About GPO   |   Newsroom/Media   |   Congressional Relations   |   Inspector General   |   Careers   |   Contact   |   askGPO   |   Help  
 
Home   |   Customers   |   Vendors   |   Libraries  

The Electronic Code of Federal Regulations (e-CFR) is a regularly updated, unofficial editorial compilation of CFR material and Federal Register amendments produced by the National Archives and Records Administration's Office of the Federal Register (OFR) and the Government Printing Office.

Parallel Table of Authorities and Rules for the Code of Federal Regulations and the United States Code
Text | PDF

Find, review, and submit comments on Federal rules that are open for comment and published in the Federal Register using Regulations.gov.

Purchase individual CFR titles from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore.

Find issues of the CFR (including issues prior to 1996) at a local Federal depository library.

[2]
 
 

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of August 20, 2014

Title 40Chapter ISubchapter CPart 60 → Subpart Cc


Title 40: Protection of Environment
PART 60—STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES


Subpart Cc—Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills


Contents
§60.30c   Scope.
§60.31c   Definitions.
§60.32c   Designated facilities.
§60.33c   Emission guidelines for municipal solid waste landfill emissions.
§60.34c   Test methods and procedures.
§60.35c   Reporting and recordkeeping guidelines.
§60.36c   Compliance times.
§60.290   Applicability and designation of affected facility.
§60.291   Definitions.
§60.292   Standards for particulate matter.
§60.293   Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes.
§§60.294-60.295   [Reserved]
§60.296   Test methods and procedures.

Source: 61 FR 9919, Mar. 12, 1996, unless otherwise noted.

§60.30c   Scope.

This subpart contains emission guidelines and compliance times for the control of certain designated pollutants from certain designated municipal solid waste landfills in accordance with section 111(d) of the Act and subpart B.

§60.31c   Definitions.

Terms used but not defined in this subpart have the meaning given them in the Act and in subparts A, B, and WWW of this part.

Municipal solid waste landfill or MSW landfill means an entire disposal facility in a contiguous geographical space where household waste is placed in or on land. An MSW landfill may also receive other types of RCRA Subtitle D wastes such as commercial solid waste, nonhazardous sludge, conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste, and industrial solid waste. Portions of an MSW landfill may be separated by access roads. An MSW landfill may be publicly or privately owned. An MSW landfill may be a new MSW landfill, an existing MSW landfill or a lateral expansion.

§60.32c   Designated facilities.

(a) The designated facility to which the guidelines apply is each existing MSW landfill for which construction, reconstruction or modification was commenced before May 30, 1991.

(b) Physical or operational changes made to an existing MSW landfill solely to comply with an emission guideline are not considered a modification or reconstruction and would not subject an existing MSW landfill to the requirements of subpart WWW [see §60.750 of subpart WWW].

(c) For purposes of obtaining an operating permit under title V of the Act, the owner or operator of a MSW landfill subject to this subpart with a design capacity less than 2.5 million megagrams or 2.5 million cubic meters is not subject to the requirement to obtain an operating permit for the landfill under part 70 or 71 of this chapter, unless the landfill is otherwise subject to either part 70 or 71. For purposes of submitting a timely application for an operating permit under part 70 or 71, the owner or operator of a MSW landfill subject to this subpart with a design capacity greater than or equal to 2.5 million megagrams and 2.5 million cubic meters on the effective date of EPA approval of the State's program under section 111(d) of the Act, and not otherwise subject to either part 70 or 71, becomes subject to the requirements of §§70.5(a)(1)(i) or 71.5(a)(1)(i) of this chapter 90 days after the effective date of such 111(d) program approval, even if the design capacity report is submitted earlier.

(d) When a MSW landfill subject to this subpart is closed, the owner or operator is no longer subject to the requirement to maintain an operating permit under part 70 or 71 of this chapter for the landfill if the landfill is not otherwise subject to the requirements of either part 70 or 71 and if either of the following conditions are met.

(1) The landfill was never subject to the requirement for a control system under §60.33c(c) of this subpart; or

(2) The owner or operator meets the conditions for control system removal specified in §60.752(b)(2)(v) of subpart WWW.

