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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of July 30, 2014

Title 16: Commercial Practices
PART 1500—HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS


§1500.129   Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act.

The Commission finds that for those substances covered by the Federal Caustic Poison Act (44 Stat. 1406), the requirements of section 2(p)(1) of the Federal Hazardous Substances Act (repeated in §1500.3(b)(14)(i)) are not adequate for the protection of the public health. Labeling for those substances, in the concentrations listed in the Federal Caustic Poison Act, were required to bear the signal word “poison.” The Commission concludes that the lack of the designation “poison” would indicate to the consumer a lesser hazard and that such would not be in the interest of the public health. Under the authority granted in section 3(b) of the act, the Commission therefore finds that for the following substances, and at the following concentrations, the word “poison” is necessary instead of any signal word:

(a) Hydrochloric acid and any preparation containing free or chemically unneutralized hydrochloric acid (HCl) in a concentration of 10 percent or more.

(b) Sulfuric acid and any preparation containing free or chemically unneutralized sulfuric acid (H2 SO4) in a concentration of 10 percent or more.

(c) Nitric acid or any preparation containing free or chemically unneutralized nitric acid (HNO3) in a concentration of 5 percent or more.

(d) Carbolic acid (C6 H5 OH), also known as phenol, and any preparation containing carbolic acid in a concentration of 5 percent or more.

(e) Oxalic acid and any preparation containing free or chemically unneutralized oxalic acid (H2 C2 O4) in a concentration of 10 percent or more.

(f) Any salt of oxalic acid and any preparation containing any such salt in a concentration of 10 percent or more.

(g) Acetic acid or any preparation containing free or chemically unneutralized acetic acid (HC2 H2 O2) in a concentration of 20 percent or more.

(h) Hypochlorous acid, either free or combined, and any preparation containing the same in a concentration that will yield 10 percent or more by weight of available chlorine.

(i) Potassium hydroxide and any preparation containing free or chemically unneutralized potassium hydroxide (KOH), including caustic potash and vienna paste (vienna caustic), in a concentration of 10 percent or more.

(j) Sodium hydroxide and any preparation containing free or chemically unneutralized sodium hydroxide (NaOH), including caustic soda and lye in a concentration of 10 percent or more.

(k) Silver nitrate, sometimes known as lunar caustic, and any preparation containing silver nitrate (AgNO3) in a concentration of 5 percent or more.

(l) Ammonia water and any preparation containing free or chemically uncombined ammonia (NH3), including ammonium hydroxide and “hartshorn,” in a concentration of 5 percent or more.



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