About GPO   |   Newsroom/Media   |   Congressional Relations   |   Inspector General   |   Careers   |   Contact   |   askGPO   |   Help  
 
Home   |   Customers   |   Vendors   |   Libraries  

The Electronic Code of Federal Regulations (e-CFR) is a regularly updated, unofficial editorial compilation of CFR material and Federal Register amendments produced by the National Archives and Records Administration's Office of the Federal Register (OFR) and the Government Printing Office.

Parallel Table of Authorities and Rules for the Code of Federal Regulations and the United States Code
Text | PDF

Find, review, and submit comments on Federal rules that are open for comment and published in the Federal Register using Regulations.gov.

Purchase individual CFR titles from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore.

Find issues of the CFR (including issues prior to 1996) at a local Federal depository library.

[2]
 
 

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of April 22, 2014

Title 40: Protection of Environment
PART 63—NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED)


Subpart VVVV—National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Boat Manufacturing


Contents

What the Subpart Covers

§63.5680   What is the purpose of this subpart?
§63.5683   Does this subpart apply to me?
§63.5686   How do I demonstrate that my facility is not a major source?
§63.5689   What parts of my facility are covered by this subpart?
§63.5692   How do I know if my boat manufacturing facility is a new source or an existing source?
§63.5695   When must I comply with this subpart?

Standards for Open Molding Resin and Gel Coat Operations

§63.5698   What emission limit must I meet for open molding resin and gel coat operations?
§63.5701   What are my options for complying with the open molding emission limit?
§63.5704   What are the general requirements for complying with the open molding emission limit?
§63.5707   What is an implementation plan for open molding operations and when do I need to prepare one?
§63.5710   How do I demonstrate compliance using emissions averaging?
§63.5713   How do I demonstrate compliance using compliant materials?
§63.5714   How do I demonstrate compliance if I use filled resins?

Demonstrating Compliance for Open Molding Operations Controlled by Add-On Control Devices

§63.5715   What operating limits must I meet?
§63.5716   When must I conduct a performance test?
§63.5719   How do I conduct a performance test?
§63.5722   How do I use the performance test data to demonstrate initial compliance?
§63.5725   What are the requirements for monitoring and demonstrating continuous compliance?

Standards for Closed Molding Resin Operations

§63.5728   What standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations?

Standards for Resin and Gel Coat Mixing Operations

§63.5731   What standards must I meet for resin and gel coat mixing operations?

Standards for Resin and Gel Coat Application Equipment Cleaning Operations

§63.5734   What standards must I meet for resin and gel coat application equipment cleaning operations?
§63.5737   How do I demonstrate compliance with the resin and gel coat application equipment cleaning standards?

Standards for Carpet and Fabric Adhesive Operations

§63.5740   What emission limit must I meet for carpet and fabric adhesive operations?

Standards for Aluminum Recreational Boat Surface Coating Operations

§63.5743   What standards must I meet for aluminum recreational boat surface coating operations?
§63.5746   How do I demonstrate compliance with the emission limits for aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum coatings?
§63.5749   How do I calculate the organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents?
§63.5752   How do I calculate the organic HAP content of aluminum recreational boat surface coatings?
§63.5753   How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings?
§63.5755   How do I demonstrate compliance with the aluminum recreational boat surface coating spray gun cleaning work practice standards?

Methods for Determining Hazardous Air Pollutant Content

§63.5758   How do I determine the organic HAP content of materials?

Notifications, Reports, and Records

§63.5761   What notifications must I submit and when?
§63.5764   What reports must I submit and when?
§63.5767   What records must I keep?
§63.5770   In what form and for how long must I keep my records?

Other Information You Need To Know

§63.5773   What parts of the General Provisions apply to me?
§63.5776   Who implements and enforces this subpart?

Definitions

§63.5779   What definitions apply to this subpart?
Table 1 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Boat Manufacturing Facilities
Table 2 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Alternative Organic HAP Content Requirements for Open Molding Resin and Gel Coat Operations
Table 3 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—MACT Model Point Value Formulas for Open Molding Operations
Table 4 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Operating Limits if Using an Add-on Control Device for Open Molding Operations
Table 5 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends
Table 6 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Contents of Petroleum Solvent Groups
Table 7 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Applicability and Timing of Notifications
Table 8 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart VVVV

Source: 66 FR 44232, Aug. 22, 2001, unless otherwise noted.

What the Subpart Covers

§63.5680   What is the purpose of this subpart?

(a) This subpart establishes national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (HAP) for new and existing boat manufacturing facilities with resin and gel coat operations, carpet and fabric adhesive operations, or aluminum recreational boat surface coating operations. This subpart also establishes requirements to demonstrate initial and continuous compliance with the emission standards.

§63.5683   Does this subpart apply to me?

(a) This subpart applies to you if you meet both of the criteria listed in paragraphs (a)(1) and (2) of this section.

(1) You are the owner or operator of a boat manufacturing facility that builds fiberglass boats or aluminum recreational boats.

(2) Your boat manufacturing facility is a major source of HAP either in and of itself, or because it is collocated with other sources of HAP, such that all sources combined constitute a major source.

(b) A boat manufacturing facility is a facility that manufactures hulls or decks of boats from fiberglass or aluminum, or assembles boats from premanufactured hulls and decks, or builds molds to make fiberglass hulls or decks. A facility that manufactures only parts of boats (such as hatches, seats, or lockers) or boat trailers is not considered a boat manufacturing facility for the purpose of this subpart.

(c) A major source is any stationary source or group of stationary sources located within a contiguous area and under common control that emits or can potentially emit, considering controls, in the aggregate, 9.1 megagrams (10 tons) or more per year of a single HAP or 22.7 megagrams (25 tons) or more per year of a combination of HAP.

(d) This subpart does not apply to aluminum coating operations on aluminum boats intended for commercial or military (nonrecreational) use, antifoulant coatings, assembly adhesives, fiberglass hull and deck coatings, research and development activities, mold sealing and release agents, mold stripping and cleaning solvents, and wood coatings as defined in §63.5779. This subpart does not apply to materials contained in handheld aerosol cans.

§63.5686   How do I demonstrate that my facility is not a major source?

You can demonstrate that your facility is not a major source by using the procedures in either paragraph (a) or (b) of this section.

(a) Emission option. You must demonstrate that your facility does not emit, and does not have the potential to emit as defined in §63.2, considering federally enforceable permit limits, 9.1 megagrams (10 tons) or more per year of a single HAP or 22.7 megagrams (25 tons) or more per year of a combination of HAP. To calculate your facility's potential to emit, you must include emissions from the boat manufacturing facility and all other sources that are collocated and under common ownership or control with the boat manufacturing facility.

(b) Material consumption option. This option can be used if you manufacture either fiberglass boats or aluminum recreational boats at your facility. You must meet the criteria in paragraph (b)(1), (2), or (3) of this section and comply with the requirements in paragraph (c) of this section. If you initially rely on the limits and criteria specified in paragraph (b)(1), (2), or (3) of this section to become an area source, but then exceed the relevant limit (without first obtaining and complying with other limits that keep your potential to emit HAP below major source levels), your facility will then become a major source, and you must comply with all applicable provisions of this subpart beginning on the compliance date specified in §63.5695. Nothing in this paragraph is intended to preclude you from limiting your facility's potential to emit through other federally enforceable mechanisms available through your permitting authority.

(1) If your facility is primarily a fiberglass boat manufacturing facility, you must demonstrate that you consume less than 45.4 megagrams per rolling 12-month period of all combined polyester-and vinylester-based resins and gel coats (including tooling and production resins and gel coats, and clear gel coats), and you must demonstrate that at least 90 percent of total annual HAP emissions at the facility (including emissions from aluminum recreational boat manufacturing or other source categories) originate from the fiberglass boat manufacturing materials.

(2) If your facility is primarily an aluminum recreational boat manufacturing facility, you must demonstrate that it consumes less than 18.2 megagrams per rolling 12-month period of all combined surface coatings, aluminum wipedown solvents, application gun cleaning solvents, and carpet and fabric adhesives; and you must demonstrate that at least 90 percent of total annual HAP emissions at the facility (including emissions from fiberglass boat manufacturing or other source categories) originate from the aluminum recreational boat manufacturing materials.

(3) If your facility is a fiberglass boat or an aluminum recreational boat manufacturing facility, you must demonstrate that the boat manufacturing materials consumed per rolling 12-month period contain a total of less than 4.6 megagrams of any single HAP and less than 11.4 megagrams of all combined HAP, and you must demonstrate that at least 90 percent of total annual HAP emissions at the facility (including emissions from other source categories) originate from these boat manufacturing materials.

(c) If you use the material consumption option described in paragraph (b) of this section to demonstrate that you are not a major source, you must comply with the requirements of paragraphs (c)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) If your facility has HAP emissions that do not originate from boat manufacturing operations or materials described in paragraph (b), then you must keep any records necessary to demonstrate that the 90 percent criterion is met.

(2) A rolling 12-month period includes the previous 12 months of operation. You must maintain records of the total amount of materials described in paragraph (b) of this section used each month, and, if necessary, the HAP content of each material and the calculation of the total HAP consumed each month. Because records are needed for a 12-month period, you must keep records beginning no later than 12 months before the compliance date specified in §63.5695. Records must be kept for 5 years after they are created.

(3) In determining whether the 90 percent criterion included in paragraph (b) of this section is met, you do not need to include materials used in routine janitorial, building, or facility grounds maintenance; personal uses by employees or other persons; or products used for maintaining motor vehicles operated by the facility.

§63.5689   What parts of my facility are covered by this subpart?

The affected source (the portion of your boat manufacturing facility covered by this subpart) is the combination of all of the boat manufacturing operations listed in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section.

(a) Open molding resin and gel coat operations (including pigmented gel coat, clear gel coat, production resin, tooling gel coat, and tooling resin).

(b) Closed molding resin operations.

(c) Resin and gel coat mixing operations.

(d) Resin and gel coat application equipment cleaning operations.

(e) Carpet and fabric adhesive operations.

(f) Aluminum hull and deck coating operations, including solvent wipedown operations and paint spray gun cleaning operations, on aluminum recreational boats.

§63.5692   How do I know if my boat manufacturing facility is a new source or an existing source?

(a) A boat manufacturing facility is a new source if it meets the criteria in paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) You commence construction of the affected source after July 14, 2000.

(2) It is a major source.

(3) It is a completely new boat manufacturing affected source where no other boat manufacturing affected source existed prior to the construction of the new source.

(b) For the purposes of this subpart, an existing source is any source that is not a new source.

§63.5695   When must I comply with this subpart?

You must comply with the standards in this subpart by the compliance dates specified in Table 1 to this subpart.

Standards for Open Molding Resin and Gel Coat Operations

§63.5698   What emission limit must I meet for open molding resin and gel coat operations?

(a) You must limit organic HAP emissions from the five open molding operations listed in paragraphs (a)(1) through (5) of this section to the emission limit specified in paragraph (b) of this section. Operations listed in paragraph (d) are exempt from this limit.

(1) Production resin.

(2) Pigmented gel coat.

(3) Clear gel coat.

(4) Tooling resin.

(5) Tooling gel coat.

(b) You must limit organic HAP emissions from open molding operations to the limit specified by equation 1 of this section, based on a 12-month rolling average.

eCFR graphic er22au01.011.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

HAP Limit= total allowable organic HAP that can be emitted from the open molding operations, kilograms.

