEEE 802.3az-20103), then it shall be connected to a device that also supports IEEE 802.3az.

6. Calculation of Average Power Consumption

6.1. Average Power Calculation. For all tests in the on, standby-active, low, and standby-passive modes, the average power shall be calculated using one of the following two methods:

6.1.1. Record the accumulated energy (Ei) in kilo-watt hours (kWh) consumed over the time period specified for each test (Ti). The average power consumption is calculated as Pi = Ei/Ti.

6.1.2. Record the average power consumption (Pi) by sampling the power at a rate of at least 1 sample per second and computing the arithmetic mean of all samples over the time period specified for each test (Ti).

The resulting average power consumption value for each mode of operation shall be rounded according to the accurary requirements specified in section 3.3.3 of this section.

7. Test Measurements.

7.1. On Mode Test.

7.1.1. On Mode Stabilization. If the TV has an ABC sensor enabled by default, direct at least 300 lx into the ABC sensor. The TV shall be stabilized prior to testing on mode using the IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 Blu-ray DiscTM dynamic broadcast-content video signal in accordance with section 11.4.2 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3).

7.1.2. On Mode Test for TVs without ABC Enabled by Default. The following test shall be performed if the TV is shipped with ABC disabled by default or the ABC function is unavailable. Display the IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 Blu-ray DiscTM dynamic broadcast-content video signal for one 10-minute period (incorporated by reference, see §430.3). Measure and record the average power consumption value over the test duration as Pon.

7.1.3. On Mode Test for TVs with ABC Enabled by Default. The following test shall be performed if the TV is shipped with ABC enabled by default:

7.1.3.1. Illuminance Values. Display the IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 Blu-ray DiscTM dynamic broadcast-content video signal for one 10-minute period (incorporated by reference, see §430.3) with 100 lx (± 5 lx) entering the ABC sensor. Measure and record the average power consumption value over the test duration as P100. Repeat the measurements with 35 lx (± 2 lx), 12 lx (± 1 lx), and 3 lux (± 1 lx) entering the ABC sensor and record the values as P35, P12, and P3 respectively. Testing shall be performed from the brightest to dimmest illuminance value and the values shall be changed by varying the input voltage to the light source.

Note: The 3 lx illuminance value shall be simulated using a 67 mm 2 F-stop neutral density filter. 12 lx is measured at the ABC sensor prior to the application of the neutral density filter.

7.1.3.2. On Mode Power Calculation. All illuminance values shall be weighted equally when calculating the on mode power for a TV with ABC enabled by default and shall be determined by the following equation:

Pon = P100 * W100 + P35 * W35 + P12 * W12 + P3 * W3

Where:

W100 = W35 = W12 = W3 = 0.25

7.1.3.3. Lamp Requirements. A standard spectrum, halogen incandescent aluminized reflector lamp with a lamp diameter of 95 mm (±10 mm), a beam angle of 30 degrees (± 10 degrees), and a center beam candlepower of 1500 cd (± 500 cd) shall be positioned in front of the ABC sensor so that the light is directed into the sensor.

Note: Lamps with spectrum modifying qualities, such as an IR coating, are not considered to meet a standard spectrum.

7.1.3.4. Light Source Set-up. The center of the lamp shall measure 1.5 m (±0.1 m) from the center of the ABC sensor. The light source shall be aligned ensuring that the center focal point of the lamp is perpendicular to the center of the ABC sensor.

7.1.3.5. Illuminance Measurement. The room illuminance shall be measured at the sensor in the direction of the light source while the TV is on and displaying the first menu from the IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 Blu-ray DiscTM dynamic broadcast-content video signal.

7.2. Luminance Test.

7.2.1. Luminance Test Set-up.

7.2.1.1. Picture Setting Set-up. When transitioning from the on mode power consumption test to the luminance test, the TV shall remain in the default picture setting within the home configuration for the first luminance measurement.

7.2.1.2. ABC Configuration. The ABC sensor shall be disabled at all times during the luminance test. If the ABC sensor is incapable of being disabled through the TV settings menu, direct at least 300 lx of light into the ABC sensor.

7.2.1.3. Stabilization. Prior to the first luminance measurement, the TV must undergo a 10-minute re-stabilization period using the IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 Blu-ray DiscTM dynamic broadcast-content video signal.

7.2.2. Luminance Meter Set-up. Align the luminance meter perpendicular to the center of the TV screen. If a non-contact luminance meter is used to measure the screen luminance, the luminance measurement shall be taken at a distance capable of meeting the meter specifications outlined in section 3.1.3, and in accordance with the meter's user manual.

7.2.3. Three Vertical Bar Signal Measurement. The IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 three vertical bar signal found in section 11.5.5 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3) shall be displayed for no more than 5 seconds when each luminance measurement is taken. The luminance measurement taken in the default picture setting within the home configuration shall be recorded as LDefault_Home.

7.2.4. Luminance in the Brightest Selectable Preset Picture Setting. Using the IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 three vertical bar signal, determine the brightest selectable preset picture setting within the home configuration. Measure and record the screen luminance in the brightest selectable preset picture setting as LBrightest_Home.

7.2.5. Retail Configuration Luminance Measurement. If the TV has a retail configuration and the retail configuration is acceptable for making a luminance measurement, measure and record the screen luminance in the default picture setting within the retail configuration as LDefault_Retail. A retail configuration is considered acceptable for a luminance measurement if the TV does not display a demo or ticker which alters the screen content, or if such features are present, they must be capable of being disabled for the entire re-stabilization period and measurement.

7.3. Standby Mode Test.

7.3.1. Video Input Device. The video input device shall be disconnected from the TV for all testing in standby mode.

7.3.2. Standby-Passive Mode. The standby-passive mode test shall be performed according to section 5.3.1 of IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3). Measure and record the average power consumption value over the test duration as Pstandby-passive.

7.3.3. Standby-Active, Low Mode. The standby-active, low mode shall only be tested if the TV is capable of connecting to a network and is capable of entering this mode of operation. The standby-active, low mode test shall be performed according to section 5.3.1 of IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3). Measure and record the average power consumption value over the test duration as Pstandby-active,low.

7.4. Off Mode Test.

7.4.1. The off mode test shall be performed according to section 5.3.1 of IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0 (incorporated by reference, see §430.3). Measure and record the average power consumption value over the test duration as Poff.

8. Annual Energy Consumption

8.1. Input Value. The annual energy consumption (AEC) of the TV shall be calculated using on mode, standby mode, and off mode power consumption values as measured pursuant to section 7.1, 7.3, and 7.4 respectively.

8.2. Rounding. Calculate the AEC of the TV using the equation below. The calculated AEC value shall be rounded as follows:

If the calculated AEC value is 100 kWh or less, the rated value shall be rounded to the nearest tenth of a kWh;

If the calculated AEC value is greater than 100 kWh, the rated value shall be rounded to the nearest kWh.

8.3. Calculations. Express the AEC in kWh per year, according to the following:

AEC = 365 * (Pon * Hon + Pstandby-active, low * Hstandby-active, low + Pstandby-passive * Hstandby-passive + Poff * Hoff)/1000

Where:

Pm = power measured in a given mode m (in Watts)

Hm = hours per day spent in mode m

365 = conversion factor from daily to yearly

1000 = conversion factor from watts to kilowatts

Values for Hm (in hours/day) are specified in Table 2 of this section:

Table 2—Hourly Weightings

Standby-active, low modeHonHstandby-active, lowHstandby-passiveHoff
Yes51900
No50190

[78 FR 63841, Oct. 25, 2013]

Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Conventional Ranges, Conventional Cooking Tops, Conventional Ovens, and Microwave Ovens

Note: Any representation made after April 29, 2013 related to standby mode and off mode energy consumption of conventional ranges, conventional cooking tops, and conventional ovens, or after July 17, 2013 for standby and off mode energy consumption of microwave ovens, must be based upon results generated under this test procedure.

Any representation related to standby mode and off mode energy consumption of microwave ovens made between February 19, 2013 and July 17, 2013 may be based upon results generated under this test procedure or upon the test procedure as it appeared at 10 CFR part 430, subpart B, appendix I as contained in the 10 CFR parts 200 to 499 edition revised as of January 1, 2012.

Upon the compliance date(s) of any energy conservation standard(s) for conventional ranges, conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, and microwave ovens that incorporates standby mode and off mode energy consumption, use of the applicable provisions of this test procedure to demonstrate compliance with the energy conservation standard will also be required.

1. Definitions

1.1 Active mode means a mode in which the product is connected to a mains power source, has been activated, and is performing the main functions of producing heat by means of a gas flame, electric resistance heating, or microwave energy, or circulating air internally or externally to the cooking product. Delay start mode is a one-off, user-initiated, short-duration function that is associated with an active mode.

1.2 Built-in means the product is supported by surrounding cabinetry, walls, or other similar structures.

1.3 Combined low-power mode means the aggregate of available modes other than active mode, but including the delay start mode portion of active mode.

1.4 Cycle finished mode means a standby mode in which a conventional cooking top, conventional oven, or conventional range provides continuous status display following operation in active mode.

1.5 Drop-in means the product is supported by horizontal surface cabinetry.

1.6 Fan-only mode means an active mode that is not user-selectable and in which a fan circulates air internally or externally to the cooking product for a finite period of time after the end of the heating function, where the end of the heating function is indicated to the consumer by means of a display, indicator light, or audible signal.

1.7 Forced convection means a mode of conventional oven operation in which a fan is used to circulate the heated air within the oven compartment during cooking.

1.8 Freestanding means the product is not supported by surrounding cabinetry, walls, or other similar structures.

1.9 IEC 62301 (First Edition) means the test standard published by the International Electrotechnical Commission, titled “Household electrical appliances—Measurement of standby power,” Publication 62301 (First Edition 2005-06) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

1.10 IEC 62301 (Second Edition) means the test standard published by the International Electrotechnical Commission, titled “Household electrical appliances—Measurement of standby power,” Publication 62301 (Edition 2.0 2011-01) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

1.11 Inactive mode means a standby mode that facilitates the activation of active mode by remote switch (including remote control), internal sensor, or timer, or that provides continuous status display.

1.12 Normal non-operating temperature means the temperature of all areas of an appliance to be tested are within 5 °F (2.8 °C) of the temperature that the identical areas of the same basic model of the appliance would attain if it remained in the test room for 24 hours while not operating with all oven doors closed.

1.13 Off mode means a mode in which the product is connected to a mains power source and is not providing any active mode or standby mode function, and where the mode may persist for an indefinite time. An indicator that only shows the user that the product is in the off position is included within the classification of an off mode.

1.14 Primary energy consumption means either the electrical energy consumption of a conventional electric oven or the gas energy consumption of a conventional gas oven.

1.15 Secondary energy consumption means any electrical energy consumption of a conventional gas oven.

1.16 Standard cubic foot (or liter (L)) of gas means that quantity of gas that occupies 1 cubic foot (or alternatively expressed in L) when saturated with water vapor at a temperature of 60 °F (15.6 °C) and a pressure of 30 inches of mercury (101.6 kPa) (density of mercury equals 13.595 grams per cubic centimeter).

1.17 Standby mode means any mode in which a conventional cooking top, conventional oven, conventional range, or microwave oven is connected to a main power source and offers one or more of the following user-oriented or protective functions which may persist for an indefinite time: (a) facilitation of the activation of other modes (including activation or deactivation of active mode) by remote switch (including remote control), internal sensor, or timer; (b) provision of continuous functions, including information or status displays (including clocks) or sensor-based functions. A timer is a continuous clock function (which may or may not be associated with a display) that allows for regularly scheduled tasks and that operates on a continuous basis.

1.18 Thermocouple means a device consisting of two dissimilar metals which are joined together and, with their associated wires, are used to measure temperature by means of electromotive force.

1.19 Symbol usage. The following identity relationships are provided to help clarify the symbology used throughout this procedure.

A—Number of Hours in a Year

C—Specific Heat

E—Energy Consumed

Eff—Cooking Efficiency

H—Heating Value of Gas

K—Conversion for Watt-hours to Kilowatt-hours

Ke—3.412 Btu/Wh, Conversion for Watt-hours to Btu's

M—Mass

n—Number of Units

O—Annual Useful Cooking Energy Output

P—Power

Q—Gas Flow Rate

R—Energy Factor, Ratio of Useful Cooking Energy Output to Total Energy Input

S—Number of Self-Cleaning Operations per Year

T—Temperature

t—Time

V—Volume of Gas Consumed

W—Weight of Test Block

2. Test Conditions

2.1 Installation. A free standing kitchen range shall be installed with the back directly against, or as near as possible to, a vertical wall which extends at least 1 foot above and on either side of the appliance. There shall be no side walls. A drop-in, built-in, or wall-mounted appliance shall be installed in an enclosure in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. These appliances are to be completely assembled with all handles, knobs, guards, and the like mounted in place. Any electric resistance heaters, gas burners, baking racks, and baffles shall be in place in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions; however, broiler pans are to be removed from the oven's baking compartment.

2.1.1 Conventional electric ranges, ovens, and cooking tops. These products shall be connected to an electrical supply circuit with voltage as specified in section 2.2.1 of this appendix with a watt-hour meter installed in the circuit. The watt-hour meter shall be as described in section 2.9.1.1 of this appendix. For standby mode and off mode testing, these products shall also be installed in accordance with Section 5, Paragraph 5.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), disregarding the provisions regarding batteries and the determination, classification, and testing of relevant modes.

2.1.2 Conventional gas ranges, ovens, and cooking tops. These products shall be connected to a gas supply line with a gas meter installed between the supply line and the appliance being tested, according to manufacturer's specifications. The gas meter shall be as described in section 2.9.2 of this appendix. Conventional gas ranges, ovens, and cooking tops with electrical ignition devices or other electrical components shall be connected to an electrical supply circuit of nameplate voltage with a watt-hour meter installed in the circuit. The watt-hour meter shall be as described in section 2.9.1.1 of this appendix. For standby mode and off mode testing, these products shall also be installed in accordance with Section 5, Paragraph 5.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), disregarding the provisions regarding batteries and the determination, classification, and testing of relevant modes.

2.1.3 Microwave ovens. Install the microwave oven in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and connect to an electrical supply circuit with voltage as specified in section 2.2.1 of this appendix. The microwave oven shall also be installed in accordance with Section 5, Paragraph 5.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), disregarding the provisions regarding batteries and the determination, classification, and testing of relevant modes. A watt meter shall be installed in the circuit and shall be as described in section 2.9.1.3 of this appendix.

2.2 Energy supply.

2.2.1 Electrical supply.

2.2.1.1 Voltage. Maintain the electrical supply to the conventional range, conventional cooking top, and conventional oven being tested at 240/120 volts ±2 percent except that basic models rated only at 208/120 volts shall be tested at that rating ±2 percent. For microwave oven testing, maintain the electrical supply to the unit at 240/120 volts ±1 percent. Maintain the electrical supply frequency for all products at 60 hertz ±1 percent.

2.2.1.2 Supply voltage waveform. For the standby mode and off mode testing, maintain the electrical supply voltage waveform as indicated in Section 4, Paragraph 4.3.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3). For microwave oven standby mode and off mode testing, if the power measuring instrument used for testing is unable to measure and record the total harmonic content during the test measurement period, it is acceptable to measure and record the total harmonic content immediately before and after the test measurement period.

2.2.2.1 Gas burner adjustments. Conventional gas ranges, ovens, and cooking tops shall be tested with all of the gas burners adjusted in accordance with the installation or operation instructions provided by the manufacturer. In every case, the burner must be adjusted with sufficient air flow to prevent a yellow flame or a flame with yellow tips.

2.2.2.2 Natural gas. For testing convertible cooking appliances or appliances which are designed to operate using only natural gas, maintain the natural gas pressure immediately ahead of all controls of the unit under test at 7 to 10 inches of water column (1743.6 to 2490.8 Pa). The regulator outlet pressure shall equal the manufacturer's recommendation. The natural gas supplied should have a heating value of approximately 1,025 Btu's per standard cubic foot (38.2 kJ/L). The actual gross heating value, Hn, in Btu's per standard cubic foot (kJ/L), for the natural gas to be used in the test shall be obtained either from measurements made by the manufacturer conducting the test using equipment that meets the requirements described in Section 2.9.4 or by the use of bottled natural gas whose gross heating value is certified to be at least as accurate a value that meets the requirements in Section 2.9.4.

2.2.2.3 Propane. For testing convertible cooking appliances with propane or for testing appliances which are designed to operate using only LP-gas, maintain the propane pressure immediately ahead of all controls of the unit under test at 11 to 13 inches of water column (2740 to 3238 Pa). The regulator outlet pressure shall equal the manufacturer's recommendation. The propane supplied should have a heating value of approximately 2,500 Btu's per standard cubic foot (93.2 kJ/L). The actual gross heating value, Hp, in Btu's per standard cubic foot (kJ/L), for the propane to be used in the test shall be obtained either from measurements made by the manufacturer conducting the test using equipment that meets the requirements described in Section 2.9.4 or by the use of bottled propane whose gross heating value is certified to be at least as accurate a value that meets the requirements described in Section 2.9.4.

2.2.2.4 Test gas. A basic model of a convertible cooking appliance shall be tested with natural gas, but may also be tested with propane. Any basic model of a conventional range, conventional cooking top, or conventional oven which is designed to operate using only natural gas as the energy source must be tested with natural gas. Any basic model of a conventional range, conventional cooking top, or conventional oven which is designed to operate using only LP gas as the gas energy source must be tested with propane gas.

2.3 Air circulation. Maintain air circulation in the room sufficient to secure a reasonably uniform temperature distribution, but do not cause a direct draft on the unit under test.

2.4 Setting the conventional oven thermostat.

2.4.1 Conventional electric oven. Install a thermocouple approximately in the center of the usable baking space. Provide a temperature indicator system for measuring the oven's temperature with an accuracy as indicated in Section 2.9.3.2. If the oven thermostat does not cycle on and off, adjust or determine the conventional electric oven thermostat setting to provide an average internal temperature which is 325° ±5 °F (180.6° ±2.8 °C) higher than the room ambient air temperature. If the oven thermostat operates by cycling on and off, adjust or determine the conventional electric oven thermostat setting to provide an average internal temperature which is 325° ±5 °F (180.6° ±2.8 °C) higher than the room ambient air temperature. This shall be done by measuring the maximum and minimum temperatures in any three consecutive cut-off/cut-on actions of the electric resistance heaters, excluding the initial cut-off/cut-on action, by the thermostat after the temperature rise of 325° ±5 °F (180.6° ±2.8 °C) has been attained by the conventional electric oven. Remove the thermocouple after the thermostat has been set.

2.4.2 Conventional gas oven. Install five parallel-connected weighted thermocouples, one located at the center of the conventional gas oven's usable baking space and the other four equally spaced between the center and the corners of the conventional gas oven on the diagonals of a horizontal plane through the center of the conventional gas oven. Each weighted thermocouple shall be constructed of a copper disc that is 1-inch (25.4 mm) in diameter and 18 -inch (3.2 mm) thick. The two thermocouple wires shall be located in two holes in the disc spaced 12 -inch (12.7 mm) apart, with each hole being located 14 -inch (6.4 mm) from the center of the disc. Both thermocouple wires shall be silver-soldered to the copper disc. Provide a temperature indicator system for measuring the oven's temperature with an accuracy as indicated in Section 2.9.3.2. If the oven thermostat does not cycle on or off, adjust or determine the conventional gas oven thermostat setting to provide an average internal temperature which is 325 °±5 °F (180.6 °±2.8 °C) higher than the room ambient air temperature. If the oven thermostat operates by cycling on and off, adjust or determine the conventional gas oven thermostat setting to provide an average internal temperature which is 325° ±5 °F (180.6 ±2.8 °C) higher than the room ambient air temperature. This shall be done by measuring the maximum and minimum temperatures in any three consecutive cut-off/cut-on actions of the gas burners, excluding the initial cut-off/cut-on action, by the thermostat after the temperature rise of 325° ±5 °F (180.6° ±2.8 °C) has been attained by the conventional gas oven. Remove the thermocouples after the thermostat has been set.

