About GPO   |   Newsroom/Media   |   Congressional Relations   |   Inspector General   |   Careers   |   Contact   |   askGPO   |   Help  
 
Home   |   Customers   |   Vendors   |   Libraries  

The Electronic Code of Federal Regulations (e-CFR) is a regularly updated, unofficial editorial compilation of CFR material and Federal Register amendments produced by the National Archives and Records Administration's Office of the Federal Register (OFR) and the Government Printing Office.

Parallel Table of Authorities and Rules for the Code of Federal Regulations and the United States Code
Text | PDF

Find, review, and submit comments on Federal rules that are open for comment and published in the Federal Register using Regulations.gov.

Purchase individual CFR titles from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore.

Find issues of the CFR (including issues prior to 1996) at a local Federal depository library.

[2]
 
 

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of August 28, 2014

Title 40Chapter ISubchapter CPart 63 → Subpart ZZZZZ


Title 40: Protection of Environment
PART 63—NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED)


Subpart ZZZZZ—National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Iron and Steel Foundries Area Sources


Contents

Applicability and Compliance Dates

§63.10880   Am I subject to this subpart?
§63.10881   What are my compliance dates?

Pollution Prevention Management Practices for New and Existing Affected Sources

§63.10885   What are my management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches?
§63.10886   What are my management practices for binder formulations?

Requirements for New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Small Foundries

§63.10890   What are my management practices and compliance requirements?

Requirements for New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and Steel Foundries

§63.10895   What are my standards and management practices?
§63.10896   What are my operation and maintenance requirements?
§63.10897   What are my monitoring requirements?
§63.10898   What are my performance test requirements?
§63.10899   What are my recordkeeping and reporting requirements?
§63.10900   What parts of the General Provisions apply to my large foundry?

Other Requirements and Information

§63.10905   Who implements and enforces this subpart?
§63.10906   What definitions apply to this subpart?
Table 1 to Subpart ZZZZZ of Part 63—Performance Test Requirements for New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Foundries
Table 2 to Subpart ZZZZZ of Part 63—Procedures for Establishing Operating Limits for New Affected Sources Classified as Large Foundries
Table 3 to Subpart ZZZZZ of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions to New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Foundries
Table 4 to Subpart ZZZZZ of Part 63—Compliance Certifications for New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and Steel Foundries

Source: 73 FR 252, Jan. 2, 2008, unless otherwise noted.

Applicability and Compliance Dates

§63.10880   Am I subject to this subpart?

(a) You are subject to this subpart if you own or operate an iron and steel foundry that is an area source of hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions.

(b) This subpart applies to each new or existing affected source. The affected source is each iron and steel foundry.

(1) An affected source is existing if you commenced construction or reconstruction of the affected source before September 17, 2007.

(2) An affected source is new if you commenced construction or reconstruction of the affected source on or after September 17, 2007. If an affected source is not new pursuant to the preceding sentence, it is not new as a result of a change in its compliance obligations pursuant to §63.10881(d).

(c) On and after January 2, 2008, if your iron and steel foundry becomes a major source as defined in §63.2, you must meet the requirements of 40 CFR part 63, subpart EEEEE.

(d) This subpart does not apply to research and development facilities, as defined in section 112(c)(7) of the Clean Air Act.

(e) You are exempt from the obligation to obtain a permit under 40 CFR part 70 or 40 CFR part 71, provided you are not otherwise required by law to obtain a permit under 40 CFR 70.3(a) or 40 CFR 71.3(a). Notwithstanding the previous sentence, you must continue to comply with the provisions of this subpart.

(f) If you own or operate an existing affected source, you must determine the initial applicability of the requirements of this subpart to a small foundry or a large foundry based on your facility's metal melt production for calendar year 2008. If the metal melt production for calendar year 2008 is 20,000 tons or less, your area source is a small foundry. If your metal melt production for calendar year 2008 is greater than 20,000 tons, your area source is a large foundry. You must submit a written notification to the Administrator that identifies your area source as a small foundry or a large foundry no later than January 2, 2009.

(g) If you own or operate a new affected source, you must determine the initial applicability of the requirements of this subpart to a small foundry or a large foundry based on your facility's annual metal melting capacity at startup. If the annual metal melting capacity is 10,000 tons or less, your area source is a small foundry. If the annual metal melting capacity is greater than 10,000 tons, your area source is a large foundry. You must submit a written notification to the Administrator that identifies your area source as a small foundry or a large foundry no later than 120 days after startup.

§63.10881   What are my compliance dates?

(a) If you own or operate an existing affected source, you must achieve compliance with the applicable provisions of this subpart by the dates in paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) Not later than January 2, 2009 for the pollution prevention management practices for metallic scrap in §63.10885(a) and binder formulations in §63.10886.

(2) Not later than January 4, 2010 for the pollution prevention management practices for mercury in §63.10885(b).

(3) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, not later than 2 years after the date of your large foundry's notification of the initial determination required in §63.10880(f) for the standards and management practices in §63.10895.

(b) If you have a new affected source for which the initial startup date is on or before January 2, 2008, you must achieve compliance with the provisions of this subpart not later than January 2, 2008.

(c) If you own or operate a new affected source for which the initial startup date is after January 2, 2008, you must achieve compliance with the provisions of this subpart upon startup of your affected source.

(d) Following the initial determination for an existing affected source required in §63.10880(f),

(1) Beginning January 1, 2010, if the annual metal melt production of your small foundry exceeds 20,000 tons during the preceding calendar year, you must submit a notification of foundry reclassification to the Administrator within 30 days and comply with the requirements in paragraphs (d)(1)(i) or (ii) of this section, as applicable.

(i) If your small foundry has never been classified as a large foundry, you must comply with the requirements for a large foundry no later than 2 years after the date of your foundry's notification that the annual metal melt production exceeded 20,000 tons.

(ii) If your small foundry had previously been classified as a large foundry, you must comply with the requirements for a large foundry no later than the date of your foundry's most recent notification that the annual metal melt production exceeded 20,000 tons.

(2) If your facility is initially classified as a large foundry (or your small foundry subsequently becomes a large foundry), you must comply with the requirements for a large foundry for at least 3 years before reclassifying your facility as a small foundry, even if your annual metal melt production falls below 20,000 tons. After 3 years, you may reclassify your facility as a small foundry provided your annual metal melt production for the preceding calendar year was 20,000 tons or less. If you reclassify your large foundry as a small foundry, you must submit a notification of reclassification to the Administrator within 30 days and comply with the requirements for a small foundry no later than the date you notify the Administrator of the reclassification. If the annual metal melt production exceeds 20,000 tons during a subsequent year, you must submit a notification of reclassification to the Administrator within 30 days and comply with the requirements for a large foundry no later than the date you notify the Administrator of the reclassification.

(e) Following the initial determination for a new affected source required in §63.10880(g),

(1) If you increase the annual metal melt capacity of your small foundry to exceed 10,000 tons, you must submit a notification of reclassification to the Administrator within 30 days and comply with the requirements for a large foundry no later than the startup date for the new equipment, if applicable, or the date of issuance for your revised State or Federal operating permit.

(2) If your facility is initially classified as a large foundry (or your small foundry subsequently becomes a large foundry), you must comply with the requirements for a large foundry for at least 3 years before reclassifying your facility as a small foundry. After 3 years, you may reclassify your facility as a small foundry provided your most recent annual metal melt capacity is 10,000 tons or less. If you reclassify your large foundry as a small foundry, you must notify the Administrator within 30 days and comply with the requirements for a small foundry no later than the date your melting equipment was removed or taken out of service, if applicable, or the date of issuance for your revised State or Federal operating permit.

Pollution Prevention Management Practices for New and Existing Affected Sources

§63.10885   What are my management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches?

(a) Metallic scrap management program. For each segregated metallic scrap storage area, bin or pile, you must comply with the materials acquisition requirements in paragraph (a)(1) or (2) of this section. You must keep a copy of the material specifications onsite and readily available to all personnel with material acquisition duties, and provide a copy to each of your scrap providers. You may have certain scrap subject to paragraph (a)(1) of this section and other scrap subject to paragraph (a)(2) of this section at your facility provided the metallic scrap remains segregated until charge make-up.