MR = mass of production resin used in the past 12 months, excluding any materials exempt under paragraph (d) of this section, megagrams.

MPG = mass of pigmented gel coat used in the past 12 months, excluding any materials exempt under paragraph (d) of this section, megagrams.

MCG = mass of clear gel coat used in the past 12 months, excluding any materials exempt under paragraph (d) of this section, megagrams.

MTR = mass of tooling resin used in the past 12 months, excluding any materials exempt under paragraph (d) of this section, megagrams.

MTG = mass of tooling gel coat used in the past 12 months, excluding any materials exempt under paragraph (d) of this section, megagrams.

(c) The open molding emission limit is the same for both new and existing sources.

(d) The materials specified in paragraphs (d)(1) through (3) of this section are exempt from the open molding emission limit specified in paragraph (b) of this section.

(1) Production resins (including skin coat resins) that must meet specifications for use in military vessels or must be approved by the U.S. Coast Guard for use in the construction of lifeboats, rescue boats, and other life-saving appliances approved under 46 CFR subchapter Q or the construction of small passenger vessels regulated by 46 CFR subchapter T. Production resins for which this exemption is used must be applied with nonatomizing (non-spray) resin application equipment. You must keep a record of the resins for which you are using this exemption.

(2) Pigmented, clear, and tooling gel coat used for part or mold repair and touch up. The total gel coat materials included in this exemption must not exceed 1 percent by weight of all gel coat used at your facility on a 12-month rolling-average basis. You must keep a record of the amount of gel coats used per month for which you are using this exemption and copies of calculations showing that the exempt amount does not exceed 1 percent of all gel coat used.

(3) Pure, 100 percent vinylester resin used for skin coats. This exemption does not apply to blends of vinylester and polyester resins used for skin coats. The total resin materials included in the exemption cannot exceed 5 percent by weight of all resin used at your facility on a 12-month rolling-average basis. You must keep a record of the amount of 100 percent vinylester skin coat resin used per month that is eligible for this exemption and copies of calculations showing that the exempt amount does not exceed 5 percent of all resin used.

§63.5701   What are my options for complying with the open molding emission limit?

You must use one or more of the options listed in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section to meet the emission limit in §63.5698 for the resins and gel coats used in open molding operations at your facility.

(a) Maximum achievable control technology (MACT) model point value averaging (emissions averaging) option. (1) Demonstrate that emissions from the open molding resin and gel coat operations that you average meet the emission limit in §63.5698 using the procedures described in §63.5710. Compliance with this option is based on a 12-month rolling average.

(2) Those operations and materials not included in the emissions average must comply with either paragraph (b) or (c) of this section.

(b) Compliant materials option. Demonstrate compliance by using resins and gel coats that meet the organic HAP content requirements in Table 2 to this subpart. Compliance with this option is based on a 12-month rolling average.

(c) Add-on control option. Use an enclosure and add-on control device, and demonstrate that the resulting emissions meet the emission limit in §63.5698. Compliance with this option is based on control device performance testing and control device monitoring.

§63.5704   What are the general requirements for complying with the open molding emission limit?

(a) Emissions averaging option. For those open molding operations and materials complying using the emissions averaging option, you must demonstrate compliance by performing the steps in paragraphs (a)(1) through (5) of this section.

(1) Use the methods specified in §63.5758 to determine the organic HAP content of resins and gel coats.

(2) Complete the calculations described in §63.5710 to show that the organic HAP emissions do not exceed the limit specified in §63.5698.

(3) Keep records as specified in paragraphs (a)(3)(i) through (iv) of this section for each resin and gel coat.

(i) Hazardous air pollutant content.

(ii) Amount of material used per month.

(iii) Application method used for production resin and tooling resin. This record is not required if all production resins and tooling resins are applied with nonatomized technology.

(iv) Calculations performed to demonstrate compliance based on MACT model point values, as described in §63.5710.

(4) Prepare and submit the implementation plan described in §63.5707 to the Administrator and keep it up to date.

(5) Submit semiannual compliance reports to the Administrator as specified in §63.5764.

(b) Compliant materials option. For each open molding operation complying using the compliant materials option, you must demonstrate compliance by performing the steps in paragraphs (b)(1) through (4) of this section.

(1) Use the methods specified in §63.5758 to determine the organic HAP content of resins and gel coats.

(2) Complete the calculations described in §63.5713 to show that the weighted-average organic HAP content does not exceed the limit specified in Table 2 to this subpart.

(3) Keep records as specified in paragraphs (b)(3)(i) through (iv) of this section for each resin and gel coat.

(i) Hazardous air pollutant content.

(ii) Application method for production resin and tooling resin. This record is not required if all production resins and tooling resins are applied with nonatomized technology.

(iii) Amount of material used per month. This record is not required for an operation if all materials used for that operation comply with the organic HAP content requirements.

(iv) Calculations performed, if required, to demonstrate compliance based on weighted-average organic HAP content as described in §63.5713.

(4) Submit semiannual compliance reports to the Administrator as specified in §63.5764.

(c) Add-on control option. If you are using an add-on control device, you must demonstrate compliance by performing the steps in paragraphs (c)(1) through (5) of this section.

(1) Conduct a performance test of the control device as specified in §§63.5719 and 63.5722 to demonstrate initial compliance.

(2) Use the performance test results to determine control device parameters to monitor after the performance test as specified in §63.5725.

(3) Comply with the operating limits specified in §63.5715 and the control device and emission capture system monitoring requirements specified in §63.5725 to demonstrate continuous compliance.

(4) Keep the records specified in §63.5767.

(5) Submit to the Administrator the notifications and reports specified in §§63.5761 and 63.5764.

§63.5707   What is an implementation plan for open molding operations and when do I need to prepare one?

(a) You must prepare an implementation plan for all open molding operations for which you comply by using the emissions averaging option described in §63.5704(a).

(b) The implementation plan must describe the steps you will take to bring the open molding operations covered by this subpart into compliance. For each operation included in the emissions average, your implementation plan must include the elements listed in paragraphs (b)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) A description of each operation included in the average.

(2) The maximum organic HAP content of the materials used, the application method used (if any atomized resin application methods are used in the average), and any other methods used to control emissions.

(3) Calculations showing that the operations covered by the plan will comply with the open molding emission limit specified in §63.5698.

(c) You must submit the implementation plan to the Administrator with the notification of compliance status specified in §63.5761.

(d) You must keep the implementation plan on site and provide it to the Administrator when asked.

(e) If you revise the implementation plan, you must submit the revised plan with your next semiannual compliance report specified in §63.5764.

§63.5710   How do I demonstrate compliance using emissions averaging?

(a) Compliance using the emissions averaging option is demonstrated on a 12-month rolling-average basis and is determined at the end of every month (12 times per year). The first 12-month rolling-average period begins on the compliance date specified in §63.5695.

(b) At the end of the twelfth month after your compliance date and at the end of every subsequent month, use equation 1 of this section to demonstrate that the organic HAP emissions from those operations included in the average do not exceed the emission limit in §63.5698 calculated for the same 12-month period. (Include terms in equation 1 of §63.5698 and equation 1 of this section for only those operations and materials included in the average.)

eCFR graphic er22au01.012.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

HAP emissions= Organic HAP emissions calculated using MACT model point values for each operation included in the average, kilograms.

PVR = Weighted-average MACT model point value for production resin used in the past 12 months, kilograms per megagram.

MR = Mass of production resin used in the past 12 months, megagrams.

PVPG = Weighted-average MACT model point value for pigmented gel coat used in the past 12 months, kilograms per megagram.

MPG = Mass of pigmented gel coat used in the past 12 months, megagrams.

PVCG = Weighted-average MACT model point value for clear gel coat used in the past 12 months, kilograms per megagram.

MCG = Mass of clear gel coat used in the past 12 months, megagrams.

PVTR = Weighted-average MACT model point value for tooling resin used in the past 12 months, kilograms per megagram.

MTR = Mass of tooling resin used in the past 12 months, megagrams.

PVTG = Weighted-average MACT model point value for tooling gel coat used in the past 12 months, kilograms per megagram.

MTG = Mass of tooling gel coat used in the past 12 months, megagrams.

(c) At the end of every month, use equation 2 of this section to compute the weighted-average MACT model point value for each open molding resin and gel coat operation included in the average.

eCFR graphic er22au01.013.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

PVOP = weighted-average MACT model point value for each open molding operation (PVR, PVPG, PVCG, PVTR, and PVTG) included in the average, kilograms of HAP per megagram of material applied.

Mi = mass of resin or gel coat i used within an operation in the past 12 months, megagrams.

n=number of different open molding resins and gel coats used within an operation in the past 12 months.

PVi = the MACT model point value for resin or gel coat i used within an operation in the past 12 months, kilograms of HAP per megagram of material applied.

(d) You must use the equations in Table 3 to this subpart to calculate the MACT model point value (PVi) for each resin and gel coat used in each operation in the past 12 months.

(e) If the organic HAP emissions, as calculated in paragraph (b) of this section, are less than the organic HAP limit calculated in §63.5698(b) for the same 12-month period, then you are in compliance with the emission limit in §63.5698 for those operations and materials included in the average.

[66 FR 44232, Aug. 22, 2001; 66 FR 50504, Oct. 3, 2001]

§63.5713   How do I demonstrate compliance using compliant materials?

(a) Compliance using the organic HAP content requirements listed in Table 2 to this subpart is based on a 12-month rolling average that is calculated at the end of every month. The first 12-month rolling-average period begins on the compliance date specified in §63.5695. If you are using filled material (production resin or tooling resin), you must comply according to the procedure described in §63.5714.

(b) At the end of the twelfth month after your compliance date and at the end of every subsequent month, review the organic HAP contents of the resins and gel coats used in the past 12 months in each operation. If all resins and gel coats used in an operation have organic HAP contents no greater than the applicable organic HAP content limits in Table 2 to this subpart, then you are in compliance with the emission limit specified in §63.5698 for that 12-month period for that operation. In addition, you do not need to complete the weighted-average organic HAP content calculation contained in paragraph (c) of this section for that operation.

(c) At the end of every month, you must use equation 1 of this section to calculate the weighted-average organic HAP content for all resins and gel coats used in each operation in the past 12 months.

eCFR graphic er22au01.014.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

Mi = mass of open molding resin or gel coat i used in the past 12 months in an operation, megagrams.

HAPi = Organic HAP content, by weight percent, of open molding resin or gel coat i used in the past 12 months in an operation. Use the methods in §63.5758 to determine organic HAP content.

n = number of different open molding resins or gel coats used in the past 12 months in an operation.

(d) If the weighted-average organic HAP content does not exceed the applicable organic HAP content limit specified in Table 2 to this subpart, then you are in compliance with the emission limit specified in §63.5698.

§63.5714   How do I demonstrate compliance if I use filled resins?

(a) If you are using a filled production resin or filled tooling resin, you must demonstrate compliance for the filled material on an as-applied basis using equation 1 of this section.

eCFR graphic er22au01.015.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

PVF = The as-applied MACT model point value for a filled production resin or tooling resin, kilograms organic HAP per megagram of filled material.

PVu = The MACT model point value for the neat (unfilled) resin, before filler is added, as calculated using the formulas in Table 3 to this subpart.

% Filler =The weight-percent of filler in the as-applied filled resin system.