2.5 Ambient room air temperature.

2.5.1 Active mode ambient room air temperature. During the active mode test, maintain an ambient room air temperature, TR, of 77° ±9 °F (25° ±5 °C) for conventional ovens and cooking tops, as measured at least 5 feet (1.5 m) and not more than 8 feet (2.4 m) from the nearest surface of the unit under test and approximately 3 feet (0.9 m) above the floor. The temperature shall be measured with a thermometer or temperature indicating system with an accuracy as specified in section 2.9.3.1.

2.5.2 Standby mode and off mode ambient temperature. For standby mode and off mode testing, maintain room ambient air temperature conditions as specified in Section 4, Paragraph 4.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

2.6 Normal nonoperating temperature. All areas of the appliance to be tested shall attain the normal nonoperating temperature, as defined in section 1.12 of this appendix, before any testing begins. The equipment for measuring the applicable normal nonoperating temperature shall be as described in sections 2.9.3.1, 2.9.3.2, 2.9.3.3, and 2.9.3.4 of this appendix, as applicable.

2.7 Test blocks for conventional oven and cooking top. The test blocks shall be made of aluminum alloy No. 6061, with a specific heat of 0.23 Btu/lb- °F (0.96 kJ/[kg ÷ °C]) and with any temper that will give a czoefficient of thermal conductivity of 1073.3 to 1189.1 Btu-in/h-ft2- °F (154.8 to 171.5 W/[m ÷ °C]). Each block shall have a hole at its top. The hole shall be 0.08 inch (2.03 mm) in diameter and 0.80 inch (20.3 mm) deep. The manufacturer conducting the test may provide other means which will ensure that the thermocouple junction is installed at this same position and depth.

The bottom of each block shall be flat to within 0.002 inch (0.051 mm) TIR (total indicator reading). Determine the actual weight of each test block with a scale with an accuracy as indicated in Section 2.9.5.

2.7.1 Conventional oven test block. The test block for the conventional oven, W1, shall be 6.25±0.05 inches (158.8±1.3 mm) in diameter, approximately 2.8 inches (71 mm) high and shall weigh 8.5±0.1 lbs (3.86±0.05 kg). The block shall be finished with an anodic black coating which has a minimum thickness of 0.001 inch (0.025 mm) or with a finish having the equivalent absorptivity.

2.7.2 Small test block for conventional cooking top. The small test block, W2, shall be 6.25±0.05 inches (158.8±1.3 mm) in diameter, approximately 2.8 inches (71 mm) high and shall weigh 8.5±0.1 lbs (3.86±0.05 kg).

2.7.3 Large test block for conventional cooking top. The large test block for the conventional cooking top, W3, shall be 9±0.05 inches (228.6±1.3 mm) in diameter, approximately 3.0 inches (76 mm) high and shall weigh 19±0.1 lbs (8.62±0.05 kg).

2.7.4 Thermocouple installation. Install the thermocouple such that the thermocouple junction (where the thermocouple contacts the test block) is at the bottom of the hole provided in the test block and that the thermocouple junction makes good thermal contact with the aluminum block. If the test blocks are to be water cooled between tests the thermocouple hole should be sealed, or other steps taken, to insure that the thermocouple hole is completely dry at the start of the next test. Provide a temperature indicator system for measuring the test block temperature with an accuracy as indicated in Section 2.9.3.3.

2.7.5 Initial test block temperature. Maintain the initial temperature of the test blocks, TI, within ±4 °F (±2.2 °C) of the ambient room air temperature as specified in Section 2.5. If the test block has been cooled (or heated) to bring it to room temperature, allow the block to stabilize for at least 2 minutes after removal from the cooling (or heating) source, before measuring its initial temperature.

2.8 [Reserved]

2.9 Instrumentation. Perform all test measurements using the following instruments, as appropriate:

2.9.1 Electrical Measurements.

2.9.1.1 Watt-hour meter. The watt-hour meter for measuring the electrical energy consumption of conventional ovens and cooking tops shall have a resolution of 1 watt-hour (3.6 kJ) or less and a maximum error no greater than 1.5 percent of the measured value for any demand greater than 5 watts. The watt-hour meter for measuring the energy consumption of microwave ovens shall have a resolution of 0.1 watt-hour (0.36 kJ) or less and a maximum error no greater than 1.5 percent of the measured value.

2.9.1.2 Watt meter. The watt meter used to measure the conventional oven, conventional range, or range clock power shall have a resolution of 0.2 watt (0.2 J/s) or less and a maximum error no greater than 5 percent of the measured value.

2.9.1.3 Standby mode and off mode watt meter. The watt meter used to measure standby mode and off mode shall meet the requirements specified in Section 4, Paragraph 4.4 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3). For microwave oven standby mode and off mode testing, if the power measuring instrument used for testing is unable to measure and record the crest factor, power factor, or maximum current ratio during the test measurement period, it is acceptable to measure the crest factor, power factor, and maximum current ratio immediately before and after the test measurement period.

2.9.2 Gas Measurements.

2.9.2.1 Positive displacement meters. The gas meter to be used for measuring the gas consumed by the gas burners of the oven or cooking top shall have a resolution of 0.01 cubic foot (0.28 L) or less and a maximum error no greater than 1 percent of the measured valued for any demand greater than 2.2 cubic feet per hour (62.3 L/h).

2.9.3 Temperature measurement equipment.

2.9.3.1 Room temperature indicating system. The room temperature indicating system shall be as specified in Section 2.9.3.4 for ranges, ovens and cooktops.

2.9.3.2 Temperature indicator system for measuring conventional oven temperature. The equipment for measuring the conventional oven temperature shall have an error no greater than ±4 °F (±2.2 °C) over the range of 65° to 500 °F (18 °C to 260 °C).

2.9.3.3 Temperature indicator system for measuring test block temperature. The system shall have an error no greater than ±2 °F (±1.1 °C) when measuring specific temperatures over the range of 65° to 330 °F (18.3 °C to 165.6 °C). It shall also have an error no greater than ±2 °F (±1.1 °C) when measuring any temperature difference up to 240 °F (133.3 °C) within the above range.

2.9.3.4 Temperature indicator system for measuring surface temperatures. The temperature of any surface of an appliance shall be measured by means of a thermocouple in firm contact with the surface. The temperature indicating system shall have an error no greater than ±1 °F (±0.6 °C) over the range 65° to 90 °F (18 °C to 32 °C).

2.9.4 Heating Value. The heating value of the natural gas or propane shall be measured with an instrument and associated readout device that has a maximum error no greater than ±0.5% of the measured value and a resolution of ±0.2% or less of the full scale reading of the indicator instrument. The heating value of natural gas or propane must be corrected for local temperature and pressure conditions.

2.9.5 Scale. The scale used for weighing the test blocks shall have a maximum error no greater than 1 ounce (28.4 g).

3. Test Methods and Measurements

3.1. Test methods.

3.1.1 Conventional oven. Perform a test by establishing the testing conditions set forth in section 2, Test Conditions, of this appendix and turn off the gas flow to the conventional cooking top, if so equipped. Before beginning the test, the conventional oven shall be at its normal non-operating temperature as defined in section 1.12 and described in section 2.6 of this appendix. Set the conventional oven test block W1 approximately in the center of the usable baking space. If there is a selector switch for selecting the mode of operation of the oven, set it for normal baking. If an oven permits baking by either forced convection by using a fan, or without forced convection, the oven is to be tested in each of those two modes. The oven shall remain on for one complete thermostat “cut-off/cut-on” of the electrical resistance heaters or gas burners after the test block temperature has increased 234 °F (130 °C) above its initial temperature.

3.1.1.1 Self-cleaning operation of a conventional oven. Establish the test conditions set forth in section 2, Test Conditions, of this appendix. Turn off the gas flow to the conventional cooking top. The temperature of the conventional oven shall be its normal non-operating temperature as defined in section 1.12 and described in section 2.6 of this appendix. Then set the conventional oven's self-cleaning process in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. If the self-cleaning process is adjustable, use the average time recommended by the manufacturer for a moderately soiled oven.

3.1.1.2 Conventional oven standby mode and off mode power. Establish the standby mode and off mode testing conditions set forth in section 2, Test Conditions, of this appendix. For conventional ovens that take some time to enter a stable state from a higher power state as discussed in Section 5, Paragraph 5.1, Note 1 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), allow sufficient time for the conventional oven to reach the lower power state before proceeding with the test measurement. Follow the test procedure as specified in Section 5, Paragraph 5.3.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) for testing in each possible mode as described in 3.1.1.2.1 and 3.1.1.2.2 of this appendix. For units in which power varies as a function of displayed time in standby mode, set the clock time to 3:23 at the end of the stabilization period specified in Section 5, Paragraph 5.3 of IEC 62301 (First Edition), and use the average power approach described in Section 5, Paragraph 5.3.2(a) of IEC 62301 (First Edition), but with a single test period of 10 minutes +0/−2 sec after an additional stabilization period until the clock time reaches 3:33.

3.1.1.2.1 If the conventional oven has an inactive mode, as defined in section 1.11 of this appendix, measure and record the average inactive mode power of the conventional oven, PIA, in watts.

3.1.1.2.2 If the conventional oven has an off mode, as defined in section 1.13 of this appendix, measure and record the average off mode power of the conventional oven, POM, in watts.

3.1.2 Conventional cooking top. Establish the test conditions set forth in section 2, Test Conditions, of this appendix. Turn off the gas flow to the conventional oven(s), if so equipped. The temperature of the conventional cooking top shall be its normal nonoperating temperature as defined in section 1.12 and described in section 2.6 of this appendix. Set the test block in the center of the surface unit under test. The small test block, W2, shall be used on electric surface units of 7 inches (178 mm) or less in diameter. The large test block, W3, shall be used on electric surface units over 7 inches (178 mm) in diameter and on all gas surface units. Turn on the surface unit under test and set its energy input rate to the maximum setting. When the test block reaches 144 °F (80 °C) above its initial test block temperature, immediately reduce the energy input rate to 25±5 percent of the maximum energy input rate. After 15±0.1 minutes at the reduced energy setting, turn off the surface unit under test.

3.1.2.1 Conventional cooking top standby mode and off mode power. Establish the standby mode and off mode testing conditions set forth in section 2, Test Conditions, of this appendix. For conventional cooktops that take some time to enter a stable state from a higher power state as discussed in Section 5, Paragraph 5.1, Note 1 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), allow sufficient time for the conventional cooking top to reach the lower power state before proceeding with the test measurement. Follow the test procedure as specified in Section 5, Paragraph 5.3.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) for testing in each possible mode as described in sections 3.1.2.1.1 and 3.1.2.1.2 of this appendix. For units in which power varies as a function of displayed time in standby mode, set the clock time to 3:23 at the end of the stabilization period specified in Section 5, Paragraph 5.3 of IEC 62301 (First Edition), and use the average power approach described in Section 5, Paragraph 5.3.2(a) of IEC 62301 (First Edition), but with a single test period of 10 minutes +0/-2 sec after an additional stabilization period until the clock time reaches 3:33.

3.1.2.1.1 If the conventional cooking top has an inactive mode, as defined in section 1.11 of this appendix, measure and record the average inactive mode power of the conventional cooking top, PIA, in watts.

3.1.2.1.2 If the conventional cooking top has an off mode, as defined in section 1.13 of this appendix, measure and record the average off mode power of the conventional cooking top, POM, in watts.

3.1.3 Conventional range standby mode and off mode power. Establish the standby mode and off mode testing conditions set forth in section 2, Test Conditions, of this appendix. For conventional ranges that take some time to enter a stable state from a higher power state as discussed in Section 5, Paragraph 5.1, Note 1 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), allow sufficient time for the conventional range to reach the lower power state before proceeding with the test measurement. Follow the test procedure as specified in Section 5, Paragraph 5.3.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) for testing in each possible mode as described in sections 3.1.3.1 and 3.1.3.2 of this appendix. For units in which power varies as a function of displayed time in standby mode, set the clock time to 3:23 at the end of the stabilization period specified in Section 5, Paragraph 5.3 of IEC 62301 (First Edition), and use the average power approach described in Section 5, Paragraph 5.3.2(a) of IEC 62301 (First Edition), but with a single test period of 10 minutes +0/−2 sec after an additional stabilization period until the clock time reaches 3:33.

3.1.3.1 If the conventional range has an inactive mode, as defined in section 1.11 of this appendix, measure and record the average inactive mode power of the conventional range, PIA, in watts.

3.1.3.2 If the conventional range has an off mode, as defined in section 1.13 of this appendix, measure and record the average off mode power of the conventional range, POM, in watts.

3.1.4 Microwave oven.

3.1.4.1 Microwave oven test standby mode and off mode power. Establish the testing conditions set forth in section 2, Test Conditions, of this appendix. For microwave ovens that drop from a higher power state to a lower power state as discussed in Section 5, Paragraph 5.1, Note 1 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), allow sufficient time for the microwave oven to reach the lower power state before proceeding with the test measurement. Follow the test procedure as specified in Section 5, Paragraph 5.3.2 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition). For units in which power varies as a function of displayed time in standby mode, set the clock time to 3:23 and use the average power approach described in Section 5, Paragraph 5.3.2(a) of IEC 62301 (First Edition), but with a single test period of 10 minutes +0/−2 sec after an additional stabilization period until the clock time reaches 3:33. If a microwave oven is capable of operation in either standby mode or off mode, as defined in sections 1.17 and 1.13 of this appendix, respectively, or both, test the microwave oven in each mode in which it can operate.

3.2 Test measurements.

3.2.1 Conventional oven test energy consumption. If the oven thermostat controls the oven temperature without cycling on and off, measure the energy consumed, EO, when the temperature of the block reaches TO (TO is 234 °F (130 °C) above the initial block temperature, TI). If the oven thermostat operates by cycling on and off, make the following series of measurements: Measure the block temperature, TA, and the energy consumed, EA, or volume of gas consumed, VA, at the end of the last “ON” period of the conventional oven before the block reaches TO. Measure the block temperature, TB, and the energy consumed, EB, or volume of gas consumed, VB, at the beginning of the next “ON” period. Measure the block temperature, TC, and the energy consumed, EC, or volume of gas consumed, VC, at the end of that “ON” period. Measure the block temperature, TD, and the energy consumed, ED, or volume of gas consumed, VD, at the beginning of the following “ON” period. Energy measurements for EO, EA, EB, EC, and ED should be expressed in watt-hours (kJ) for conventional electric ovens, and volume measurements for VA, VB, VC, and VD should be expressed in standard cubic feet (L) of gas for conventional gas ovens. For a gas oven, measure in watt-hours (kJ) any electrical energy, EIO, consumed by an ignition device or other electrical components required for the operation of a conventional gas oven while heating the test block to TO.

3.2.1.1 Conventional oven average test energy consumption. If the conventional oven permits baking by either forced convection or without forced convection and the oven thermostat does not cycle on and off, measure the energy consumed with the forced convection mode, (EO)1, and without the forced convection mode, (EO)2, when the temperature of the block reaches TO (TO is 234 °F (130 °C) above the initial block temperature, TI). If the conventional oven permits baking by either forced convection or without forced convection and the oven thermostat operates by cycling on and off, make the following series of measurements with and without the forced convection mode: Measure the block temperature, TA, and the energy consumed, EA, or volume of gas consumed, VA, at the end of the last “ON” period of the conventional oven before the block reaches TO. Measure the block temperature, TB, and the energy consumed, EB, or volume of gas consumed, VB, at the beginning of the next “ON” period. Measure the block temperature, TC, and the energy consumed, EC, or volume of gas consumed, VC, at the end of that “ON” period. Measure the block temperature, TD, and the energy consumed, ED, or volume of gas consumed, VD, at the beginning of the following “ON” period. Energy measurements for EO, EA, EB, EC, and ED should be expressed in watt-hours (kJ) for conventional electric ovens, and volume measurements for VA, VB, VC, and VD should be expressed in standard cubic feet (L) of gas for conventional gas ovens. For a gas oven that can be operated with or without forced convection, measure in watt-hours (kJ) any electrical energy consumed by an ignition device or other electrical components required for the operation of a conventional gas oven while heating the test block to TO using the forced convection mode, (EIO)1, and without using the forced convection mode, (EIO)2.

3.2.1.2 Conventional oven fan-only mode energy consumption. If the conventional oven is capable of operation in fan-only mode, measure the fan-only mode energy consumption, EOF, expressed in kilowatt-hours (kJ) of electricity consumed by the conventional oven for the duration of fan-only mode, using a watt-hour meter as specified in section 2.9.1.1 of this appendix. Alternatively, if the duration of fan-only mode is known, the watt-hours consumed may be measured for a period of 10 minutes in fan-only mode, using a watt-hour meter as specified in section 2.9.1.1 of this appendix. Multiply this value by the time in minutes that the conventional oven remains in fan-only mode, tOF, and divide by 10,000 to obtain EOF. The alternative approach may be used only if the resulting EOF is representative of energy use during the entire fan-only mode.

3.2.1.3 Energy consumption of self-cleaning operation. Measure the energy consumption, ES, in watt-hours (kJ) of electricity or the volume of gas consumption, VS, in standard cubic feet (L) during the self-cleaning test set forth in section 3.1.1.1 of this appendix. For a gas oven, also measure in watt-hours (kJ) any electrical energy, EIS, consumed by ignition devices or other electrical components required during the self-cleaning test.

3.2.1.4 Standby mode and off mode energy consumption. Make measurements as specified in section 3.1.1.2 of this appendix. If the conventional oven is capable of operating in inactive mode, as defined in section 1.11 of this appendix, measure the average inactive mode power of the conventional oven, PIA, in watts as specified in section 3.1.1.2.1 of this appendix. If the conventional oven is capable of operating in off mode, as defined in section 1.13 of this appendix, measure the average off mode power of the conventional oven, POM, in watts as specified in section 3.1.1.2.2 of this appendix.

3.2.2 Conventional surface unit test energy consumption.

3.2.2.1 Conventional surface unit average test energy consumption. For the surface unit under test, measure the energy consumption, ECT, in watt-hours (kJ) of electricity or the volume of gas consumption, VCT, in standard cubic feet (L) of gas and the test block temperature, TCT, at the end of the 15 minute (reduced input setting) test interval for the test specified in section 3.1.2 of this appendix and the total time, tCT, in hours, that the unit is under test. Measure any electrical energy, EIC, consumed by an ignition device of a gas heating element or other electrical components required for the operation of the conventional gas cooking top in watt-hours (kJ).

3.2.2.2 Conventional surface unit standby mode and off mode energy consumption. Make measurements as specified in section 3.1.2.1 of this appendix. If the conventional surface unit is capable of operating in inactive mode, as defined in section 1.11 of this appendix, measure the average inactive mode power of the conventional surface unit, PIA, in watts as specified in section 3.1.2.1.1 of this appendix. If the conventional surface unit is capable of operating in off mode, as defined in section 1.13 of this appendix, measure the average off mode power of the conventional surface unit, POM, in watts as specified in section 3.1.2.1.2 of this appendix.