(1) Restricted metallic scrap. You must prepare and operate at all times according to written material specifications for the purchase and use of only metal ingots, pig iron, slitter, or other materials that do not include post-consumer automotive body scrap, post-consumer engine blocks, post-consumer oil filters, oily turnings, lead components, chlorinated plastics, or free liquids. For the purpose of this subpart, “free liquids” is defined as material that fails the paint filter test by EPA Method 9095B, “Paint Filter Liquids Test” (revision 2), November 2004 (incorporated by reference—see §63.14). The requirements for no free liquids do not apply if the owner or operator can demonstrate that the free liquid is water that resulted from scrap exposure to rain.

(2) General iron and steel scrap. You must prepare and operate at all times according to written material specifications for the purchase and use of only iron and steel scrap that has been depleted (to the extent practicable) of organics and HAP metals in the charge materials used by the iron and steel foundry. The materials specifications must include at minimum the information specified in paragraph (a)(2)(i) or (ii) of this section.

(i) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2)(ii) of this section, specifications for metallic scrap materials charged to a scrap preheater or metal melting furnace to be depleted (to the extent practicable) of the presence of used oil filters, chlorinated plastic parts, accessible lead-containing components (such as batteries and wheel weights), and a program to ensure the scrap materials are drained of free liquids.

(ii) For scrap charged to a cupola metal melting furnace that is equipped with an afterburner, specifications for metallic scrap materials to be depleted (to the extent practicable) of the presence of chlorinated plastics, accessible lead-containing components (such as batteries and wheel weights), and a program to ensure the scrap materials are drained of free liquids.

(b) Mercury requirements. For scrap containing motor vehicle scrap, you must procure the scrap pursuant to one of the compliance options in paragraphs (b)(1), (2), or (3) of this section for each scrap provider, contract, or shipment. For scrap that does not contain motor vehicle scrap, you must procure the scrap pursuant to the requirements in paragraph (b)(4) of this section for each scrap provider, contract, or shipment. You may have one scrap provider, contract, or shipment subject to one compliance provision and others subject to another compliance provision.

(1) Site-specific plan for mercury switches. You must comply with the requirements in paragraphs (b)(1)(i) through (v) of this section.

(i) You must include a requirement in your scrap specifications for removal of mercury switches from vehicle bodies used to make the scrap.

(ii) You must prepare and operate according to a plan demonstrating how your facility will implement the scrap specification in paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section for removal of mercury switches. You must submit the plan to the Administrator for approval. You must operate according to the plan as submitted during the review and approval process, operate according to the approved plan at all times after approval, and address any deficiency identified by the Administrator or delegated authority within 60 days following disapproval of a plan. You may request approval to revise the plan and may operate according to the revised plan unless and until the revision is disapproved by the Administrator or delegated authority. The Administrator or delegated authority may change the approval status of the plan upon 90-days written notice based upon the semiannual report or other information. The plan must include:

(A) A means of communicating to scrap purchasers and scrap providers the need to obtain or provide motor vehicle scrap from which mercury switches have been removed and the need to ensure the proper management of the mercury switches removed from the scrap as required under the rules implementing subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (40 CFR parts 261 through 265 and 268). The plan must include documentation of direction to appropriate staff to communicate to suppliers throughout the scrap supply chain the need to promote the removal of mercury switches from end-of-life vehicles. Upon the request of the Administrator or delegated authority, you must provide examples of materials that are used for outreach to suppliers, such as letters, contract language, policies for purchasing agents, and scrap inspection protocols;

(B) Provisions for obtaining assurance from scrap providers motor vehicle scrap provided to the facility meet the scrap specification;

(C) Provisions for periodic inspections or other means of corroboration to ensure that scrap providers and dismantlers are implementing appropriate steps to minimize the presence of mercury switches in motor vehicle scrap and that the mercury switches removed are being properly managed, including the minimum frequency such means of corroboration will be implemented; and

(D) Provisions for taking corrective actions (i.e., actions resulting in scrap providers removing a higher percentage of mercury switches or other mercury-containing components) if needed, based on the results of procedures implemented in paragraph (b)(1)(ii)(C) of this section).

(iii) You must require each motor vehicle scrap provider to provide an estimate of the number of mercury switches removed from motor vehicle scrap sent to the facility during the previous year and the basis for the estimate. The Administrator may request documentation or additional information at any time.

(iv) You must establish a goal for each scrap supplier to remove at least 80 percent of the mercury switches. Although a site-specific plan approved under paragraph (b)(1) of this section may require only the removal of convenience light switch mechanisms, the Administrator will credit all documented and verifiable mercury-containing components removed from motor vehicle scrap (such as sensors in anti-locking brake systems, security systems, active ride control, and other applications) when evaluating progress towards the 80 percent goal.

(v) For each scrap provider, you must submit semiannual progress reports to the Administrator that provide the number of mercury switches removed or the weight of mercury recovered from the switches, the estimated number of vehicles processed, an estimate of the percent of mercury switches removed, and certification that the removed mercury switches were recycled at RCRA-permitted facilities or otherwise properly managed pursuant to RCRA subtitle C regulations referenced in paragraph (b)(1)(ii)(A) of this section. This information can be submitted in aggregate form and does not have to be submitted for each shipment. The Administrator may change the approval status of a site-specific plan following 90-days notice based on the progress reports or other information.

(2) Option for approved mercury programs. You must certify in your notification of compliance status that you participate in and purchase motor vehicle scrap only from scrap providers who participate in a program for removal of mercury switches that has been approved by the Administrator based on the criteria in paragraphs (b)(2)(i) through (iii) of this section. If you purchase motor vehicle scrap from a broker, you must certify that all scrap received from that broker was obtained from other scrap providers who participate in a program for the removal of mercury switches that has been approved by the Administrator based on the criteria in paragraphs (b)(2)(i) through (iii) of this section. The National Mercury Switch Recovery Program and the State of Maine Mercury Switch Removal Program are EPA-approved programs under paragraph (b)(2) of this section unless and until the Administrator disapproves the program (in part or in whole) under paragraph (b)(2)(iii) of this section.

(i) The program includes outreach that informs the dismantlers of the need for removal of mercury switches and provides training and guidance for removing mercury switches;

(ii) The program has a goal to remove at least 80 percent of mercury switches from motor vehicle scrap the scrap provider processes. Although a program approved under paragraph (b)(2) of this section may require only the removal of convenience light switch mechanisms, the Administrator will credit all documented and verifiable mercury-containing components removed from motor vehicle scrap (such as sensors in anti-locking brake systems, security systems, active ride control, and other applications) when evaluating progress towards the 80 percent goal; and

(iii) The program sponsor agrees to submit progress reports to the Administrator no less frequently than once every year that provide the number of mercury switches removed or the weight of mercury recovered from the switches, the estimated number of vehicles processed, an estimate of the percent of mercury switches recovered, and certification that the recovered mercury switches were recycled at facilities with permits as required under the rules implementing subtitle C of RCRA (40 CFR parts 261 through 265 and 268). The progress reports must be based on a database that includes data for each program participant; however, data may be aggregated at the State level for progress reports that will be publicly available. The Administrator may change the approval status of a program or portion of a program (e.g., at the State level) following 90-days notice based on the progress reports or on other information.

(iv) You must develop and maintain onsite a plan demonstrating the manner through which your facility is participating in the EPA-approved program.

(A) The plan must include facility-specific implementation elements, corporate-wide policies, and/or efforts coordinated by a trade association as appropriate for each facility.

(B) You must provide in the plan documentation of direction to appropriate staff to communicate to suppliers throughout the scrap supply chain the need to promote the removal or mercury switches from end-of-life vehicles. Upon the request of the Administrator or delegated authority, you must provide examples of materials that are used for outreach to suppliers, such as letters, contract language, policies for purchasing agents, and scrap inspection protocols.

(C) You must conduct periodic inspections or other means of corroboration to ensure that scrap providers are aware of the need for and are implementing appropriate steps to minimize the presence of mercury in scrap from end-of-life vehicles.

(3) Option for specialty metal scrap. You must certify in your notification of compliance status and maintain records of documentation that the only materials from motor vehicles in the scrap are materials recovered for their specialty alloy (including, but not limited to, chromium, nickel, molybdenum, or other alloys) content (such as certain exhaust systems) and, based on the nature of the scrap and purchase specifications, that the type of scrap is not reasonably expected to contain mercury switches.

(4) Scrap that does not contain motor vehicle scrap. For scrap not subject to the requirements in paragraphs (b)(1) through (3) of this section, you must certify in your notification of compliance status and maintain records of documentation that this scrap does not contain motor vehicle scrap.

§63.10886   What are my management practices for binder formulations?