(b) If the filled resin is used as a production resin and the value of PVF calculated by equation 1 of this section does not exceed 46 kilograms of organic HAP per megagram of filled resin applied, then the filled resin is in compliance.

(c) If the filled resin is used as a tooling resin and the value of PVF calculated by equation 1 of this section does not exceed 54 kilograms of organic HAP per megagram of filled resin applied, then the filled resin is in compliance.

(d) If you are including a filled resin in the emissions averaging procedure described in §63.5710, then use the value of PVF calculated using equation 1 of this section for the value of PV i in equation 2 of §63.5710.

Demonstrating Compliance for Open Molding Operations Controlled by Add-On Control Devices

§63.5715   What operating limits must I meet?

(a) For open molding operations on which you use a thermal oxidizer as an add-on control device, you must meet the operating limits specified in Table 4 to this subpart that apply to the emission capture system and thermal oxidizer. You must establish the operating limits during the performance test according to the procedures in §63.5725. You must meet the operating limits at all times after you establish them.

(b) If you use an add-on control device other than a thermal oxidizer, or wish to monitor an alternative parameter and comply with a different operating limit, you must apply to the Administrator for approval of alternative monitoring under §63.8(f).

§63.5716   When must I conduct a performance test?

(a) If your source is an existing source, you must complete the add-on control device performance test no later than the compliance date specified in §63.5695.

(b) If your source is a new source, you must complete the add-on control device performance test no later than 180 days after the compliance date specified in §63.5695.

(c) You must conduct a performance test every 5 years as part of renewing your 40 CFR part 70 or 71 operating permit.

§63.5719   How do I conduct a performance test?

(a) You must capture the emissions using a permanent enclosure (such as a spray booth or similar containment device) and direct the captured emissions to the add-on control device.

(b) You must measure emissions as specified in paragraph (b)(1) or (2) of this section.

(1) If the enclosure vented to the control device is a permanent total enclosure as defined in Method 204 of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51, then you may measure emissions only at the outlet of the control device.

(2) If the permanent enclosure vented to the control device is not a total enclosure, you must build a temporary total enclosure, as defined in Method 204 of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51, around the permanent enclosure. You must then simultaneously measure emissions from the control device outlet and the emissions from the temporary total enclosure outlet. You determine compliance from the combined emissions from the control device outlet and the temporary total enclosure outlet.

(c) You must conduct the control device performance test using the emission measurement methods specified in paragraphs (c)(1) through (4) of this section.

(1) Use either Method 1 or 1A of appendix A to 40 CFR part 60, as appropriate, to select the sampling sites.

(2) Use Method 2, 2A, 2C, 2D, 2F or 2G of appendix A to 40 CFR part 60, as appropriate, to measure gas volumetric flow rate.

(3) Use Method 18 of appendix A to 40 CFR part 60 to measure organic HAP emissions or use Method 25A of appendix A to 40 CFR part 60 to measure total gaseous organic emissions as a surrogate for total organic HAP emissions. If you use Method 25A, you must assume that all gaseous organic emissions measured as carbon are organic HAP emissions. If you use Method 18 and the number of organic HAP in the exhaust stream exceeds five, you must take into account the use of multiple chromatographic columns and analytical techniques to get an accurate measure of at least 90 percent of the total organic HAP mass emissions. Do not use Method 18 to measure organic HAP emissions from a combustion device; use instead Method 25A and assume that all gaseous organic mass emissions measured as carbon are organic HAP emissions.

(4) You may use American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D6420-99 (available for purchase from at least one of the following addresses: 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA 19428-2959; or University Microfilms International, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106.) in lieu of Method 18 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, under the conditions specified in paragraphs (c)(4)(i) through (iii) of this section.

(i) If the target compound(s) is listed in Section 1.1 of ASTM D6420-99 and the target concentration is between 150 parts per billion by volume and 100 parts per million by volume.

(ii) If the target compound(s) is not listed in Section 1.1 of ASTM D6420-99, but is potentially detected by mass spectrometry, an additional system continuing calibration check after each run, as detailed in Section 10.5.3 of ASTM D6420-99, must be followed, met, documented, and submitted with the performance test report even if you do not use a moisture condenser or the compound is not considered soluble.

(iii) If a minimum of one sample/analysis cycle is completed at least every 15 minutes.

(d) The control device performance test must consist of three runs and each run must last at least 1 hour. The production conditions during the test runs must represent normal production conditions with respect to the types of parts being made and material application methods. The production conditions during the test must also represent maximum potential emissions with respect to the organic HAP content of the materials being applied and the material application rates.

(e) During the test, you must also monitor and record separately the amounts of production resin, tooling resin, pigmented gel coat, clear gel coat, and tooling gel coat applied inside the enclosure that is vented to the control device.

§63.5722   How do I use the performance test data to demonstrate initial compliance?

Demonstrate initial compliance with the open molding emission limit as described in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section:

(a) Calculate the organic HAP limit you must achieve using equation 1 of §63.5698. For determining initial compliance, the organic HAP limit is based on the amount of material used during the performance test, in megagrams, rather than during the past 12 months. Calculate the limit using the megagrams of resin and gel coat applied inside the enclosure during the three runs of the performance test and equation 1 of §63.5698.

(b) Add the total measured emissions, in kilograms, from all three of the 1-hour runs of the performance test.

(c) If the total emissions from the three 1-hour runs of the performance test are less than the organic HAP limit calculated in paragraph (a) of this section, then you have demonstrated initial compliance with the emission limit in §63.5698 for those operations performed in the enclosure and controlled by the add-on control device.

§63.5725   What are the requirements for monitoring and demonstrating continuous compliance?

(a) You must establish control device parameters that indicate proper operation of the control device.

(b) You must install, operate, and maintain a continuous parameter monitoring system as specified in paragraphs (b)(1) through (8) of this section.

(1) The continuous parameter monitoring system must complete a minimum of one cycle of operation for each successive 15-minute period. You must have a minimum of four successive cycles of operation to have a valid hour of data.

(2) You must have valid data from at least 90 percent of the hours during which the process operated.

(3) You must determine the average of all recorded readings for each successive 3-hour period of the emission capture system and add-on control device operation.

(4) You must maintain the continuous parameter monitoring system at all times and have available necessary parts for routine repairs of the monitoring equipment.

(5) You must operate the continuous parameter monitoring system and collect emission capture system and add-on control device parameter data at all times that a controlled open molding operation is being performed, except during monitoring malfunctions, associated repairs, and required quality assurance or control activities (including, if applicable, calibration checks and required zero and span adjustments).

(6) You must not use emission capture system or add-on control device parameter data recorded during monitoring malfunctions, associated repairs, out-of-control periods, or required quality assurance or control activities when calculating data averages. You must use all the data collected during all other periods in calculating the data averages for determining compliance with the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits.

(7) You must record the results of each inspection, calibration, and validation check.

(8) Any period for which the monitoring system is out-of-control, as defined in §63.7(d)(7), or malfunctioning, and data are not available for required calculations is a deviation from the monitoring requirements. A monitoring malfunction is any sudden, infrequent, not reasonably preventable failure of the continuous parameter monitoring system to provide valid data. Monitoring failures that are caused in part by poor maintenance or careless operation are not malfunctions.

(c) Enclosure bypass line. You must meet the requirements of paragraphs (c)(1) and (2) of this section for each emission capture system enclosure that contains bypass lines that could divert emissions away from the add-on control device to the atmosphere.

(1) You must monitor or secure the valve or closure mechanism controlling the bypass line in a nondiverting position in such a way that the valve or closure mechanism cannot be opened without creating a record that the valve was opened. The method used to monitor or secure the valve or closure mechanism must meet one of the requirements specified in paragraphs (c)(1)(i) through (iv) of this section.

(i) Flow control position indicator. Install, calibrate, maintain, and operate according to the manufacturer's specifications a flow control position indicator that takes a reading at least once every 15 minutes and provides a record indicating whether the emissions are directed to the add-on control device or diverted from the add-on control device. The time of occurrence and flow control position must be recorded, as well as every time the flow direction is changed. The flow control position indicator must be installed at the entrance to any bypass line that could divert the emissions away from the add-on control device to the atmosphere.

(ii) Car-seal or lock-and-key valve closures. Secure any bypass line valve in the closed position with a car-seal or a lock-and-key type configuration. You must visually inspect the seal or closure mechanism at least once every month to ensure that the valve is maintained in the closed position, and the emissions are not diverted away from the add-on control device to the atmosphere.

(iii) Valve closure continuous monitoring. Ensure that any bypass line valve is in the closed (non-diverting) position through monitoring of valve position at least once every 15 minutes. You must inspect the monitoring system at least once every month to verify that the monitor will indicate valve position.

(iv) Automatic shutdown system. Use an automatic shutdown system in which the open molding operation is stopped when flow is diverted by the bypass line away from the add-on control device to the atmosphere when the open molding operation is running. You must inspect the automatic shutdown system at least once every month to verify that it will detect diversions of flow and shut down the open molding operation.

(2) If any bypass line is opened, you must include a description of why the bypass line was opened and the length of time it remained open in the semiannual compliance reports required in §63.5764(d).

(d) Thermal oxidizers. If you are using a thermal oxidizer or incinerator as an add-on control device, you must comply with the requirements in paragraphs (d)(1) through (6) of this section.

(1) You must install a combustion temperature monitoring device in the firebox of the thermal oxidizer or incinerator, or in the duct immediately downstream of the firebox before any substantial heat exchange occurs. You must meet the requirements in paragraphs (b) and (d)(1)(i) through (vii) of this section for each temperature monitoring device.

(i) Locate the temperature sensor in a position that provides a representative temperature.

(ii) Use a temperature sensor with a minimum tolerance of 2.2 °C or 0.75 percent of the temperature value, whichever is larger.

(iii) Shield the temperature sensor system from electromagnetic interference and chemical contaminants.

(iv) If a chart recorder is used, it must have a sensitivity in the minor division of at least 10 °C.

(v) Perform an electronic calibration at least semiannually according to the procedures in the manufacturer's owners manual. Following the electronic calibration, you must conduct a temperature sensor validation check in which a second or redundant temperature sensor placed nearby the process temperature sensor must yield a reading within 16.7 °C of the process temperature sensor's reading.

(vi) Conduct calibration and validation checks any time the sensor exceeds the manufacturer's specified maximum operating temperature range or install a new temperature sensor.

(vii) At least monthly, inspect all components for integrity and all electrical connections for continuity, oxidation, and galvanic corrosion.

(2) Before or during the performance test, you must conduct a performance evaluation of the combustion temperature monitoring system according to §63.8(e). Section 63.8(e) specifies the general requirements for continuous monitoring systems and requirements for notifications, the site-specific performance evaluation plan, conduct of the performance evaluation, and reporting of performance evaluation results.

(3) During the performance test required by §63.5716, you must monitor and record the combustion temperature and determine the average combustion temperature for the three 1-hour test runs. This average temperature is the minimum operating limit for the thermal oxidizer.

(4) Following the performance test, you must continuously monitor the combustion temperature and record the average combustion temperature no less frequently than every 15 minutes.

(5) You must operate the incinerator or thermal oxidizer so that the average combustion temperature in any 3-hour period does not fall below the average combustion temperature recorded during the performance test.

(6) If the average combustion temperature in any 3-hour period falls below the average combustion temperature recorded during the performance test, or if you fail to collect the minimum data specified in paragraph (d)(4) of this section, it is a deviation for the operating limit in §63.5715.