3.2.3 Conventional range standby mode and off mode energy consumption. Make measurements as specified in section 3.1.3 of this appendix. If the conventional range is capable of operating in inactive mode, as defined in section 1.11 of this appendix, measure the average inactive mode power of the conventional range, PIA, in watts as specified in section 3.1.3.1 of this appendix. If the conventional range is capable of operating in off mode, as defined in section 1.13 of this appendix, measure the average off mode power of the conventional range, POM, in watts as specified in section 3.1.3.2 of this appendix.

3.2.4 Microwave oven test standby mode and off mode power. Make measurements as specified in Section 5, Paragraph 5.3 of IEC 62301 (Second Edition) (incorporated by reference; see §430.3). If the microwave oven is capable of operating in standby mode, as defined in section 1.17 of this appendix, measure the average standby mode power of the microwave oven, PSB, in watts as specified in section 3.1.4.1 of this appendix. If the microwave oven is capable of operating in off mode, as defined in section 1.13 of this appendix, measure the average off mode power of the microwave oven, POM, as specified in section 3.1.4.1.

3.3 Recorded values.

3.3.1 Record the test room temperature, TR, at the start and end of each range, oven or cooktop test, as determined in Section 2.5.

3.3.2 Record measured test block weights W1, W2, and W3 in pounds (kg).

3.3.3 Record the initial temperature, T1, of the test block under test.

3.3.4 For a conventional oven with a thermostat which operates by cycling on and off, record the conventional oven test measurements TA, EA, TB, EB, TC, EC, TD, and ED for conventional electric ovens or TA, VA, TB, VB, TC, VC, TD, and VD for conventional gas ovens. If the thermostat controls the oven temperature without cycling on and off, record EO. For a gas oven which also uses electrical energy for the ignition or operation of the oven, also record EIO.

3.3.5 For a conventional oven that can be operated with or without forced convection and the oven thermostat controls the oven temperature without cycling on and off, measure the energy consumed with the forced convection mode, (EO)1, and without the forced convection mode, (EO)2. If the conventional oven operates with or without forced convection and the thermostat controls the oven temperature by cycling on and off, record the conventional oven test measurements TA, EA, TB, EB, TC, EC, TD, and ED for conventional electric ovens or TA, VA, TB, VB, TC, VC, TD, and VD for conventional gas ovens. For a gas oven that can be operated with or without forced convection, measure any electrical energy consumed by an ignition device or other electrical components used during the forced convection mode, (EIO)1, and without using the forced convection mode, (EIO)2.

3.3.6 Record the measured energy consumption, ES, or gas consumption, VS, and for a gas oven, any electrical energy, EIS, for the test of the self-cleaning operation of a conventional oven.

3.3.7 For conventional ovens, record the conventional oven standby mode and off mode test measurements PIA and POM, if applicable. For conventional cooktops, record the conventional cooking top standby mode and off mode test measurements PIA and POM, if applicable. For conventional ranges, record the conventional range standby mode and off mode test measurements PIA and POM, if applicable.

3.3.8 For the surface unit under test, record the electric energy consumption, ECT, or the gas volume consumption, VCT, the final test block temperature, TCT, and the total test time, tCT. For a gas cooking top which uses electrical energy for ignition of the burners, also record EIC.

3.3.9 Record the heating value, Hn, as determined in section 2.2.2.2 of this appendix for the natural gas supply.

3.3.10 Record the heating value, Hp, as determined in section 2.2.2.3 of this appendix for the propane supply.

3.3.11 Record the average standby mode power, PSB, for the microwave oven standby mode, as determined in section 3.2.4 of this appendix for a microwave oven capable of operating in standby mode. Record the average off mode power, POM, for the microwave oven off mode power test, as determined in section 3.2.4 of this appendix for a microwave oven capable of operating in off mode.

4. Calculation of Derived Results From Test Measurements

4.1 Conventional oven.

4.1.1 Test energy consumption. For a conventional oven with a thermostat which operates by cycling on and off, calculate the test energy consumption, EO, expressed in watt-hours (kJ) for electric ovens and in Btus (kJ) for gas ovens, and defined as:

eCFR graphic er31oc12.000.gif

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for electric ovens, and,

eCFR graphic er31oc12.001.gif

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for gas ovens,

Where:

H = either Hn or Hp, the heating value of the gas used in the test as specified in section 2.2.2.2 and section 2.2.2.3 of this appendix, expressed in Btus per standard cubic foot (kJ/L).

TO = 234 °F (130 °C) plus the initial test block temperature.

and,

eCFR graphic er31oc12.002.gif

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Where:

TA = block temperature in °F ( °C) at the end of the last “ON” period of the conventional oven before the test block reaches TO.

TB = block temperature in °F ( °C) at the beginning of the “ON” period following the measurement of TA.

TC = block temperature in °F ( °C) at the end of the “ON” period which starts with TB.

TD = block temperature in °F ( °C) at the beginning of the “ON” period which follows the measurement of TC.

EA = electric energy consumed in Wh (kJ) at the end of the last “ON” period before the test block reaches TO.

EB = electric energy consumed in Wh (kJ) at the beginning of the “ON” period following the measurement of TA.

EC = electric energy consumed in Wh (kJ) at the end of the “ON” period which starts with TB.

ED = electric energy consumed in Wh (kJ) at the beginning of the “ON” period which follows the measurement of TC.

VA = volume of gas consumed in standard cubic feet (L) at the end of the last “ON” period before the test block reaches TO.

VB = volume of gas consumed in standard cubic feet (L) at the beginning of the “ON” period following the measurement of TA.

VC = volume of gas consumed in standard cubic feet (L) at the end of the “ON” period which starts with TB.

VD = volume of gas consumed in standard cubic feet (L) at the beginning of the “ON” period which follows the measurement of TC.

4.1.1.1 Average test energy consumption. If the conventional oven can be operated with or without forced convection, determine the average test energy consumption, EO and EIO, in watt-hours (kJ) for electric ovens and Btus (kJ) for gas ovens using the following equations:

eCFR graphic er31oc12.003.gif

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Where:

(EO)1 = test energy consumption using the forced convection mode in watt-hours (kJ) for electric ovens and in Btus (kJ) for gas ovens as measured in section 3.2.1.1 of this appendix.

(EO)2 = test energy consumption without using the forced convection mode in watt-hours (kJ) for electric ovens and in Btus (kJ) for gas ovens as measured in section 3.2.1.1 of this appendix.

(EIO)1 = electrical energy consumption in watt-hours (kJ) of a gas oven in forced convection mode as measured in section 3.2.1.1 of this appendix.

(EIO)2 = electrical energy consumption in watt-hours (kJ) of a gas oven without using the forced convection mode as measured in section 3.2.1.1 of this appendix.

4.1.2 Conventional oven annual energy consumption.

4.1.2.1. Annual cooking energy consumption.

4.1.2.1.1. Annual primary energy consumption. Calculate the annual primary energy consumption for cooking, ECO, expressed in kilowatt-hours (kJ) per year for electric ovens and in Btu's (kJ) per year for gas ovens, and defined as:

eCFR graphic er03oc97.004.gif

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Where:

E O = test energy consumption as measured in Section 3.2.1 or as calculated in Section 4.1.1 or Section 4.1.1.1.

K e = 3.412 Btu/Wh (3.6 kJ/Wh,) conversion factor of watt-hours to Btu's.

O O = 29.3 kWh (105,480 kJ) per year, annual useful cooking energy output of conventional electric oven.

W 1 = measured weight of test block in pounds (kg).

C p = 0.23 Btu/lb-°F (0.96 kJ/kg ÷ °C), specific heat of test block.

T S = 234 °F (130 °C), temperature rise of test block.

eCFR graphic er03oc97.005.gif

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Where:

EO = test energy consumption as measured in Section 3.2.1. or as calculated in Section 4.1.1 or Section 4.1.1.1.

OO = 88.8 kBtu (93,684 kJ) per year, annual useful cooking energy output of conventional gas oven.

W1, Cp and TS are the same as defined above.

4.1.2.1.2 Annual secondary energy consumption for cooking of gas ovens. Calculate the annual secondary energy consumption for cooking, ESO, expressed in kilowatt-hours (kJ) per year and defined as:

eCFR graphic er03oc97.006.gif

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Where:

EIO = electrical test energy consumption as measured in Section 3.2.1 or as calculated in Section 4.1.1.1.

OO = 29.3 kWh (105,480 kJ) per year, annual useful cooking energy output.

Ke, W1, Cp, and TS are as defined in Section 4.1.2.1.1.

4.1.2.2 Annual conventional oven self-cleaning energy.

4.1.2.2.1 Annual primary energy consumption. Calculate the annual primary energy consumption for conventional oven self-cleaning operations, ESC, expressed in kilowatt-hours (kJ) per year for electric ovens and in Btus (kJ) for gas ovens, and defined as: ESC = ES × Se × K, for electric ovens,

Where:

ES = energy consumption in watt-hours, as measured in section 3.2.1.3 of this appendix.

Se = 4, average number of times a self-cleaning operation of a conventional electric oven is used per year.

K = 0.001 kWh/Wh conversion factor for watt-hours to kilowatt-hours.

or

ESC = VS × H × Sg, for gas ovens,

Where:

VS = gas consumption in standard cubic feet (L), as measured in section 3.2.1.3 of this appendix.

H = Hn or Hp, the heating value of the gas used in the test as specified in sections 2.2.2.2 and 2.2.2.3 of this appendix in Btus per standard cubic foot (kJ/L).

Sg = 4, average number of times a self-cleaning operation of a conventional gas oven is used per year.

4.1.2.2.2 Annual secondary energy consumption for self-cleaning operation of gas ovens. Calculate the annual secondary energy consumption for self-cleaning operations of a gas oven, ESS, expressed in kilowatt-hours (kJ) per year and defined as:

ESS = EIS × Sg × K,

Where:

EIS = electrical energy consumed during the self-cleaning operation of a conventional gas oven, as measured in section 3.2.1.3 of this appendix.

Sg = 4, average number of times a self-cleaning operation of a conventional gas oven is used per year.

K = 0.001 kWh/Wh conversion factor for watt-hours to kilowatt-hours.

4.1.2.3 Annual combined low-power mode energy consumption of a single conventional oven. Calculate the annual standby mode and off mode energy consumption for conventional ovens, EOTLP, expressed in kilowatt-hours (kJ) per year and defined as:

EOTLP = [(PIA × SIA) + (POM × SOM)] × K,

Where:

PIA = conventional oven inactive mode power, in watts, as measured in section 3.2.1.4 of this appendix.

POM = conventional oven off mode power, in watts, as measured in section 3.2.1.4 of this appendix.

STOT equals the total number of inactive mode and off mode hours per year;

If the conventional oven has fan-only mode, STOT equals (8,540.1 − (tOF/60)) hours, where tOF is the conventional oven fan-only mode duration, in minutes, as measured in section 3.2.1.2 of this appendix, and 60 is the conversion factor for minutes to hours; otherwise, STOT is equal to 8,540.1 hours.

If the conventional oven has both inactive mode and off mode, SIA and SOM both equal STOT/2;

If the conventional oven has an inactive mode but no off mode, the inactive mode annual hours, SIA, is equal to STOT and the off mode annual hours, SOM, is equal to 0;

If the conventional oven has an off mode but no inactive mode, SIA is equal to 0 and SOM is equal to STOT;

K = 0.001 kWh/Wh conversion factor for watt-hours to kilowatt-hours.

4.1.2.4 Total annual energy consumption of a single conventional oven.

4.1.2.4.1 Conventional electric oven energy consumption. Calculate the total annual energy consumption of a conventional electric oven, EAO, expressed in kilowatt-hours (kJ) per year and defined as:

EAO = ECO + ESC,

Where:

ECO = annual primary cooking energy consumption as determined in section 4.1.2.1.1 of this appendix.

ESC = annual primary self-cleaning energy consumption as determined in section 4.1.2.2.1 of this appendix.

4.1.2.4.2 Conventional electric oven integrated energy consumption. Calculate the total integrated annual electrical energy consumption of a conventional electric oven, IEAO, expressed in kilowatt-hours (kJ) per year and defined as:

IEAO = ECO + ESC + EOTLP, + (EOF × NOE),

Where:

ECO = annual primary cooking energy consumption as determined in section 4.1.2.1.1 of this appendix.

ESC = annual primary self-cleaning energy consumption as determined in section 4.1.2.2.1 of this appendix.

EOTLP = annual combined low-power mode energy consumption as determined in section 4.1.2.3 of this appendix.

EOF = fan-only mode energy consumption as measured in section 3.2.1.2 of this appendix.

NOE = representative number of annual conventional electric oven cooking cycles per year, which is equal to 219 cycles for a conventional electric oven without self-clean capability and 204 cycles for a conventional electric oven with self-clean capability.

4.1.2.4.3 Conventional gas oven energy consumption. Calculate the total annual gas energy consumption of a conventional gas oven, EAOG, expressed in Btus (kJ) per year and defined as:

EAOG = ECO + ESC,

Where:

ECO = annual primary cooking energy consumption as determined in section 4.1.2.1.1 of this appendix.

ESC = annual primary self-cleaning energy consumption as determined in section 4.1.2.2.1 of this appendix.

If the conventional gas oven uses electrical energy, calculate the total annual electrical energy consumption, EAOE, expressed in kilowatt-hours (kJ) per year and defined as:

EAOE = ESO + ESS,

Where:

ESO = annual secondary cooking energy consumption as determined in section 4.1.2.1.2 of this appendix.

ESS = annual secondary self-cleaning energy consumption as determined in section 4.1.2.2.2 of this appendix.

If the conventional gas oven uses electrical energy, also calculate the total integrated annual electrical energy consumption, IEAOE, expressed in kilowatt-hours (kJ) per year and defined as:

IEAOE = ESO + ESS+ EOTLP + (EOF × NOG),

Where:

ESO = annual secondary cooking energy consumption as determined in section 4.1.2.1.2 of this appendix.

ESS = annual secondary self-cleaning energy consumption as determined in section 4.1.2.2.2 of this appendix.

EOTLP = annual combined low-power mode energy consumption as determined in section 4.1.2.3 of this appendix.

EOF = fan-only mode energy consumption as measured in section 3.2.1.2 of this appendix.

NOG = representative number of annual conventional gas oven cooking cycles per year, which is equal to 183 cycles for a conventional gas oven without self-clean capability and 197 cycles for a conventional gas oven with self-clean capability.

4.1.2.5. Total annual energy consumption of multiple conventional ovens. If the cooking appliance includes more than one conventional oven, calculate the total annual energy consumption of the conventional ovens using the following equations:

4.1.2.5.1 Conventional electric oven energy consumption. Calculate the total annual energy consumption, ETO, in kilowatt-hours (kJ) per year and defined as:

ETO = EACO + EASC,

Where:

eCFR graphic er31oc12.004.gif

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is the average annual primary energy consumption for cooking, and where:

n = number of conventional ovens in the basic model.

ECO = annual primary energy consumption for cooking as determined in section 4.1.2.1.1 of this appendix.

eCFR graphic er31oc12.005.gif

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average annual self-cleaning energy consumption,

Where:

n = number of self-cleaning conventional ovens in the basic model.

ESC = annual primary self-cleaning energy consumption as determined according to section 4.1.2.2.1 of this appendix.

4.1.2.5.2 Conventional electric oven integrated energy consumption. Calculate the total integrated annual energy consumption, IETO, in kilowatt-hours (kJ) per year and defined as:

IETO = EACO + EASC + EOTLP + (EOF × NOE),

Where:

eCFR graphic er31oc12.006.gif

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is the average annual primary energy consumption for cooking, and where:

n = number of conventional ovens in the basic model.

ECO = annual primary energy consumption for cooking as determined in section 4.1.2.1.1 of this appendix.

eCFR graphic er31oc12.007.gif

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average annual self-cleaning energy consumption,

Where:

n = number of self-cleaning conventional ovens in the basic model.

ESC = annual primary self-cleaning energy consumption as determined according to section 4.1.2.2.1 of this appendix.

EOTLP = annual combined low-power mode energy consumption for the cooking appliance as determined in section 4.1.2.3 of this appendix.

EOF = fan-only mode energy consumption as measured in section 3.2.1.2 of this appendix.

NOE = representative number of annual conventional electric oven cooking cycles per year, which is equal to 219 cycles for a conventional electric oven without self-clean capability and 204 cycles for a conventional electric oven with self-clean capability.

4.1.2.5.3 Conventional gas oven energy consumption. Calculate the total annual gas energy consumption, ETOG, in Btus (kJ) per year and defined as:

ETOG = EACO + EASC,

Where:

EACO = average annual primary energy consumption for cooking in Btus (kJ) per year and is calculated as:

eCFR graphic er31oc12.008.gif

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Where:

n = number of conventional ovens in the basic model.

ECO = annual primary energy consumption for cooking as determined in section 4.1.2.1.1 of this appendix.

and,

EASC = average annual self-cleaning energy consumption in Btus (kJ) per year and is calculated as:

eCFR graphic er31oc12.009.gif

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Where:

n = number of self-cleaning conventional ovens in the basic model.

ESC = annual primary self-cleaning energy consumption as determined according to section 4.1.2.2.1 of this appendix.

If the oven also uses electrical energy, calculate the total annual electrical energy consumption, ETOE, in kilowatt-hours (kJ) per year and defined as:

ETOE = EASO + EAAS,

Where:

eCFR graphic er31oc12.010.gif

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is the average annual secondary energy consumption for cooking,

Where:

n = number of conventional ovens in the basic model.

ESO = annual secondary energy consumption for cooking of gas ovens as determined in section 4.1.2.1.2 of this appendix.

eCFR graphic er31oc12.011.gif

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is the average annual secondary self-cleaning energy consumption,

Where:

n = number of self-cleaning ovens in the basic model.

ESS = annual secondary self-cleaning energy consumption of gas ovens as determined in section 4.1.2.2.2 of this appendix.

If the oven also uses electrical energy, also calculate the total integrated annual electrical energy consumption, IETOE, in kilowatt-hours (kJ) per year and defined as:

IETOE = EASO + EAAS + EOTLP + (EOF × NOG),

Where:

eCFR graphic er31oc12.012.gif

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is the average annual secondary energy consumption for cooking,

Where:

n = number of conventional ovens in the basic model.

ESO = annual secondary energy consumption for cooking of gas ovens as determined in section 4.1.2.1.2 of this appendix.

eCFR graphic er31oc12.013.gif

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is the average annual secondary self-cleaning energy consumption,

Where:

n = number of self-cleaning ovens in the basic model.

ESS = annual secondary self-cleaning energy consumption of gas ovens as determined in section 4.1.2.2.2 of this appendix.

EOTLP = annual combined low-power mode energy consumption as determined in section 4.1.2.3 of this appendix.

EOF = fan-only mode energy consumption as measured in section 3.2.1.2 of this appendix.

NOG = representative number of annual conventional gas oven cooking cycles per year, which is equal to 183 cycles for a conventional gas oven without self-clean capability and 197 cycles for a conventional gas oven with self-clean capability.

4.1.3 Conventional oven cooking efficiency.

4.1.3.1 Single conventional oven. Calculate the conventional oven cooking efficiency, EffAO, using the following equations:

For electric ovens:

eCFR graphic er03oc97.015.gif

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and,

For gas ovens:

eCFR graphic er03oc97.016.gif

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Where:

W1 = measured weight of test block in pounds (kg).

Cp = 0.23 Btu/lb-°F (0.96 kJ/kg÷ °C), specific heat of test block.

