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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of April 21, 2014

Title 5: Administrative Personnel


PART 734—POLITICAL ACTIVITIES OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES


Contents

Subpart A—General Provisions

§734.101   Definitions.
§734.102   Jurisdiction.
§734.103   Multicandidate political committees of Federal labor organizations and Federal employee organizations.
§734.104   Restriction of political activity.

Subpart B—Permitted Activities

§734.201   Exclusion from coverage.
§734.202   Permitted activities.
§734.203   Participation in nonpartisan activities.
§734.204   Participation in political organizations.
§734.205   Participation in political campaigns.
§734.206   Participation in elections.
§734.207   Candidacy for public office.
§734.208   Participation in fundraising.

Subpart C—Prohibited Activities

§734.301   Exclusion from coverage.
§734.302   Use of official authority; prohibition.
§734.303   Fundraising.
§734.304   Candidacy for public office.
§734.305   Soliciting or discouraging the political participation of certain persons.
§734.306   Participation in political activities while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties, or using a Federal vehicle.
§734.307   Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

Subpart D—Employees in Certain Agencies and Positions

§734.401   Coverage.
§734.402   Expression of an employee's individual opinion.
§734.403   Participation in elections.
§734.404   Participation in political organizations.
§734.405   Campaigning for a spouse or family member.
§734.406   Participation in political activities while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties, or using a Federal vehicle; prohibition.
§734.407   Use of official authority; prohibition.
§734.408   Participation in political management and political campaigning; prohibitions.
§734.409   Participation in political organizations; prohibitions.
§734.410   Participation in political fundraising; prohibitions.
§734.411   Participation in political campaigning; prohibitions.
§734.412   Participation in elections; prohibitions.
§734.413   Employees of the Federal Election Commission; prohibitions.

Subpart E—Special Provisions for Certain Presidential Appointees and Employees Paid from the Appropriation for the Executive Office of the President

§734.501   Permitted and prohibited activities.
§734.502   Participation in political activity while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties, or using a Federal vehicle.
§734.503   Allocation and reimbursement of costs associated with political activities.
§734.504   Contributions to political action committees through voluntary payroll allotments prohibited.

Subpart F—Employees Who Work on An Irregular or Occasional Basis

§734.601   Employees who work on an irregular or occasional basis.

Subpart G—Related Statutes and Executive Orders

§734.701   General.
§734.702   Related statutes and Executive orders.

Authority: 5 U.S.C. 1103, 1104, 7325; Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1978, 92 Stat. 3783, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. p. 323; and E.O. 12107, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. p. 264.

Source: 59 FR 48769, Sept. 23, 1994, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A—General Provisions

§734.101   Definitions.

For the purposes of this part:

Accept means to come into possession of something from a person officially on behalf of a candidate, a campaign, a political party, or a partisan political group, but does not include ministerial activities which precede or follow this official act.

Candidate means an individual who seeks nomination or election to any elective office whether or not the person is elected. An individual is deemed to be a candidate if the individual has received political contributions or made expenditures or has consented to another person receiving contributions or making expenditures with a view to bringing about the individual's nomination or election.

Campaign means all acts done by a candidate and his or her adherents to obtain a majority or plurality of the votes to be cast toward a nomination or in an election.

Election includes a primary, special, runoff, or general election.

Employee means any individual (other than the President, Vice President, or a member of the uniformed services) employed or holding office in—

(1) An Executive agency other than the General Accounting Office;

(2) A position within the competitive service which is not in an Executive agency;

(3) The Government of the District of Columbia, other than the Mayor or a member of the City Council or the Recorder of Deeds; or

(4) The United States Postal Service or the Postal Rate Commission.

Employing office shall have the meaning given by the head of each agency or instrumentality of the United States Government or District of Columbia Government covered by this part. Each agency or instrumentality shall provide notice identifying the appropriate employing offices within it through internal agency notice procedures.

Federal employee organization means any lawful nonprofit organization, association, society, or club composed of Federal employees.