For each furfuryl alcohol warm box mold or core making line at a new or existing iron and steel foundry, you must use a binder chemical formulation that does not use methanol as a specific ingredient of the catalyst formulation. This requirement does not apply to the resin portion of the binder system.

Requirements for New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Small Foundries

§63.10890   What are my management practices and compliance requirements?

(a) You must comply with the pollution prevention management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches in §63.10885 and binder formulations in §63.10886.

(b) You must submit an initial notification of applicability according to §63.9(b)(2).

(c) You must submit a notification of compliance status according to §63.9(h)(1)(i). You must send the notification of compliance status before the close of business on the 30th day after the applicable compliance date specified in §63.10881. The notification must include the following compliance certifications, as applicable:

(1) “This facility has prepared, and will operate by, written material specifications for metallic scrap according to §63.10885(a)(1)” and/or “This facility has prepared, and will operate by, written material specifications for general iron and steel scrap according to §63.10885(a)(2).”

(2) “This facility has prepared, and will operate by, written material specifications for the removal of mercury switches and a site-specific plan implementing the material specifications according to §63.10885(b)(1) and/or “This facility participates in and purchases motor vehicle scrap only from scrap providers who participate in a program for removal of mercury switches that has been approved by the Administrator according to §63.10885(b)(2) and has prepared a plan for participation in the EPA-approved program according to §63.10885(b)(2)(iv)” and/or “The only materials from motor vehicles in the scrap charged to a metal melting furnace at this facility are materials recovered for their specialty alloy content in accordance with §63.10885(b)(3) which are not reasonably expected to contain mercury switches” and/or “This facility complies with the requirements for scrap that does not contain motor vehicle scrap in accordance with §63.10885(b)(4).”

(3) “This facility complies with the no methanol requirement for the catalyst portion of each binder chemical formulation for a furfuryl alcohol warm box mold or core making line according to §63.10886.”

(d) As required by §63.10(b)(1), you must maintain files of all information (including all reports and notifications) for at least 5 years following the date of each occurrence, measurement, maintenance, corrective action, report, or record. At a minimum, the most recent 2 years of data shall be retained on site. The remaining 3 years of data may be retained off site. Such files may be maintained on microfilm, on a computer, on computer floppy disks, on magnetic tape disks, or on microfiche.

(e) You must maintain records of the information specified in paragraphs (e)(1) through (7) of this section according to the requirements in §63.10(b)(1).

(1) Records supporting your initial notification of applicability and your notification of compliance status according to §63.10(b)(2)(xiv).

(2) Records of your written materials specifications according to §63.10885(a) and records that demonstrate compliance with the requirements for restricted metallic scrap in §63.10885(a)(1) and/or for the use of general scrap in §63.10885(a)(2) and for mercury in §63.10885(b)(1) through (3), as applicable. You must keep records documenting compliance with §63.10885(b)(4) for scrap that does not contain motor vehicle scrap.

(3) If you are subject to the requirements for a site-specific plan for mercury switch removal under §63.10885(b)(1), you must:

(i) Maintain records of the number of mercury switches removed or the weight of mercury recovered from the switches and properly managed, the estimated number of vehicles processed, and an estimate of the percent of mercury switches recovered; and

(ii) Submit semiannual reports of the number of mercury switches removed or the weight of mercury recovered from the switches and properly managed, the estimated number of vehicles processed, an estimate of the percent of mercury switches recovered, and a certification that the recovered mercury switches were recycled at RCRA-permitted facilities. The semiannual reports must include a certification that you have conducted periodic inspections or taken other means of corroboration as required under §63.10885(b)(1)(ii)(C). You must identify which option in paragraph §63.10885(b) applies to each scrap provider, contract, or shipment. You may include this information in the semiannual compliance reports required under paragraph (f) of this section.

(4) If you are subject to the option for approved mercury programs under §63.10885(b)(2), you must maintain records identifying each scrap provider and documenting the scrap provider's participation in an approved mercury switch removal program. If you purchase motor vehicle scrap from a broker, you must maintain records identifying each broker and documentation that all scrap provided by the broker was obtained from other scrap providers who participate in an approved mercury switch removal program.

(5) Records to document use of binder chemical formulation that does not contain methanol as a specific ingredient of the catalyst formulation for each furfuryl alcohol warm box mold or core making line as required by §63.10886. These records must be the Material Safety Data Sheet (provided that it contains appropriate information), a certified product data sheet, or a manufacturer's hazardous air pollutant data sheet.

(6) Records of the annual quantity and composition of each HAP-containing chemical binder or coating material used to make molds and cores. These records must be copies of purchasing records, Material Safety Data Sheets, or other documentation that provides information on the binder or coating materials used.

(7) Records of metal melt production for each calendar year.

(f) You must submit semiannual compliance reports to the Administrator according to the requirements in §63.10(e). The report must clearly identify any deviation from the pollution prevention management practices in §63.10885 or §63.10886 and the corrective action taken.

(g) You must submit a written notification to the Administrator of the initial classification of your facility as a small foundry as required in §63.10880(f) and (g), as applicable, and for any subsequent reclassification as required in §63.10881(d)(1) or (e), as applicable.

(h) Following the initial determination for an existing affected source as a small foundry, if the annual metal melt production exceeds 20,000 tons during the preceding year, you must comply with the requirements for large foundries by the applicable dates in §63.10881(d)(1)(i) or (d)(1)(ii). Following the initial determination for a new affected source as a small foundry, if you increase the annual metal melt capacity to exceed 10,000 tons, you must comply with the requirements for a large foundry by the applicable dates in §63.10881(e)(1).

(i) You must comply with the following requirements of the General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A): §§63.1 through 63.5; §63.6(a), (b), (c), and (e)(1); §63.9; §63.10(a), (b)(1), (b)(2)(xiv), (b)(3), (d)(1), (d)(4), and (f); and §§63.13 through 63.16. Requirements of the General Provisions not cited in the preceding sentence do not apply to the owner or operator of a new or existing affected source that is classified as a small foundry.

Requirements for New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and Steel Foundries

§63.10895   What are my standards and management practices?

(a) If you own or operate an affected source that is a large foundry as defined in §63.10906, you must comply with the pollution prevention management practices in §§63.10885 and 63.10886, the requirements in paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section, and the requirements in §§63.10896 through 63.10900.

(b) You must operate a capture and collection system for each metal melting furnace at a new or existing iron and steel foundry unless that furnace is specifically uncontrolled as part of an emissions averaging group. Each capture and collection system must meet accepted engineering standards, such as those published by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists.

(c) You must not discharge to the atmosphere emissions from any metal melting furnace or group of all metal melting furnaces that exceed the applicable limit in paragraph (c)(1) or (2) of this section. When an alternative emissions limit is provided for a given emissions source, you are not restricted in the selection of which applicable alternative emissions limit is used to demonstrate compliance.

(1) For an existing iron and steel foundry, 0.8 pounds of particulate matter (PM) per ton of metal charged or 0.06 pounds of total metal HAP per ton of metal charged.

(2) For a new iron and steel foundry, 0.1 pounds of PM per ton of metal charged or 0.008 pounds of total metal HAP per ton of metal charged.

(d) If you own or operate a new affected source, you must comply with each control device parameter operating limit in paragraphs (d)(1) and (2) of this section that applies to you.

(1) For each wet scrubber applied to emissions from a metal melting furnace, you must maintain the 3-hour average pressure drop and scrubber water flow rate at or above the minimum levels established during the initial or subsequent performance test.

(2) For each electrostatic precipitator applied to emissions from a metal melting furnace, you must maintain the voltage and secondary current (or total power input) to the control device at or above the level established during the initial or subsequent performance test.

(e) If you own or operate a new or existing iron and steel foundry, you must not discharge to the atmosphere fugitive emissions from foundry operations that exhibit opacity greater than 20 percent (6-minute average), except for one 6-minute average per hour that does not exceed 30 percent.

§63.10896   What are my operation and maintenance requirements?

(a) You must prepare and operate at all times according to a written operation and maintenance (O&M) plan for each control device for an emissions source subject to a PM, metal HAP, or opacity emissions limit in §63.10895. You must maintain a copy of the O&M plan at the facility and make it available for review upon request. At a minimum, each plan must contain the following information:

(1) General facility and contact information;

(2) Positions responsible for inspecting, maintaining, and repairing emissions control devices which are used to comply with this subpart;

(3) Description of items, equipment, and conditions that will be inspected, including an inspection schedule for the items, equipment, and conditions. For baghouses that are equipped with bag leak detection systems, the O&M plan must include the site-specific monitoring plan required in §63.10897(d)(2).