TS = 234 °F (130 °C), temperature rise of test block.

EO = test energy consumption as measured in Section 3.2.1 or calculated in Section 4.1.1 or Section 4.1.1.1.

Ke = 3.412 Btu/Wh (3.6 kJ/Wh), conversion factor for watt-hours to Btu's.

EIO = electrical test energy consumption according to Section 3.2.1 or as calculated in Section 4.1.1.1.

4.1.3.2 Multiple conventional ovens. If the cooking appliance includes more than one conventional oven, calculate the cooking efficiency for all of the conventional ovens in the appliance, EffTO, using the following equation:

eCFR graphic er03oc97.017.gif

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Where:

n = number of conventional ovens in the cooking appliance.

EffAO = cooking efficiency of each oven determined according to Section 4.1.3.1.

4.1.4 Conventional oven energy factor and integrated energy factor.

4.1.4.1 Conventional oven energy factor. Calculate the energy factor, or the ratio of useful cooking energy output to the total energy input, RO, using the following equations:

eCFR graphic er31oc12.014.gif

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For electric ovens,

Where:

OO = 29.3 kWh (105,480 kJ) per year, annual useful cooking energy output.

EAO = total annual energy consumption for electric ovens as determined in section 4.1.2.4.1 of this appendix.

For gas ovens:

eCFR graphic er31oc12.015.gif

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Where:

OO = 88.8 kBtu (93,684 kJ) per year, annual useful cooking energy output.

EAOG = total annual gas energy consumption for conventional gas ovens as determined in section 4.1.2.4.3 of this appendix.

EAOE = total annual electrical energy consumption for conventional gas ovens as determined in section 4.1.2.4.3 of this appendix.

Ke = 3,412 Btu/kWh (3,600 kJ/kWh), conversion factor for kilowatt-hours to Btu's.

4.1.4.2 Conventional oven integrated energy factor. Calculate the integrated energy factor, or the ratio of useful cooking energy output to the total integrated energy input, IRO, using the following equations:

eCFR graphic er31oc12.016.gif

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For electric ovens,

Where:

OO = 29.3 kWh (105,480 kJ) per year, annual useful cooking energy output.

IEAO = total integrated annual energy consumption for electric ovens as determined in section 4.1.2.4.2 of this appendix.

For gas ovens:

eCFR graphic er31oc12.017.gif

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Where:

OO = 88.8 kBtu (93,684 kJ) per year, annual useful cooking energy output.

EAOG = total annual gas energy consumption for conventional gas ovens as determined in section 4.1.2.4.3 of this appendix.

IEAOE = total integrated annual electrical energy consumption for conventional gas ovens as determined in section 4.1.2.4.3 of this appendix.

Ke = 3,412 Btu/kWh (3,600 kJ/kWh), conversion factor for kilowatt-hours to Btus.

4.2.1.1 Electric surface unit cooking efficiency. Calculate the cooking efficiency, EffSU, of the electric surface unit under test, defined as:

eCFR graphic er31oc12.018.gif

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Where:

W = measured weight of test block, W2 or W3, expressed in pounds (kg).

Cp = 0.23 Btu/lb- °F (0.96 kJ/kg ÷ °C), specific heat of test block.

TSU = temperature rise of the test block: final test block temperature, TCT, as determined in section 3.2.2 of this appendix, minus the initial test block temperature, TI, expressed in °F ( °C) as determined in section 2.7.5 of this appendix.

Ke = 3.412 Btu/Wh (3.6 kJ/Wh), conversion factor of watt-hours to Btus.

ECT = measured energy consumption, as determined according to section 3.2.2.1 of this appendix, expressed in watt-hours (kJ).

4.2.1.2 Gas surface unit cooking efficiency. Calculate the cooking efficiency, EffSU, of the gas surface unit under test, defined as:

eCFR graphic er31oc12.019.gif

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Where:

W3 = measured weight of test block as measured in section 3.3.2 of this appendix, expressed in pounds (kg).

Cp and TSU are the same as defined in section 4.2.1.1 of this appendix.

and,

E = VCT + (EIC × Ke),

Where:

VCT = total gas consumption in standard cubic feet (L) for the gas surface unit test as measured in section 3.2.2.1 of this appendix.

EIC = electrical energy consumed in watt-hours (kJ) by an ignition device of a gas surface unit as measured in section 3.2.2.1 of this appendix.

Ke = 3.412 Btu/Wh (3.6 kJ/Wh), conversion factor of watt-hours to Btus.

4.2.1.3 Conventional cooking top cooking efficiency. Calculate the conventional cooking top cooking efficiency, EffCT, using the following equation:

eCFR graphic er03oc97.023.gif

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Where:

n = number of surface units in the cooking top.

EffSU = the efficiency of each of the surface units, as determined according to Section 4.2.1.1 or Section 4.2.1.2.

4.2.2 Conventional cooking top annual energy consumption.

4.2.2.1 Conventional electric cooking top.

4.2.2.1.1 Annual energy consumption of a conventional electric cooking top. Calculate the annual electrical energy consumption of an electric cooking top, ECA, in kilowatt-hours (kJ) per year, defined as:

eCFR graphic er31oc12.020.gif

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Where:

OCT = 173.1 kWh (623,160 kJ) per year, annual useful cooking energy output.

EffCT = conventional cooking top cooking efficiency as defined in section 4.2.1.3 of this appendix.

4.2.2.1.2 Integrated annual energy consumption of a conventional electric cooking top. Calculate the total integrated annual electrical energy consumption of an electric cooking top, IECA, in kilowatt-hours (kJ) per year, defined as:

eCFR graphic er31oc12.021.gif

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Where:

OCT = 173.1 kWh (623,160 kJ) per year, annual useful cooking energy output.

EffCT = conventional cooking top cooking efficiency as defined in section 4.2.1.3 of this appendix.

ECTLP = conventional cooking top combined low-power mode energy consumption = [(PIA × SIA) + (POM × SOM)] × K,

Where:

PIA = conventional cooking top inactive mode power, in watts, as measured in section 3.1.2.1.1 of this appendix.

POM = conventional cooking top off mode power, in watts, as measured in section 3.1.2.1.2 of this appendix.

If the conventional cooking top has both inactive mode and off mode annual hours, SIA and SOM both equal 4273.4;

If the conventional cooking top has an inactive mode but no off mode, the inactive mode annual hours, SIA, is equal to 8546.9, and the off mode annual hours, SOM, is equal to 0;

If the conventional cooking top has an off mode but no inactive mode, SIA is equal to 0, and SOM is equal to 8546.9;

K = 0.001 kWh/Wh conversion factor for watt-hours to kilowatt-hours.

4.2.2.2 Conventional gas cooking top

4.2.2.2.1 Annual cooking energy consumption. Calculate the annual energy consumption for cooking, ECC, in Btu's (kJ) per year for a gas cooking top, defined as:

eCFR graphic er03oc97.025.gif

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Where:

OCT = 527.6 kBtu (556,618 kJ) per year, annual useful cooking energy output.

EffCT = the gas cooking top efficiency as defined in Section 4.2.1.3.

4.2.2.2.2 Total integrated annual energy consumption of a conventional gas cooking top. Calculate the total integrated annual energy consumption of a conventional gas cooking top, IECA, in Btus (kJ) per year, defined as:

IECA = ECC + ECTSO,

Where:

ECC = energy consumption for cooking as determined in section 4.2.2.2.1 of this appendix.

ECTSO = conventional cooking top combined low-power mode energy consumption = [(PIA × SIA) + (POM × SOM)] × K,

Where:

PIA = conventional cooking top inactive mode power, in watts, as measured in section 3.1.2.1.1 of this appendix.

POM = conventional cooking top off mode power, in watts, as measured in section 3.1.2.1.2 of this appendix.

If the conventional cooking top has both inactive mode and off mode annual hours, SIA and SOM both equal 4273.4;

If the conventional cooking top has an inactive mode but no off mode, the inactive mode annual hours, SIA, is equal to 8546.9, and the off mode annual hours, SOM, is equal to 0;

If the conventional cooking top has an off mode but no inactive mode, SIA is equal to 0, and SOM is equal to 8546.9;

K = 0.001 kWh/Wh conversion factor for watt-hours to kilowatt-hours.

4.2.3 Conventional cooking top energy factor and integrated energy factor.

4.2.3.1 Conventional cooking top energy factor. Calculate the energy factor or ratio of useful cooking energy output for cooking to the total energy input, RCT, as follows:

For an electric cooking top, the energy factor is the same as the cooking efficiency as determined according to section 4.2.1.3 of this appendix.

For gas cooking tops,

eCFR graphic er31oc12.022.gif

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Where:

OCT = 527.6 kBtu (556,618 kJ) per year, annual useful cooking energy output of cooking top.

ECC = energy consumption for cooking as determined in section 4.2.2.2.1 of this appendix.

4.2.3.2 Conventional cooking top integrated energy factor. Calculate the integrated energy factor or ratio of useful cooking energy output for cooking to the total integrated energy input, IRCT, as follows:

For electric cooking tops,

eCFR graphic er31oc12.023.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

OCT = 527.6 kBtu (556,618 kJ) per year, annual useful cooking energy output of cooking top.

IECA = total annual integrated energy consumption of cooking top determined according to section 4.2.2.1.2 of this appendix.

For gas cooking tops,

eCFR graphic er31oc12.024.gif

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Where:

OCT = 527.6 kBtu (556,618 kJ) per year, annual useful cooking energy output of cooking top.

IECA = total integrated annual energy consumption of cooking top determined according to section 4.2.2.2.2 of this appendix.

4.3 Combined components. The annual energy consumption of a kitchen range (e.g., a cooking top and oven combined) shall be the sum of the annual energy consumption of each of its components. The integrated annual energy consumption of a kitchen range shall be the sum of the annual energy consumption of each of its components plus the total annual fan-only mode energy consumption for the oven component, ETOF, defined as:

ETOF = EOF × NR,

Where:

EOF = conventional oven fan-only mode energy consumption, in kilowatt-hours, as measured in section 3.2.1.2 of this appendix.

NR = representative number of annual conventional oven cooking cycles per year, which is equal to 219 cycles for a conventional electric oven without self-clean capability, 204 cycles for a conventional electric oven with self-clean capability, 183 cycles for a conventional gas oven without self-clean capability, and 197 cycles for a conventional gas oven with self-clean capability.

plus the conventional range integrated annual combined low-power mode energy consumption, ERTLP, defined as:

ERTLP = [(PIA × SIA) + (POM × SOM)] × K

Where:

PIA = conventional range inactive mode power, in watts, as measured in section 3.1.3.1 of this appendix.

POM = conventional range off mode power, in watts, as measured in section 3.1.3.2 of this appendix.

STOT equals the total number of inactive mode and off mode hours per year;

If the conventional oven component of the conventional range has fan-only mode, STOT equals (8,329.2 − (tOF/60)) hours, where tOF is the conventional oven fan-only mode duration, in minutes, as measured in section 3.2.1.2 of this appendix, and 60 is the conversion factor for minutes to hours; otherwise, STOT is equal to 8,329.2 hours.

If the conventional range has both inactive mode and off mode, SIA and SOM both equal STOT/2;

If the conventional range has an inactive mode but no off mode, the inactive mode annual hours, SIA, is equal to STOT, and the off mode annual hours, SOM, is equal to 0;

If the conventional range has an off mode but no inactive mode, SIA is equal to 0, and SOM is equal to STOT;

K = 0.001 kWh/Wh conversion factor for watt-hours to kilowatt-hours.

The annual energy consumption for other combinations of ovens and cooktops will also be treated as the sum of the annual energy consumption of each of its components. The energy factor of a combined component is the sum of the annual useful cooking energy output of each component divided by the sum of the total annual energy consumption of each component. The integrated energy factor of other combinations of ovens and cooktops is the sum of the annual useful cooking energy output of each component divided by the sum of the total integrated annual energy consumption of each component.

[62 FR 51981, Oct. 3, 1997, as amended at 75 FR 42583, July 22, 2010; 76 FR 12844, Mar. 9, 2011; 77 FR 65987, Oct. 31, 2012; 78 FR 4025, Jan. 18, 2013]

Appendix J1 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Automatic and Semi-Automatic Clothes Washers

Manufacturers may use Appendix J1 to certify compliance with existing DOE energy conservation standards until the compliance date of any amended standards that address standby and off mode power consumption for residential clothes washers. After this date, all residential clothes washers shall be tested using the provisions of Appendix J2.

1. Definitions and Symbols

1.1 Adaptive control system means a clothes washer control system, other than an adaptive water fill control system, which is capable of automatically adjusting washer operation or washing conditions based on characteristics of the clothes load placed in the clothes container, without allowing or requiring consumer intervention or actions. The automatic adjustments may, for example, include automatic selection, modification, or control of any of the following: wash water temperature, agitation or tumble cycle time, number of rinse cycles, and spin speed. The characteristics of the clothes load, which could trigger such adjustments, could, for example, consist of or be indicated by the presence of either soil, soap, suds, or any other additive laundering substitute or complementary product.

Note: Appendix J1 does not provide a means for determining the energy consumption of a clothes washer with an adaptive control system. Therefore, pursuant to 10 CFR 430.27, a waiver must be obtained to establish an acceptable test procedure for each such clothes washer.

1.2 Adaptive water fill control system means a clothes washer water fill control system which is capable of automatically adjusting the water fill level based on the size or weight of the clothes load placed in the clothes container, without allowing or requiring consumer intervention or actions.

1.3 Bone-dry means a condition of a load of test cloth which has been dried in a dryer at maximum temperature for a minimum of 10 minutes, removed and weighed before cool down, and then dried again for 10 minute periods until the final weight change of the load is 1 percent or less.

1.4 Clothes container means the compartment within the clothes washer that holds the clothes during the operation of the machine.

1.5 Compact means a clothes washer which has a clothes container capacity of less than 1.6 ft3 (45 L).

1.6 Deep rinse cycle means a rinse cycle in which the clothes container is filled with water to a selected level and the clothes load is rinsed by agitating it or tumbling it through the water.

1.7 Energy test cycle for a basic model means (A) the cycle recommended by the manufacturer for washing cotton or linen clothes, and includes all wash/rinse temperature selections and water levels offered in that cycle, and (B) for each other wash/rinse temperature selection or water level available on that basic model, the portion(s) of other cycle(s) with that temperature selection or water level that, when tested pursuant to these test procedures, will contribute to an accurate representation of the energy consumption of the basic model as used by consumers. Any cycle under (A) or (B) shall include the agitation/tumble operation, spin speed(s), wash times, and rinse times applicable to that cycle, including water heating time for water heating clothes washers.

1.8 Load use factor means the percentage of the total number of wash loads that a user would wash a particular size (weight) load.

1.9 Manual control system means a clothes washer control system which requires that the consumer make the choices that determine washer operation or washing conditions, such as, for example, wash/rinse temperature selections, and wash time before starting the cycle.

1.10 Manual water fill control system means a clothes washer water fill control system which requires the consumer to determine or select the water fill level.

1.11 Modified energy factor means the quotient of the cubic foot (or liter) capacity of the clothes container divided by the total clothes washer energy consumption per cycle, with such energy consumption expressed as the sum of the machine electrical energy consumption, the hot water energy consumption, and the energy required for removal of the remaining moisture in the wash load.

1.12 Non-water-heating clothes washer means a clothes washer which does not have an internal water heating device to generate hot water.

1.13 Spray rinse cycle means a rinse cycle in which water is sprayed onto the clothes for a period of time without maintaining any specific water level in the clothes container.

1.14 Standard means a clothes washer which has a clothes container capacity of 1.6 ft3 (45 L) or greater.

1.15 Temperature use factor means, for a particular wash/rinse temperature setting, the percentage of the total number of wash loads that an average user would wash with that setting.

1.16 Thermostatically controlled water valves means clothes washer controls that have the ability to sense and adjust the hot and cold supply water.

1.17 Uniformly distributed warm wash temperature selection(s) means (A) multiple warm wash selections for which the warm wash water temperatures have a linear relationship with all discrete warm wash selections when the water temperatures are plotted against equally spaced consecutive warm wash selections between the hottest warm wash and the coldest warm wash. If the warm wash has infinite selections, the warm wash water temperature has a linear relationship with the distance on the selection device (e.g. dial angle or slide movement) between the hottest warm wash and the coldest warm wash. The criteria for a linear relationship as specified above is that the difference between the actual water temperature at any warm wash selection and the point where that temperature is depicted on the temperature/selection line formed by connecting the warmest and the coldest warm selections is less than ±5 percent. In all cases, the mean water temperature of the warmest and the coldest warm selections must coincide with the mean of the “hot wash” (maximum wash temperature ≤135 °F (57.2 °C)) and “cold wash” (minimum wash temperature) water temperatures within ±3.8 °F (±2.1 °C); or (B) on a clothes washer with only one warm wash temperature selection, a warm wash temperature selection with a water temperature that coincides with the mean of the “hot wash” (maximum wash temperature ≤135 °F (57.2 °C)) and “cold wash” (minimum wash temperature) water temperatures within ±3.8 °F (±2.1 °C).

1.18 Warm wash means all wash temperature selections that are below the hottest hot, less than 135 °F (57.2 °C), and above the coldest cold temperature selection.

1.19 Water factor means the quotient of the total weighted per-cycle water consumption divided by the cubic foot (or liter) capacity of the clothes washer.

1.20 Water-heating clothes washer means a clothes washer where some or all of the hot water for clothes washing is generated by a water heating device internal to the clothes washer.

1.21 Symbol usage. The following identity relationships are provided to help clarify the symbology used throughout this procedure.

E—Electrical Energy Consumption

H—Hot Water Consumption

C—Cold Water Consumption

R—Hot Water Consumed by Warm Rinse

ER—Electrical Energy Consumed by Warm Rinse

TUF—Temperature Use Factor

HE—Hot Water Energy Consumption

F—Load Usage Factor

Q—Total Water Consumption

ME—Machine Electrical Energy Consumption

RMC—Remaining Moisture Content

WI—Initial Weight of Dry Test Load

WC—Weight of Test Load After Extraction

m—Extra Hot Wash (maximum wash temp. >135 °F (57.2 °C.))

h—Hot Wash (maximum wash temp. ≤135 °F (57.2 °C.))

w—Warm Wash

c—Cold Wash (minimum wash temp.)

r—Warm Rinse (hottest rinse temp.)

x or max—Maximum Test Load

a or avg—Average Test Load

n or min—Minimum Test Load

The following examples are provided to show how the above symbols can be used to define variables:

Emx = “Electrical Energy Consumption” for an “Extra Hot Wash” and “Maximum Test Load”

Ra = “Hot Water Consumed by Warm Rinse” for the “Average Test Load”

TUFm = “Temperature Use Factor” for an “Extra Hot Wash”

HEmin = “Hot Water Energy Consumption” for the “Minimum Test Load”

1.22 Cold rinse means the coldest rinse temperature available on the machine.

1.23 Warm rinse means the hottest rinse temperature available on the machine (and should be the same rinse temperature selection tested in 3.7 of this appendix).

2. Testing Conditions

2.1 Installation. Install the clothes washer in accordance with manufacturer's instructions.

2.2 Electrical energy supply. Maintain the electrical supply at the clothes washer terminal block within 2 percent of 120, 120/240, or 120/208Y volts as applicable to the particular terminal block wiring system and within 2 percent of the nameplate frequency as specified by the manufacturer. If the clothes washer has a dual voltage conversion capability, conduct test at the highest voltage specified by the manufacturer.