Federal labor organization means an organization defined in 5 U.S.C. 7103(a)(4).

Multicandidate political committee means an organization defined in 2 U.S.C. 441a(a)(4).

Nonpartisan election means—

(1) An election in which none of the candidates is to be nominated or elected as representing a political party any of whose candidates for Presidential elector received votes in the last preceding election at which Presidential electors were selected; or

(2) An election involving a question or issue which is not specifically identified with a political party, such as a constitutional amendment, referendum, approval of a municipal ordinance, or any question or issue of a similar character.

Occasional means occurring infrequently, at irregular intervals, and according to no fixed or certain scheme; acting or serving for the occasion or only on particular occasions.

Office means the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

On Duty means the time period when an employee is:

(1) In a pay status other than paid leave, compensatory time off, credit hours, time off as an incentive award, or excused or authorized absence (including leave without pay); or

(2) Representing any agency or instrumentality of the United States Government or any agency or instrumentality of the District of Columbia Government in an official capacity.

Partisan when used as an adjective means related to a political party.

Partisan political group means any committee, club, or other organization which is affiliated with a political party or candidate for public office in a partisan election, or organized for a partisan purpose, or which engages in partisan political activity.

Partisan political office means any office for which any candidate is nominated or elected as representing a party any of whose candidates for Presidential elector received votes in the last preceding election at which Presidential electors were selected, but does not include any office or position within a political party or affiliated organization.

Person means an individual; a State, local, or foreign government; or a corporation and subsidiaries it controls, company, association, firm, partnership, society, joint stock company, or any other organization or institution, including any officer, employee, or agent of such person or entity.

Political Action Committee means any committee, association, or organization (whether or not incorporated) which accepts contributions or makes expenditures for the purpose of influencing, or attempting to influence, the nomination or election of one or more individuals to Federal, State, or local elective public office.

Political activity means an activity directed toward the success or failure of a political party, candidate for partisan political office, or partisan political group.

Political contribution means any gift, subscription, loan, advance, or deposit of money or anything of value, made for any political purpose.

(a) A political contribution includes:

(1) Any contract, promise, or agreement, express or implied, whether or not legally enforceable, to make a contribution for any political purpose;

(2) Any payment by any person, other than a candidate or a political party or affiliated organization, of compensation for the personal services of another person which are rendered to any candidate or political party or affiliated organization without charge for any political purpose; and

(3) The provision of personal services, paid or unpaid, for any political purpose.

(b) A political contribution does not include the value of services provided without compensation by any individual who volunteers on behalf of any candidate, campaign, political party, or partisan political group.

Political management means the direction or supervision of a partisan political group or campaign for partisan political office.

Political party means a national political party, a State political party, or an affiliated organization.

Political purpose means an objective of promoting or opposing a political party, candidate for partisan political office, or partisan political group.

Receive means to come into possession of something from a person officially on behalf of a candidate, a campaign, a political party, or a partisan political group, but does not include ministerial activities which precede or follow this official act.

Recurrent means occurring frequently, or periodically on a regular basis.

Room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties by an individual employed or holding office in the Government of the United States or any agency thereof includes, but is not limited to:

(1) Any Federally owned space (including, but not limited to, “public buildings” as defined in 40 U.S.C. 612(1)) or Federally leased space in which Federal employees perform official duties on a regular basis;

(2) Public areas as defined in 40 U.S.C. 490(a)(17) and 41 CFR 101-20.003 of buildings under the custody and control of the General Services Administration.

(3) A room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties by an individual employed or holding office in the Government of the United States or any agency thereof does not include rooms in the White House, or in the residence of the Vice President, which are part of the Residence area or which are not regularly used solely in the discharge of official duties.

Solicit means to request expressly of another person that he or she contribute something to a candidate, a campaign, a political party, or partisan political group.

Subordinate refers to the relationship between two employees when one employee is under the supervisory authority, control or administrative direction of the other employee.