(4) Identity and estimated quantity of the replacement parts that will be maintained in inventory; and

(5) For a new affected source, procedures for operating and maintaining a CPMS in accordance with manufacturer's specifications.

(b) You may use any other O&M, preventative maintenance, or similar plan which addresses the requirements in paragraph (a)(1) through (5) of this section to demonstrate compliance with the requirements for an O&M plan.

§63.10897   What are my monitoring requirements?

(a) You must conduct an initial inspection of each PM control device for a metal melting furnace at an existing affected source. You must conduct each initial inspection no later than 60 days after your applicable compliance date for each installed control device which has been operated within 60 days of the compliance date. For an installed control device which has not operated within 60 days of the compliance date, you must conduct an initial inspection prior to startup of the control device. Following the initial inspections, you must perform periodic inspections and maintenance of each PM control device for a metal melting furnace at an existing affected source. You must perform the initial and periodic inspections according to the requirements in paragraphs (a)(1) through (4) of this section. You must record the results of each initial and periodic inspection and any maintenance action in the logbook required in §63.10899(b)(13).

(1) For the initial inspection of each baghouse, you must visually inspect the system ductwork and baghouse units for leaks. You must also inspect the inside of each baghouse for structural integrity and fabric filter condition. Following the initial inspections, you must inspect and maintain each baghouse according to the requirements in paragraphs (a)(1)(i) and (ii) of this section.

(i) You must conduct monthly visual inspections of the system ductwork for leaks.

(ii) You must conduct inspections of the interior of the baghouse for structural integrity and to determine the condition of the fabric filter every 6 months.

(2) For the initial inspection of each dry electrostatic precipitator, you must verify the proper functioning of the electronic controls for corona power and rapper operation, that the corona wires are energized, and that adequate air pressure is present on the rapper manifold. You must also visually inspect the system ductwork and electrostatic housing unit and hopper for leaks and inspect the interior of the electrostatic precipitator to determine the condition and integrity of corona wires, collection plates, hopper, and air diffuser plates. Following the initial inspection, you must inspect and maintain each dry electrostatic precipitator according to the requirements in paragraphs (a)(2)(i) through (iii) of this section.

(i) You must conduct a daily inspection to verify the proper functioning of the electronic controls for corona power and rapper operation, that the corona wires are energized, and that adequate air pressure is present on the rapper manifold.

(ii) You must conduct monthly visual inspections of the system ductwork, housing unit, and hopper for leaks.

(iii) You must conduct inspections of the interior of the electrostatic precipitator to determine the condition and integrity of corona wires, collection plates, plate rappers, hopper, and air diffuser plates every 24 months.

(3) For the initial inspection of each wet electrostatic precipitator, you must verify the proper functioning of the electronic controls for corona power, that the corona wires are energized, and that water flow is present. You must also visually inspect the system ductwork and electrostatic precipitator housing unit and hopper for leaks and inspect the interior of the electrostatic precipitator to determine the condition and integrity of corona wires, collection plates, plate wash spray heads, hopper, and air diffuser plates. Following the initial inspection, you must inspect and maintain each wet electrostatic precipitator according to the requirements in paragraphs (a)(3)(i) through (iii) of this section.

(i) You must conduct a daily inspection to verify the proper functioning of the electronic controls for corona power, that the corona wires are energized, and that water flow is present.

(ii) You must conduct monthly visual inspections of the system ductwork, electrostatic precipitator housing unit, and hopper for leaks.

(iii) You must conduct inspections of the interior of the electrostatic precipitator to determine the condition and integrity of corona wires, collection plates, plate wash spray heads, hopper, and air diffuser plates every 24 months.

(4) For the initial inspection of each wet scrubber, you must verify the presence of water flow to the scrubber. You must also visually inspect the system ductwork and scrubber unit for leaks and inspect the interior of the scrubber for structural integrity and the condition of the demister and spray nozzle. Following the initial inspection, you must inspect and maintain each wet scrubber according to the requirements in paragraphs (a)(4)(i) through (iii) of this section.

(i) You must conduct a daily inspection to verify the presence of water flow to the scrubber.

(ii) You must conduct monthly visual inspections of the system ductwork and scrubber unit for leaks.

(iii) You must conduct inspections of the interior of the scrubber to determine the structural integrity and condition of the demister and spray nozzle every 12 months.

(b) For each wet scrubber applied to emissions from a metal melting furnace at a new affected source, you must use a continuous parameter monitoring system (CPMS) to measure and record the 3-hour average pressure drop and scrubber water flow rate.

(c) For each electrostatic precipitator applied to emissions from a metal melting furnace at a new affected source, you must measure and record the hourly average voltage and secondary current (or total power input) using a CPMS.

(d) If you own or operate an existing affected source, you may install, operate, and maintain a bag leak detection system for each negative pressure baghouse or positive pressure baghouse as an alternative to the baghouse inspection requirements in paragraph (a)(1) of this section. If you own or operate a new affected source, you must install, operate, and maintain a bag leak detection system for each negative pressure baghouse or positive pressure baghouse. You must install, operate, and maintain each bag leak detection system according to the requirements in paragraphs (d)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) Each bag leak detection system must meet the requirements in paragraphs (d)(1)(i) through (vii) of this section.

(i) The system must be certified by the manufacturer to be capable of detecting emissions of particulate matter at concentrations of 10 milligrams per actual cubic meter (0.00044 grains per actual cubic foot) or less.

(ii) The bag leak detection system sensor must provide output of relative particulate matter loadings and the owner or operator shall continuously record the output from the bag leak detection system using a strip chart recorder, data logger, or other means.

(iii) The system must be equipped with an alarm that will sound when an increase in relative particulate loadings is detected over the alarm set point established in the operation and maintenance plan, and the alarm must be located such that it can be heard by the appropriate plant personnel.

(iv) The initial adjustment of the system must, at minimum, consist of establishing the baseline output by adjusting the sensitivity (range) and the averaging period of the device, and establishing the alarm set points. If the system is equipped with an alarm delay time feature, you also must adjust the alarm delay time.

(v) Following the initial adjustment, do not adjust the sensitivity or range, averaging period, alarm set point, or alarm delay time. Except, once per quarter, you may adjust the sensitivity of the bag leak detection system to account for seasonable effects including temperature and humidity according to the procedures in the monitoring plan required by paragraph (d)(2) of this section.

(vi) For negative pressure baghouses, induced air baghouses, and positive pressure baghouses that are discharged to the atmosphere through a stack, the bag leak detector sensor must be installed downstream of the baghouse and upstream of any wet scrubber.

(vii) Where multiple detectors are required, the system's instrumentation and alarm may be shared among detectors.

(2) You must prepare a site-specific monitoring plan for each bag leak detection system to be incorporated in your O&M plan. You must operate and maintain each bag leak detection system according to the plan at all times. Each plan must address all of the items identified in paragraphs (d)(2)(i) through (vi) of this section.

(i) Installation of the bag leak detection system.

(ii) Initial and periodic adjustment of the bag leak detection system including how the alarm set-point will be established.

(iii) Operation of the bag leak detection system including quality assurance procedures.

(iv) Maintenance of the bag leak detection system including a routine maintenance schedule and spare parts inventory list.

(v) How the bag leak detection system output will be recorded and stored.

(vi) Procedures for determining what corrective actions are necessary in the event of a bag leak detection alarm as required in paragraph (d)(3) of this section.

(3) In the event that a bag leak detection system alarm is triggered, you must initiate corrective action to determine the cause of the alarm within 1 hour of the alarm, initiate corrective action to correct the cause of the problem within 24 hours of the alarm, and complete corrective action as soon as practicable, but no later than 10 calendar days from the date of the alarm. You must record the date and time of each valid alarm, the time you initiated corrective action, the correction action taken, and the date on which corrective action was completed. Corrective actions may include, but are not limited to:

(i) Inspecting the bag house for air leaks, torn or broken bags or filter media, or any other condition that may cause an increase in emissions.

(ii) Sealing off defective bags or filter media.

(iii) Replacing defective bags or filter media or otherwise repairing the control device.

(iv) Sealing off a defective baghouse department.

(v) Cleaning the bag leak detection system probe, or otherwise repairing the bag leak detection system.

(vi) Shutting down the process producing the particulate emissions.