[61 FR 9919, Mar. 12, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 32750, June 16, 1998]

§60.33c   Emission guidelines for municipal solid waste landfill emissions.

(a) For approval, a State plan shall include control of MSW landfill emissions at each MSW landfill meeting the following three conditions:

(1) The landfill has accepted waste at any time since November 8, 1987, or has additional design capacity available for future waste deposition;

(2) The landfill has a design capacity greater than or equal to 2.5 million megagrams and 2.5 million cubic meters. The landfill may calculate design capacity in either megagrams or cubic meters for comparison with the exemption values. Any density conversions shall be documented and submitted with the design capacity report; and

(3) The landfill has a nonmethane organic compound emission rate of 50 megagrams per year or more.

(b) For approval, a State plan shall include the installation of a collection and control system meeting the conditions provided in §60.752(b)(2)(ii) of this part at each MSW landfill meeting the conditions in paragraph (a) of this section. The State plan shall include a process for State review and approval of the site-specific design plans for the gas collection and control system(s).

(c) For approval, a State plan shall include provisions for the control of collected MSW landfill emissions through the use of control devices meeting the requirements of paragraph (c)(1), (2), or (3) of this section, except as provided in §60.24.

(1) An open flare designed and operated in accordance with the parameters established in §60.18; or

(2) A control system designed and operated to reduce NMOC by 98 weight percent; or

(3) An enclosed combustor designed and operated to reduce the outlet NMOC concentration to 20 parts per million as hexane by volume, dry basis at 3 percent oxygen, or less.

(d) For approval, a State plan shall require each owner or operator of an MSW landfill having a design capacity less than 2.5 million megagrams by mass or 2.5 million cubic meters by volume to submit an initial design capacity report to the Administrator as provided in §60.757(a)(2) of subpart WWW by the date specified in §60.35c of this subpart. The landfill may calculate design capacity in either megagrams or cubic meters for comparison with the exemption values. Any density conversions shall be documented and submitted with the report. Submittal of the initial design capacity report shall fulfill the requirements of this subpart except as provided in paragraph (d)(1) and (d)(2) of this section.

(1) The owner or operator shall submit an amended design capacity report as provided in §60.757(a)(3) of subpart WWW. [Guidance: Note that if the design capacity increase is the result of a modification, as defined in §60.751 of subpart WWW, that was commenced on or after May 30, 1991, the landfill will become subject to subpart WWW instead of this subpart. If the design capacity increase is the result of a change in operating practices, density, or some other change that is not a modification, the landfill remains subject to this subpart.]

(2) When an increase in the maximum design capacity of a landfill with an initial design capacity less than 2.5 million megagrams or 2.5 million cubic meters results in a revised maximum design capacity equal to or greater than 2.5 million megagrams and 2.5 million cubic meters, the owner or operator shall comply with paragraph (e) of this section.

(e) For approval, a State plan shall require each owner or operator of an MSW landfill having a design capacity equal to or greater than 2.5 million megagrams and 2.5 million cubic meters to either install a collection and control system as provided in paragraph (b) of this section and §60.752(b)(2) of subpart WWW or calculate an initial NMOC emission rate for the landfill using the procedures specified in §60.34c of this subpart and §60.754 of subpart WWW. The NMOC emission rate shall be recalculated annually, except as provided in §60.757(b)(1)(ii) of subpart WWW.

(1) If the calculated NMOC emission rate is less than 50 megagrams per year, the owner or operator shall:

(i) Submit an annual emission report, except as provided for in §60.757(b)(1)(ii); and

(ii) Recalculate the NMOC emission rate annually using the procedures specified in §60.754(a)(1) of subpart WWW until such time as the calculated NMOC emission rate is equal to or greater than 50 megagrams per year, or the landfill is closed.

(2)(i) If the NMOC emission rate, upon initial calculation or annual recalculation required in paragraph (e)(1)(ii) of this section, is equal to or greater than 50 megagrams per year, the owner or operator shall install a collection and control system as provided in paragraph (b) of this section and §60.752(b)(2) of subpart WWW.

(ii) If the landfill is permanently closed, a closure notification shall be submitted to the Administrator as provided in §60.35c of this subpart and §60.757(d) of subpart WWW.