Uniformed services means uniformed services as defined in 5 U.S.C. 2101(3).

[59 FR 48769, Sept. 23, 1994, as amended at 61 FR 35099, July 5, 1996]

§734.102   Jurisdiction.

(a) The United States Office of Special Counsel has exclusive authority to investigate allegations of political activity prohibited by the Hatch Act Reform Amendments of 1993, as implemented by 5 CFR part 734, prosecute alleged violations before the United States Merit Systems Protection Board, and render advisory opinions concerning the applicability of 5 CFR part 734 to the political activity of Federal employees and employees of the District of Columbia government. (5 U.S.C. 1212 and 1216. Advice concerning the Hatch Act Reform Amendments may be requested from the Office of Special Counsel:

(1) By letter addressed to the Office of Special Counsel at 1730 M Street NW., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, or

(2) By telephone on (202) 653-7188, or (1-800) 854-2824.

(b) The Merit Systems Protection Board has exclusive authority to determine whether a violation of the Hatch Act Reform Amendments of 1993, as implemented by 5 CFR part 734, has occurred and to impose a minimum penalty of suspension for 30 days and a maximum penalty of removal for violation of the political activity restrictions regulated by this part. (5 U.S.C. 1204 and 7326).

(c) The Office of Personnel Management is authorized to issue regulations describing the political activities which are permitted and prohibited under the Hatch Act Reform Amendments of 1993. (5 U.S.C. 1103, 1104, 7325; Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1978, 92 Stat. 3783, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. p. 323; and E.O. 12107, 3 CFR 1978 Comp. p. 264.)

[59 FR 48769, Sept. 23, 1994, as amended at 61 FR 35100, July 5, 1996]

§734.103   Multicandidate political committees of Federal labor organizations and Federal employee organizations.

(a) In order to qualify under this part, each multicandidate political committee of a Federal labor organization must provide to the Office the following:

(1) Information verifying that the multicandidate political committee is a multicandidate political committee as defined by 2 U.S.C. 441a(a)(4);

(2) Information identifying the Federal labor organization to which the multicandidate political committee is connected; and

(3) Information that identifies the Federal labor organization as a labor organization defined at 5 U.S.C. 7103(4).

(b) In order to qualify under this part, each multicandidate political committee of a Federal employee organization must provide to the Office the following:

(1) Information verifying that the multicandidate political committee is a multicandidate political committee as defined in 2 U.S.C. 441a(a)(4);

(2) Information identifying the Federal employee organization to which the multicandidate political committee is connected; and

(3) Information indicating that the multicandidate political committee was in existence as of October 6, 1993.

§734.104   Restriction of political activity.

No further proscriptions or restrictions may be imposed upon employees covered under this regulation except:

(a) Employees who are appointed by the President by and with the advice and consent of the Senate;

(b) Employees who are appointed by the President;

(c) Non-career senior executive service members;

(d) Schedule C employees, 5 CFR 213.3301, 213.3302; and

(e) Any other employees who serve at the pleasure of the President.

Subpart B—Permitted Activities

§734.201   Exclusion from coverage.

This subpart does not apply to employees in the agencies and positions described in subpart D of this part.

§734.202   Permitted activities.

Employees may take an active part in political activities, including political management and political campaigns, to the extent not expressly prohibited by law and this part.

§734.203   Participation in nonpartisan activities.

An employee may:

(a) Express his or her opinion privately and publicly on political subjects;

(b) Be politically active in connection with a question which is not specifically identified with a political party, such as a constitutional amendment, referendum, approval of a municipal ordinance or any other question or issue of a similar character;

(c) Participate in the nonpartisan activities of a civic, community, social, labor, or professional organization, or of a similar organization; and

(d) Participate fully in public affairs, except as prohibited by other Federal law, in a manner which does not compromise his or her efficiency or integrity as an employee or the neutrality, efficiency, or integrity of the agency or instrumentality of the United States Government or the District of Columbia Government in which he or she is employed.