(e) You must make monthly inspections of the equipment that is important to the performance of the total capture system (i.e., pressure sensors, dampers, and damper switches). This inspection must include observations of the physical appearance of the equipment (e.g., presence of holes in the ductwork or hoods, flow constrictions caused by dents or accumulated dust in the ductwork, and fan erosion). You must repair any defect or deficiency in the capture system as soon as practicable, but no later than 90 days. You must record the date and results of each inspection and the date of repair of any defect or deficiency.

(f) You must install, operate, and maintain each CPMS or other measurement device according to your O&M plan. You must record all information needed to document conformance with these requirements.

(g) In the event of an exceedance of an established emissions limitation (including an operating limit), you must restore operation of the emissions source (including the control device and associated capture system) to its normal or usual manner or operation as expeditiously as practicable in accordance with good air pollution control practices for minimizing emissions. The response shall include minimizing the period of any startup, shutdown or malfunction and taking any necessary corrective actions to restore normal operation and prevent the likely recurrence of the exceedance. You must record the date and time correction action was initiated, the correction action taken, and the date corrective action was completed.

(h) If you choose to comply with an emissions limit in §63.10895(c) using emissions averaging, you must calculate and record for each calendar month the pounds of PM or total metal HAP per ton of metal melted from the group of all metal melting furnaces at your foundry. You must calculate and record the weighted average pounds per ton emissions rate for the group of all metal melting furnaces at the foundry determined from the performance test procedures in §63.10898(d) and (e).

§63.10898   What are my performance test requirements?

(a) You must conduct a performance test to demonstrate initial compliance with the applicable emissions limits for each metal melting furnace or group of all metal melting furnaces that is subject to an emissions limit in §63.10895(c) and for each building or structure housing foundry operations that is subject to the opacity limit for fugitive emissions in §63.10895(e). You must conduct the test within 180 days of your compliance date and report the results in your notification of compliance status.

(1) If you own or operate an existing iron and steel foundry, you may choose to submit the results of a prior performance test for PM or total metal HAP that demonstrates compliance with the applicable emissions limit for a metal melting furnace or group of all metal melting furnaces provided the test was conducted within the last 5 years using the methods and procedures specified in this subpart and either no process changes have been made since the test, or you can demonstrate that the results of the performance test, with or without adjustments, reliably demonstrate compliance with the applicable emissions limit despite such process changes.

(2) If you own or operate an existing iron and steel foundry and you choose to submit the results of a prior performance test according to paragraph (a)(1) of this section, you must submit a written notification to the Administrator of your intent to use the previous test data no later than 60 days after your compliance date. The notification must contain a full copy of the performance test and contain information to demonstrate, if applicable, that either no process changes have been made since the test, or that the results of the performance test, with or without adjustments, reliably demonstrate compliance despite such process changes.

(3) If you have an electric induction furnace equipped with an emissions control device at an existing foundry, you may use the test results from another electric induction furnace to demonstrate compliance with the applicable PM or total metal HAP emissions limit in §63.10895(c) provided the furnaces are similar with respect to the type of emission control device that is used, the composition of the scrap charged, furnace size, and furnace melting temperature.

(4) If you have an uncontrolled electric induction furnace at an existing foundry, you may use the test results from another electric induction furnace to demonstrate compliance with the applicable PM or total metal HAP emissions limit in §63.10895(c) provided the test results are prior to any control device and the electric induction furnaces are similar with respect to the composition of the scrap charged, furnace size, and furnace melting temperature.

(5) For electric induction furnaces that do not have emission capture systems, you may install a temporary enclosure for the purpose of representative sampling of emissions. A permanent enclosure and capture system is not required for the purpose of the performance test.

(b) You must conduct subsequent performance tests to demonstrate compliance with all applicable PM or total metal HAP emissions limits in §63.10895(c) for a metal melting furnace or group of all metal melting furnaces no less frequently than every 5 years and each time you elect to change an operating limit or make a process change likely to increase HAP emissions.

(c) You must conduct each performance test according to the requirements in §63.7(e)(1), Table 1 to this subpart, and paragraphs (d) through (g) of this section.

(d) To determine compliance with the applicable PM or total metal HAP emissions limit in §63.10895(c) for a metal melting furnace in a lb/ton of metal charged format, compute the process-weighted mass emissions (Ep) for each test run using Equation 1 of this section:

eCFR graphic er02ja08.000.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

Ep = Process-weighted mass emissions rate of PM or total metal HAP, pounds of PM or total metal HAP per ton (lb/ton) of metal charged;

C = Concentration of PM or total metal HAP measured during performance test run, grains per dry standard cubic foot (gr/dscf);

Q = Volumetric flow rate of exhaust gas, dry standard cubic feet per hour (dscf/hr);

T = Total time during a test run that a sample is withdrawn from the stack during melt production cycle, hr;

P = Total amount of metal charged during the test run, tons; and

K = Conversion factor, 7,000 grains per pound.

(e) To determine compliance with the applicable emissions limit in §63.10895(c) for a group of all metal melting furnaces using emissions averaging,

(1) Determine and record the monthly average charge rate for each metal melting furnace at your iron and steel foundry for the previous calendar month; and

(2) Compute the mass-weighted PM or total metal HAP using Equation 2 of this section.

eCFR graphic er02ja08.001.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

EC = The mass-weighted PM or total metal HAP emissions for the group of all metal melting furnaces at the foundry, pounds of PM or total metal HAP per ton of metal charged;

Epi = Process-weighted mass emissions of PM or total metal HAP for individual emission unit i as determined from the performance test and calculated using Equation 1 of this section, pounds of PM or total metal HAP per ton of metal charged;

Tti = Total tons of metal charged for individual emission unit i for the calendar month prior to the performance test, tons; and

n = The total number of metal melting furnaces at the iron and steel foundry.

(3) For an uncontrolled electric induction furnace that is not equipped with a capture system and has not been previously tested for PM or total metal HAP, you may assume an emissions factor of 2 pounds per ton of PM or 0.13 pounds of total metal HAP per ton of metal melted in Equation 2 of this section instead of a measured test value. If the uncontrolled electric induction furnace is equipped with a capture system, you must use a measured test value.

(f) To determine compliance with the applicable PM or total metal HAP emissions limit for a metal melting furnace in §63.10895(c) when emissions from one or more regulated furnaces are combined with other non-regulated emissions sources, you may demonstrate compliance using the procedures in paragraphs (f)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) Determine the PM or total metal HAP process-weighted mass emissions for each of the regulated streams prior to the combination with other exhaust streams or control device.

(2) Measure the flow rate and PM or total metal HAP concentration of the combined exhaust stream both before and after the control device and calculate the mass removal efficiency of the control device using Equation 3 of this section.

eCFR graphic er02ja08.002.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

Ei = Mass emissions rate of PM or total metal HAP at the control device inlet, lb/hr;

Eo = Mass emissions rate of PM or total metal HAP at the control device outlet, lb/hr.

(3) Meet the applicable emissions limit based on the calculated PM or total metal HAP process-weighted mass emissions for the regulated emissions source using Equation 4 of this section:

eCFR graphic er02ja08.003.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

Ep1released = Calculated process-weighted mass emissions of PM (or total metal HAP) predicted to be released to the atmosphere from the regulated emissions source, pounds of PM or total metal HAP per ton of metal charged; and

Ep1i = Process-weighted mass emissions of PM (or total metal HAP) in the uncontrolled regulated exhaust stream, pounds of PM or total metal HAP per ton of metal charged.

(g) To determine compliance with an emissions limit for situations when multiple sources are controlled by a single control device, but only one source operates at a time or other situations that are not expressly considered in paragraphs (d) through (f) of this section, you must submit a site-specific test plan to the Administrator for approval according to the requirements in §63.7(c)(2) and (3).

(h) You must conduct each opacity test for fugitive emissions according to the requirements in §63.6(h)(5) and Table 1 to this subpart.

(i) You must conduct subsequent performance tests to demonstrate compliance with the opacity limit in §63.10895(e) no less frequently than every 6 months and each time you make a process change likely to increase fugitive emissions.

(j) In your performance test report, you must certify that the capture system operated normally during the performance test.

(k) You must establish operating limits for a new affected source during the initial performance test according to the requirements in Table 2 of this subpart.

(l) You may change the operating limits for a wet scrubber, electrostatic precipitator, or baghouse if you meet the requirements in paragraphs (l)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) Submit a written notification to the Administrator of your plan to conduct a new performance test to revise the operating limit.

(2) Conduct a performance test to demonstrate compliance with the applicable emissions limitation in §63.10895(c).