(e) Other control devices. If you are using a control device other a thermal oxidizer, then you must comply with alternative monitoring requirements and operating limits approved by the Administrator under §63.8(f).

(f) Emission capture system. For each enclosure in the emission capture system, you must comply with the requirements in paragraphs (f)(1) through (5) of this section.

(1) You must install a device to measure and record either the flow rate or the static pressure in the duct from each enclosure to the add-on control device.

(2) You must install a device to measure and record the pressure drop across at least one opening in each enclosure.

(3) Each flow measurement device must meet the requirements in paragraphs (b) and (f)(3)(i) through (iv) of this section.

(i) Locate the flow sensor in a position that provides a representative flow measurement in the duct between each enclosure in the emission capture system and the add-on control device.

(ii) Reduce swirling flow or abnormal velocity distributions due to upstream and downstream disturbances.

(iii) Conduct a flow sensor calibration check at least semiannually.

(iv) At least monthly, inspect all components for integrity, all electrical connections for continuity, and all mechanical connections for leakage.

(4) For each pressure measurement device, you must comply with the requirements in paragraphs (a) and (f)(4)(i) through (vii) of this section.

(i) Locate each pressure drop sensor in or as close to a position that provides a representative measurement of the pressure drop across each enclosure opening you are monitoring.

(ii) Locate each duct static pressure sensor in a position that provides a representative measurement of the static pressure in the duct between the enclosure and control device.

(iii) Minimize or eliminate pulsating pressure, vibration, and internal and external corrosion.

(iv) Check the pressure tap for plugging daily.

(v) Use an inclined manometer with a measurement sensitivity of 0.0004 millimeters mercury (mmHg) to check gauge calibration quarterly and transducer calibration monthly.

(vi) Conduct calibration checks any time the sensor exceeds the manufacturer's specified maximum operating pressure range or install a new pressure sensor.

(vii) At least monthly, inspect all components for integrity, all electrical connections for continuity, and all mechanical connections for leakage.

(5) For each capture device that is not part of a permanent total enclosure as defined in Method 204 in appendix M to 40 CFR part 51, you must establish an operating limit for either the gas volumetric flow rate or duct static pressure, as specified in paragraphs (f)(5)(i) and (ii) of this section. You must also establish an operating limit for pressure drop across at least one opening in each enclosure according to paragraphs (f)(5)(iii) and (iv) of this section. The operating limits for a permanent total enclosure are specified in Table 4 to this subpart.

(i) During the emission test required by §63.5716 and described in §63.5719, you must monitor and record either the gas volumetric flow rate or the duct static pressure for each separate enclosure in your emission capture system at least once every 15 minutes during each of the three test runs at a point in the duct between the enclosure and the add-on control device inlet.

(ii) Following the emission test, calculate and record the average gas volumetric flow rate or duct static pressure for the three test runs for each enclosure. This average gas volumetric flow rate or duct static pressure is the minimum operating limit for that specific enclosure.

(iii) During the emission test required by §63.5716 and described in §63.5719, you must monitor and record the pressure drop across the opening of each enclosure in your emission capture system at least once every 15 minutes during each of the three test runs.

(iv) Following the emission test, calculate and record the average pressure drop for the three test runs for each enclosure. This average pressure drop is the minimum operating limit for that specific enclosure.

Standards for Closed Molding Resin Operations

§63.5728   What standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations?

(a) If a resin application operation meets the definition of closed molding specified in §63.5779, there is no requirement to reduce emissions from that operation.

(b) If the resin application operation does not meet the definition of closed molding, then you must comply with the limit for open molding resin operations specified in §63.5698.

(c) Open molding resin operations that precede a closed molding operation must comply with the limit for open molding resin and gel coat operations specified in §63.5698. Examples of these operations include gel coat or skin coat layers that are applied before lamination is performed by closed molding.

Standards for Resin and Gel Coat Mixing Operations

§63.5731   What standards must I meet for resin and gel coat mixing operations?

(a) All resin and gel coat mixing containers with a capacity equal to or greater than 208 liters, including those used for on-site mixing of putties and polyputties, must have a cover with no visible gaps in place at all times.

(b) The work practice standard in paragraph (a) of this section does not apply when material is being manually added to or removed from a container, or when mixing or pumping equipment is being placed in or removed from a container.

(c) To demonstrate compliance with the work practice standard in paragraph (a) of this section, you must visually inspect all mixing containers subject to this standard at least once per month. The inspection should ensure that all containers have covers with no visible gaps between the cover and the container, or between the cover and equipment passing through the cover.

(d) You must keep records of which mixing containers are subject to this standard and the results of the inspections, including a description of any repairs or corrective actions taken.

Standards for Resin and Gel Coat Application Equipment Cleaning Operations

§63.5734   What standards must I meet for resin and gel coat application equipment cleaning operations?

(a) For routine flushing of resin and gel coat application equipment (e.g., spray guns, flowcoaters, brushes, rollers, and squeegees), you must use a cleaning solvent that contains no more than 5 percent organic HAP by weight. For removing cured resin or gel coat from application equipment, no organic HAP content limit applies.

(b) You must store organic HAP-containing solvents used for removing cured resin or gel coat in containers with covers. The covers must have no visible gaps and must be in place at all times, except when equipment to be cleaned is placed in or removed from the container. On containers with a capacity greater than 7.6 liters, the distance from the top of the container to the solvent surface must be no less than 0.75 times the diameter of the container. Containers that store organic HAP-containing solvents used for removing cured resin or gel coat are exempt from the requirements of 40 CFR part 63, subpart T. Cured resin or gel coat means resin or gel coat that has changed from a liquid to a solid.

§63.5737   How do I demonstrate compliance with the resin and gel coat application equipment cleaning standards?

(a) Determine and record the organic HAP content of the cleaning solvents subject to the standards specified in §63.5734 using the methods specified in §63.5758.

(b) If you recycle cleaning solvents on site, you may use documentation from the solvent manufacturer or supplier or a measurement of the organic HAP content of the cleaning solvent as originally obtained from the solvent supplier for demonstrating compliance, subject to the conditions in §63.5758 for demonstrating compliance with organic HAP content limits.

(c) At least once per month, you must visually inspect any containers holding organic HAP-containing solvents used for removing cured resin and gel coat to ensure that the containers have covers with no visible gaps. Keep records of the monthly inspections and any repairs made to the covers.

Standards for Carpet and Fabric Adhesive Operations

§63.5740   What emission limit must I meet for carpet and fabric adhesive operations?

(a) You must use carpet and fabric adhesives that contain no more than 5 percent organic HAP by weight.

(b) To demonstrate compliance with the emission limit in paragraph (a) of this section, you must determine and record the organic HAP content of the carpet and fabric adhesives using the methods in §63.5758.

Standards for Aluminum Recreational Boat Surface Coating Operations

§63.5743   What standards must I meet for aluminum recreational boat surface coating operations?

(a) For aluminum wipedown solvent operations and aluminum surface coating operations, you must comply with either the separate emission limits in paragraphs (a)(1) and (2) of this section, or the combined emission limit in paragraph (a)(3) of this section. Compliance with these limitations is based on a 12-month rolling average that is calculated at the end of every month.

(1) You must limit emissions from aluminum wipedown solvents to no more than 0.33 kilograms of organic HAP per liter of total coating solids applied from aluminum primers, clear coats, and top coats combined. No limit applies when cleaning surfaces are receiving decals or adhesive graphics.

(2) You must limit emissions from aluminum recreational boat surface coatings (including thinners, activators, primers, topcoats, and clear coats) to no more than 1.22 kilograms of organic HAP per liter of total coating solids applied from aluminum primers, clear coats, and top coats combined.

(3) You must limit emissions from the combined aluminum surface coatings and aluminum wipedown solvents to no more than 1.55 kilograms of organic HAP per liter of total coating solids applied from aluminum primers, clear coats, and top coats combined.

(b) You must comply with the work practice standard in paragraph (b)(1), (2), (3), or (4) of this section when cleaning aluminum coating spray guns with solvents containing more than 5 percent organic HAP by weight.

(1) Clean spray guns in an enclosed device. Keep the device closed except when you place spray guns in or remove them from the device.

(2) Disassemble the spray gun and manually clean the components in a vat. Keep the vat closed when you are not using it.

(3) Clean spray guns by placing solvent in the pressure pot and forcing the solvent through the gun. Do not use atomizing air during this procedure. Direct the used cleaning solvent from the spray gun into a container that you keep closed when you are not using it.

(4) An alternative gun cleaning process or technology approved by the Administrator according to the procedures in §63.6(g).

§63.5746   How do I demonstrate compliance with the emission limits for aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum coatings?

To demonstrate compliance with the emission limits for aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum coatings specified in §63.5743(a), you must meet the requirements of paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section.

(a) Determine and record the organic HAP content (kilograms of organic HAP per kilogram of material, or weight fraction) of each aluminum wipedown solvent and aluminum coating (including primers, topcoats, clear coats, thinners, and activators). Use the methods in §63.5758 to determine organic HAP content.

(b) Use the methods in §63.5758(b) to determine the solids content (liters of solids per liter of coating, or volume fraction) of each aluminum surface coating, including primers, topcoats, and clear coats. Keep records of the solids content.

(c) Use the methods in §63.5758(c) to determine the density of each aluminum surface coating and wipedown solvent.

(d) Compliance is based on a 12-month rolling average calculated at the end of every month. The first 12-month rolling-average period begins on the compliance date specified in §63.5695.

(e) At the end of the twelfth month after your compliance date and at the end of every subsequent month, use the procedures in §63.5749 to calculate the organic HAP from aluminum wipedown solvents per liter of coating solids, and use the procedures in §63.5752 to calculate the kilograms of organic HAP from aluminum coatings per liter of coating solids.

(f) Keep records of the calculations used to determine compliance.

(g) Approval of alternative means of demonstrating compliance. You may apply to the Administrator for permission to use an alternative means (such as an add-on control system) of limiting emissions from aluminum wipedown solvent and coating operations and demonstrating compliance with the emission limits in §63.5743(a).

(1) The application must include the information listed in paragraphs (g)(1)(i) through (iii) of this section.

(i) An engineering evaluation that compares the emissions using the alternative means to the emissions that would result from using the strategy specified in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section. The engineering evaluation may include the results from an emission test that accurately measures the capture efficiency and control device efficiency achieved by the control system and the composition of the associated coatings so that the emissions comparison can be made.

(ii) A proposed monitoring protocol that includes operating parameter values to be monitored for compliance and an explanation of how the operating parameter values will be established through a performance test.

(iii) Details of appropriate recordkeeping and reporting procedures.

(2) The Administrator will approve the alternative means of limiting emissions if the Administrator determines that HAP emissions will be no greater than if the source uses the procedures described in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section to demonstrate compliance.

(3) The Administrator's approval may specify operation, maintenance, and monitoring requirements to ensure that emissions from the regulated operations are no greater than those that would otherwise result from regulated operations in compliance with this subpart.

§63.5749   How do I calculate the organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents?

(a) Use equation 1 of this section to calculate the weighted-average organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents used in the past 12 months.

eCFR graphic er22au01.016.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

HAPWD = weighted-average organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents, kilograms of HAP per liter of total coating solids from aluminum primers, top coats, and clear coats.

n = number of different wipedown solvents used in the past 12 months.