Example 1: An employee may participate, including holding office, in any nonpartisan group. Such participation may include fundraising as long as the fundraising is not in any way connected with any partisan political issue, group, or candidate, and as long as the fundraising complies with part 2635 of this title as well as any other directives that may apply, e.g., the Federal Property Management Regulations in 41 CFR chapter 101.

Example 2: An employee, individually or collectively with other employees, may petition or provide information to Congress as provided in 5 U.S.C. 7211.

[59 FR 48769, Sept. 23, 1994, as amended at 61 FR 35100, July 5, 1996]

§734.204   Participation in political organizations.

An employee may:

(a) Be a member of a political party or other political group and participate in its activities;

(b) Serve as an officer of a political party or other political group, a member of a national, State, or local committee of a political party, an officer or member of a committee of a political group, or be a candidate for any of these positions;

(c) Attend and participate fully in the business of nominating caucuses of political parties;

(d) Organize or reorganize a political party organization or political group; and

(e) Participate in a political convention, rally, or other political gathering.

(f) Serve as a delegate, alternate, or proxy to a political party convention.

Example 1: An employee of the Department of Education may serve as a delegate, alternate, or proxy to a State or national party convention.

Example 2: A noncareer member of the Senior Executive Service, or other employee covered under this subpart, may serve as a vice-president of a political action committee, as long as the duties of the office do not involve personal solicitation, acceptance, or receipt of political contributions. Ministerial activities which precede or follow the official acceptance and receipt, such as handling, disbursing, or accounting for contributions are not covered under the definitions of accept and receive in §734.101. Sections 734.208 and 734.303 describe in detail permitted and prohibited activities which are related to fundraising.

Example 3: An employee of the Federal Communications Commission may make motions or place a name in nomination at a nominating caucus.

Example 4: An employee of the Department of the Interior may serve as an officer of a candidate's campaign committee as long as he does not personally solicit, accept, or receive political contributions. Sections 734.208 and 734.303 of this part describe in detail permitted and prohibited activities which are related to fundraising.

[59 FR 48769, Sept. 23, 1994, as amended at 61 FR 35100, July 5, 1996]

§734.205   Participation in political campaigns.

Subject to the prohibitions in §734.306, an employee may:

(a) Display pictures, signs, stickers, badges, or buttons associated with political parties, candidates for partisan political office, or partisan political groups, as long as these items are displayed in accordance with the provisions of §734.306 of subpart C of this part;

(b) Initiate or circulate a nominating petition for a candidate for partisan political office;

(c) Canvass for votes in support of or in opposition to a partisan political candidate or a candidate for political party office;

(d) Endorse or oppose a partisan political candidate or a candidate for political party office in a political advertisement, broadcast, campaign literature, or similar material;

(e) Address a convention, caucus, rally, or similar gathering of a political party or political group in support of or in opposition to a partisan political candidate or a candidate for political party office; and

(f) Take an active part in managing the political campaign of a partisan political candidate or a candidate for political party office.

Example 1: An employee of the Environmental Protection Agency may broadcast endorsements for a partisan political candidate via a public address system attached to his or her private automobile.

Example 2: An employee of the Department of Interior may canvass voters by telephone on behalf of a political party or partisan political candidate.

Example 3: An employee of the Department of Agriculture may stand outside of polling places on election day and hand out brochures on behalf of a partisan political candidate or political party.

Example 4: An employee may appear in a television or radio broadcast which endorses a partisan political candidate and is sponsored by the candidate's campaign committee, a political party, or a partisan political group.

Example 5: An independent contractor is not covered by this part and may display a political button while performing the duties for which he or she is contracted.

Example 6: An employee of the Department of Commerce who is on official travel may take annual leave in the morning to give an address at a breakfast for a candidate for partisan political office.

Example 7: An employee may manage the political campaign of a candidate for public office including supervising paid and unpaid campaign workers.