(3) Establish revised operating limits according to the applicable procedures in Table 2 to this subpart.

§63.10899   What are my recordkeeping and reporting requirements?

(a) As required by §63.10(b)(1), you must maintain files of all information (including all reports and notifications) for at least 5 years following the date of each occurrence, measurement, maintenance, corrective action, report, or record. At a minimum, the most recent 2 years of data shall be retained on site. The remaining 3 years of data may be retained off site. Such files may be maintained on microfilm, on a computer, on computer floppy disks, on magnetic tape disks, or on microfiche.

(b) In addition to the records required by 40 CFR 63.10, you must keep records of the information specified in paragraphs (b)(1) through (13) of this section.

(1) You must keep records of your written materials specifications according to §63.10885(a) and records that demonstrate compliance with the requirements for restricted metallic scrap in §63.10885(a)(1) and/or for the use of general scrap in §63.10885(a)(2) and for mercury in §63.10885(b)(1) through (3), as applicable. You must keep records documenting compliance with §63.10885(b)(4) for scrap that does not contain motor vehicle scrap.

(2) If you are subject to the requirements for a site-specific plan for mercury under §63.10885(b)(1), you must:

(i) Maintain records of the number of mercury switches removed or the weight of mercury recovered from the switches and properly managed, the estimated number of vehicles processed, and an estimate of the percent of mercury switches recovered; and

(ii) Submit semiannual reports of the number of mercury switches removed or the weight of mercury recovered from the switches and properly managed, the estimated number of vehicles processed, an estimate of the percent of mercury switches recovered, and a certification that the recovered mercury switches were recycled at RCRA-permitted facilities. The semiannual reports must include a certification that you have conducted periodic inspections or taken other means of corroboration as required under §63.10885(b)(1)(ii)(C). You must identify which option in §63.10885(b) applies to each scrap provider, contract, or shipment. You may include this information in the semiannual compliance reports required under paragraph (c) of this section.

(3) If you are subject to the option for approved mercury programs under §63.10885(b)(2), you must maintain records identifying each scrap provider and documenting the scrap provider's participation in an approved mercury switch removal program. If your scrap provider is a broker, you must maintain records identifying each of the broker's scrap suppliers and documenting the scrap supplier's participation in an approved mercury switch removal program.

(4) You must keep records to document use of any binder chemical formulation that does not contain methanol as a specific ingredient of the catalyst formulation for each furfuryl alcohol warm box mold or core making line as required by §63.10886. These records must be the Material Safety Data Sheet (provided that it contains appropriate information), a certified product data sheet, or a manufacturer's hazardous air pollutant data sheet.

(5) You must keep records of the annual quantity and composition of each HAP-containing chemical binder or coating material used to make molds and cores. These records must be copies of purchasing records, Material Safety Data Sheets, or other documentation that provide information on the binder or coating materials used.

(6) You must keep records of monthly metal melt production for each calendar year.

(7) You must keep a copy of the operation and maintenance plan as required by §63.10896(a) and records that demonstrate compliance with plan requirements.

(8) If you use emissions averaging, you must keep records of the monthly metal melting rate for each furnace at your iron and steel foundry, and records of the calculated pounds of PM or total metal HAP per ton of metal melted for the group of all metal melting furnaces required by §63.10897(h).

(9) If applicable, you must keep records for bag leak detection systems as follows:

(i) Records of the bag leak detection system output;

(ii) Records of bag leak detection system adjustments, including the date and time of the adjustment, the initial bag leak detection system settings, and the final bag leak detection system settings; and

(iii) The date and time of all bag leak detection system alarms, and for each valid alarm, the time you initiated corrective action, the corrective action taken, and the date on which corrective action was completed.

(10) You must keep records of capture system inspections and repairs as required by §63.10897(e).

(11) You must keep records demonstrating conformance with your specifications for the operation of CPMS as required by §63.10897(f).

(12) You must keep records of corrective action(s) for exceedances and excursions as required by §63.10897(g).

(13) You must record the results of each inspection and maintenance required by §63.10897(a) for PM control devices in a logbook (written or electronic format). You must keep the logbook onsite and make the logbook available to the Administrator upon request. You must keep records of the information specified in paragraphs (b)(13)(i) through (iii) of this section.

(i) The date and time of each recorded action for a fabric filter, the results of each inspection, and the results of any maintenance performed on the bag filters.

(ii) The date and time of each recorded action for a wet or dry electrostatic precipitator (including ductwork), the results of each inspection, and the results of any maintenance performed for the electrostatic precipitator.

(iii) The date and time of each recorded action for a wet scrubber (including ductwork), the results of each inspection, and the results of any maintenance performed on the wet scrubber.

(c) You must submit semiannual compliance reports to the Administrator according to the requirements in §63.10(e). The reports must include, at a minimum, the following information as applicable:

(1) Summary information on the number, duration, and cause (including unknown cause, if applicable) of excursions or exceedances, as applicable, and the corrective action taken;

(2) Summary information on the number, duration, and cause (including unknown cause, if applicable) for monitor downtime incidents (other than downtime associated with zero and span or other calibration checks, if applicable); and

(3) Summary information on any deviation from the pollution prevention management practices in §§63.10885 and 63.10886 and the operation and maintenance requirements §63.10896 and the corrective action taken.

(d) You must submit written notification to the Administrator of the initial classification of your new or existing affected source as a large iron and steel facility as required in §63.10880(f) and (g), as applicable, and for any subsequent reclassification as required in §63.10881(d) or (e), as applicable.

§63.10900   What parts of the General Provisions apply to my large foundry?

(a) If you own or operate a new or existing affected source that is classified as a large foundry, you must comply with the requirements of the General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) according to Table 3 of this subpart.

(b) If you own or operator a new or existing affected source that is classified as a large foundry, your notification of compliance status required by §63.9(h) must include each applicable certification of compliance, signed by a responsible official, in Table 4 of this subpart.

Other Requirements and Information

§63.10905   Who implements and enforces this subpart?

(a) This subpart can be implemented and enforced by EPA or a delegated authority such as your State, local, or tribal agency. If the EPA Administrator has delegated authority to your State, local, or tribal agency, then that agency has the authority to implement and enforce this subpart. You should contact your EPA Regional Office to find out if implementation and enforcement of this subpart is delegated to your State, local, or tribal agency.

(b) In delegating implementation and enforcement authority of this subpart to a State, local, or tribal agency under 40 CFR part 63, subpart E, the authorities contained in paragraph (c) of this section are retained by the EPA Administrator and are not transferred to the State, local, or tribal agency.

(c) The authorities that cannot be delegated to State, local, or tribal agencies are specified in paragraphs (c)(1) through (6) of this section.

(1) Approval of an alternative non-opacity emissions standard under 40 CFR 63.6(g).

(2) Approval of an alternative opacity emissions standard under §63.6(h)(9).

(3) Approval of a major change to test methods under §63.7(e)(2)(ii) and (f). A “major change to test method” is defined in §63.90.

(4) Approval of a major change to monitoring under §63.8(f). A “major change to monitoring” under is defined in §63.90.

(5) Approval of a major change to recordkeeping and reporting under §63.10(f). A “major change to recordkeeping/reporting” is defined in §63.90.

(6) Approval of a local, State, or national mercury switch removal program under §63.10885(b)(2).

§63.10906   What definitions apply to this subpart?

Terms used in this subpart are defined in the Clean Air Act, in §63.2, and in this section.

Annual metal melt capacity means the lower of the total metal melting furnace equipment melt rate capacity assuming 8,760 operating hours per year summed for all metal melting furnaces at the foundry or, if applicable, the maximum permitted metal melt production rate for the iron and steel foundry calculated on an annual basis. Unless otherwise specified in the permit, permitted metal melt production rates that are not specified on an annual basis must be annualized assuming 24 hours per day, 365 days per year of operation. If the permit limits the operating hours of the furnace(s) or foundry, then the permitted operating hours are used to annualize the maximum permitted metal melt production rate.

Annual metal melt production means the quantity of metal melted in a metal melting furnace or group of all metal melting furnaces at the iron and steel foundry in a given calendar year. For the purposes of this subpart, metal melt production is determined on the basis on the quantity of metal charged to each metal melting furnace; the sum of the metal melt production for each furnace in a given calendar year is the annual metal melt production of the foundry.