2.3 Supply Water.

2.3.1 Clothes washers in which electrical energy consumption or water energy consumption are affected by the inlet water temperature. (For example, water heating clothes washers or clothes washers with thermostatically controlled water valves.). The temperature of the hot water supply at the water inlets shall not exceed 135 °F (57.2 °C) and the cold water supply at the water inlets shall not exceed 60 °F (15.6 °C). A water meter shall be installed in both the hot and cold water lines to measure water consumption.

2.3.2 Clothes washers in which electrical energy consumption and water energy consumption are not affected by the inlet water temperature. The temperature of the hot water supply shall be maintained at 135 °F±5 °F (57.2 °C±2.8 °C) and the cold water supply shall be maintained at 60 °F±5 °F (15.6 °C±2.8 °C). A water meter shall be installed in both the hot and cold water lines to measure water consumption.

2.4 Water pressure. The static water pressure at the hot and cold water inlet connection of the clothes washer shall be maintained at 35 pounds per square inch gauge (psig) ±2.5 psig (241.3 kPa±17.2 kPa) during the test. The static water pressure for a single water inlet connection shall be maintained at 35 psig±2.5 psig (241.3 kPa±17.2 kPa) during the test. A water pressure gauge shall be installed in both the hot and cold water lines to measure water pressure.

2.5 Instrumentation. Perform all test measurements using the following instruments, as appropriate:

2.5.1 Weighing scales.

2.5.1.1 Weighing scale for test cloth. The scale shall have a resolution of no larger than 0.2 oz (5.7 g) and a maximum error no greater than 0.3 percent of the measured value.

2.5.1.2 Weighing scale for clothes container capacity measurements. The scale should have a resolution no larger than 0.50 lbs (0.23 kg) and a maximum error no greater than 0.5 percent of the measured value.

2.5.2 Watt-hour meter. The watt-hour meter shall have a resolution no larger than 1 Wh (3.6 kJ) and a maximum error no greater than 2 percent of the measured value for any demand greater than 50 Wh (180.0 kJ).

2.5.3 Temperature measuring device. The device shall have an error no greater than ±1 °F (±0.6 °C) over the range being measured.

2.5.4 Water meter. The water meter shall have a resolution no larger than 0.1 gallons (0.4 liters) and a maximum error no greater than 2 percent for the water flow rates being measured.

2.5.5 Water pressure gauge. The water pressure gauge shall have a resolution of 1 pound per square inch gauge (psig) (6.9 kPa) and shall have an error no greater than 5 percent of any measured value.

2.6 Test cloths.

2.6.1 Energy Test Cloth. The energy test cloth shall be made from energy test cloth material, as specified in 2.6.4, that is 24 inches by 36 inches (61.0 cm by 91.4 cm) and has been hemmed to 22 inches by 34 inches (55.9 cm by 86.4 cm) before washing. The energy test cloth shall be clean and shall not be used for more than 60 test runs (after preconditioning as specified in 2.6.3 of this appendix). All energy test cloth must be permanently marked identifying the lot number of the material. Mixed lots of material shall not be used for testing the clothes washers.

2.6.2 Energy Stuffer Cloth. The energy stuffer cloth shall be made from energy test cloth material, as specified in 2.6.4, and shall consist of pieces of material that are 12 inches by 12 inches (30.5 cm by 30.5 cm) and have been hemmed to 10 inches by 10 inches (25.4 cm by 25.4 cm) before washing. The energy stuffer cloth shall be clean and shall not be used for more than 60 test runs (after preconditioning as specified in 2.6.3 of this appendix). All energy stuffer cloth must be permanently marked identifying the lot number of the material. Mixed lots of material shall not be used for testing the clothes washers.

2.6.3 Preconditioning of Test Cloths. The new test cloths, including energy test cloths and energy stuffer cloths, shall be pre-conditioned in a clothes washer in the following manner:

2.6.3.1 Perform 5 complete normal wash-rinse-spin cycles, the first two with current AHAM Standard detergent Formula 3 and the last three without detergent. Place the test cloth in a clothes washer set at the maximum water level. Wash the load for ten minutes in soft water (17 ppm hardness or less) using 27.0 grams + 4.0 grams per pound of cloth load of AHAM Standard detergent Formula 3. The wash temperature is to be controlled to 135 °F ±5 °F (57.2 °C ±2.8 °C) and the rinse temperature is to be controlled to 60 °F ±5 °F (15.6 °C ±2.8 °C). Repeat the cycle with detergent and then repeat the cycle three additional times without detergent, bone drying the load between cycles (total of five wash and rinse cycles).

2.6.4 Energy test cloth material. The energy test cloths and energy stuffer cloths shall be made from fabric meeting the following specifications. The material should come from a roll of material with a width of approximately 63 inches and approximately 500 yards per roll, however, other sizes maybe used if they fall within the specifications.

2.6.4.1 Nominal fabric type. Pure finished bleached cloth, made with a momie or granite weave, which is nominally 50 percent cotton and 50 percent polyester.

2.6.4.2 The fabric weight shall be 5.60 ounces per square yard (190.0 g/m2), ±5 percent.

2.6.4.3 The thread count shall be 65 × 57 per inch (warp × fill), ±2 percent.

2.6.4.4 The warp yarn and filling yarn shall each have fiber content of 50 percent ±4 percent cotton, with the balance being polyester, and be open end spun, 15/1 ±5 percent cotton count blended yarn.

2.6.4.5 Water repellent finishes, such as fluoropolymer stain resistant finishes shall not be applied to the test cloth. The absence of such finishes shall be verified by:

2.6.4.5.1 American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists (AATCC) Test Method 118—1997, Oil Repellency: Hydrocarbon Resistance Test (reaffirmed 1997), of each new lot of test cloth (when purchased from the mill) to confirm the absence of ScotchguardTM or other water repellent finish (required scores of “D” across the board).

2.6.4.5.2 American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists (AATCC) Test Method 79-2000, Absorbency of Bleached Textiles (reaffirmed 2000), of each new lot of test cloth (when purchased from the mill) to confirm the absence of ScotchguardTM or other water repellent finish (time to absorb one drop should be on the order of 1 second).

2.6.4.5.3 The standards listed in 2.6.4.5.1 and 2.6.4.5.2 of this appendix which are not otherwise set forth in this part 430 are incorporated by reference. The material listed in this paragraph has been approved for incorporation by reference by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Any subsequent amendment to a standard by the standard-setting organization will not affect the DOE test procedures unless and until amended by DOE. Material is incorporated as it exists on the date of the approval and notice of any change in the material will be published in the Federal Register. The standards incorporated by reference are the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists Test Method 118-1997, Oil Repellency: Hydrocarbon Resistance Test (reaffirmed 1997) and Test Method 79-2000, Absorbency of Bleached Textiles (reaffirmed 2000).

(a) The above standards incorporated by reference are available for inspection at:

(i) National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html.

(ii) U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Hearings and Dockets, “Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Clothes Washer Energy Conservation Standards,” Docket No. EE—RM-94-403, Forrestal Building, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC.

(b) Copies of the above standards incorporated by reference can be obtained from the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists, P.O. Box 12215, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, telephone (919) 549-3526, fax (919) 549-8933, or email: orders@aatcc.org.

2.6.4.6 The moisture absorption and retention shall be evaluated for each new lot of test cloth by the Standard Extractor Remaining Moisture Content (RMC) Test specified in 2.6.5 of this appendix.

2.6.4.6.1 Repeat the Standard Extractor RMC Test in 2.6.5 of this appendix three times.

2.6.4.6.2 An RMC correction curve shall be calculated as specified in 2.6.6 of this appendix.

2.6.5 Standard Extractor RMC Test Procedure. The following procedure is used to evaluate the moisture absorption and retention characteristics of a lot of test cloth by measuring the RMC in a standard extractor at a specified set of conditions. Table 2.6.5 of this appendix is the matrix of test conditions. The 500g requirement will only be used if a clothes washer design can achieve spin speeds in the 500g range. When this matrix is repeated 3 times, a total of 48 extractor RMC test runs are required. For the purpose of the extractor RMC test, the test cloths may be used for up to 60 test runs (after preconditioning as specified in 2.6.3 of this appendix).

Table 2.6.5—Matrix of Extractor RMC Test Conditions

“g Force” Warm soak Cold soak
15 min. spin 4 min. spin 15 min. spin 4 min. spin
100
200
350
500

2.6.5.1 The standard extractor RMC tests shall be run in a Bock Model 215 extractor (having a basket diameter of 19.5 inches, length of 12 inches, and volume of 2.1 ft3), with a variable speed drive (Bock Engineered Products, P.O. Box 5127, Toledo, OH 43611) or an equivalent extractor with same basket design (i.e. diameter, length, volume, and hole configuration) and variable speed drive.

2.6.5.2 Test Load. Test cloths shall be preconditioned in accordance with 2.6.3 of this appendix. The load size shall be 8.4 lbs., consistent with 3.8.1 of this appendix.

2.6.5.3 Procedure.

2.6.5.3.1 Record the “bone-dry” weight of the test load (WI).

2.6.5.3.2 Soak the test load for 20 minutes in 10 gallons of soft (<17 ppm) water. The entire test load shall be submerged. The water temperature shall be 100 °F ±5 °F.

2.6.5.3.3 Remove the test load and allow water to gravity drain off of the test cloths. Then manually place the test cloths in the basket of the extractor, distributing them evenly by eye. Spin the load at a fixed speed corresponding to the intended centripetal acceleration level (measured in units of the acceleration of gravity, g) ±1 g for the intended time period ±5 seconds.

2.6.5.3.4 Record the weight of the test load immediately after the completion of the extractor spin cycle (WC).

2.6.5.3.5 Calculate the RMC as (WC-WI)/WI.

2.6.5.3.6 The RMC of the test load shall be measured at three (3) g levels: 100g; 200g; and 350g, using two different spin times at each g level: 4 minutes; and 15 minutes. If a clothes washer design can achieve spin speeds in the 500g range then the RMC of the test load shall be measured at four (4) g levels: 100g; 200g; 350g; and 500g, using two different spin times at each g level: 4 minutes; and 15 minutes.

2.6.5.4 Repeat 2.6.5.3 of this appendix using soft (<17 ppm) water at 60 °F ±5 °F.

2.6.6 Calculation of RMC correction curve.

2.6.6.1 Average the values of 3 test runs and fill in Table 2.6.5 of this appendix. Perform a linear least-squares fit to determine coefficients A and B such that the standard RMC values shown in Table 2.6.6.1 of this appendix (RMCstandard) are linearly related to the RMC values measured in section 2.6.5 of this appendix (RMCcloth):

RMCstandard A * RMCcloth + B

where A and B are coefficients of the linear least-squares fit.

2.6.6.2 Perform an analysis of variance with replication test using two factors, spin speed and lot, to check the interaction of speed and lot. Use the values from Table 2.6.5 and Table 2.6.6.1 of this Appendix in the calculation. The “P” value of the F-statistic for interaction between spin speed and lot in the variance analysis shall be greater than or equal to 0.1. If the “P” value is less than 0.1, the test cloth is unacceptable. “P” is a theoretically based measure of interaction based on an analysis of variance.

2.6.7 Application of RMC correction curve.

2.6.7.1 Using the coefficients A and B calculated in 2.6.6.1 of this appendix:

RMCcorr = A * RMC + B

2.6.7.2 Substitute RMCcorr values in calculations in 3.8 of this appendix.

2.7 Test Load Sizes. Maximum, minimum, and, when required, average test load sizes shall be determined using Table 5.1 and the clothes container capacity as measured in 3.1.1 through 3.1.5. Test loads shall consist of energy test cloths, except that adjustments to the test loads to achieve proper weight can be made by the use of energy stuffer cloths with no more than 5 stuffer clothes per load.

2.8 Use of Test Loads. Table 2.8 defines the test load sizes and corresponding water fill settings which are to be used when measuring water and energy consumptions. Adaptive water fill control system and manual water fill control system are defined in section 1 of this appendix:

Table 2.8—Test Load Sizes and Water Fill Settings Required

Manual water fill
control system
Adaptive water fill control system
Test load sizeWater fill settingTest load sizeWater fill setting
Max
Min
Max
Min
Max
Avg
Min
As determined by the Clothes Washer.

2.8.1 The test load sizes to be used to measure RMC are specified in section 3.8.1.

2.8.2 Test loads for energy and water consumption measurements shall be bone dry prior to the first cycle of the test, and dried to a maximum of 104 percent of bone dry weight for subsequent testing.

2.8.3 Load the energy test cloths by grasping them in the center, shaking them to hang loosely and then put them into the clothes container prior to activating the clothes washer.

2.9 Pre-conditioning.

2.9.1 Nonwater-heating clothes washer. If the clothes washer has not been filled with water in the preceding 96 hours, pre-condition it by running it through a cold rinse cycle and then draining it to ensure that the hose, pump, and sump are filled with water.

2.9.2 Water-heating clothes washer. If the clothes washer has not been filled with water in the preceding 96 hours, or if it has not been in the test room at the specified ambient conditions for 8 hours, pre-condition it by running it through a cold rinse cycle and then draining it to ensure that the hose, pump, and sump are filled with water.

2.10 Wash time setting. If one wash time is prescribed in the energy test cycle, that shall be the wash time setting; otherwise, the wash time setting shall be the higher of either the minimum or 70 percent of the maximum wash time available in the energy test cycle, regardless of the labeling of suggested dial locations. If the clothes washer is equipped with an electromechanical dial controlling wash time, reset the dial to the minimum wash time and then turn it in the direction of increasing wash time to reach the appropriate setting. If the appropriate setting is passed, return the dial to the minimum wash time and then turn in the direction of increasing wash time until the setting is reached.

2.11 Test room temperature for water-heating clothes washers. Maintain the test room ambient air temperature at 75 °F±5 °F (23.9 °C±2.8 °C).

3. Test Measurements

3.1 Clothes container capacity. Measure the entire volume which a dry clothes load could occupy within the clothes container during washer operation according to the following procedures:

3.1.1 Place the clothes washer in such a position that the uppermost edge of the clothes container opening is leveled horizontally, so that the container will hold the maximum amount of water.

3.1.2 Line the inside of the clothes container with 2 mil (0.051 mm) plastic sheet. All clothes washer components which occupy space within the clothes container and which are recommended for use with the energy test cycle shall be in place and shall be lined with 2 mil (0.051 mm) plastic sheet to prevent water from entering any void space.

3.1.3 Record the total weight of the machine before adding water.

3.1.4 Fill the clothes container manually with either 60 °F±5 °F (15.6 °C±2.8 °C) or 100 °F±10 °F (37.8 °C±5.5 °C) water to its uppermost edge. Measure and record the weight of water, W, in pounds.

3.1.5 The clothes container capacity is calculated as follows:

C=W/d.

where:

C=Capacity in cubic feet (liters).

W=Mass of water in pounds (kilograms).

d=Density of water (62.0 lbs/ft3 for 100 °F (993 kg/m3 for 37.8 °C) or 62.3 lbs/ft3 for 60 °F (998 kg/m3 for 15.6 °C)).

3.2 Procedure for measuring water and energy consumption values on all automatic and semi-automatic washers. All energy consumption tests shall be performed under the energy test cycle(s), unless otherwise specified. Table 3.2 defines the sections below which govern tests of particular clothes washers, based on the number of wash/rinse temperature selections available on the model, and also, in some instances, method of water heating. The procedures prescribed are applicable regardless of a clothes washer's washing capacity, loading port location, primary axis of rotation of the clothes container, and type of control system.

3.2.1 Inlet water temperature and the wash/rinse temperature settings.

3.2.1.1 For automatic clothes washers set the wash/rinse temperature selection control to obtain the wash water temperature desired (extra hot, hot, warm, or cold) and cold rinse, and open both the hot and cold water faucets.

3.2.1.2 For semi-automatic washers: (1) For hot water temperature, open the hot water faucet completely and close the cold water faucet; (2) for warm inlet water temperature, open both hot and cold water faucets completely; (3) for cold water temperature, close the hot water faucet and open the cold water faucet completely.

3.2.1.3 Determination of warm wash water temperature(s) to decide whether a clothes washer has uniformly distributed warm wash temperature selections. The wash water temperature, Tw, of each warm water wash selection shall be calculated or measured.

For non-water-heating clothes washers, calculate Tw as follows:

Tw(°F)=((Hw×135 °F)+(Cw×60 °F))/(Hw+Cw)

or

Tw(°C)=((Hw×57.2 °C)+(Cw×15.6 °C))/(Hw+Cw)

where:

Hw=Hot water consumption of a warm wash

Cw=Cold water consumption of a warm wash

For water-heating clothes washers, measure and record the temperature of each warm wash selection after fill.

3.2.2 Total water consumption during the energy test cycle shall be measured, including hot and cold water consumption during wash, deep rinse, and spray rinse.

3.2.3 Clothes washers with adaptive water fill/manual water fill control systems

3.2.3.1 Clothes washers with adaptive water fill control system and alternate manual water fill control systems. If a clothes washer with an adaptive water fill control system allows consumer selection of manual controls as an alternative, then both manual and adaptive modes shall be tested and, for each mode, the energy consumption (HET, MET, and DE) and water consumption (QT), values shall be calculated as set forth in section 4. Then the average of the two values (one from each mode, adaptive and manual) for each variable shall be used in section 4 for the clothes washer.

3.2.3.2 Clothes washers with adaptive water fill control system.

3.2.3.2.1. Not user adjustable. The maximum, minimum, and average water levels as defined in the following sections shall be interpreted to mean that amount of water fill which is selected by the control system when the respective test loads are used, as defined in Table 2.8. The load usage factors which shall be used when calculating energy consumption values are defined in Table 4.1.3.

3.2.3.2.2 User adjustable. Four tests shall be conducted on clothes washers with user adjustable adaptive water fill controls which affect the relative wash water levels. The first test shall be conducted with the maximum test load and with the adaptive water fill control system set in the setting that will give the most energy intensive result. The second test shall be conducted with the minimum test load and with the adaptive water fill control system set in the setting that will give the least energy intensive result. The third test shall be conducted with the average test load and with the adaptive water fill control system set in the setting that will give the most energy intensive result for the given test load. The fourth test shall be conducted with the average test load and with the adaptive water fill control system set in the setting that will give the least energy intensive result for the given test load. The energy and water consumption for the average test load and water level, shall be the average of the third and fourth tests.

3.2.3.3 Clothes washers with manual water fill control system. In accordance with Table 2.8, the water fill selector shall be set to the maximum water level available on the clothes washer for the maximum test load size and set to the minimum water level for the minimum test load size. The load usage factors which shall be used when calculating energy consumption values are defined in Table 4.1.3.

Table 3.2—Test Section Reference

Max. Wash Temp. Available≤135 °F (57.2 °C)>135 °F (57.2 °C)2
Number of Wash Temp. Selections12>23>3
Test Sections Required to be Followed3.33.3
   3.43.43.4
   3.53.53.5
   3.63.63.63.63.6
   13.713.713.713.713.7
   3.83.83.83.83.8

1Only applicable to machines with warm rinse in any cycle.

2This only applies to water hearting clothes washers on which the maximum wash temperature available exceeds 135 °F (57.2 °C)

3.3 “Extra Hot Wash” (Max Wash Temp >135 °F (57.2 °C)) for water heating clothes washers only. Water and electrical energy consumption shall be measured for each water fill level and/or test load size as specified in 3.3.1 through 3.3.3 for the hottest wash setting available.

3.3.1 Maximum test load and water fill. Hot water consumption (Hmx), cold water consumption (Cmx), and electrical energy consumption (Emx) shall be measured for an extra hot wash/cold rinse energy test cycle, with the controls set for the maximum water fill level. The maximum test load size is to be used and shall be determined per Table 5.1.