Example 8: While not on duty, a Federal employee may distribute campaign leaflets by hand to homes or parked cars even though the leaflet may contain information concerning where to send contributions among other factual material about a partisan political candidate. However, should a member of the public stop the employee and request further information about contributions, the employee should refer that request to another campaign worker who is not a Federal employee.

Example 9: An employee may place in his or her front yard a sign or banner supporting a partisan political candidate.

[59 FR 48769, Sept. 23, 1994, as amended at 61 FR 35100, July 5, 1996]

§734.206   Participation in elections.

An employee may:

(a) Register and vote in any election;

(b) Act as recorder, watcher, challenger, or similar officer at polling places;

(c) Serve as an election judge or clerk, or in a similar position; and

(d) Drive voters to polling places for a partisan political candidate, partisan political group, or political party.

Example: An employee may drive voters to polling places in a privately owned vehicle, but not in a Government-owned or leased vehicle.

§734.207   Candidacy for public office.

An employee may:

(a) Run as an independent candidate in a partisan election covered by 5 CFR part 733; and

(b) Run as a candidate in a nonpartisan election.

Example 1: An employee who is a candidate for public office in a nonpartisan election is not barred by the Hatch Act from soliciting, accepting, or receiving political contributions for his or her own campaign; however, such solicitation, acceptance, or receipt must comply with part 2635 of this title as well as any other directives that may apply, e.g., The Federal Property Management Regulations in 41 CFR chapter 101.

§734.208   Participation in fundraising.

(a) An employee may make a political contribution to a political party, political group, campaign committee of a candidate for public office in a partisan election and multicandidate political committee of a Federal labor or Federal employee organization.

(b) Subject to the prohibitions stated in section 734.303, an employee may—

(1) Attend a political fundraiser;

(2) Accept and receive political contributions in a partisan election described in 5 CFR part 733;

(3) Solicit, accept, or receive uncompensated volunteer services from any individual; and

(4) Solicit, accept, or receive political contributions, as long as:

(i) The person who is solicited for a political contribution belongs to the same Federal labor organization, or Federal employee organization, as the employee who solicits, accepts, or receives the contribution;

(ii) The person who is solicited for a political contribution is not a subordinate employee; and

(iii) The request is for a contribution to the multicandidate political committee of a Federal labor organization or to the multicandidate political committee of a Federal employee organization in existence on October 6, 1993.

(c) Subject to the provisions of §734.306, an employee may make a financial contribution to a political action committee through a voluntary allotment made under §550.311(b) of this chapter, if the head of the employee's agency permits agency employees to make such allotments to political action committees.

(d) An employee who is covered under this subpart and is a payroll official in an agency where employees are permitted to make allotments to political action committees may process the completed direct deposit forms for voluntary allotments which have been made to such committees under section 550.311(b) of this title.

Example 1: An GS-12 employee of the Department of Treasury who belongs to the same Federal employee organization as a GS-5 employee of the Department of Treasury may solicit a contribution for the multicandidate political committee when she is not on duty as long as the GS-5 employee is not under the supervisory authority of the GS-12 employee.

Example 2: An employee of the National Park Service may give a speech or keynote address at a political fundraiser when he is not on duty, as long as the employee does not solicit political contributions, as prohibited in §734.303(b) of this part.

Example 3: An employee's name may appear on an invitation to a political fundraiser as a guest speaker as long as the reference in no way suggests that the employee solicits or encourages contributions, as prohibited in §734.303 of this part and described in example 2 thereunder. However, the employee's official title may not appear on invitations to any political fundraiser, except that an employee who is ordinarily addressed using a general term of address, such as “The Honorable,” may use or permit the use of that term of address for such purposes.