[61 FR 9919, Mar. 12, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 32750, June 16, 1998; 64 FR 9261, Feb. 24, 1999]

§60.34c   Test methods and procedures.

For approval, a State plan shall include provisions for: the calculation of the landfill NMOC emission rate listed in §60.754, as applicable, to determine whether the landfill meets the condition in §60.33c(a)(3); the operational standards in §60.753; the compliance provisions in §60.755; and the monitoring provisions in §60.756.

§60.35c   Reporting and recordkeeping guidelines.

For approval, a State plan shall include the recordkeeping and reporting provisions listed in §§60.757 and 60.758, as applicable, except as provided under §60.24.

(a) For existing MSW landfills subject to this subpart the initial design capacity report shall be submitted no later than 90 days after the effective date of EPA approval of the State's plan under section 111(d) of the Act.

(b) For existing MSW landfills covered by this subpart with a design capacity equal to or greater than 2.5 million megagrams and 2.5 million cubic meters, the initial NMOC emission rate report shall be submitted no later than 90 days after the effective date of EPA approval of the State's plan under section 111(d) of the Act.

[61 FR 9919, Mar. 12, 1996, as amended at 64 FR 9262, Feb. 24, 1999]

§60.36c   Compliance times.

(a) Except as provided for under paragraph (b) of this section, planning, awarding of contracts, and installation of MSW landfill air emission collection and control equipment capable of meeting the emission guidelines established under §60.33c shall be accomplished within 30 months after the date the initial NMOC emission rate report shows NMOC emissions equal or exceed 50 megagrams per year.

(b) For each existing MSW landfill meeting the conditions in §60.33c(a)(1) and §60.33c(a)(2) whose NMOC emission rate is less than 50 megagrams per year on the effective date of the State emission standard, installation of collection and control systems capable of meeting emission guidelines in §60.33c shall be accomplished within 30 months of the date when the condition in §60.33c(a)(3) is met (i.e., the date of the first annual nonmethane organic compounds emission rate which equals or exceeds 50 megagrams per year).

[61 FR 9919, Mar. 12, 1996, as amended at 63 FR 32750, June 16, 1998]

Title 40Chapter ISubchapter CPart 60 → Subpart CC



Subpart CC—Standards of Performance for Glass Manufacturing Plants


Contents
§60.30c   Scope.
§60.31c   Definitions.
§60.32c   Designated facilities.
§60.33c   Emission guidelines for municipal solid waste landfill emissions.
§60.34c   Test methods and procedures.
§60.35c   Reporting and recordkeeping guidelines.
§60.36c   Compliance times.
§60.290   Applicability and designation of affected facility.
§60.291   Definitions.
§60.292   Standards for particulate matter.
§60.293   Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes.
§§60.294-60.295   [Reserved]
§60.296   Test methods and procedures.

§60.290   Applicability and designation of affected facility.

(a) Each glass melting furnace is an affected facility to which the provisions of this subpart apply.

(b) Any facility under paragraph (a) of this section that commences construction or modification after June 15, 1979, is subject to the requirements of this subpart.

(c) This subpart does not apply to hand glass melting furnaces, glass melting furnaces designed to produce less than 4.55 Mg (5 tons) of glass per day and all-electric melters.

[45 FR 66751, Oct. 7, 1980, as amended at 65 FR 61759, Oct. 17, 2000]

§60.291   Definitions.

As used in this subpart, all terms not defined herein shall have the meaning given them in the Act and in subpart A of this part, unless otherwise required by the context.

All-electric melter means a glass melting furnace in which all the heat required for melting is provided by electric current from electrodes submerged in the molten glass, although some fossil fuel may be charged to the furnace as raw material only.

Borosilicate recipe means glass product composition of the following approximate ranges of weight proportions: 60 to 80 percent silicon dioxide, 4 to 10 percent total R2O (e.g., Na2O and K2O), 5 to 35 percent boric oxides, and 0 to 13 percent other oxides.

Container glass means glass made of soda-lime recipe, clear or colored, which is pressed and/or blown into bottles, jars, ampoules, and other products listed in Standard Industrial Classification 3221 (SIC 3221).