Volj = volume of aluminum wipedown solvent j used in the past 12 months, liters.

Dj = density of aluminum wipedown solvent j, kilograms per liter.

Wj = mass fraction of organic HAP in aluminum wipedown solvent j.

m = number of different aluminum surface coatings (primers, top coats, and clear coats) used in the past 12 months.

Voli = volume of aluminum primer, top coat, or clear coat i used in the past 12 months, liters.

Solidsi = solids content aluminum primer, top coat, or clear coat i, liter solids per liter of coating.

(b) Compliance is based on a 12-month rolling average. If the weighted-average organic HAP content does not exceed 0.33 kilograms of organic HAP per liter of total coating solids, then you are in compliance with the emission limit specified in §63.5743(a)(1).

§63.5752   How do I calculate the organic HAP content of aluminum recreational boat surface coatings?

(a) Use equation 1 of this section to calculate the weighted-average HAP content for all aluminum surface coatings used in the past 12 months.

eCFR graphic er22au01.017.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

HAPSC = weighted-average organic HAP content for all aluminum coating materials, kilograms of organic HAP per liter of coating solids.

m = number of different aluminum primers, top coats, and clear coats used in the past 12 months.

Voli = volume of aluminum primer, top coat, or clear coat i used in the past 12 months, liters.

Di = density of coating i, kilograms per liter.

Wi = mass fraction of organic HAP in coating i, kilograms of organic HAP per kilogram of coating.

p = number of different thinners, activators, and other coating additives used in the past 12 months.

Volk = total volume of thinner, activator, or additive k used in the past 12 months, liters.

Dk = density of thinner, activator, or additive k, kilograms per liter.

Wk = mass fraction of organic HAP in thinner, activator, or additive k, kilograms of organic HAP per kilogram of thinner or activator.

Solidsi = solids content of aluminum primer, top coat, or clear coat i, liter solids per liter of coating.

(b) Compliance is based on a 12-month rolling average. If the weighted-average organic HAP content does not exceed 1.22 kilograms of organic HAP per liter of coating solids, then you are in compliance with the emission limit specified in §63.5743(a)(2).

§63.5753   How do I calculate the combined organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings?

(a) Use equation 1 of this section to calculate the combined weighted-average organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents and aluminum recreational boat surface coatings.

eCFR graphic er22au01.018.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

HAPWD = the weighted-average organic HAP content of aluminum wipedown solvents used in the past 12 months, calculated using equation 1 of §63.5749.

HAPSC = the weighted average organic HAP content of aluminum recreational boat surface coatings used in the past 12 months, calculated using equation 1 of §63.5752.

(b) Compliance is based on a 12-month rolling average. If the combined organic HAP content does not exceed 1.55 kilograms of organic HAP per liter of total coating solids, then you are in compliance with the emission limit specified in §63.5743(a)(3).

§63.5755   How do I demonstrate compliance with the aluminum recreational boat surface coating spray gun cleaning work practice standards?

You must demonstrate compliance with the aluminum coating spray gun cleaning work practice standards by meeting the requirements of paragraph (a) or (b) of this section.

(a) Demonstrate that solvents used to clean the aluminum coating spray guns contain no more than 5 percent organic HAP by weight by determining organic HAP content with the methods in §63.5758. Keep records of the organic HAP content determination.

(b) For solvents containing more than 5 percent organic HAP by weight, comply with the requirements in paragraph (b)(1) or (b)(2), and paragraph (b)(3) of this section.

(1) If you are using an enclosed spray gun cleaner, visually inspect it at least once per month to ensure that covers are in place and the covers have no visible gaps when the cleaner is not in use, and that there are no leaks from hoses or fittings.

(2) If you are manually cleaning the gun or spraying solvent into a container that can be closed, visually inspect all solvent containers at least once per month to ensure that the containers have covers and the covers fit with no visible gaps.

(3) Keep records of the monthly inspections and any repairs that are made to the enclosed gun cleaners or the covers.

Methods for Determining Hazardous Air Pollutant Content

§63.5758   How do I determine the organic HAP content of materials?

(a) Determine the organic HAP content for each material used. To determine the organic HAP content for each material used in your open molding resin and gel coat operations, carpet and fabric adhesive operations, or aluminum recreational boat surface coating operations, you must use one of the options in paragraphs (a)(1) through (6) of this section.

(1) Method 311 (appendix A to 40 CFR part 63). You may use Method 311 for determining the mass fraction of organic HAP. Use the procedures specified in paragraphs (a)(1)(i) and (ii) of this section when determining organic HAP content by Method 311.

(i) Include in the organic HAP total each organic HAP that is measured to be present at 0.1 percent by mass or more for Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)-defined carcinogens as specified in 29 CFR 1910.1200(d)(4) and at 1.0 percent by mass or more for other compounds. For example, if toluene (not an OSHA carcinogen) is measured to be 0.5 percent of the material by mass, you do not need to include it in the organic HAP total. Express the mass fraction of each organic HAP you measure as a value truncated to four places after the decimal point (for example, 0.1234).

(ii) Calculate the total organic HAP content in the test material by adding up the individual organic HAP contents and truncating the result to three places after the decimal point (for example, 0.123).

(2) Method 24 (appendix A to 40 CFR part 60). You may use Method 24 to determine the mass fraction of non-aqueous volatile matter of aluminum coatings and use that value as a substitute for mass fraction of organic HAP.

(3) ASTM D1259-85 (Standard Test Method for Nonvolatile Content of Resins). You may use ASTM D1259-85 (available for purchase from ASTM) to measure the mass fraction of volatile matter of resins and gel coats for open molding operations and use that value as a substitute for mass fraction of organic HAP.

(4) Alternative method. You may use an alternative test method for determining mass fraction of organic HAP if you obtain prior approval by the Administrator. You must follow the procedure in §63.7(f) to submit an alternative test method for approval.

(5) Information from the supplier or manufacturer of the material. You may rely on information other than that generated by the test methods specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (4) of this section, such as manufacturer's formulation data, according to paragraphs (a)(5)(i) through (iii) of this section.

(i) Include in the organic HAP total each organic HAP that is present at 0.1 percent by mass or more for OSHA-defined carcinogens as specified in 29 CFR 1910.1200(d)(4) and at 1.0 percent by mass or more for other compounds. For example, if toluene (not an OSHA carcinogen) is 0.5 percent of the material by mass, you do not have to include it in the organic HAP total.

(ii) If the organic HAP content is provided by the material supplier or manufacturer as a range, then you must use the upper limit of the range for determining compliance. If a separate measurement of the total organic HAP content using the methods specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (4) of this section exceeds the upper limit of the range of the total organic HAP content provided by the material supplier or manufacturer, then you must use the measured organic HAP content to determine compliance.

(iii) If the organic HAP content is provided as a single value, you may assume the value is a manufacturing target value and actual organic HAP content may vary from the target value. If a separate measurement of the total organic HAP content using the methods specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (4) of this section is less than 2 percentage points higher than the value for total organic HAP content provided by the material supplier or manufacturer, then you may use the provided value to demonstrate compliance. If the measured total organic HAP content exceeds the provided value by 2 percentage points or more, then you must use the measured organic HAP content to determine compliance.

(6) Solvent blends. Solvent blends may be listed as single components for some regulated materials in certifications provided by manufacturers or suppliers. Solvent blends may contain organic HAP which must be counted toward the total organic HAP content of the materials. When detailed organic HAP content data for solvent blends are not available, you may use the values for organic HAP content that are listed in Table 5 or 6 to this subpart. You may use Table 6 to this subpart only if the solvent blends in the materials you use do not match any of the solvent blends in Table 5 to this subpart and you know only whether the blend is either aliphatic or aromatic. However, if test results indicate higher values than those listed in Table 5 or 6 to this subpart, then the test results must be used for determining compliance.

(b) Determine the volume fraction solids in aluminum recreational boat surface coatings. To determine the volume fraction of coating solids (liters of coating solids per liter of coating) for each aluminum recreational boat surface coating, you must use one of the methods specified in paragraphs (b)(1) through (3) of this section. If the results obtained with paragraphs (b)(2) or (3) of this section do not to agree with those obtained according to paragraph (b)(1) of this section, you must use the results obtained with paragraph (b)(1) of this section to determine compliance.

(1) ASTM Method D2697-86(1998) or D6093-97. You may use ASTM Method D2697-86(1998) or D6093-97 (available for purchase from ASTM) to determine the volume fraction of coating solids for each coating. Divide the nonvolatile volume percent obtained with the methods by 100 to calculate volume fraction of coating solids.

(2) Information from the supplier or manufacturer of the material. You may obtain the volume fraction of coating solids for each coating from the supplier or manufacturer.

(3) Calculation of volume fraction of coating solids. You may determine it using equation 1 of this section:

eCFR graphic er22au01.019.gif

View or download PDF

Where:

Solids=volume fraction of coating solids, liters coating solids per liter coating.

mvolatiles=Total volatile matter content of the coating, including organic HAP, volatile organic compounds, water, and exempt compounds, determined according to Method 24 in appendix A of 40 CFR part 60, grams volatile matter per liter coating.

Davg = average density of volatile matter in the coating, grams volatile matter per liter volatile matter, determined from test results using ASTM Method D1475-90 (available for purchase from ASTM), information from the supplier or manufacturer of the material, or reference sources providing density or specific gravity data for pure materials. If there is disagreement between ASTM Method D1475-90 test results and other information sources, the test results will take precedence.

(c) Determine the density of each aluminum recreational boat wipedown solvent and surface coating. Determine the density of all aluminum recreational boat wipedown solvents, surface coatings, thinners, and other additives from test results using ASTM Method D1475-90, information from the supplier or manufacturer of the material, or reference sources providing density or specific gravity data for pure materials. If there is disagreement between ASTM Method D1475-90 test results and other information sources, you must use the test results to demonstrate compliance.

Notifications, Reports, and Records

§63.5761   What notifications must I submit and when?

(a) You must submit all of the notifications in Table 7 to this subpart that apply to you by the dates in the table. The notifications are described more fully in 40 CFR part 63, subpart A, General Provisions, referenced in Table 8 to this subpart.

(b) If you change any information submitted in any notification, you must submit the changes in writing to the Administrator within 15 calendar days after the change.

§63.5764   What reports must I submit and when?

(a) You must submit the applicable reports specified in paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section. To the extent possible, you must organize each report according to the operations covered by this subpart and the compliance procedure followed for that operation.

(b) Unless the Administrator has approved a different schedule for submission of reports under §63.10(a), you must submit each report by the dates in paragraphs (b)(1) through (5) of this section.

(1) If your source is not controlled by an add-on control device (i.e., you are complying with organic HAP content limits, application equipment requirements, or MACT model point value averaging provisions), the first compliance report must cover the period beginning 12 months after the compliance date specified for your source in §63.5695 and ending on June 30 or December 31, whichever date is the first date following the end of the first 12-month period after the compliance date that is specified for your source in §63.5695. If your source is controlled by an add-on control device, the first compliance report must cover the period beginning on the compliance date specified for your source in §63.5695 and ending on June 30 or December 31, whichever date is the first date following the end of the first calendar half after the compliance date that is specified for your source in §63.5695.

(2) The first compliance report must be postmarked or delivered no later than 60 calendar days after the end of the compliance reporting period specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section.

(3) Each subsequent compliance report must cover the applicable semiannual reporting period from January 1 through June 30 or from July 1 through December 31.