Example 4: When an employee of the Department of Transportation is not on duty, he or she may engage in activities which do not require personal solicitations of contributions, such as organizing mail or phone solicitations for political contributions. Activities such as stuffing envelopes with requests for political contributions also are permitted. However, he or she may not sign the solicitation letter unless the solicitation is for the contribution of uncompensated volunteer services of individuals who are not subordinate employees. An employee may not knowingly send to his or her subordinate employees a letter soliciting the contribution of their uncompensated services. However, he or she may sign a letter that solicits contributions of uncompensated volunteer services as part of a general mass mailing that might reach a subordinate employee, as long as the mass mailing is not specifically targeted to his or her subordinate employees.

Example 5: An employee who is not on duty may participate in a phone bank soliciting the uncompensated services of individuals. However, an employee may not make phone solicitations for political contributions even anonymously.

Example 6: An employee of the Department of Agriculture who is on official travel and is not in a pay status nor officially representing the Department may write invitations in his hotel room to a meet-the-candidate reception which he plans to hold in his home.

Example 7: An employee may serve as an officer or chairperson of a political fundraising organization or committee as long as he or she does not personally solicit, accept, or receive political contributions. For example, the employee may organize or manage fundraising activities as long as he or she does not violate the above prohibition.

Example 8: The head of a cabinet-level department may contribute one of her worn-out cowboy boots to the campaign committee of a Senatorial candidate to be auctioned off in a fundraising raffle for the benefit of the candidate's campaign.

Example 9: An employee may help organize a fundraiser including supplying names for the invitation list as long as he or she does not personally solicit, accept, or receive contributions.

Example 10: An employee on travel may engage in political activity when he or she is not on duty without taking annual leave.

Example 11: A Federal employee may solicit, accept, or receive the uncompensated volunteer services of any individual, except a subordinate employee, to work on behalf of a partisan political candidate or organization. However, such solicitation, acceptance, or receipt must comply with part 2635 of this title as well as any other directives that may apply, e.g., the Federal Property Management Regulations in 41 CFR chapter 101. Further, Federal employees are subject to criminal anti-coercion provisions found at 18 U.S.C. 610.

Example 12: An employee who desires to make a financial contribution to a political action committee through a voluntary allotment personally may obtain blank direct deposit forms from his or her payroll office. However, he or she may not complete the form while he or she is on duty, on Federal property, or in a Federally owned or leased vehicle. Moreover, he or she may not personally deliver his or her completed form, or the completed form of another employee, to the payroll office. However, the employee may mail his or her direct deposit form to his or her agency payroll office.

Example 13: Employees who are permitted to solicit, accept, or receive political contributions under the circumstances described in §734.208(b)(4) may not solicit, accept, or receive such contributions either while they are on duty, or while they are on Federal premises, or both.

[59 FR 48769, Sept. 23, 1994, as amended at 61 FR 35100, July 5, 1996]

Subpart C—Prohibited Activities

§734.301   Exclusion from coverage.

This subpart does not apply to employees in the agencies and positions described in subpart D of this part.

§734.302   Use of official authority; prohibition.

(a) An employee may not use his or her official authority or influence for the purpose of interfering with or affecting the result of an election.

(b) Activities prohibited by paragraph (a) of this section include, but are not limited to:

(1) Using his or her official title while participating in political activity;

(2) Using his or her authority to coerce any person to participate in political activity; and

(3) Soliciting, accepting, or receiving uncompensated individual volunteer services from a subordinate for any political purpose.

Example 1: An employee who signs a letter seeking uncompensated volunteer services from individuals may not identify himself or herself by using his or her official title. However, the employee may use a general form of address, such as “The Honorable.”

Example 2: A noncareer member of the Senior Executive Service, or another employee covered by this subpart, may not ask his or her subordinate employees to provide uncompensated individual volunteer services for a political party, partisan political group, or candidate for partisan political office. Moreover, he or she may not accept or receive such services from a subordinate employee who offers to donate them.

Example 3: An employee may not require any person to contribute to a partisan political campaign in order to win a Federal contract:

[61 FR 35100, July 5, 1996]

§734.303   Fundraising.