3.3.2 Minimum test load and water fill. Hot water consumption (Hmn), cold water consumption (Cmn), and electrical energy consumption (Emn) shall be measured for an extra hot wash/cold rinse energy test cycle, with the controls set for the minimum water fill level. The minimum test load size is to be used and shall be determined per Table 5.1.

3.3.3 Average test load and water fill. For clothes washers with an adaptive water fill control system, measure the values for hot water consumption (Hma), cold water consumption (Cma), and electrical energy consumption (Ema) for an extra hot wash/cold rinse energy test cycle, with an average test load size as determined per Table 5.1.

3.4 “Hot Wash” (Max Wash Temp≤135 °F (57.2 °C)). Water and electrical energy consumption shall be measured for each water fill level or test load size as specified in 3.4.1 through 3.4.3 for a 135 °F (57.2 °C)) wash, if available, or for the hottest selection less than 135 °F (57.2 °C)).

3.4.1 Maximum test load and water fill. Hot water consumption (Hhx), cold water consumption (Chx), and electrical energy consumption (Ehx) shall be measured for a hot wash/cold rinse energy test cycle, with the controls set for the maximum water fill level. The maximum test load size is to be used and shall be determined per Table 5.1.

3.4.2 Minimum test load and water fill. Hot water consumption (Hhn), cold water consumption (Chn), and electrical energy consumption (Ehn) shall be measured for a hot wash/cold rinse energy test cycle, with the controls set for the minimum water fill level. The minimum test load size is to be used and shall be determined per Table 5.1.

3.4.3 Average test load and water fill. For clothes washers with an adaptive water fill control system, measure the values for hot water consumption (Hha), cold water consumption (Cha), and electrical energy consumption (Eha) for a hot wash/cold rinse energy test cycle, with an average test load size as determined per Table 5.1.

3.5 “Warm Wash.” Water and electrical energy consumption shall be determined for each water fill level and/or test load size as specified in 3.5.1 through 3.5.2.3 for the applicable warm water wash temperature(s).

3.5.1 Clothes washers with uniformly distributed warm wash temperature selection(s). The reportable values to be used for the warm water wash setting shall be the arithmetic average of the measurements for the hot and cold wash selections. This is a calculation only, no testing is required.

3.5.2 Clothes washers that lack uniformly distributed warm wash temperature selections. For a clothes washer with fewer than four discrete warm wash selections, test all warm wash temperature selections. For a clothes washer that offers four or more warm wash selections, test at all discrete selections, or test at 25 percent, 50 percent, and 75 percent positions of the temperature selection device between the hottest hot (≤135 °F (57.2 °C)) wash and the coldest cold wash. If a selection is not available at the 25, 50 or 75 percent position, in place of each such unavailable selection use the next warmer setting. Each reportable value to be used for the warm water wash setting shall be the arithmetic average of all tests conducted pursuant to this section.

3.5.2.1 Maximum test load and water fill. Hot water consumption (Hwx), cold water consumption (Cwx), and electrical energy consumption (Ewx) shall be measured with the controls set for the maximum water fill level. The maximum test load size is to be used and shall be determined per Table 5.1.

3.5.2.2 Minimum test load and water fill. Hot water consumption (Hwn), cold water consumption (Cwn), and electrical energy consumption (Ewn) shall be measured with the controls set for the minimum water fill level. The minimum test load size is to be used and shall be determined per Table 5.1.

3.5.2.3 Average test load and water fill. For clothes washers with an adaptive water fill control system, measure the values for hot water consumption (Hwa), cold water consumption (Cwa), and electrical energy consumption (Ewa) with an average test load size as determined per Table 5.1.

3.6 “Cold Wash” (Minimum Wash Temperature Selection). Water and electrical energy consumption shall be measured for each water fill level or test load size as specified in sections 3.6.1 through 3.6.3 of this Appendix for the coldest wash temperature selection available. For a clothes washer that offers two or more wash temperature settings labeled as cold, such as “Cold” and “Tap Cold”, the setting with the minimum wash temperature shall be considered the cold wash. If any of the other cold wash temperature settings add hot water to raise the wash temperature above the cold water supply temperature, as defined in section 2.3 of this Appendix, those setting(s) shall be considered warm wash setting(s), as defined in section 1.18 of this Appendix. If none of the cold wash temperature settings add hot water for any of the water fill levels or test load sizes required for the energy test cycle, the wash temperature setting labeled as “Cold” shall be considered the cold wash, and the other wash temperature setting(s) labeled as cold shall not be required for testing.

3.7 Warm Rinse. Tests in sections 3.7.1 and 3.7.2 shall be conducted with the hottest rinse temperature available. If multiple wash temperatures are available with the hottest rinse temperature, any “warm wash” temperature may be selected to conduct the tests.

3.7.1 For the rinse only, measure the amount of hot water consumed by the clothes washer including all deep and spray rinses, for the maximum (Rx), minimum (Rn), and, if required by section 3.5.2.3, average (Ra) test load sizes or water fill levels.

3.7.2 Measure the amount of electrical energy consumed by the clothes washer to heat the rinse water only, including all deep and spray rinses, for the maximum (ERx), minimum (ERn), and, if required by section 3.5.2.3, average (ERa), test load sizes or water fill levels.

3.8 Remaining Moisture Content:

3.8.1 The wash temperature will be the same as the rinse temperature for all testing. Use the maximum test load as defined in Table 5.1 and section 3.1 for testing.

3.8.2 For clothes washers with cold rinse only:

3.8.2.1 Record the actual ‘bone dry’ weight of the test load (WImax), then place the test load in the clothes washer.

3.8.2.2 Set water level selector to maximum fill.

3.8.2.3 Run the energy test cycle.

3.8.2.4 Record the weight of the test load immediately after completion of the energy test cycle (WCmax).

3.8.2.5 Calculate the remaining moisture content of the maximum test load, RMCMAX, expressed as a percentage and defined as:

RMCmax = ((WCmax−WImax)/WImax)×100%

3.8.3 For clothes washers with cold and warm rinse options:

3.8.3.1 Complete steps 3.8.2.1 through 3.8.2.4 for cold rinse. Calculate the remaining moisture content of the maximum test load for cold rinse, RMCCOLD, expressed as a percentage and defined as:

RMCCOLD = ((WCmax−WImax)/WImax)×100%

3.8.3.2 Complete steps 3.8.2.1 through 3.8.2.4 for warm rinse. Calculate the remaining moisture content of the maximum test load for warm rinse, RMCWARM, expressed as a percentage and defined as:

RMCWARM = ((WCmax−WImax)/WImax)×100%

3.8.3.3 Calculate the remaining moisture content of the maximum test load, RMCmax, expressed as a percentage and defined as:

RMCmax = RMCCOLD×(1-TUFr)+RMCWARM×(TUFr).

where:

TUFr is the temperature use factor for warm rinse as defined in Table 4.1.1.

3.8.4 Clothes washers which have options that result in different RMC values, such as multiple selection of spin speeds or spin times, that are available in the energy test cycle, shall be tested at the maximum and minimum extremes of the available options, excluding any “no spin” (zero spin speed) settings, in accordance with requirements in 3.8.2 or 3.8.3. The calculated RMCmax extraction and RMCmin extraction at the maximum and minimum settings, respectively, shall be combined as follows and the final RMC to be used in section 4.3 shall be:

RMC = 0.75 × RMCmax extraction + 0.25 × RMCmin extraction

4. Calculation of Derived Results From Test Measurements

4.1 Hot water and machine electrical energy consumption of clothes washers.

4.1.1 Per-cycle temperature-weighted hot water consumption for maximum, average, and minimum water fill levels using each appropriate load size as defined in section 2.8 and Table 5.1. Calculate for the cycle under test the per-cycle temperature weighted hot water consumption for the maximum water fill level, Vhx, the average water fill level, Vha, and the minimum water fill level, Vhn, expressed in gallons per cycle (or liters per cycle) and defined as:

(a) Vhx = [Hmx×TUFm]+[Hhx×TUFh]+[Hwx ×TUFw]+[Hcx×TUFc]+[Rx×TUFr]

(b) Vha = [Hma×TUFm]+[Hha×TUFh]+[Hwa ×TUFw]+[Hca×TUFc]+[Ra×TUFr]

(c) Vhn = [Hmn×TUFm]+[Hhn×TUFh]+[Hwn ×TUFw]+[Hcn×TUFc]+[Rn×TUFr]

where:

Hmx, Hma, and Hmn, are reported hot water consumption values, in gallons per-cycle (or liters per cycle), at maximum, average, and minimum water fill, respectively, for the extra-hot wash cycle with the appropriate test loads as defined in section 2.8.

Hhx, Hha, and Hhn, are reported hot water consumption values, in gallons per-cycle (or liters per cycle), at maximum, average, and minimum water fill, respectively, for the hot wash cycle with the appropriate test loads as defined in section 2.8.

Hwx, Hwa, and Hwn, are reported hot water consumption values, in gallons per-cycle (or liters per cycle), at maximum, average, and minimum water fill, respectively, for the warm wash cycle with the appropriate test loads as defined in section 2.8.

Hcx, Hca, and Hcn, are reported hot water consumption values, in gallons per-cycle (or liters per cycle), at maximum, average, and minimum water fill, respectively, for the cold wash cycle with the appropriate test loads as defined in section 2.8.

Rx, Ra, and Rn are the reported hot water consumption values, in gallons per-cycle (or liters per cycle), at maximum, average, and minimum water fill, respectively, for the warm rinse cycle and the appropriate test loads as defined in section 2.8.

TUFm, TUFh, TUFw, TUFc, and TUFr are temperature use factors for extra hot wash, hot wash, warm wash, cold wash, and warm rinse temperature selections, respectively, and are as defined in Table 4.1.1.

Table 4.1.1—Temperature Use Factors

Max Wash Temp Available≤135 °F≤135 °F≤135 °F>135 °F>135 °F
   (57.2 °C)(57.2 °C)(57.2 °C)(57.2 °C)(57.2 °C)
No. Wash Temp SelectionsSingle2 Temps>2 Temps3 Temps>3 Temps
TUFm (extra hot)NANANA0.140.05
TUFh (hot)NA0.630.14NA0.09
TUFw (warm)NANA0.490.490.49
TUFc (cold)1.000.370.370.370.37
TUFr (warm rinse)0.270.270.270.270.27

4.1.2 Total per-cycle hot water energy consumption for all maximum, average, and minimum water fill levels tested. Calculate the total per-cycle hot water energy consumption for the maximum water fill level, HEmax, the minimum water fill level, HEmin, and the average water fill level, HEavg, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

(a) HEmax = [Vhx×T×K]=Total energy when a maximum load is tested.

(b) HEavg = [Vha×T×K]=Total energy when an average load is tested.

(c) HEmin = [Vhn×T×K]=Total energy when a minimum load is tested.

where:

T=Temperature rise=75 °F (41.7 °C).

K=Water specific heat in kilowatt-hours per gallon degree F=0.00240 (0.00114 kWh/L-°C).

Vhx Vha, and Vhn, are as defined in 4.1.1.

4.1.3 Total weighted per-cycle hot water energy consumption. Calculate the total weighted per cycle hot water energy consumption, HET, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

HET = [HEmax×Fmax]+[HEavg×Favg]+[HEmn×Fmin]

where:

HEmax, HEavg, and HEmin are as defined in 4.1.2.

Fmax, Favg, and Fmin are the load usage factors for the maximum, average, and minimum test loads based on the size and type of control system on the washer being tested. The values are as shown in table 4.1.3.

Table 4.1.3—Load Usage Factors

Water fill control systemManualAdaptive
Fmax =0.7210.122
Favg =0.742
Fmin = 0.2810.142

1 Reference 3.2.3.3.

2 Reference 3.2.3.2.

4.1.4 Total per-cycle hot water energy consumption using gas-heated or oil-heated water. Calculate for the energy test cycle the per-cycle hot water consumption, HETG, using gas-heated or oil-heated water, expressed in Btu per cycle (or megajoules per cycle) and defined as:

HETG = HET×1/e×3412 Btu/kWh or HETG = HET×1/e×3.6 MJ/kWh

Where:

e = Nominal gas or oil water heater efficiency=0.75.

HET = As defined in 4.1.3.

4.1.5 Per-cycle machine electrical energy consumption for all maximum, average, and minimum test load sizes. Calculate the total per-cycle machine electrical energy consumption for the maximum water fill level, MEmax, the minimum water fill level, MEmin, and the average water fill level, MEavg, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

(a)MEmax = [Emx×TUFm]+ [Ehx×TUFh]+ [Ewx×TUFw]+ [Ecx×TUFc]+ [ERx×TUFr]

(b) MEavg = [Ema×TUFm]+ [Eha×TUFh]+ [Ewa×TUFw]+ [Eca×TUFc]+ [ERa×TUFr]

(c) MEmin = [Emn×TUFm]+ [Ehn×TUFh]+ [Ewn×TUFw]+ [Ecn×xTUFc]+ [ERn×TUFr]

where:

Emx, Ema, and Emn, are reported electrical energy consumption values, in kilowatt-hours per cycle, at maximum, average, and minimum test loads, respectively, for the extra-hot wash cycle.

Ehx, Eha, and Ehn, are reported electrical energy consumption values, in kilowatt-hours per cycle, at maximum, average, and minimum test loads, respectively, for the hot wash cycle.

Ewx, Ewa, and Ewn, are reported electrical energy consumption values, in kilowatt-hours per cycle, at maximum, average, and minimum test loads, respectively, for the warm wash cycle.

Ecx, Eca, and Ecn, are reported electrical energy consumption values, in kilowatt-hours per cycle, at maximum, average, and minimum test loads, respectively, for the cold wash cycle.

ERx, ERa, ERn, are reported electrical energy consumption values, in kilowatt-hours per cycle, at maximum, average, and minimum test loads, respectively, for the warm rinse cycle per definitions in 3.7.2 of this appendix.

TUFm, TUFh, TUFw, TUFc, and TUFr are as defined in Table 4.1.1.

4.1.6 Total weighted per-cycle machine electrical energy consumption. Calculate the total per cycle load size weighted energy consumption, MET, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

MET = [MEmax× Fmax]+[MEavg× Favg]+[MEmin× Fmin]

where:

MEmax, MEavg, and MEmin are as defined in 4.1.5.

Fmax, Favg, and Fmin are as defined in Table 4.1.3.

4.1.7 Total per-cycle energy consumption when electrically heated water is used. Calculate for the energy test cycle the total per-cycle energy consumption, ETE, using electrical heated water, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as:

ETE = HET+MET

where:

MET = As defined in 4.1.6.

HET = As defined in 4.1.3.

4.2 Water consumption of clothes washers.

4.2.1 Per-cycle water consumption. Calculate the maximum, average, and minimum total water consumption, expressed in gallons per cycle (or liters per cycle), for the cold wash/cold rinse cycle and defined as:

Qmax = [Hcx+Ccx]

Qavg = [Hca+Cca]

Qmin = [Hcn+Ccn]

where:

Hcx, Ccx, Hca, Cca, Hcn, and Ccn are as defined in 3.6.

4.2.2 Total weighted per-cycle water consumption. Calculate the total weighted per cycle consumption, QT, expressed in gallons per cycle (or liters per cycle) and defined as:

QT = [Qmax×Fmax]+[Qavg×Favg]+[Qmin×Fmin]

where:

Qmax, Qavg, and Qmin are as defined in 4.2.1.

Fmax, Favg, and Fmin are as defined in table 4.1.3.

4.2.3 Water factor. Calculate the water factor, WF, expressed in gallons per cycle per cubic foot (or liters per cycle per liter), as:

WF = QT/C

Where:

QT = As defined in section 4.2.2.

C = As defined in section 3.1.5.

4.3 Per-cycle energy consumption for removal of moisture from test load. Calculate the per-cycle energy required to remove the moisture of the test load, DE, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle and defined as

DE = (LAF)×(Maximum test load weight)×(RMC—4%)×(DEF)×(DUF)

where:

LAF=Load adjustment factor=0.52.

Test load weight=As required in 3.8.1, expressed in lbs/cycle.

RMC=As defined in 3.8.2.5, 3.8.3.3 or 3.8.4.

DEF=nominal energy required for a clothes dryer to remove moisture from clothes=0.5 kWh/lb (1.1 kWh/kg).

DUF=dryer usage factor, percentage of washer loads dried in a clothes dryer=0.84.

4.4 Modified energy factor. Calculate the modified energy factor, MEF, expressed in cubic feet per kilowatt-hour per cycle (or liters per kilowatt-hour per cycle) and defined as:

MEF=C/(ETE + DE)

where:

C=As defined in 3.1.5.

ETE = As defined in 4.1.7.

DE = As defined in 4.3.

5. Test Loads

Table 5.1—Test Load Sizes

Container volumeMinimum loadMaximum loadAverage load
cu. ft.
≥<
liter
≥<
lbkglbkglbkg
0-0.800-22.73.001.363.001.363.001.36
0.80-0.9022.7-25.53.001.363.501.593.251.47
0.90-1.0025.5-28.33.001.363.901.773.451.56
1.00-1.1028.3-31.13.001.364.301.953.651.66
1.10-1.2031.1-34.03.001.364.702.133.851.75
1.20-1.3034.0-36.83.001.365.102.314.051.84
1.30-1.4036.8-39.63.001.365.502.494.251.93
1.40-1.5039.6-42.53.001.365.902.684.452.02
1.50-1.6042.5-45.33.001.366.402.904.702.13
1.60-1.7045.3-48.13.001.366.803.084.902.22
1.70-1.8048.1-51.03.001.367.203.275.102.31
1.80-1.9051.0-53.83.001.367.603.455.302.40
1.90-2.0053.8-56.63.001.368.003.635.502.49
2.00-2.1056.6-59.53.001.368.403.815.702.59
2.10-2.2059.5-62.33.001.368.803.995.902.68
2.20-2.3062.3-65.13.001.369.204.176.102.77
2.30-2.4065.1-68.03.001.369.604.356.302.86
2.40-2.5068.0-70.83.001.3610.004.546.502.95
2.50-2.6070.8-73.63.001.3610.504.766.753.06
2.60-2.7073.6-76.53.001.3610.904.946.953.15
2.70-2.8076.5-79.33.001.3611.305.137.153.24
2.80-2.9079.3-82.13.001.3611.705.317.353.33
2.90-3.0082.1-85.03.001.3612.105.497.553.42
3.00-3.1085.0-87.83.001.3612.505.677.753.52
3.10-3.2087.8-90.63.001.3612.905.857.953.61
3.20-3.3090.6-93.43.001.3613.306.038.153.70
3.30-3.4093.4-96.33.001.3613.706.218.353.79
3.40-3.5096.3-99.13.001.3614.106.408.553.88
3.50-3.6099.1-101.93.001.3614.606.628.803.99
3.60-3.70101.9-104.83.001.3615.006.809.004.08
3.70-3.80104.8-107.63.001.3615.406.999.204.17
3.80-3.90107.6-110.43.001.3615.807.169.404.26
3.90-4.00110.4-113.33.001.3616.207.349.604.35
4.00-4.10113.3-116.13.001.3616.607.539.804.45
4.10-4.20116.1-118.93.001.3617.007.7210.004.54
4.20-4.30118.9-121.83.001.3617.407.9010.204.63
4.30-4.40121.8-124.63.001.3617.808.0910.404.72
4.40-4.50124.6-127.43.001.3618.208.2710.604.82
4.50-4.60127.4-130.33.001.3618.708.4610.854.91
4.60-4.70130.3-133.13.001.3619.108.6511.055.00
4.70-4.80133.1-135.93.001.3619.508.8311.255.10
4.80-4.90135.9-138.83.001.3619.909.0211.455.19
4.90-5.00138.8-141.63.001.3620.309.2011.655.28
5.00-5.10141.6-144.43.001.3620.709.3911.855.38
5.10-5.20144.4-147.23.001.3621.109.5812.055.47
5.20-5.30147.2-150.13.001.3621.509.7612.255.56
5.30-5.40150.1-152.93.001.3621.909.9512.455.65
5.40-5.50152.9-155.73.001.3622.3010.1312.655.75
5.50-5.60155.7-158.63.001.3622.8010.3212.905.84
5.60-5.70158.6-161.43.001.3623.2010.5113.105.93
5.70-5.80161.4-164.23.001.3623.6010.6913.306.03
5.80-5.90164.2-167.13.001.3624.0010.8813.506.12
5.90-6.00167.1-169.93.001.3624.4011.0613.706.21

Notes: (1) All test load weights are bone dry weights.