(4) Each subsequent compliance report must be postmarked or delivered no later than 60 calendar days after the end of the semiannual reporting period.

(5) For each affected source that is subject to permitting regulations pursuant to 40 CFR part 70 or 71, and if the permitting authority has established dates for submitting semiannual reports pursuant to 40 CFR 70.6(a)(3)(iii)(A) or 40 CFR 71.6(a)(3)(iii)(A), you may submit the first and subsequent compliance reports according to the dates the permitting authority has established instead of according to the dates in paragraphs (b)(1) through (4) of this section.

(c) The compliance report must include the information specified in paragraphs (c)(1) through (7) of this section.

(1) Company name and address.

(2) A statement by a responsible official with that official's name, title, and signature, certifying the truth, accuracy, and completeness of the report.

(3) The date of the report and the beginning and ending dates of the reporting period.

(4) A description of any changes in the manufacturing process since the last compliance report.

(5) A statement or table showing, for each regulated operation, the applicable organic HAP content limit, application equipment requirement, or MACT model point value averaging provision with which you are complying. The statement or table must also show the actual weighted-average organic HAP content or weighted-average MACT model point value (if applicable) for each operation during each of the rolling 12-month averaging periods that end during the reporting period.

(6) If you were in compliance with the emission limits and work practice standards during the reporting period, you must include a statement to that effect.

(7) If you deviated from an emission limit or work practice standard during the reporting period, you must also include the information listed in paragraphs (c)(7)(i) through (iv) of this section in the semiannual compliance report.

(i) A description of the operation involved in the deviation.

(ii) The quantity, organic HAP content, and application method (if relevant) of the materials involved in the deviation.

(iii) A description of any corrective action you took to minimize the deviation and actions you have taken to prevent it from happening again.

(iv) A statement of whether or not your facility was in compliance for the 12-month averaging period that ended at the end of the reporting period.

(d) If your facility has an add-on control device, you must submit semiannual compliance reports and quarterly excess emission reports as specified in §63.10(e). The contents of the reports are specified in §63.10(e).

(e) If your facility has an add-on control device, you must complete a startup, shutdown, and malfunction plan as specified in §63.6(e), and you must submit the startup, shutdown, and malfunction reports specified in §63.10(e)(5).

§63.5767   What records must I keep?

You must keep the records specified in paragraphs (a) through (d) of this section in addition to records specified in individual sections of this subpart.

(a) You must keep a copy of each notification and report that you submitted to comply with this subpart.

(b) You must keep all documentation supporting any notification or report that you submitted.

(c) If your facility is not controlled by an add-on control device (i.e., you are complying with organic HAP content limits, application equipment requirements, or MACT model point value averaging provisions), you must keep the records specified in paragraphs (c)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) The total amounts of open molding production resin, pigmented gel coat, clear gel coat, tooling resin, and tooling gel coat used per month and the weighted-average organic HAP contents for each operation, expressed as weight-percent. For open molding production resin and tooling resin, you must also record the amounts of each applied by atomized and nonatomized methods.

(2) The total amount of each aluminum coating used per month (including primers, top coats, clear coats, thinners, and activators) and the weighted-average organic HAP content as determined in §63.5752.

(3) The total amount of each aluminum wipedown solvent used per month and the weighted-average organic HAP content as determined in §63.5749.

(d) If your facility has an add-on control device, you must keep the records specified in §63.10(b) relative to control device startup, shut down, and malfunction events; control device performance tests; and continuous monitoring system performance evaluations.

§63.5770   In what form and for how long must I keep my records?

(a) Your records must be readily available and in a form so they can be easily inspected and reviewed.

(b) You must keep each record for 5 years following the date that each record is generated.

(c) You must keep each record on site for at least 2 years after the date that each record is generated. You can keep the records offsite for the remaining 3 years.

(d) You can keep the records on paper or an alternative media, such as microfilm, computer, computer disks, magnetic tapes, or on microfiche.

Other Information You Need To Know

§63.5773   What parts of the General Provisions apply to me?

You must comply with the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 63, subpart A, as specified in Table 8 to this subpart.

§63.5776   Who implements and enforces this subpart?

(a) If the Administrator has delegated authority to your State or local agency, the State or local agency has the authority to implement and enforce this subpart.

(b) In delegating implementation and enforcement authority of this subpart to a State or local agency under 40 CFR part 63, subpart E, the authorities that are retained by the Administrator of the U.S. EPA and are not transferred to the State or local agency are listed in paragraphs (b)(1) through (4) of this section.

(1) Under §63.6(g), the authority to approve alternatives to the standards listed in paragraphs (b)(1)(i) through (vii) of this section is not delegated.

(i) §63.5698—Emission limit for open molding resin and gel coat operations.

(ii) §63.5728—Standards for closed molding resin operations.

(iii) §63.5731(a)—Standards for resin and gel coat mixing operations.

(iv) §63.5734—Standards for resin and gel coat application equipment cleaning operations.

(v) §63.5740(a)—Emission limit for carpet and fabric adhesive operations.

(vi) §63.5743—Standards for aluminum recreational boat surface coating operations.

(vii) §63.5746(g)—Approval of alternative means of demonstrating compliance with the emission limits for aluminum recreational boat surface coating operations.

(2) Under §63.7(e)(2)(ii) and (f), the authority to approve alternatives to the test methods listed in paragraphs (b)(2)(i) through (iv) of this section is not delegated.

(i) §63.5719(b)—Method for determining whether an enclosure is a total enclosure.

(ii) §63.5719(c)—Methods for measuring emissions from a control device.

(iii) §63.5725(d)(1)—Performance specifications for thermal oxidizer combustion temperature monitors.

(iv) §63.5758—Method for determining hazardous air pollutant content of regulated materials.

(3) Under §63.8(f), the authority to approve major alternatives to the monitoring requirements listed in §63.5725 is not delegated. A “major alternative” is defined in §63.90.

(4) Under §63.10(f), the authority to approve major alternatives to the reporting and recordkeeping requirements listed in §§63.5764, 63.5767, and 63.5770 is not delegated. A “major alternative” is defined in §63.90.

Definitions

§63.5779   What definitions apply to this subpart?

Terms used in this subpart are defined in the Clean Air Act, in §63.2, and in this section as follows:

Add-on control means an air pollution control device, such as a thermal oxidizer, that reduces pollution in an air stream by destruction or removal before discharge to the atmosphere.

Administrator means the Administrator of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) or an authorized representative (for example, a State delegated the authority to carry out the provisions of this subpart).

Aluminum recreational boat means any marine or freshwater recreational boat that has a hull or deck constructed primarily of aluminum. A recreational boat is a vessel which by design and construction is intended by the manufacturer to be operated primarily for pleasure, or to be leased, rented or chartered to another for the latter's pleasure (rather than for commercial or military purposes); and whose major structural components are fabricated and assembled in an indoor, production-line manufacturing plant or similar land-side operation and not in a dry dock, graving dock, or marine railway on the navigable waters of the United States.

Aluminum recreational boat surface coating operation means the application of primers or top coats to aluminum recreational boats. It also includes the application of clear coats over top coats. Aluminum recreational boat surface coating operations do not include the application of wood coatings or antifoulant coatings to aluminum recreational boats.

Aluminum coating spray gun cleaning means the process of flushing or removing paints or coatings from the interior or exterior of a spray gun used to apply aluminum primers, clear coats, or top coats to aluminum recreational boats.

Aluminum wipedown solvents means solvents used to remove oil, grease, welding smoke, or other contaminants from the aluminum surfaces of a boat before priming or painting. Aluminum wipedown solvents contain no coating solids; aluminum surface preparation materials that contain coating solids are considered coatings for the purpose of this subpart and are not wipedown solvents.

Antifoulant coating means any coating that is applied to the underwater portion of a boat specifically to prevent or reduce the attachment of biological organisms and that is registered with EPA as a pesticide under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (7 U.S.C. section 136, et seq.). For the purpose of this subpart, primers used with antifoulant coatings to prepare the surface to accept the antifoulant coating are considered antifoulant coatings.

Assembly adhesive means any chemical material used in the joining of one fiberglass, metal, foam, or wood parts to another to form a temporary or permanently bonded assembly. Assembly adhesives include, but are not limited to, methacrylate adhesives and putties made from polyester or vinylester resin mixed with inert fillers or fibers.

Atomized resin application means a resin application technology in which the resin leaves the application equipment and breaks into droplets or an aerosol as it travels from the application equipment to the surface of the part. Atomized resin application includes, but is not limited to, resin spray guns and resin chopper spray guns.

Boat means any type of vessel, other than a seaplane, that can be used for transportation on the water.

Boat manufacturing facility means a facility that manufactures the hulls or decks of boats from fiberglass or aluminum or assembles boats from premanufactured hulls and decks, or builds molds to make fiberglass hulls or decks. A facility that manufactures only parts of boats (such as hatches, seats, or lockers) or boat trailers, but no boat hulls or decks or molds for fiberglass boat hulls or decks, is not considered a boat manufacturing facility for the purpose of this subpart.

Carpet and fabric adhesive means any chemical material that permanently attaches carpet, fabric, or upholstery to any surface of a boat.

Clear gel coat means gel coats that are clear or translucent so that underlying colors are visible. Clear gel coats are used to manufacture parts for sale. Clear gel coats do not include tooling gel coats used to build or repair molds.

Closed molding means any molding process in which pressure is used to distribute the resin through the reinforcing fabric placed between two mold surfaces to either saturate the fabric or fill the mold cavity. The pressure may be clamping pressure, fluid pressure, atmospheric pressure, or vacuum pressure used either alone or in combination. The mold surfaces may be rigid or flexible. Closed molding includes, but is not limited to, compression molding with sheet molding compound, infusion molding, resin injection molding (RIM), vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM), resin transfer molding (RTM), and vacuum-assisted compression molding. Processes in which a closed mold is used only to compact saturated fabric or remove air or excess resin from the fabric (such as in vacuum bagging), are not considered closed molding. Open molding steps, such as application of a gel coat or skin coat layer by conventional open molding prior to a closed molding process, are not closed molding.

Cured resin and gel coat means resin or gel coat that has been polymerized and changed from a liquid to a solid.

Deviation means any instance in which an affected source subject to this subpart or an owner or operator of such a source:

(1) Fails to meet any requirement or obligation established by this subpart, including, but not limited to, any emission limit, operating limit, or work practice requirement;

(2) Fails to meet any term or condition which is adopted to implement an applicable requirement in this subpart and which is included in the operating permit for any affected source required to obtain such permit; or

(3) Fails to meet any emission limit, operating limit, or work practice requirement in this subpart during any startup, shutdown, or malfunction, regardless of whether or not such failure is permitted by this subpart.

Enclosure means a structure, such as a spray booth, that surrounds a source of emissions and captures and directs the emissions to an add-on control device.

Fiberglass boat means a vessel in which either the hull or deck is built from a composite material consisting of a thermosetting resin matrix reinforced with fibers of glass, carbon, aramid, or other material.

Fiberglass hull and deck coatings means coatings applied to the exterior or interior surface of fiberglass boat hulls and decks on the completed boat. Polyester and vinylester resins and gel coats used in building fiberglass parts are not fiberglass hull and deck coatings for the purpose of this subpart.

Filled resin means a resin to which an inert material has been added to change viscosity, density, shrinkage, or other physical properties.