Experimental furnace means a glass melting furnace with the sole purpose of operating to evaluate glass melting processes, technologies, or glass products. An experimental furnace does not produce glass that is sold (except for further research and development purposes) or that is used as a raw material for nonexperimental furnaces.

Flat glass means glass made of soda-lime recipe and produced into continuous flat sheets and other products listed in SIC 3211.

Flow channels means appendages used for conditioning and distributing molten glass to forming apparatuses and are a permanently separate source of emissions such that no mixing of emissions occurs with emissions from the melter cooling system prior to their being vented to the atmosphere.

Glass melting furnace means a unit comprising a refractory vessel in which raw materials are charged, melted at high temperature, refined, and conditioned to produce molten glass. The unit includes foundations, superstructure and retaining walls, raw material charger systems, heat exchangers, melter cooling system, exhaust system, refractory brick work, fuel supply and electrical boosting equipment, integral control systems and instrumentation, and appendages for conditioning and distributing molten glass to forming apparatuses. The forming apparatuses, including the float bath used in flat glass manufacturing and flow channels in wool fiberglass and textile fiberglass manufacturing, are not considered part of the glass melting furnace.

Glass produced means the weight of the glass pulled from the glass melting furnace.

Hand glass melting furnace means a glass melting furnace where the molten glass is removed from the furnace by a glassworker using a blowpipe or a pontil.

Lead recipe means glass product composition of the following ranges of weight proportions: 50 to 60 percent silicon dioxide, 18 to 35 percent lead oxides, 5 to 20 percent total R2O (e.g., Na2O and K2O), 0 to 8 percent total R2O3 (e.g., Al2O3), 0 to 15 percent total RO (e.g., CaO, MgO), other than lead oxide, and 5 to 10 percent other oxides.

Pressed and blown glass means glass which is pressed, blown, or both, including textile fiberglass, noncontinuous flat glass, noncontainer glass, and other products listed in SIC 3229. It is separated into:

(1) Glass of borosilicate recipe.

(2) Glass of soda-lime and lead recipes.

(3) Glass of opal, fluoride, and other recipes.

Rebricking means cold replacement of damaged or worn refractory parts of the glass melting furnace. Rebricking includes replacement of the refractories comprising the bottom, sidewalls, or roof of the melting vessel; replacement of refractory work in the heat exchanger; replacement of refractory portions of the glass conditioning and distribution system.

Soda-lime recipe means glass product composition of the following ranges of weight proportions: 60 to 75 percent silicon dioxide, 10 to 17 percent total R2O (e.g., Na2O and K2O), 8 to 20 percent total RO but not to include any PbO (e.g., CaO, and MgO), 0 to 8 percent total R2O3 (e.g., Al2O3), and 1 to 5 percent other oxides.

Textile fiberglass means fibrous glass in the form of continuous strands having uniform thickness.

With modified-processes means using any technique designed to minimize emissions without the use of add-on pollution controls.

Wool fiberglass means fibrous glass of random texture, including fiberglass insulation, and other products listed in SIC 3296.

[45 FR 66751, Oct. 7, 1980, as amended at 49 FR 41035, Oct. 19, 1984; 65 FR 61759, Oct. 17, 2000]

§60.292   Standards for particulate matter.

(a) On and after the date on which the performance test required to be conducted by §60.8 is completed, no owner or operator of a glass melting furnace subject to the provisions of this subpart shall cause to be discharged into the atmosphere—

(1) From any glass melting furnace fired exclusively with either a gaseous fuel or a liquid fuel, particulate matter at emission rates exceeding those specified in table CC-1, Column 2 and Column 3, respectively, or

(2) From any glass melting furnace, fired simultaneously with gaseous and liquid fuels, particulate matter at emission rates exceeding STD as specified by the following equation:

STD=X [1.3(Y)+(Z)]

Where:

STD=Particulate matter emission limit, g of particulate/kg (lb of particulate/ton) of glass produced.

X=Emission rate specified in table CC-1 for furnaces fired with gaseous fuel (Column 2).

Y=Decimal fraction of liquid fuel heating value to total (gaseous and liquid) fuel heating value fired in the glass melting furnaces as determined in §60.296(b). (joules/joules).

