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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of October 17, 2014

Title 26Chapter ISubchapter APart 1 → §1.1092(c)-1


Title 26: Internal Revenue
PART 1—INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED)


§1.1092(c)-1   Qualified covered calls.

(a) In general. Section 1092(c) defines a straddle as offsetting positions with respect to personal property. Under section 1092(d)(3)(B)(i)(I), stock is personal property if the stock is part of a straddle that involves an option on that stock or substantially identical stock or securities. Under section 1092(c)(4), however, writing a qualified covered call option and owning the optioned stock is not treated as a straddle under section 1092 if certain conditions, described in section 1092(c)(4)(B), are satisfied. Section 1092(c)(4)(H) authorizes the Secretary to modify these conditions to carry out the purposes of section 1092(c)(4) in light of changes in the marketplace.

(b) Term limitation—(1) General rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, an option is not a qualified covered call unless it is granted not more than 12 months before the day on which the option expires or satisfies term limitation and qualified benchmark requirements established by the Commissioner in guidance published in the Internal Revenue Bulletin (see §601.601(d)(2)(ii)(b) of this chapter).

(2) Special benchmark rule for an option granted not more than 33 months before the day on which the option expires—(i) In general. The 12-month limitation described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section is extended to 33 months provided the lowest qualified benchmark is determined using the adjusted applicable stock price, as defined in §1.1092(c)-4(e).

(ii) Examples. The following examples illustrate the rules set out in paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section:

Example 1. Taxpayer owns stock in Corporation X. Taxpayer writes an equity option with standardized terms on Corporation X stock through a national securities exchange with a term of 21 months. The applicable stock price for Corporation X stock is $100. The bench marks for a 21-month equity option with standardized terms with an applicable stock price of $100 will be based upon the adjusted applicable stock price. Using the table at §1.1092(c)-4(e), the applicable stock price of $100 is multiplied by the adjustment factor 1.12, resulting in an adjusted applicable stock price of $112. Using the bench marks for an equity option with standardized terms with an adjusted applicable stock price of $112, the highest available strike price less than the adjusted applicable stock price is $110, and the second highest strike price less than the adjusted applicable stock price is $105. Therefore, a 21-month equity call option with standardized terms on Corporation X stock will not be deep in the money if the strike price is not less than $105.
Example 2. Taxpayer owns stock in Corporation Y. Taxpayer writes an equity option with standardized terms on Corporation Y stock through a national securities exchange with a term of 21 months. The applicable stock price for Corporation Y stock is $13.25. The bench marks for a 21-month equity option with standardized terms with an applicable stock price of $13.25 will be based upon the adjusted applicable stock price. Using the table at §1.1092(c)-4(e), the applicable stock price of $13.25 is multiplied by the adjustment factor 1.12, resulting in an adjusted applicable stock price of $14.84. Using the bench marks for an equity option with standardized terms with an adjusted applicable stock price of $14.84, the highest available strike price less than the adjusted applicable stock price is $12.50. However, under section 1092(c)(4)(D), the lowest qualified bench mark can be no lower than 85% of the applicable stock price, which for Corporation Y stock is $12.61 (85% of the adjusted applicable stock price of $14.84). Thus, because the highest available strike price less than the adjusted applicable stock price for an equity option with standardized terms is lower than the lowest qualified bench mark under section 1092(c)(4)(D), the lowest strike price at which a qualified covered call option can be written is the next higher strike price, or $15.00. Therefore, a 21-month equity call option with standardized terms on Corporation Y stock will not be deep in the money if the strike price is not less than $15.

(c) Effective date. This section applies to qualified covered call options entered into on or after July 29, 2002.

[67 FR 20899, Apr. 29, 2002]



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