(2) Allowable tolerance on the test load weights are ±0.10 lbs (0.05 kg).

6. Waivers and Field Testing

6.1 Waivers and Field Testing for Non-conventional Clothes Washers. Manufacturers of nonconventional clothes washers, such as clothes washers with adaptive control systems, must submit a petition for waiver pursuant to 10 CFR 430.27 to establish an acceptable test procedure for that clothes washer. For these and other clothes washers that have controls or systems such that the DOE test procedures yield results that are so unrepresentative of the clothes washer's true energy consumption characteristics as to provide materially inaccurate comparative data, field testing may be appropriate for establishing an acceptable test procedure. The following are guidelines for field testing which may be used by manufacturers in support of petitions for waiver. These guidelines are not mandatory and the Department may determine that they do not apply to a particular model. Depending upon a manufacturer's approach for conducting field testing, additional data may be required. Manufacturers are encouraged to communicate with the Department prior to the commencement of field tests which may be used to support a petition for waiver. Section 6.3 provides an example of field testing for a clothes washer with an adaptive water fill control system. Other features, such as the use of various spin speed selections, could be the subject of field tests.

6.2 Nonconventional Wash System Energy Consumption Test. The field test may consist of a minimum of 10 of the nonconventional clothes washers (“test clothes washers”) and 10 clothes washers already being distributed in commerce (“base clothes washers”). The tests should include a minimum of 50 energy test cycles per clothes washer. The test clothes washers and base clothes washers should be identical in construction except for the controls or systems being tested. Equal numbers of both the test clothes washer and the base clothes washer should be tested simultaneously in comparable settings to minimize seasonal or consumer laundering conditions or variations. The clothes washers should be monitored in such a way as to accurately record the average total energy and water consumption per cycle, including water heating energy when electrically heated water is used, and the energy required to remove the remaining moisture of the test load. The field test results should be used to determine the best method to correlate the rating of the test clothes washer to the rating of the base clothes washer.

6.3 Adaptive water fill control system field test. Section 3.2.3.1 defines the test method for measuring energy consumption for clothes washers which incorporate control systems having both adaptive and alternate cycle selections. Energy consumption calculated by the method defined in section 3.2.3.1 assumes the adaptive cycle will be used 50 percent of the time. This section can be used to develop field test data in support of a petition for waiver when it is believed that the adaptive cycle will be used more than 50 percent of the time. The field test sample size should be a minimum of 10 test clothes washers. The test clothes washers should be totally representative of the design, construction, and control system that will be placed in commerce. The duration of field testing in the user's house should be a minimum of 50 energy test cycles, for each unit. No special instructions as to cycle selection or product usage should be given to the field test participants, other than inclusion of the product literature pack which would be shipped with all units, and instructions regarding filling out data collection forms, use of data collection equipment, or basic procedural methods. Prior to the test clothes washers being installed in the field test locations, baseline data should be developed for all field test units by conducting laboratory tests as defined by section 1 through section 5 of these test procedures to determine the energy consumption, water consumption, and remaining moisture content values. The following data should be measured and recorded for each wash load during the test period: wash cycle selected, the mode of the clothes washer (adaptive or manual), clothes load dry weight (measured after the clothes washer and clothes dryer cycles are completed) in pounds, and type of articles in the clothes load (e.g., cottons, linens, permanent press). The wash loads used in calculating the in-home percentage split between adaptive and manual cycle usage should be only those wash loads which conform to the definition of the energy test cycle.

Calculate:

T=The total number of energy test cycles run during the field test

Ta = The total number of adaptive control energy test cycles

Tm = The total number of manual control energy test cycles

The percentage weighting factors:

Pa = (Ta/T)×100 (the percentage weighting for adaptive control selection)

Pm = (Tm/T)×100 (the percentage weighting for manual control selection)

Energy consumption (HET, MET, and DE) and water consumption (QT), values calculated in section 4 for the manual and adaptive modes, should be combined using Pa and Pm as the weighting factors.

[62 FR 45508, Aug. 27, 1997; 63 FR 16669, Apr. 6, 1998, as amended at 66 FR 3330, Jan. 12, 2001; 68 FR 62204, Oct. 31, 2003; 69 FR 18803, Apr. 9, 2004; 77 FR 13937, Mar. 7, 2012; 77 FR 20292, Apr. 4, 2012]

Appendix J2 to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Automatic and Semi-Automatic Clothes Washers

Manufacturers may use Appendix J1 to certify compliance with existing DOE energy conservation standards until the compliance date of any amended standards that address standby and off mode power consumption for residential clothes washers. After this date, all residential clothes washers shall be tested using the provisions of Appendix J2.

1. Definitions and Symbols

1.1 Active mode means a mode in which the clothes washer is connected to a mains power source, has been activated, and is performing one or more of the main functions of washing, soaking, tumbling, agitating, rinsing, and/or removing water from the clothing, or is involved in functions necessary for these main functions, such as admitting water into the washer or pumping water out of the washer. Active mode also includes delay start and cycle finished modes.

1.2 Active washing mode means a mode in which the clothes washer is performing any of the operations included in a complete cycle intended for washing a clothing load, including the main functions of washing, soaking, tumbling, agitating, rinsing, and/or removing water from the clothing.

1.3 Adaptive control system means a clothes washer control system, other than an adaptive water fill control system, which is capable of automatically adjusting washer operation or washing conditions based on characteristics of the clothes load placed in the clothes container, without allowing or requiring consumer intervention or actions. The automatic adjustments may, for example, include automatic selection, modification, or control of any of the following: Wash water temperature, agitation or tumble cycle time, number of rinse cycles, and spin speed. The characteristics of the clothes load, which could trigger such adjustments, could, for example, consist of or be indicated by the presence of either soil, soap, suds, or any other additive laundering substitute or complementary product.

Note: Appendix J2 does not provide a means for determining the energy consumption of a clothes washer with an adaptive control system. A waiver must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR 430.27 to establish an acceptable test procedure for each such clothes washer.

1.4 Adaptive water fill control system means a clothes washer water fill control system which is capable of automatically adjusting the water fill level based on the size or weight of the clothes load placed in the clothes container, without allowing or requiring consumer intervention or actions.

1.5 Bone-dry means a condition of a load of test cloth which has been dried in a dryer at maximum temperature for a minimum of 10 minutes, removed and weighed before cool down, and then dried again for 10 minute periods until the final weight change of the load is 1 percent or less.

1.6 Clothes container means the compartment within the clothes washer that holds the clothes during the operation of the machine.

1.7 Cold rinse means the coldest rinse temperature available on the machine.

1.8 Combined low-power mode means the aggregate of available modes other than active washing mode, including inactive mode, off mode, delay start mode, and cycle finished mode.

1.9 Compact means a clothes washer which has a clothes container capacity of less than 1.6 ft3 (45 L).

1.10 Cycle finished mode means an active mode which provides continuous status display, intermittent tumbling, or air circulation following operation in active washing mode.

1.11 Deep rinse cycle means a rinse cycle in which the clothes container is filled with water to a selected level and the clothes load is rinsed by agitating it or tumbling it through the water.

1.12 Delay start mode means an active mode in which activation of active washing mode is facilitated by a timer.

1.13 Energy test cycle for a basic model means:

(A) The cycle selection recommended by the manufacturer for washing cotton or linen clothes, and includes all wash/rinse temperature selections for each of the temperature use factors (TUFs) offered in that cycle, and

(B) If the cycle selection described in Part (A) does not include all wash/rinse temperature selections for each of the TUFs available on the clothes washer, the energy test cycle shall include, in addition to Part (A), the alternate cycle selection(s) offering these remaining wash/rinse temperature selection(s), tested only at the wash/rinse temperature selection(s) for each TUF not available on the cycle selection described in Part (A).

Where multiple alternate cycle selections offer a wash/rinse temperature selection for which a TUF has been developed, and that is not available on the cycle selection recommended by the manufacturer for washing cotton or linen clothes described in Part (A), the alternate cycle selection certified by the manufacturer to have the highest energy consumption for that TUF, as measured according to section 2.13, shall be included in the energy test cycle, so that each TUF that is available on the clothes washer has been tested once.

(C) All cycle selections included under Part (A) and all cycle selections included under Part (B) shall be tested using each appropriate load size as defined in section 2.8 and Table 5.1 of this appendix.

(D) For any cycle selection tested under (A) or (B), the manufacturer default settings shall be used, except for the temperature selection, if necessary. This includes wash conditions such as agitation/tumble operation, soil level, spin speed(s), wash times, rinse times, and all other wash parameters or optional features applicable to that cycle, including water heating time for water heating clothes washers.

(E) Each wash cycle included as part of the energy test cycle shall include the entire active washing mode and exclude any delay start or cycle finished modes.

(F) The energy test cycle shall not include any cycle, if available, that is dedicated for cleaning, deodorizing, or sanitizing the clothes washer, and is separate from clothes washing cycles.

1.14 IEC 62301 means the test standard published by the International Electrotechnical Commission, entitled “Household electrical appliances-Measurement of standby power,” Publication 62301, Edition 2.0 2011-01 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

1.15 Inactive mode means a standby mode that facilitates the activation of active mode by remote switch (including remote control), internal sensor, or timer, or that provides continuous status display.

1.16 Integrated modified energy factor means the quotient of the cubic foot (or liter) capacity of the clothes container divided by the total clothes washer energy consumption per cycle, with such energy consumption expressed as the sum of:

(a) The machine electrical energy consumption;

(b) The hot water energy consumption;

(c) The energy required for removal of the remaining moisture in the wash load; and

(d) The combined low-power mode energy consumption.

1.17 Integrated water factor means the quotient of the total weighted per-cycle water consumption for all wash cycles in gallons divided by the cubic foot (or liter) capacity of the clothes washer.

1.18 Load usage factor means the percentage of the total number of wash loads that a user would wash a particular size (weight) load.

1.19 Lot means a quantity of cloth that has been manufactured with the same batches of cotton and polyester during one continuous process.

1.20 Manual control system means a clothes washer control system which requires that the consumer make the choices that determine washer operation or washing conditions, such as, for example, wash/rinse temperature selections and wash time, before starting the cycle.

1.21 Manual water fill control system means a clothes washer water fill control system which requires the consumer to determine or select the water fill level.

1.22 Modified energy factor means the quotient of the cubic foot (or liter) capacity of the clothes container divided by the total clothes washer energy consumption per cycle, with such energy consumption expressed as the sum of the machine electrical energy consumption, the hot water energy consumption, and the energy required for removal of the remaining moisture in the wash load.

1.23 Non-water-heating clothes washer means a clothes washer which does not have an internal water heating device to generate hot water.

1.24 Off mode means a mode in which the clothes washer is connected to a mains power source and is not providing any active or standby mode function, and where the mode may persist for an indefinite time. An indicator that only shows the user that the product is in the off position is included within the classification of an off mode.

1.25 Roll means a subset of a lot.

1.26 Spray rinse cycle means a rinse cycle in which water is sprayed onto the clothes for a period of time without maintaining any specific water level in the clothes container.

1.27 Standard means a clothes washer which has a clothes container capacity of 1.6 ft3 (45 L) or greater.

1.28 Standby mode means any mode in which the clothes washer is connected to a mains power source and offers one or more of the following user oriented or protective functions that may persist for an indefinite time:

(a) To facilitate the activation of other modes (including activation or deactivation of active mode) by remote switch (including remote control), internal sensor, or timer;

(b) Continuous functions, including information or status displays (including clocks) or sensor-based functions.

A timer is a continuous clock function (which may or may not be associated with a display) that provides regular scheduled tasks (e.g., switching) and that operates on a continuous basis.

1.29 Symbol usage. The following identity relationships are provided to help clarify the symbology used throughout this procedure.

C—Capacity

C (with subscripts)—Cold Water Consumption

D—Energy Consumption for Removal of Moisture from Test Load

E—Electrical Energy Consumption

F—Load Usage Factor

H—Hot Water Consumption

HE—Hot Water Energy Consumption

ME—Machine Electrical Energy Consumption

P—Power

Q—Water Consumption

RMC—Remaining Moisture Content

S—Annual Hours

TUF—Temperature Use Factor

V—Temperature-Weighted Hot Water Consumption

W—Mass of Water

WC—Weight of Test Load After Extraction

WI—Initial Weight of Dry Test Load

Subscripts:

a or avg—Average Test Load

B—Part B of the Energy Test Cycle

c—Cold Wash (minimum wash temp.)

corr—Corrected (RMC values)

h—Hot Wash (maximum wash temp. ≤135 °F (57.2 °C))

ia—Inactive Mode

LP—Combined Low-Power Mode

m—Extra Hot Wash (maximum wash temp. >135 °F (57.2 °C))

n—Minimum Test Load

o—Off Mode

oi—Combined Off and Inactive Modes

T—Total

w—Warm Wash

ww—Warm Wash/Warm Rinse

x—Maximum Test Load

The following examples are provided to show how the above symbols can be used to define variables:

EmX = “Electrical Energy Consumption” for an “Extra Hot Wash” and “Maximum Test Load”

HEmin = “Hot Water Energy Consumption” for the “Minimum Test Load”

Pia = “Power” in “Inactive Mode”

Qhmin = “Water Consumption” for a “Hot Wash” and “Minimum Test Load”

TUFm = “Temperature Use Factor” for an “Extra Hot Wash”

1.30 Temperature use factor means, for a particular wash/rinse temperature setting, the percentage of the total number of wash loads that an average user would wash with that setting.

1.31 Thermostatically controlled water valves means clothes washer controls that have the ability to sense and adjust the hot and cold supply water.

1.32 Uniformly distributed warm wash temperature selection(s) means (A) multiple warm wash selections for which the warm wash water temperatures have a linear relationship with all discrete warm wash selections when the water temperatures are plotted against equally spaced consecutive warm wash selections between the hottest warm wash and the coldest warm wash. If the warm wash has infinite selections, the warm wash water temperature has a linear relationship with the distance on the selection device (e.g. dial angle or slide movement) between the hottest warm wash and the coldest warm wash. The criteria for a linear relationship as specified above is that the difference between the actual water temperature at any warm wash selection and the point where that temperature is depicted on the temperature/selection line formed by connecting the warmest and the coldest warm selections is less than ±5 percent. In all cases, the mean water temperature of the warmest and the coldest warm selections must coincide with the mean of the “hot wash” (maximum wash temperature ≤135 °F (57.2 °C)) and “cold wash” (minimum wash temperature) water temperatures within ±3.8 °F (±2.1 °C); or (B) on a clothes washer with only one warm wash temperature selection, a warm wash temperature selection with a water temperature that coincides with the mean of the “hot wash” (maximum wash temperature ≤135 °F (57.2 °C)) and “cold wash” (minimum wash temperature) water temperatures within ±3.8 °F (±2.1 °C).

1.33 Warm rinse means the hottest rinse temperature available on the machine.

1.34 Warm wash means all wash temperature selections that are below the maximum wash temperature ≤135 °F (57.2 °C) and above the minimum wash temperature.

1.35 Water factor means the quotient of the total weighted per-cycle water consumption for cold wash divided by the cubic foot (or liter) capacity of the clothes washer.

1.36 Water-heating clothes washer means a clothes washer where some or all of the hot water for clothes washing is generated by a water heating device internal to the clothes washer.

2. Testing Conditions

2.1 Installation. Install the clothes washer in accordance with manufacturer's instructions. For combined low-power mode testing, the product shall be installed in accordance with Section 5, Paragraph 5.2 of IEC 62301 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), disregarding the provisions regarding batteries and the determination, classification, and testing of relevant modes.

2.2 Electrical energy supply.

2.2.1 Supply voltage and frequency. Maintain the electrical supply at the clothes washer terminal block within 2 percent of 120, 120/240, or 120/208Y volts as applicable to the particular terminal block wiring system and within 2 percent of the nameplate frequency as specified by the manufacturer. If the clothes washer has a dual voltage conversion capability, conduct test at the highest voltage specified by the manufacturer.

2.2.2 Supply voltage waveform. For the combined low-power mode testing, maintain the electrical supply voltage waveform indicated in Section 4, Paragraph 4.3.2 of IEC 62301. If the power measuring instrument used for testing is unable to measure and record the total harmonic content during the test measurement period, it is acceptable to measure and record the total harmonic content immediately before and after the test measurement period.

2.3 Supply Water.

2.3.1 Clothes washers in which electrical energy consumption or water energy consumption are affected by the inlet water temperature. (For example, water heating clothes washers or clothes washers with thermostatically controlled water valves.). The temperature of the hot water supply at the water inlets shall not exceed 135 °F (57.2 °C) and the cold water supply at the water inlets shall not exceed 60 °F (15.6 °C). A water meter shall be installed in both the hot and cold water lines to measure water consumption.

2.3.2 Clothes washers in which electrical energy consumption and water energy consumption are not affected by the inlet water temperature. The temperature of the hot water supply shall be maintained at 135 °F ±5 °F (57.2 °C ±2.8 °C) and the cold water supply shall be maintained at 60 °F ±5 °F (15.6 °C ±2.8 °C). A water meter shall be installed in both the hot and cold water lines to measure water consumption.

2.4 Water pressure. The static water pressure at the hot and cold water inlet connection of the clothes washer shall be maintained at 35 pounds per square inch gauge (psig) ±2.5 psig (241.3 kPa ±17.2 kPa) when the water is flowing. The static water pressure for a single water inlet connection shall be maintained at 35 psig ±2.5 psig (241.3 kPa ±17.2 kPa) when the water is flowing. A water pressure gauge shall be installed in both the hot and cold water lines to measure water pressure.

2.5 Instrumentation. Perform all test measurements using the following instruments, as appropriate:

2.5.1 Weighing scales.

2.5.1.1 Weighing scale for test cloth. The scale shall have a resolution of no larger than 0.2 oz (5.7 g) and a maximum error no greater than 0.3 percent of the measured value.

2.5.1.2 Weighing scale for clothes container capacity measurement. The scale should have a resolution no larger than 0.50 lbs (0.23 kg) and a maximum error no greater than 0.5 percent of the measured value.

2.5.2 Watt-hour meter. The watt-hour meter shall have a resolution no larger than 1 Wh (3.6 kJ) and a maximum error no greater than 2 percent of the measured value for any demand greater than 50 Wh (180.0 kJ).