Z=(1-Y).

(b) Conversion of a glass melting furnace to the use of liquid fuel is not considered a modification for the purposes of §60.14.

(c) Rebricking and the cost of rebricking is not considered a reconstruction for the purposes of §60.15.

(d) An owner or operator of an experimental furnace is not subject to the requirements of this section.

(e) During routine maintenance of add-on pollution controls, an owner or operator of a glass melting furnace subject to the provisions of paragraph (a) of this section is exempt from the provisions of paragraph (a) of this section if:

(1) Routine maintenance in each calendar year does not exceed 6 days;

(2) Routine maintenance is conducted in a manner consistent with good air pollution control practices for minimizing emissions; and

(3) A report is submitted to the Administrator 10 days before the start of the routine maintenance (if 10 days cannot be provided, the report must be submitted as soon as practicable) and the report contains an explanation of the schedule of the maintenance.

Table CC-1—Emission Rates

[g of particulate/kg of glass produced]

Col. 1—Glass manufacturing plant industry segment Col. 2—Furnace fired with gaseous fuel Col. 3—Furnace fired with liquid fuel
Container glass0.10.13
Pressed and blown glass
(a) Borosilicate Recipes0.50.65
(b) Soda-Lime and Lead Recipes0.10.13
(c) Other-Than Borosilicate, Soda-Lime, and Lead Recipes (including opal, fluoride, and other recipes)0.250.325
Wool fiberglass0.250.325
Flat glass0.2250.225

[45 FR 66751, Oct. 7, 1980, as amended at 49 FR 41035, Oct. 19, 1984; 54 FR 6674, Feb. 14, 1989; 65 FR 61759, Oct. 17, 2000]

§60.293   Standards for particulate matter from glass melting furnace with modified-processes.

(a) An owner or operator of a glass melting furnaces with modified-processes is not subject to the provisions of §60.292 if the affected facility complies with the provisions of this section.

(b) On and after the date on which the performance test required to be conducted by §60.8 is completed, no owner or operator of a glass melting furnace with modified-processes subject to the provisions of this subpart shall cause to be discharged into the atmosphere from the affected facility:

(1) Particulate matter at emission rates exceeding 0.5 gram of particulate per kilogram of glass produced (g/kg) as measured according to paragraph (e) of this section for container glass, flat glass, and pressed and blown glass with a soda-lime recipe melting furnaces.

(2) Particulate matter at emission rates exceeding 1.0 g/kg as measured according to paragraph (e) of this section for pressed and blown glass with a borosilicate recipe melting furnace.

(3) Particulate matter at emission rates exceeding 0.5 g/kg as measured according to paragraph (e) of this section for textile fiberglass and wool fiberglass melting furnaces.

(c) The owner or operator of an affected facility that is subject to emission limits specified under paragraph (b) of this section shall:

(1) Install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a continuous monitoring system for the measurement of the opacity of emissions discharged into the atmosphere from the affected facility.

(2) During the performance test required to be conducted by §60.8, conduct continuous opacity monitoring during each test run.

(3) Calculate 6-minute opacity averages from 24 or more data points equally spaced over each 6-minute period during the test runs.

(4) Determine, based on the 6-minute opacity averages, the opacity value corresponding to the 99 percent upper confidence level of a normal distribution of average opacity values.

(5) For the purposes of §60.7, report to the Administrator as excess emissions all of the 6-minute periods during which the average opacity, as measured by the continuous monitoring system installed under paragraph (c)(1) of this section, exceeds the opacity value corresponding to the 99 percent upper confidence level determined under paragraph (c)(4) of this section.

(d)(1) After receipt and consideration of written application, the Administrator may approve alternative continuous monitoring systems for the measurement of one or more process or operating parameters that is or are demonstrated to enable accurate and representative monitoring of an emission limit specified in paragraph (b) of this section.

(2) After the Administrator approves an alternative continuous monitoring system for an affected facility, the requirements of paragraphs (c) (1) through (5) of this section will not apply for that affected facility.