Bag leak detection system means a system that is capable of continuously monitoring relative particulate matter (dust) loadings in the exhaust of a baghouse to detect bag leaks and other upset conditions. A bag leak detection system includes, but is not limited to, an instrument that operates on triboelectric, electrodynamic, light scattering, light transmittance, or other effect to continuously monitor relative particulate matter loadings.

Binder chemical means a component of a system of chemicals used to bind sand together into molds, mold sections, and cores through chemical reaction as opposed to pressure.

Capture system means the collection of components used to capture gases and fumes released from one or more emissions points and then convey the captured gas stream to a control device or to the atmosphere. A capture system may include, but is not limited to, the following components as applicable to a given capture system design: Duct intake devices, hoods, enclosures, ductwork, dampers, manifolds, plenums, and fans.

Chlorinated plastics means solid polymeric materials that contain chlorine in the polymer chain, such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and PVC copolymers.

Control device means the air pollution control equipment used to remove particulate matter from the effluent gas stream generated by a metal melting furnace.

Cupola means a vertical cylindrical shaft furnace that uses coke and forms of iron and steel such as scrap and foundry returns as the primary charge components and melts the iron and steel through combustion of the coke by a forced upward flow of heated air.

Deviation means any instance in which an affected source or an owner or operator of such an affected source:

(1) Fails to meet any requirement or obligation established by this subpart including, but not limited to, any emissions limitation (including operating limits), management practice, or operation and maintenance requirement;

(2) Fails to meet any term or condition that is adopted to implement an applicable requirement in this subpart and that is included in the operating permit for any iron and steel foundry required to obtain such a permit; or

(3) Fails to meet any emissions limitation (including operating limits) or management standard in this subpart during startup, shutdown, or malfunction, regardless of whether or not such failure is permitted by this subpart.

Electric arc furnace means a vessel in which forms of iron and steel such as scrap and foundry returns are melted through resistance heating by an electric current flowing through the arcs formed between the electrodes and the surface of the metal and also flowing through the metal between the arc paths.

Electric induction furnace means a vessel in which forms of iron and steel such as scrap and foundry returns are melted though resistance heating by an electric current that is induced in the metal by passing an alternating current through a coil surrounding the metal charge or surrounding a pool of molten metal at the bottom of the vessel.

Exhaust stream means gases emitted from a process through a conveyance as defined in this subpart.

Foundry operations mean all process equipment and practices used to produce metal castings for shipment. Foundry operations include: Mold or core making and coating; scrap handling and preheating; metal melting and inoculation; pouring, cooling, and shakeout; shotblasting, grinding, and other metal finishing operations; and sand handling.

Free liquids means material that fails the paint filter liquids test by EPA Method 9095B, Revision 2, November 1994 (incorporated by reference—see §63.14). That is, if any portion of the material passes through and drops from the filter within the 5-minute test period, the material contains free liquids.

Fugitive emissions means any pollutant released to the atmosphere that is not discharged through a system of equipment that is specifically designed to capture pollutants at the source, convey them through ductwork, and exhaust them using forced ventilation. Fugitive emissions include pollutants released to the atmosphere through windows, doors, vents, or other building openings. Fugitive emissions also include pollutants released to the atmosphere through other general building ventilation or exhaust systems not specifically designed to capture pollutants at the source.

Furfuryl alcohol warm box mold or core making line means a mold or core making line in which the binder chemical system used is that system commonly designated as a furfuryl alcohol warm box system by the foundry industry.

Iron and steel foundry means a facility or portion of a facility that melts scrap, ingot, and/or other forms of iron and/or steel and pours the resulting molten metal into molds to produce final or near final shape products for introduction into commerce. Research and development facilities, operations that only produce non-commercial castings, and operations associated with nonferrous metal production are not included in this definition.

Large foundry means, for an existing affected source, an iron and steel foundry with an annual metal melt production greater than 20,000 tons. For a new affected source, large foundry means an iron and steel foundry with an annual metal melt capacity greater than 10,000 tons.

Mercury switch means each mercury-containing capsule or switch assembly that is part of a convenience light switch mechanism installed in a vehicle.

Metal charged means the quantity of scrap metal, pig iron, metal returns, alloy materials, and other solid forms of iron and steel placed into a metal melting furnace. Metal charged does not include the quantity of fluxing agents or, in the case of a cupola, the quantity of coke that is placed into the metal melting furnace.

Metal melting furnace means a cupola, electric arc furnace, electric induction furnace, or similar device that converts scrap, foundry returns, and/or other solid forms of iron and/or steel to a liquid state. This definition does not include a holding furnace, an argon oxygen decarburization vessel, or ladle that receives molten metal from a metal melting furnace, to which metal ingots or other material may be added to adjust the metal chemistry.

Mold or core making line means the collection of equipment that is used to mix an aggregate of sand and binder chemicals, form the aggregate into final shape, and harden the formed aggregate. This definition does not include a line for making greensand molds or cores.

Motor vehicle means an automotive vehicle not operated on rails and usually is operated with rubber tires for use on highways.

Motor vehicle scrap means vehicle or automobile bodies, including automobile body hulks, that have been processed through a shredder. Motor vehicle scrap does not include automobile manufacturing bundles, or miscellaneous vehicle parts, such as wheels, bumpers, or other components that do not contain mercury switches.

Nonferrous metal means any pure metal other than iron or any metal alloy for which an element other than iron is its major constituent in percent by weight.

On blast means those periods of cupola operation when combustion (blast) air is introduced to the cupola furnace and the furnace is capable of producing molten metal. On blast conditions are characterized by both blast air introduction and molten metal production.

Responsible official means responsible official as defined in §63.2.

Scrap preheater means a vessel or other piece of equipment in which metal scrap that is to be used as melting furnace feed is heated to a temperature high enough to eliminate volatile impurities or other tramp materials by direct flame heating or similar means of heating. Scrap dryers, which solely remove moisture from metal scrap, are not considered to be scrap preheaters for purposes of this subpart.

Scrap provider means the person (including a broker) who contracts directly with an iron and steel foundry to provide motor vehicle scrap. Scrap processors such as shredder operators or vehicle dismantlers that do not sell scrap directly to a foundry are not scrap providers.

Scrubber blowdown means liquor or slurry discharged from a wet scrubber that is either removed as a waste stream or processed to remove impurities or adjust its composition or pH.

Small foundry means, for an existing affected source, an iron and steel foundry that has an annual metal melt production of 20,000 tons or less. For a new affected source, small foundry means an iron and steel foundry that has an annual metal melt capacity of 10,000 tons or less.

Total metal HAP means, for the purposes of this subpart, the sum of the concentrations of compounds of antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, and selenium as measured by EPA Method 29 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-8). Only the measured concentration of the listed analytes that are present at concentrations exceeding one-half the quantitation limit of the analytical method are to be used in the sum. If any of the analytes are not detected or are detected at concentrations less than one-half the quantitation limit of the analytical method, the concentration of those analytes will be assumed to be zero for the purposes of calculating the total metal HAP for this subpart.

Table 1 to Subpart ZZZZZ of Part 63—Performance Test Requirements for New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Foundries

As required in §63.10898(c) and (h), you must conduct performance tests according to the test methods and procedures in the following table:

For. . .You must. . .According to the following
requirements. . .
1. Each metal melting furnace subject to a PM or total metal HAP limit in §63.10895(c)a. Select sampling port locations and the number of traverse points in each stack or duct using EPA Method 1 or 1A (40 CFR part 60, appendix A)
b. Determine volumetric flow rate of the stack gas using Method 2, 2A, 2C, 2D, 2F, or 2G (40 CFR part 60, appendix A)
c. Determine dry molecular weight of the stack gas using EPA Method 3, 3A, or 3B (40 CFR part 60, appendix A).1
d. Measure moisture content of the stack gas using EPA Method 4 (40 CFR part 60, A)
e. Determine PM concentration using EPA Method 5, 5B, 5D, 5F, or 5I, as applicable or total metal HAP concentration using EPA Method 29 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A)
Sampling sites must be located at the outlet of the control device (or at the outlet of the emissions source if no control device is present) prior to any releases to the atmosphere.
i. Collect a minimum sample volume of 60 dscf of gas during each PM sampling run. The PM concentration is determined using only the front-half (probe rinse and filter) of the PM catch.
ii. For Method 29, only the measured concentration of the listed metal HAP analytes that are present at concentrations exceeding one-half the quantification limit of the analytical method are to be used in the sum. If any of the analytes are not detected or are detected at concentrations less than one-half the quantification limit of the analytical method, the concentration of those analytes is assumed to be zero for the purposes of calculating the total metal HAP.
   iii. A minimum of three valid test runs are needed to comprise a PM or total metal HAP performance test.
   iv. For cupola metal melting furnaces, sample PM or total metal HAP only during times when the cupola is on blast.
   v. For electric arc and electric induction metal melting furnaces, sample PM or total metal HAP only during normal melt production conditions, which may include, but are not limited to the following operations: Charging, melting, alloying, refining, slagging, and tapping.
   vi. Determine and record the total combined weight of tons of metal charged during the duration of each test run. You must compute the process-weighted mass emissions of PM according to Equation 1 of §63.10898(d) for an individual furnace or Equation 2 of §63.10898(e) for the group of all metal melting furnaces at the foundry.
2. Fugitive emissions from buildings or structures housing any iron and steel foundry emissions sources subject to opacity limit in §63.10895(e)a. Using a certified observer, conduct each opacity test according to EPA Method 9 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-4) and 40 CFR 63.6(h)(5)i. The certified observer may identify a limited number of openings or vents that appear to have the highest opacities and perform opacity observations on the identified openings or vents in lieu of performing observations for each opening or vent from the building or structure. Alternatively, a single opacity observation for the entire building or structure may be performed, if the fugitive release points afford such an observation.
   ii. During testing intervals when PM or total metal HAP performance tests, if applicable, are being conducted, conduct the opacity test such that the opacity observations are recorded during the PM or total metal HAP performance tests.
   b. As alternative to Method 9 performance test, conduct visible emissions test by Method 22 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-7). The test is successful if no visible emissions are observed for 90 percent of the readings over 1 hour. If VE is observed greater than 10 percent of the time over 1 hour, then the facility must conduct another performance test as soon as possible, but no later than 15 calendar days after the Method 22 test, using Method 9 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A-4)i. The observer may identify a limited number of openings or vents that appear to have the highest visible emissions and perform observations on the identified openings or vents in lieu of performing observations for each opening or vent from the building or structure. Alternatively, a single observation for the entire building or structure may be performed, if the fugitive release points afford such an observation.
ii. During testing intervals when PM or total metal HAP performance tests, if applicable, are being conducted, conduct the visible emissions test such that the observations are recorded during the PM or total metal HAP performance tests.

1You may also use as an alternative to EPA Method 3B (40 CFR part 60, appendix A), the manual method for measuring the oxygen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide content of exhaust gas, ANSI/ASME PTC 19.10-1981, “Flue and Exhaust Gas Analyses” (incorporated by reference—see §63.14).

Table 2 to Subpart ZZZZZ of Part 63—Procedures for Establishing Operating Limits for New Affected Sources Classified as Large Foundries

As required in §63.10898(k), you must establish operating limits using the procedures in the following table:

For . . .You must . . .
1. Each wet scrubber subject to the operating limits in §63.10895(d)(1) for pressure drop and scrubber water flow rate.Using the CPMS required in §63.10897(b), measure and record the pressure drop and scrubber water flow rate in intervals of no more than 15 minutes during each PM or total metal HAP test run. Compute and record the average pressure drop and average scrubber water flow rate for all the valid sampling runs in which the applicable emissions limit is met.
2. Each electrostatic precipitator subject to operating limits in §63.10895(d)(2) for voltage and secondary current (or total power input).Using the CPMS required in §63.10897(c), measure and record voltage and secondary current (or total power input) in intervals of no more than 15 minutes during each PM or total metal HAP test run. Compute and record the minimum hourly average voltage and secondary current (or total power input) from all the readings for each valid sampling run in which the applicable emissions limit is met.

Table 3 to Subpart ZZZZZ of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions to New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Foundries

As required in §63.10900(a), you must meet each requirement in the following table that applies to you:

CitationSubjectApplies to large
foundry?
Explanation
63.1ApplicabilityYes.
63.2DefinitionsYes.
63.3Units and abbreviationsYes.
63.4Prohibited activitiesYes.
63.5Construction/reconstructionYes.
63.6(a)-(g)Compliance with standards and maintenance requirementsYes.
63.6(h)Opacity and visible emissions standardsYes.
63.6(i)(i)-(j)Compliance extension and Presidential compliance exemptionYes.
63.7(a)(3), (b)-(h)Performance testing requirementsYes.
63.7(a)(1)-(a)(2)Applicability and performance test datesNoSubpart ZZZZZ specifies applicability and performance test dates.
63.8(a)(1)-(a)(3), (b), (c)(1)-(c)(3), (c)(6)-(c)(8), (d), (e), (f)(1)-(f)(6), (g)(1)-(g)(4)Monitoring requirementsYes.
63.8(a)(4)Additional monitoring requirements for control devices in §63.11No.
63.8(c)(4)Continuous monitoring system (CMS) requirementsNo.
63.8(c)(5)Continuous opacity monitoring system (COMS) minimum proceduresNo.
63.8(g)(5)Data reductionNo.
63.9Notification requirementsYes.
63.10(a), (b)(1)-(b)(2)(xii) -(b)(2)(xiv), (b)(3), (d)(1)-(2), (e)(1)-(2), (f)Recordkeeping and reporting requirementsYes.
63.10(c)(1)-(6), (c)(9)-(15)Additional records for continuous monitoring systemsNo.
63.10(c)(7)-(8)Records of excess emissions and parameter monitoring exceedances for CMSYes.
63.10(d)(3)Reporting opacity or visible emissions observationsYes.
63.10(e)(3)Excess emissions reportsYes.
63.10(e)(4)Reporting COMS dataNo.
63.11Control device requirementsNo.
63.12State authority and delegationsYes.
63.13-63.16Addresses of State air pollution control agencies and EPA regional offices. Incorporation by reference. Availability of information and confidentiality. Performance track provisionsYes.

Table 4 to Subpart ZZZZZ of Part 63—Compliance Certifications for New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and Steel Foundries

As required by §63.10900(b), your notification of compliance status must include certifications of compliance according to the following table:

For. . .Your notification of compliance status required by §63.9(h) must include this certification of compliance, signed by a responsible official:
Each new or existing affected source classified as a large foundry and subject to scrap management requirements in §63.10885(a)(1) and/or (2)“This facility has prepared, and will operate by, written material specifications for metallic scrap according to §63.10885(a)(1)” and/or “This facility has prepared, and will operate by, written material specifications for general iron and steel scrap according to §63.10885(a)(2).”
Each new or existing affected source classified as a large foundry and subject to mercury switch removal requirements in §63.10885(b)“This facility has prepared, and will operate by, written material specifications for the removal of mercury switches and a site-specific plan implementing the material specifications according to §63.10885(b)(1)” and/or “This facility participates in and purchases motor vehicles scrap only from scrap providers who participate in a program for removal of mercury switches that has been approved by the EPA Administrator according to §63.10885(b)(2) and have prepared a plan for participation in the EPA approved program according to §63.10885(b)(2)(iv)” and/or “The only materials from motor vehicles in the scrap charged to a metal melting furnace at this facility are materials recovered for their specialty alloy content in accordance with §63.10885(b)(3) which are not reasonably expected to contain mercury switches” and/or “This facility complies with the requirements for scrap that does not contain motor vehicle scrap in accordance with §63.10885(b)(4).”
Each new or existing affected source classified as a large foundry and subject to §63.10886“This facility complies with the no methanol requirement for the catalyst portion of each binder chemical formulation for a furfuryl alcohol warm box mold or core making line according to §63.10886.”
Each new or existing affected source classified as a large foundry and subject to §63.10895(b)“This facility operates a capture and collection system for each emissions source subject to this subpart according to §63.10895(b).”
Each existing affected source classified as a large foundry and subject to §63.10895(c)(1)“This facility complies with the PM or total metal HAP emissions limit in §63.10895(c) for each metal melting furnace or group of all metal melting furnaces based on a previous performance test in accordance with §63.10898(a)(1).”
Each new or existing affected source classified as a large foundry and subject to §63.10896(a)“This facility has prepared and will operate by an operation and maintenance plan according to §63.10896(a).”
Each new or existing (if applicable) affected source classified as a large foundry and subject to §63.10897(d)“This facility has prepared and will operate by a site-specific monitoring plan for each bag leak detection system and submitted the plan to the Administrator for approval according to §63.10897(d)(2).”


For questions or comments regarding e-CFR editorial content, features, or design, email ecfr@nara.gov.
For questions concerning e-CFR programming and delivery issues, email webteam@gpo.gov.