Gel coat means a thermosetting resin surface coating containing styrene (Chemical Abstract Service or CAS No. 100-42-5) or methyl methacrylate (CAS No. 80-62-6), either pigmented or clear, that provides a cosmetic enhancement or improves resistance to degradation from exposure to the elements. Gel coat layers do not contain any reinforcing fibers and gel coats are applied directly to mold surfaces or to a finished laminate.

Hazardous air pollutant or HAP means any air pollutant listed in, or pursuant to section 112(b) of the Clean Air Act.

Hazardous air pollutant content or HAP content means the amount of HAP contained in a regulated material at the time it is applied to the part being manufactured. If no HAP is added to a material as a thinner or diluent, then the HAP content is the same as the HAP content of the material as purchased from the supplier. For resin and gel coat, HAP content does not include any HAP contained in the catalyst added to the resin or gel coat during application to initiate curing.

Hazardous air pollutant data sheet (HDS) means documentation furnished by a material supplier or an outside laboratory to provide the organic HAP content of the material by weight, measured using an EPA Method, manufacturer's formulation data, or an equivalent method. For aluminum coatings, the HDS also documents the solids content by volume, determined from the manufacturer's formulation data. The purpose of the HDS is to help the affected source in showing compliance with the organic HAP content limits contained in this subpart. The HDS must state the maximum total organic HAP concentration, by weight, of the material. It must include any organic HAP concentrations equal to or greater than 0.1 percent by weight for individual organic HAP that are carcinogens, as defined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR part 1910), and 1.0 percent by weight for all other individual organic HAP, as formulated. The HDS must also include test conditions if EPA Method 311 is used for determining organic HAP content.

Maximum achievable control technology (MACT) model point value means a number calculated for open molding operations that is a surrogate for emissions and is used to determine if your open molding operations are in compliance with the provisions of this subpart. The units for MACT model point values are kilograms of organic HAP per megagram of resin or gel coat applied.

Manufacturer's certification means documentation furnished by a material supplier that shows the organic HAP content of a material and includes a HDS.

Mold means the cavity or surface into or on which gel coat, resin, and fibers are placed and from which finished fiberglass parts take their form.

Mold sealing and release agents means materials applied to a mold to seal, polish, and lubricate the mold to prevent parts from sticking to the mold. Mold sealers, waxes, and glazing and buffing compounds are considered mold sealing and release agents for the purposes of this subpart.

Mold stripping and cleaning solvents means materials used to remove mold sealing and release agents from a mold before the mold surface is repaired, polished, or lubricated during normal mold maintenance.

Month means a calendar month.

Neat resin means a resin to which no filler has been added.

Nonatomized resin application means any application technology in which the resin is not broken into droplets or an aerosol as it travels from the application equipment to the surface of the part. Nonatomized resin application technology includes, but is not limited to, flowcoaters, chopper flowcoaters, pressure fed resin rollers, resin impregnators, and hand application (for example, paint brush or paint roller).

Open molding resin and gel coat operation means any process in which the reinforcing fibers and resin are placed in the mold and are open to the surrounding air while the reinforcing fibers are saturated with resin. For the purposes of this subpart, open molding includes operations in which a vacuum bag or similar cover is used to compress an uncured laminate to remove air bubbles or excess resin, or to achieve a bond between a core material and a laminate.

Pigmented gel coat means opaque gel coats used to manufacture parts for sale. Pigmented gel coats do not include tooling gel coats used to build or repair molds.

Production resin means any resin used to manufacture parts for sale. Production resins do not include tooling resins used to build or repair molds, or assembly adhesives as defined in this section.

Recycled resin and gel coat application equipment cleaning solvent means cleaning solvents recycled on-site or returned to the supplier or another party to remove resin or gel coat residues so that the solvent can be reused.

Research and development activities means:

(1) Activities conducted at a laboratory to analyze air, soil, water, waste, or product samples for contaminants, environmental impact, or quality control;

(2) Activities conducted to test more efficient production processes or methods for preventing or reducing adverse environmental impacts, provided that the activities do not include the production of an intermediate or final product for sale or exchange for commercial profit, except in a de minimis manner; and

(3) Activities conducted at a research or laboratory facility that is operated under the close supervision of technically trained personnel, the primary purpose of which is to conduct research and development into new processes and products and that is not engaged in the manufacture of products for sale or exchange for commercial profit, except in a de minimis manner.

Resin means any thermosetting resin with or without pigment containing styrene (CAS No. 100-42-5) or methyl methacrylate (CAS No. 80-62-6) and used to encapsulate and bind together reinforcement fibers in the construction of fiberglass parts.

Resin and gel coat application equipment cleaning means the process of flushing or removing resins and gel coats from the interior or exterior of equipment that is used to apply resin or gel coat in the manufacture of fiberglass parts.

Resin and gel coat mixing operation means any operation in which resin or gel coat, including the mixing of putties or polyputties, is combined with additives that include, but are not limited to, fillers, promoters, or catalysts.

Roll-out means the process of using rollers, squeegees, or similar tools to compact reinforcing materials saturated with resin to remove trapped air or excess resin.

Skin coat is a layer of resin and fibers applied over the gel coat to protect the gel coat from being deformed by the next laminate layers.

Tooling resin means the resin used to build or repair molds (also known as tools) or prototypes (also known as plugs) from which molds will be made.

Tooling gel coat means the gel coat used to build or repair molds (also known as tools) or prototypes (also known as plugs) from which molds will be made.

Vacuum bagging means any molding technique in which the reinforcing fabric is saturated with resin and then covered with a flexible sheet that is sealed to the edge of the mold and where a vacuum is applied under the sheet to compress the laminate, remove excess resin, or remove trapped air from the laminate during curing. Vacuum bagging does not include processes that meet the definition of closed molding.

Vinylester resin means a thermosetting resin containing esters of acrylic or methacrylic acids and having double-bond and ester linkage sites only at the ends of the resin molecules.

Volume fraction of coating solids means the ratio of the volume of coating solids (also known as volume of nonvolatiles) to the volume of coating; liters of coating solids per liter of coating.

Wood coatings means coatings applied to wooden parts and surfaces of boats, such as paneling, cabinets, railings, and trim. Wood coatings include, but are not limited to, primers, stains, sealers, varnishes, and enamels. Polyester and vinylester resins or gel coats applied to wooden parts to encapsulate them or bond them to other parts are not wood coatings.

Table 1 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Boat Manufacturing Facilities

As specified in §63.5695, you must comply by the dates in the following table:

If your facility is— And— Then you must comply by this date—
1. An existing sourceIs a major source on or before August 22, 20011August 23, 2004.
2. An existing or new area sourceBecomes a major source after August 22, 200111 year after becoming a major source or August 22, 2002, whichever is later.
3. A new sourceIs a major source at startup1Upon startup or August 22, 2001, whichever is later.

1Your facility is a major source if it is a stationary source or group of stationary sources located within a contiguous area and under common control that emits or can potentially emit, considering controls, in the aggregate, 9.1 megagrams or more per year of a single hazardous air pollutant or 22.7 megagrams or more per year of a combination of hazardous air pollutants.

Table 2 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Alternative Organic HAP Content Requirements for Open Molding Resin and Gel Coat Operations

As specified in §§63.5701(b), 63.5704(b)(2), and 63.5713(a), (b), and (d), you must comply with the requirements in the following table:

For this operation— And this application method— You must not exceed this weighted-average organic HAP content (weight percent) requirement—
1. Production resin operationsAtomized (spray)28 percent.
2. Production resin operationsNonatomized (nonspray)35 percent.
3. Pigmented gel coat operationsAny method33 percent.
4. Clear gel coat operationsAny method48 percent
5. Tooling resin operationsAtomized (spray)30 percent.
6. Tooling resin operationsNonatomized (nonspray)39 percent.
7. Tooling gel coat operationsAny method40 percent.

Table 3 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—MACT Model Point Value Formulas for Open Molding Operations1

As specified in §§63.5710(d) and 63.5714(a), you must calculate point values using the formulas in the following table:

For this operation— And this application method— Use this formula to calculate the MACT model plant value for each resin and gel coat—
1. Production resin, tooling resina. Atomized0.014 × (Resin HAP%)2.425
   b. Atomized, plus vacuum bagging with roll-out0.01185 × (Resin HAP%)2.425
   c. Atomized, plus vacuum bagging without roll-out0.00945 × (Resin HAP%)2.425
   d. Nonatomized0.014 × (Resin HAP%)2.275
   e. Nonatomized, plus vaccum bagging with roll-out0.0110 × (Resin HAP%)2.275
   f. Nonatomized, plus vacuum bagging without roll-out0.0076 × (Resin HAP%)2.275
2. Pigmented gel coat, clear gel coat, tooling gel coatAll methods0.445 × (Gel coat HAP%)1.675

1Equations calculate MACT model point value in kilograms of organic HAP per megagrams of resin or gel coat applied. The equations for vacuum bagging with roll-out are applicable when a facility rolls out the applied resin and fabric prior to applying the vacuum bagging materials. The equations for vacuum bagging without roll-out are applicable when a facility applies the vacuum bagging materials immediately after resin application without rolling out the resin and fabric. HAP% = organic HAP content as supplied, expressed as a weight-percent value between 0 and 100 percent.

[66 FR 44232, Aug. 22, 2001; 66 FR 50504, Oct. 3, 2001]

Table 4 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Operating Limits if Using an Add-on Control Device for Open Molding Operations

As specified in §§63.5715(a) and 63.5725(f)(5), you must meet the operating limits in the following table:

For the following device— You must meet the following operating limit— And you must demonstrate continuous compliance with the operating limit by—
1. Thermal oxidizerThe average combustion temperature in any 3-hour period must not fall below the combustion temperature limit established according to §63.5725(d)a. Collecting the combustion temperature data according to §63.5725(d); b. reducing the data to 3-hour block averages; and c. maintaining the 3-hour average combustion temperature at or above the temperature limit.
2. Other control devicesAn operating limit approved by the Administrator according to §63.8(f)a. Collecting parameter monitoring as approved by the Administrator according to §63.8(f); and b. maintaining the parameters within the operating limits approved according to §63.8(f).
3. Emission capture system that is a PTE according to §63.5719(b)a. The direction of the air flow at all times must be into the enclosure; and b. in any 3-hour period, either the average facial velocity of air through all natural draft openings in the enclosure must be at least 200 feet per minute; or c. the pressure drop across the enclosure must be at least 0.007 inch H2O, as established in Method 204 of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51i. Collecting the direction of air flow, and either the facial velocity of air through all natural draft openings according to §63.5725(f)(3) or the pressure drop across the enclosure according to §63.5725(f)(4); and ii. reducing the data for facial velocity or pressure drop to 3-hour block averages; and iii. maintaining the 3-hour average facial velocity of air flow through all natural draft openings or the pressure drop at or above the facial velocity limit or pressure drop limit, and maintaining the direction of air flow into the enclosure at all times.
4. Emission capture system that is not a PTE according to §63.5719(b)a. The average gas volumetric flow rate or duct static pressure in each duct between a capture device and add-on control device inlet in any 3-hour period must not fall below the average volumetric flow rate or duct static pressure limit established for that capture device according to §63.5725(f)(5); and b. the average pressure drop across an opening in each enclosure in any 3-hour period must not fall below the average pressure drop limit established for that capture device according to §63.5725(f)(5)i. Collecting the gas volumetric flow rate or duct static pressure for each capture device according to §63.5725(f)(1) and (3); ii. reducing the data to 3-hour block averages; iii. maintaining the 3-hour average gas volumetric flow rate or duct static pressure for each capture device at or above the gas volumetric flow rate or duct static pressure limit; iv. collecting data for the pressure drop across an opening in each enclosure according to §63.5725(f)(2) and (4); v. reducing the data to 3-hour block averages; and vi. maintaining the 3-hour average pressure drop across the opening for each enclosure at or above the gas volumetric flow rate or duct static pressure limit.