An employee may not knowingly:

(a) Personally solicit, accept or receive a political contribution from another person, except under the circumstances specified in §734.208(b);

(b) Personally solicit political contributions in a speech or keynote address given at a fundraiser;

(c) Allow his or her official title to be used in connection with fundraising activities; or

(d) Solicit, accept, or receive uncompensated volunteer services from an individual who is a subordinate.

Example 1: An employee may not host a fundraiser at his or her home. However, a spouse who is not covered under this part may host such a fundraiser and the employee may attend. The employee may not personally solicit contributions to the fundraiser. Moreover, the employee may not accept, or receive political contributions, except under the circumstances stated in §734.208(b).

Example 2: An employee's name may not appear on an invitation to a fundraiser as a sponsor of the fundraiser, or as a point of contact for the fundraiser.

Example 3: An employee may not ask a subordinate employee to volunteer on behalf of a partisan political campaign.

Example 4: An employee may not call the personnel office of a business or corporation and request that the corporation or business provide volunteers or services for a campaign. However, an employee may call an individual who works for a business or corporation and request that specific individual's services for a campaign.

§734.304   Candidacy for public office.

An employee may not run for the nomination or as a candidate for election to partisan political office, except as specified in §734.207.

§734.305   Soliciting or discouraging the political participation of certain persons.

(a) An employee may not knowingly solicit or discourage the participation in any political activity of any person who has an application for any compensation grant, contract, ruling, license, permit, or certificate pending before the employee's employing office.

(b) An employee may not knowingly solicit or discourage the participation in any political activity of any person who is the subject of, or a participant in, an ongoing audit, investigation, or enforcement action being carried out by the employee's employing office.

(c) Each agency or instrumentality of the United States or District of Columbia Government shall determine when a matter is pending and ongoing within employing offices of the agency or instrumentality for the purposes of this part.

Example 1: An employee with agency-wide responsibility may address a large, diverse group to seek support for a partisan political candidate as long as the group has not been specifically targeted as having matters before the employing office.

Example 2: An employee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) may not solicit or discourage the participation of an insured financial institution or its employees if the institution is undergoing examination by the FDIC.

Example 3: An employee of the Food and Drug Administration may address a banquet for a partisan political candidate which is sponsored by the candidate's campaign committee, even though the audience includes three individuals who are employed by or are officials of a pharmaceutical company. However, she may not deliver the address if the banquet is sponsored by a lobbying group for pharmaceutical companies, of if she knows that the audience will be composed primarily of employees or officials of such companies.

§734.306   Participation in political activities while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties, or using a Federal vehicle.

(a) An employee may not participate in political activities subject to the provisions of subpart E of this part:

(1) While he or she is on duty;

(2) While he or she is wearing a uniform, badge, insignia, or other similar item that identifies the employing agency or instrumentality or the position of the employee;

(3) While he or she is in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties by an individual employed or holding office in the Government of the United States or any agency or instrumentality thereof; or

(4) While using a Government-owned or leased vehicle or while using a privately-owned vehicle in the discharge of official duties.

(b) The prohibitions in paragraph (a) of this section do not apply to employees covered under subpart E of this part.

Example 1: While on leave without pay, an employee is not subject to the prohibition in §734.306(a)(1) because he or she is not on duty. However, while on leave without pay, the employee remains subject to the other prohibitions in subpart C.

Example 2: A Postal Service employee who uses her private vehicle to deliver mail may place a political bumper sticker on the vehicle, as long as she covers the bumper sticker while she is on duty.

Example 3: An employee who uses his or her privately owned vehicle on a recurrent basis for official business may place a partisan political bumper sticker on the vehicle, as long as he or she covers the bumper sticker while the vehicle is being used for official duties.

Example 4: An employee who uses his or her privately owned vehicle on official business, must cover any partisan political bumper sticker while the vehicle is being used for official duties, if the vehicle is clearly identified as being on official business.