2.5.3 Watt meter. The watt meter used to measure combined low-power mode power consumption shall comply with the requirements specified in Section 4, Paragraph 4.4 of IEC 62301. If the power measuring instrument used for testing is unable to measure and record the crest factor, power factor, or maximum current ratio during the test measurement period, it is acceptable to measure and record the crest factor, power factor, and maximum current ratio immediately before and after the test measurement period.

2.5.4 Temperature measuring device. The device shall have an error no greater than ±1 °F (±0.6 °C) over the range being measured.

2.5.5 Water meter. The water meter shall have a resolution no larger than 0.1 gallons (0.4 liters) and a maximum error no greater than 2 percent for the water flow rates being measured.

2.5.6 Water pressure gauge. The water pressure gauge shall have a resolution of 1 pound per square inch gauge (psig) (6.9 kPa) and shall have an error no greater than 5 percent of any measured value.

2.6 Test cloths.

2.6.1 Energy Test Cloth. The energy test cloth shall be made from energy test cloth material, as specified in section 2.6.4 of this Appendix, that is 24 ± 12 inches by 36 ± 12 inches (61.0 ±1.3 cm by 91.4 ±1.3 cm) and has been hemmed to 22 ± 12 inches by 34 ± 12 inches (55.9 ±1.3 cm by 86.4 ±1.3 cm) before washing. The energy test cloth shall be clean and shall not be used for more than 60 test runs (after preconditioning as specified in 2.6.3 of this appendix). All energy test cloth must be permanently marked identifying the lot number of the material. Mixed lots of material shall not be used for testing a clothes washer.

2.6.2 Energy Stuffer Cloth. The energy stuffer cloth shall be made from energy test cloth material, as specified in section 2.6.4 of this Appendix, and shall consist of pieces of material that are 12 ± 14 inches by 12 ± 14 inches (30.5 ±0.6 cm by 30.5 ±0.6 cm) and have been hemmed to 10 ± 14 inches by 10 ± 14 inches (25.4 ±0.6 cm by 25.4 ±0.6 cm) before washing. The energy stuffer cloth shall be clean and shall not be used for more than 60 test runs (after preconditioning as specified in section 2.6.3 of this Appendix). All energy stuffer cloth must be permanently marked identifying the lot number of the material. Mixed lots of material shall not be used for testing a clothes washer.

2.6.3 Preconditioning of Test Cloths. The new test cloths, including energy test cloths and energy stuffer cloths, shall be pre-conditioned in a clothes washer in the following manner:

2.6.3.1 Perform 5 complete normal wash-rinse-spin cycles, the first two with AHAM Standard detergent Formula 3 and the last three without detergent. Place the test cloth in a clothes washer set at the maximum water level. Wash the load for ten minutes with a minimum fill of 20 gallons of soft water (17 ppm hardness or less) using 27.0 grams + 4.0 grams per pound of cloth load of AHAM Standard detergent Formula 3. The wash temperature is to be controlled to 135 °F ±5 °F (57.2 °C ±2.8 °C) and the rinse temperature is to be controlled to 60 °F ±5 °F (15.6 °C ±2.8 °C). Repeat the cycle with detergent and then repeat the cycle three additional times without detergent, bone drying the load between cycles (total of five wash and rinse cycles).

2.6.4 Energy test cloth material. The energy test cloths and energy stuffer cloths shall be made from fabric meeting the following specifications. The material should come from a roll of material with a width of approximately 63 inches and approximately 500 yards per roll. However, other sizes may be used if they fall within the specifications.

2.6.4.1 Nominal fabric type. Pure finished bleached cloth made with a momie or granite weave, which is nominally 50 percent cotton and 50 percent polyester.

2.6.4.2 The fabric weight specification shall be 5.60 ±0.25 ounces per square yard (190.0 ±8.4 g/m2).

2.6.4.3 The thread count shall be 65 × 57 per inch (warp × fill), ±2 percent.

2.6.4.4 The warp yarn and filling yarn shall each have fiber content of 50 percent ±4 percent cotton, with the balance being polyester, and be open end spun, 15/1 ±5 percent cotton count blended yarn.

2.6.4.5 Water repellent finishes, such as fluoropolymer stain resistant finishes shall not be applied to the test cloth. The absence of such finishes shall be verified by:

2.6.4.5.1 AATCC Test Method 118-2007, (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), for each new lot of test cloth (when purchased from the mill) to confirm the absence of ScotchguardTM or other water repellent finish (required scores of “D” across the board).

2.6.4.5.2 AATCC Test Method 79-2010, (incorporated by reference; see §430.3), for each new lot of test cloth (when purchased from the mill) to confirm the absence of ScotchguardTM or other water repellent finish (time to absorb one drop should be on the order of 1 second).

2.6.4.6 The moisture absorption and retention shall be evaluated for each new lot of test cloth by the Standard Extractor Remaining Moisture Content (RMC) Test specified in section 2.6.5 of this Appendix.

2.6.4.6.1 Repeat the Standard Extractor RMC Test in section 2.6.5 of this Appendix three times.

2.6.4.6.2 An RMC correction curve shall be calculated as specified in section 2.6.6 of this Appendix.

2.6.4.7 The maximum shrinkage after preconditioning shall not be more than 5 percent of the length and width. Measure per AATCC Test Method 135-2010, (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

2.6.5 Standard Extractor RMC Test Procedure. The following procedure is used to evaluate the moisture absorption and retention characteristics of a lot of test cloth by measuring the RMC in a standard extractor at a specified set of conditions. Table 2.6.5 of this Appendix is the matrix of test conditions. In the table, “g Force” represents units of gravitational acceleration. When this matrix is repeated 3 times, a total of 60 extractor RMC test runs are required. For the purpose of the extractor RMC test, the test cloths may be used for up to 60 test runs (after preconditioning as specified in section 2.6.3 of this Appendix).

Table 2.6.5—Matrix of extractor RMC test conditions

“g Force”Warm soakCold soak
15 min. spin4 min. spin15 min. spin4 min. spin
100
200
350
500
650

2.6.5.1 The standard extractor RMC tests shall be run in a North Star Engineered Products Inc. (formerly Bock) Model 215 extractor (having a basket diameter of 20 inches, height of 11.5 inches, and volume of 2.09 ft3), with a variable speed drive (North Star Engineered Products, P.O. Box 5127, Toledo, OH 43611) or an equivalent extractor with same basket design (i.e. diameter, height, volume, and hole configuration) and variable speed drive. Table 2.6.5.1 shows the extractor spin speed, in revolutions per minute (RPM), that shall be used to attain each required g-force level.

Table 2.6.5.1—Extractor Spin Speeds for Each Test Condition

“g Force”RPM
100594 ±1
200840 ±1
3501111 ±1
5001328 ±1
6501514 ±1

2.6.5.2 Test Load. Test loads shall be comprised of randomly selected cloth at the beginning, middle and end of a lot. Test cloths shall be preconditioned in accordance with section 2.6.3 of this Appendix. The load size shall be 8.4 lbs. It is acceptable to use two test loads for standard extractor RMC tests, with each load used for half of the total number of required tests.

2.6.5.3 Procedure.

2.6.5.3.1 Using a dryer that complies with the temperature requirements specified in section 2.12 of this Appendix, dry the test cloth until it is “bone-dry” according to the definition in section 1.5 of this Appendix. Record the “bone-dry” weight of the test load (WI).

2.6.5.3.2 Prepare the test load for soak by grouping four test cloths into loose bundles. Bundles are created by hanging four cloths vertically from one corner and loosely wrapping the test cloth onto itself to form the bundle. Bundles should be wrapped loosely to ensure consistency of water extraction. Bundles are then placed into the water to soak. Eight to nine bundles will be formed depending on the test load. The ninth bundle may not equal four cloths but can incorporate energy stuffer cloths to help offset the size difference.

2.6.5.3.3 Soak the test load for 20 minutes in 10 gallons of soft (<17 ppm) water. The entire test load shall be submerged. The water temperature shall be 100 °F ±5 °F (37.8 °C ±2.8 °C) at all times between the start and end of the soak.

2.6.5.3.4 Remove the test load and allow each of the test cloth bundles to drain over the water bath for a maximum of 5 seconds.

2.6.5.3.5 Manually place the test cloth bundles in the basket of the extractor, distributing them evenly by eye. The draining and loading process shall take no longer than 1 minute. Spin the load at a fixed speed corresponding to the intended centripetal acceleration level (measured in units of the acceleration of gravity, g) ±1g for the intended time period ±5 seconds. The timer shall begin when the extractor meets the required spin speed for each test.

2.6.5.3.6 Record the weight of the test load immediately after the completion of the extractor spin cycle (WC).

2.6.5.3.7 Calculate the remaining moisture content of the test load as (WC-WI)/WI.

2.6.5.3.8 It is not necessary to drain the soak tub if the water bath is corrected for water level and temperature before the next extraction.

2.6.5.3.9 It is not necessary to dry the test load in between extraction runs. However, the bone dry weight shall be checked after every 12 extraction runs to make sure the bone dry weight is within tolerance (8.4 ±0.1 lb).

2.6.5.3.10 The test load must be soaked and extracted once following bone drying, before continuing with the remaining extraction runs. This extraction shall be performed at the same spin speed used for the extraction run prior to bone drying, for a time period of 4 minutes. Either warm or cold soak temperature may be used.

2.6.5.3.11 The remaining moisture content of the test load shall be measured at five g levels: 100 g, 200 g, 350 g, 500 g, and 650 g, using two different spin times at each g level: 4 minutes and 15 minutes.

2.6.5.4 Repeat section 2.6.5.3 of this Appendix using soft (<17 ppm) water at 60 °F ±5 °F (15.6 °C ±2.8 °C).

2.6.6 Calculation of RMC correction curve.

2.6.6.1 Average the values of 3 test runs, and fill in Table 2.6.5 of this appendix. Perform a linear least-squares fit to determine coefficients A and B such that the standard RMC values shown in Table 2.6.6.1 of this appendix (RMCstandard) are linearly related to the RMC values measured in section 2.6.5 of this appendix (RMCcloth):

RMCstandard A * RMCcloth + B

where A and B are coefficients of the linear least-squares fit.

Table 2.6.6.1—Standard RMC Values (RMC Standard)

“g Force”RMC percentage
Warm soakCold soak
15 min. spin
(percent)
4 min. spin
(percent)
15 min. spin
(percent)
4 min. spin
(percent)
10045.949.949.752.8
20035.740.437.943.1
35029.633.130.735.8
50024.228.725.530.0
65023.026.424.128.0

2.6.6.2 Perform an analysis of variance with replication test using two factors, spin speed and lot, to check the interaction of speed and lot. Use the values from Table 2.6.5 and Table 2.6.6.1 of this Appendix in the calculation. The “P” value of the F-statistic for interaction between spin speed and lot in the variance analysis shall be greater than or equal to 0.1. If the “P” value is less than 0.1, the test cloth is unacceptable. “P” is a theoretically based measure of interaction based on an analysis of variance.

2.6.7 Application of the RMC correction curve.

2.6.7.1 Using the coefficients A and B calculated in section 2.6.6.1 of this Appendix:

RMCcorr = A × RMC + B

2.6.7.2 Apply this RMC correction curve to measured RMC values in sections 3.8.2.6, 3.8.3.2, and 3.8.3.4 of this Appendix.

2.7 Test Load Sizes. Maximum, minimum, and, when required, average test load sizes shall be determined using Table 5.1 of this Appendix and the clothes container capacity as measured in sections 3.1.1 through 3.1.5 of this Appendix. Test loads shall consist of energy test cloths, except that adjustments to the test loads to achieve proper weight can be made by the use of energy stuffer cloths with no more than 5 stuffer cloths per load.

2.8 Use of Test Loads. Table 2.8 of this Appendix defines the test load sizes and corresponding water fill settings which are to be used when measuring water and energy consumptions. Adaptive water fill control system and manual water fill control system are defined in section 1 of this Appendix:

Table 2.8—Test Load Sizes and Water Fill Settings Required

Manual water fill control systemAdaptive water fill control system
Test load sizeWater fill settingTest load sizeWater fill setting
MaxMaxMaxAs determined by the Clothes Washer.
MinMinAvg Min

2.8.1 The test load sizes to be used to measure RMC are specified in section 3.8.1 of this Appendix.

2.8.2 Test loads for energy and water consumption measurements shall be bone dry prior to the first cycle of the test, and dried to a maximum of 104 percent of bone dry weight for subsequent testing.

2.8.3 Load the energy test cloths by grasping them in the center, shaking them to hang loosely and then put them into the clothes container prior to activating the clothes washer.

2.9 Pre-conditioning of Clothes Washer.

2.9.1 Non-water-heating clothes washer. If the clothes washer has not been filled with water in the preceding 96 hours, pre-condition it by running it through a cold rinse cycle and then draining it to ensure that the hose, pump, and sump are filled with water.

2.9.2 Water-heating clothes washer. If the clothes washer has not been filled with water in the preceding 96 hours, or if it has not been in the test room at the specified ambient conditions for 8 hours, pre-condition it by running it through a cold rinse cycle and then draining it to ensure that the hose, pump, and sump are filled with water.

2.10 Wash time setting. If one wash time is prescribed in the energy test cycle, that shall be the wash time setting; otherwise, the wash time setting shall be the higher of either the minimum or 70 percent of the maximum wash time available in the energy test cycle, regardless of the labeling of suggested dial locations. If the clothes washer is equipped with an electromechanical dial controlling wash time, reset the dial to the minimum wash time and then turn it in the direction of increasing wash time to reach the appropriate setting. If the appropriate setting is passed, return the dial to the minimum wash time and then turn in the direction of increasing wash time until the setting is reached.

2.11 Test room temperature. For all clothes washers, maintain the test room ambient air temperature at 75 ±5 °F (23.9 ±2.8 °C) for active mode testing and combined low-power mode testing. Do not use the test room ambient air temperature conditions specified in Section 4, Paragraph 4.2 of IEC 62301 for combined low-power mode testing.

2.12 Bone dryer temperature. The dryer used for bone drying must heat the test cloth and energy stuffer cloths above 210 °F (99 °C).

2.13 Energy consumption for the purpose of certifying the cycle selection(s) to be included in Part (B) of the energy test cycle definition. Where multiple alternate cycle selections offer a wash/rinse temperature selection for which a TUF has been developed, and that is not available on the cycle selection recommended by the manufacturer for washing cotton or linen clothes described in Part (A) of the energy test cycle definition, the alternate cycle selection with the highest energy consumption for that TUF, as measured according to this section, shall be included in the energy test cycle.

2.13.1 For the TUF being considered under this section, establish the testing conditions set forth in section 2 of this test procedure. Select the applicable cycle selection and temperature selection. Use the manufacturer default settings for agitation/tumble operation, soil level, spin speed(s), wash times, rinse times, and all other wash parameters or optional features applicable to that cycle selection, including water heating time for water heating clothes washers.

2.13.2 Use the clothes washer's maximum test load size, determined from Table 5.1, for testing under this section.

2.13.3 For clothes washers with a manual water fill control system, user-adjustable adaptive water fill control system, or adaptive water fill control system with alternate manual water fill control system, use the water fill selector setting resulting in the maximum water level available for each cycle selection for testing under this section.

2.13.4 Each wash cycle tested under this section shall include the entire active washing mode and exclude any delay start or cycle finished modes.

2.13.5 Measure each cycle selection's electrical energy consumption (EB) and hot water consumption (HB). Calculate the total energy consumption for each cycle selection (ETB), as follows:

ETB = EB + (HB × T × K)

Where:

EB is the electrical energy consumption, expressed in kilowatt-hours per cycle.

HB is the hot water consumption, expressed in gallons per cycle.

T = temperature rise = 75 °F (41.7 °C)

K = Water specific heat in kilowatt-hours per gallon per degree F = 0.00240 kWh/gal- °F (0.00114 kWh/L- °C)

3. Test Measurements

3.1 Clothes container capacity. Measure the entire volume which a clothes load could occupy within the clothes container during active mode washer operation according to the following procedures:

3.1.1 Place the clothes washer in such a position that the uppermost edge of the clothes container opening is leveled horizontally, so that the container will hold the maximum amount of water. For front-loading clothes washers, the shipping bolts and door seal shall remain in place during the capacity measurement.

3.1.2 Line the inside of the clothes container with 2 mil (0.051 mm) plastic sheet. All clothes washer components which occupy space within the clothes container and which are recommended for use with the energy test cycle shall be in place and shall be lined with 2 mil (0.051 mm) plastic sheet to prevent water from entering any void space.

3.1.3 Record the total weight of the machine before adding water.

3.1.4 Fill the clothes container manually with either 60 °F ±5 °F (15.6 °C ±2.8 °C) or 100 °F ±10 °F (37.8 °C ±5.5 °C) water, with the door open. For a top-loading, vertical-axis clothes washer, fill the clothes container to the uppermost edge of the rotating portion, including any balance ring. For a front-loading, horizontal-axis clothes washer, fill the clothes container to the uppermost edge that is in contact with the door seal. For all clothes washers, any volume which cannot be occupied by the clothing load during operation must be excluded from the measurement. Measure and record the weight of water, W, in pounds.

3.1.5 The clothes container capacity is calculated as follows:

C = W/d

Where:

C = Capacity in cubic feet (liters).

W = Mass of water in pounds (kilograms).

d = Density of water (62.0 lbs/ft3 for 100 °F (993 kg/m3 for 37.8 °C) or 62.3 lbs/ft3 for 60 °F (998 kg/m3 for 15.6 °C)).

3.2 Procedure for measuring water and energy consumption values on all automatic and semi-automatic washers. All energy consumption tests shall be performed under the energy test cycle(s), unless otherwise specified. Table 3.2 of this Appendix defines the sections below which govern tests of particular clothes washers, based on the number of wash/rinse temperature selections available on the model, and also, in some instances, method of water heating. The procedures prescribed are applicable regardless of a clothes washer's washing capacity, loading port location, primary axis of rotation of the clothes container, and type of control system.

3.2.1 Inlet water temperature and the wash/rinse temperature settings.

3.2.1.1 For automatic clothes washers, set the wash/rinse temperature selection control to obtain the wash water temperature selection desired (extra hot, hot, warm, or cold) and cold rinse, and open both the hot and cold water faucets.

3.2.1.2 For semi-automatic washers:

(1) For hot water temperature, open the hot water faucet completely and close the cold water faucet;

(2) For warm inlet water temperature, open both hot and cold water faucets completely;

(3) For cold water temperature, close the hot water faucet and open the cold water faucet completely.

3.2.1.3 Determination of warm wash water temperature(s) to decide whether a clothes washer has uniformly distributed warm wash temperature selections. The wash water temperature, Tw, of each warm water wash selection shall be calculated or measured.

(1) For non-water heating clothes washers, calculate Tw as follows:

Tw( °F) = ((Hw × 135 °F)+ (Cw × 60 °F))/(Hw + Cw)

or

Tw( °C) = ((Hw × 57.2 °C)+ (Cw × 15.6 °C))/(Hw + Cw)

Where:

Hw = Hot water consumption of a warm wash.

Cw = Cold water consumption of a warm wash.

(2) For water-heating clothes washers, measure and record the temperature of each warm wash selection after fill.

3.2.2 Total water consumption during the energy test cycle shall be measured, including hot and cold water consumption during wash, deep rinse, and spray rinse.

3.2.3 Clothes washers with adaptive water fill/manual water fill control systems.

3.2.3.1 Clothes washers with adaptive water fill control system and alternate manual water fill control systems. If a clothes washer with an adaptive water fill control system allows consumer selection of manual controls as an alternative, then both manual and adaptive modes shall be tested and, for each mode, the energy consumption (HET, MET, and D