Table 5 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends

As specified in §63.5758(a)(6), when detailed organic HAP content data for solvent blends are not available, you may use the values in the following table:

Solvent/solvent blend CAS No. Average organic HAP content, percent by mass Typical organic HAP, percent by mass
1. Toluene108-88-3100Toluene.
2. Xylene(s)1330-20-7100Xylenes, ethylbenzene.
3. Hexane110-54-350n-hexane.
4. n-hexane110-54-3100n-hexane.
5. Ethylbenzene100-41-4100Ethylbenzene.
6. Aliphatic 1400None.
7. Aromatic 10021% xylene, 1% cumene.
8. Aromatic 1509Naphthalene.
9. Aromatic naptha64742-95-621% xylene, 1% cumene.
10. Aromatic solvent64742-94-510Naphthalene.
11. Exempt mineral spirits8032-32-40None.
12. Ligroines (VM & P)8032-32-40None.
13. Lactol spirits64742-89-615Toluene.
14. Low aromatic white spirit64742-82-10None.
15. Mineral spirits64742-88-71Xylenes.
16. Hydrotreated naphtha64742-48-90None.
17. Hydrotreated light distillate64742-47-80.1Toluene.
18. Stoddard solvent8052-41-31Xylenes.
19. Super high-flash naphtha64742-95-65Xylenes.
20. Varol® solvent8052-49-310.5% xylenes, 0.5% ethyl benzene.
21. VM & P naphtha64742-89-863% toluene, 3% xylene.
22. Petroleum distillate mixture68477-31-684% naphthalene, 4% biphenyl.

Table 6 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Contents of Petroleum Solvent Groups

As specified in §63.5758(a)(6), when detailed organic HAP content data for solvent blends are not available, you may use the values in the following table:

Solvent type Average organic HAP content, percent by mass Typical organic HAP, percent by mass
Aliphatic (Mineral Spirits 135, Mineral Spirits 150 EC, Naphtha, Mixed Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Hydrocarbon, Aliphatic Naptha, Naphthol Spirits, Petroleum Spirits, Petroleum Oil, Petroleum Naphtha, Solvent Naphtha, Solvent Blend.)31% Xylene, 1% Toluene, and 1% Ethylbenzene.
Aromatic (Medium-flash Naphtha, High-flash Naphtha, Aromatic Naphtha, Light Aromatic Naphtha, Light Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Light Aromatic Solvent.)64% Xylene, 1% Toluene, and 1% Ethylbenzene.

Table 7 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Applicability and Timing of Notifications

As specified in §63.5761(a), you must submit notifications according to the following table:

If your facility— You must submit— By this date—
1. Is an existing source subject to this subpartAn initial notification containing the information specified in §63.9(b)(2)No later than the dates specified in §63.9(b)(2).
2. Is a new source subject to this subpartThe notifications specified in §63.9(b) (3) to (5)No later than the dates specified §63.9(b)(4) and (5).
3. Qualifies for a compliance extension as specified in §63.9(c)A request for a compliance extension as specified in §63.9(c)No later than the dates specified in §63.6(i).
4. Is complying with organic HAP content limits, application equipment requirements; or MACT model point value averaging provisionsA notification of compliance status as specified in §63.9(h)No later than 30 calendar days after the end of the first 12-month averaging period after your facility's compliance date.
5. Is complying by using an add-on control devicea. notification of intent to conduct a performance test as specified in §63.9(e)No later than the date specified in §63.9(e).
   b. A notification of the date for the continuous monitoring system performance evaluation as specified in §63.9(g)With the notification of intent to conduct a performance test.
   c. A notification of compliance status as specified in §63.9(h)No later than 60 calendar days after the completion of the add-on control device performance test and continuous monitoring system performance evaluation.

Table 8 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart VVVV

As specified in §63.5773, you must comply with the applicable requirements of the General Provisions according to the following table:

Citation Requirement Applies to subpart VVVV Explanation
§63.1(a)General ApplicabilityYes.
§63.1(b)Initial Applicability DeterminationYes.
§63.1(c)(1)Applicability After Standard EstablishedYes.
§63.1(c)(2)YesArea sources are not regulated by subpart VVVV.
§63.1(c)(3)No[Reserved]
§63.1(c)(4)-(5)Yes.
§63.1(d)No[Reserved]
§63.1(e)Applicability of Permit ProgramYes.
§63.2DefinitionsYesAdditional definitions are found in §63.5779.
§63.3Units and AbbreviationsYes.
§63.4(a)Prohibited ActivitiesYes.
§63.4(b)-(c)Circumvention/SeverabilityYes.
§63.5(a)Construction/ReconstructionYes.
§63.5(b)Requirements for Existing, Newly Constructed, and Reconstructed SourcesYes.
§63.5(c)No[Reserved]
§63.5(d)Application for Approval of Construction/ReconstructionYes.
§63.5(e)Approval of Construction/ReconstructionYes.
§63.5(f)Approval of Construction/Reconstruction Based on prior State ReviewYes.
§63.6(a)Compliance with Standards and Maintenance Requirements—ApplicabilityYes.
§63.6(b)Compliance Dates for New and Reconstructed SourcesYes§63.695 specifies compliance dates, including the compliance date for new area sources that become major sources after the effective date of the rule.
§63.6(c)Compliance Dates for Existing SourcesYes§63.5695 specifies compliance dates, including the compliance date for existing area sources that become major sources after the effective date of the rule.
§63.6(d)No[Reserved]
§63.6(e)(1)-(2)Operation and Maintenance RequirementsNoOperating requirements for open molding operations with add-on controls are specified in §63.5725.
§63.6(e)(3)Startup, Shut Down, and Malfunction PlansYesOnly sources with add-on controls must complete startup, shutdown, and malfunction plans.
§63.6(f)Compliance with Nonopacity Emission StandardsYes.
§63.6(g)Use of an Alternative Nonopacity Emission StandardYes.
§63.6(h)Compliance with Opacity/Visible Emissions StandardsNoSubpart VVVV does not specify opacity or visible emission standards.
§63.6(i)Extension of Compliance with Emission StandardsYes.
§63.6(j)Exemption from Compliance with Emission StandardsYes.
§63.7(a)(1)Performance Test RequirementsYes.
§63.7(a)(2)Dates for performance testsNo§63.5716 specifies performance test dates.
§63.7(a)(3)Performance testing at other timesYes.
§63.7(b)-(h)Other performance testing requirementsYes.
§63.8(a)(1)-(2)Monitoring Requirements—ApplicabilityYesAll of §63.8 applies only to sources with add-on controls. Additional monitoring requirements for sources with add-on controls are found in §63.5725.
§63.8(a)(3)No[Reserved]
§63.8(a)(4)NoSubpart VVVV does not refer directly or indirectly to §63.11.
§63.8(b)(1)Conduct of MonitoringYes.
§63.8(b)(2)-(3)Multiple Effluents and Multiple Continuous Monitoring Systems (CMS)YesApplies to sources that use a CMS on the control device stack.
§63.8(c)(1)-(4)Continuous Monitoring System Operation and MaintenanceYes.
§63.8(c)(5)Continuous Opacity Monitoring Systems (COMS)NoSubpart VVVV does not have opacity or visible emission standards.
§63.8(c)(6)-(8)Continuous Monitoring System Calibration Checks and Out-of-Control PeriodsYes.
§63.8(d)Quality Control ProgramYes.
§63.8(e)CMS Performance EvaluationYes.
§63.8(f)(1)-(5)Use of an Alternative Monitoring MethodYes.
§63.8(f)(6)Alternative to Relative Accuracy TestYesApplies only to sources that use continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS).
§63.8(g)Data ReductionYes
§63.9(a)Notification Requirements—ApplicabilityYes.
§63.9(b)Initial NotificationsYes
§63.9(c)Request for Compliance ExtensionYes.
§63.9(d)Notification That a New Source Is Subject to Special Compliance RequirementsYes.
§63.9(e)Notification of Performance TestYesApplies only to sources with add-on controls.
§63.9(f)Notification of Visible Emissions/Opacity TestNoSubpart VVVV does not have opacity or visible emission standards.
§63.9(g)(1)Additional CMS Notifications—Date of CMS Performance EvaluationYesApplies only to sources with add-on controls.
§63.9(g)(2)Use of COMS DataNoSubpart VVVV does not require the use of COMS.
§63.9(g)(3)Alternative to Relative Accuracy TestingYesApplies only to sources with CEMS.
§63.9(h)Notification of Compliance StatusYes.
§63.9(i)Adjustment of DeadlinesYes.
§63.9(j)Change in Previous InformationYes.
§63.10(a)Recordkeeping/Reporting—ApplicabilityYes.
§63.10(b)(1)General Recordkeeping RequirementsYes§§63.567 and 63.5770 specify additional recordkeeping requirements.
§63.10(b)(2)(i)-(xi)Recordkeeping Relevant to Startup, Shutdown, and Malfunction Periods and CMSYesApplies only to sources with add-on controls.
§63.10(b)(2)(xii)-(xiv)General Recordkeeping RequirementsYes.
§63.10(b)(3)Recordkeeping Requirements for Applicability DeterminationsYes§63.5686 specifies applicability determinations for non-major sources.
§63.10(c)Additional Recordkeeping for Sources with CMSYesApplies only to sources with add-on controls.
§63.10(d)(1)General Reporting RequirementsYes§63.5764 specifies additional reporting requirements.
§63.10(d)(2)Performance Test ResultsYes§63.5764 specifies additional requirements for reporting performance test results.
§63.10(d)(3)Opacity or Visible Emissions ObservationsNoSubpart VVVV does not specify opacity or visible emission standards.
§63.10(d)(4)Progress Reports for Sources with Compliance ExtensionsYes.
§63.10(d)(5)Startup, Shutdown, and Malfunction ReportsYesApplies only to sources with add-on controls.
§63.10(e)(1)Additional CMS Reports—GeneralYesApplies only to sources with add-on controls.
§63.10(e)(2)Reporting Results of CMS Performance EvaluationsYesApplies only to sources with add-on controls.
§63.10(e)(3)Excess Emissions/CMS Performance ReportsYesApplies only to sources with add-on controls.
§63.10(e)(4)COMS Data ReportsNoSubpart VVVV does not specify opacity or visible emission standards.
§63.10(f)Recordkeeping/Reporting WaiverYes.
§63.11Control Device Requirements—ApplicabilityNoFacilities subject to subpart VVVV do not use flares as control devices.
§63.12State Authority and DelegationsYes§63.5776 lists those sections of subpart A that are not delegated.
§63.13AddressesYes.
§63.14Incorporation by ReferenceYes.
§63.15Availability of Information/ConfidentialityYes.


For questions or comments regarding e-CFR editorial content, features, or design, email ecfr@nara.gov.
For questions concerning e-CFR programming and delivery issues, email webteam@gpo.gov.