(e) An owner or operator may redetermine the opacity value corresponding to the 99 percent upper confidence level as described in paragraph (c)(4) of this section if the owner or operator:

(1) Conducts continuous opacity monitoring during each test run of a performance test that demonstrates compliance with an emission limit of paragraph (b) of this section,

(2) Recalculates the 6-minute opacity averages as described in paragraph (c)(3) of this section, and

(3) Uses the redetermined opacity value corresponding to the 99 percent upper confidence level for the purposes of paragraph (c)(5) of this section.

(f) Test methods and procedures as specified in §60.296 shall be used to determine compliance with this section except that to determine compliance for any glass melting furnace using modified processes and fired with either a gaseous fuel or a liquid fuel containing less than 0.50 weight percent sulfur, Method 5 shall be used with the probe and filter holder heating system in the sampling train set to provide a gas temperature of 120 ±14 °C (248 ±25 °F).

[49 FR 41036, Oct. 19, 1984, as amended at 64 FR 7466, Feb. 12, 1999; 65 FR 61759, Oct. 17, 2000]

§§60.294-60.295   [Reserved]

§60.296   Test methods and procedures.

(a) If a glass melting furnace with modified processes is changed to one without modified processes or if a glass melting furnace without modified processes is changed to one with modified processes, the owner or operator shall notify the Administrator at least 60 days before the change is scheduled to occur.

(b) When gaseous and liquid fuels are fired simultaneously in a glass melting furnace, the owner or operator shall determine the applicable standard under §60.292(a)(2) as follows:

(1) The ratio (Y) of liquid fuel heating value to total (gaseous and liquid) fuel heating value fired in the glass melting furnaces shall be computed for each run using the following equation:

Y=(Hl L)/(Hl L+Hg G)

where:

Y=decimal fraction of liquid fuel heating value to total fuel heating value.

Hl = gross calorific value of liquid fuel, J/kg.

Hg = gross calorific value of gaseous fuel, J/kg.

L=liquid flow rate, kg/hr.

G=gaseous flow rate, kg/hr.

(2) Suitable methods shall be used to determine the rates (L and G) of fuels burned during each test period and a material balance over the glass melting furnace shall be used to confirm the rates.

(3) ASTM Method D240-76 or 92 (liquid fuels) and D1826-77 or 94 (gaseous fuels) (incorporated by reference—see §60.17), as applicable, shall be used to determine the gross calorific values.

(c) In conducting the performance tests required in §60.8, the owner or operator shall use as reference methods and procedures the test methods in appendix A of this part or other methods and procedures as specified in this section, except as provided in §60.8(b).

(d) The owner or operator shall determine compliance with the particulate matter standards in §§60.292 and 60.293 as follows:

(1) The emission rate (E) of particulate matter shall be computed for each run using the following equation:

E=(cs Qsd−A)/P

where:

E=emission rate of particulate matter, g/kg.

cs = concentration of particulate matter, g/dsm.

Qsd = volumetric flow rate, dscm/hr.

A=zero production rate correction

= 227 g/hr for container glass, pressed and blown (soda-lime and lead) glass, and pressed and blown (other than borosilicate, soda-lime, and lead) glass.

= 454 g/hr for pressed and blown (borosilicate) glass, wool fiberglass, and flat glass.

P=glass production rate, kg/hr.

(2) Method 5 shall be used to determine the particulate matter concentration (cs) and volumetric flow rate (Qsd) of the effluent gas. The sampling time and sample volume for each run shall be at least 60 minutes and 0.90 dscm (31.8 dscf). The probe and filter holder heating system may be set to provide a gas temperature no greater than 177 ±14 °C (350 ±25 °F), except under the conditions specified in §60.293(e).

(3) Direct measurement or material balance using good engineering practice shall be used to determine the amount of glass pulled during the performance test. The rate of glass produced is defined as the weight of glass pulled from the affected facility during the performance test divided by the number of hours taken to perform the performance test.

(4) Method 9 and the procedures in §60.11 shall be used to determine opacity.

[54 FR 6674, Feb. 14, 1989; 54 FR 21344, May 17, 1989, as amended at 65 FR 61759, Oct. 17, 2000]



For questions or comments regarding e-CFR editorial content, features, or design, email ecfr@nara.gov.
For questions concerning e-CFR programming and delivery issues, email webteam@gpo.gov.