Example 5: A noncareer member of the Senior Executive Service, or any other employee covered by this subpart, who uses his or her privately owned vehicle only on an occasional basis to drive to another Federal agency for a meeting, or to take a training course, is not required to cover a partisan political bumper sticker on his or her vehicle.

Example 6: An employee may not place a partisan political bumper sticker on any Government owned or Government leased vehicle.

Example 7: An employee may place a bumper sticker on his or her privately owned vehicle and park his or her vehicle in a parking lot of an agency or instrumentality of the United States Government or in a non-Federal facility for which the employee receives a subsidy from his or her employing agency or instrumentality.

Example 8: When an agency or instrumentality of the United States Government leases offices in a commercial building and that building includes the headquarters of a candidate for partisan political office, an employee of that agency or instrumentality may do volunteer work, when he or she is not on duty, at the candidate's headquarters and in other areas of the building that have not been leased by the Government.

Example 9: A Government agency or instrumentality leases all of the space in a commercial building; employees may not participate in political activity in the public areas of the leased building.

Example 10: An employee of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) may not engage in political activities while wearing a NASA flight patch, NASA twenty-year pin or anything with an official NASA insignia.

Example 11: If a political event begins while an employee is on duty and continues into the time when he or she is not on duty, the employee must wait until he or she is not on duty to attend the event. Alternatively, an employee may request annual leave to attend the political event when it begins.

Example 12: Officials of labor organizations who have been given official time to perform representational duties are on duty.

Example 13: An employee may stuff envelopes for a mailing on behalf of a candidate for partisan political office while the employee is sitting in the park during his or her lunch period if he or she is not considered to be on duty during his or her lunch period.

Example 14: An employee who works at home may engage in political activities at home when he or she is not in a pay status or representing the Government in an official capacity.

Example 15: An employee who is appointed by the President by and with the advice and consent of the Senate (PAS) may attend a political event with any non-PAS employee whose official duties do not require accompanying the PAS as long as the non-PAS employee is not on duty.

Example 16: A noncareer member of the Senior Executive Service, or any other employee covered by this subpart, may not wear partisan political buttons or display partisan political pictures, signs, stickers, or badges while he or she is on duty or at his or her place of work.

Example 17: An employee may not engage in political activity in the cafeteria of a Federal building, even if the cafeteria is in space leased by a contractor.

Example 18: An employee who contributes financially to a political action committee through a voluntary allotment made under §550.311(b) of this title may not complete the direct deposit forms while he or she is on duty, in a “room or building” defined in §734.101 or in a Federally owned or leased vehicle.

Example 19: An employee who contributes financially to a political action committee through a voluntary allotment may not personally deliver his or her completed direct deposit form, or the completed direct deposit form of another employee, to the payroll employees who would process or administer such forms. However, the employee may mail his or her direct deposit form to his or her agency payroll office.

[59 FR 48769, Sept. 23, 1994, as amended at 61 FR 35101, July 5, 1996]

§734.307   Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

An employee covered under this subpart who is the spouse or family member of either a candidate for partisan political office, candidate for political party office, or candidate for public office in a nonpartisan election, is subject to the same prohibitions as other employees covered under this subpart.

Example 1: An employee who is married to a candidate for partisan political office may attend a fundraiser for his or her spouse, stand in the receiving line, sit at the head table, and urge others to vote for his or her spouse. However, the employee may not personally solicit, accept, or receive contributions of money or the paid or unpaid services of a business or corporation, or sell or collect money for tickets to the fundraiser.

Example 2: An employee who is the daughter of a candidate for partisan political office may appear in a family photograph which is printed in a campaign flier. She may distribute fliers at a campaign rally as long as she does not personally solicit contributions.

Example 3: An employee who is married to a candidate for political partisan political office may appear with her spouse in a political advertisement or a broadcast, and urge others to vote for her spouse, as long as the employee does not personally solicit political contributions.

[59 FR 48769, Sept. 23, 1994, as amended at 61 FR 35101, July 5, 1996]

Subpart D—Employees in Certain Agencies and Positions

§734.401   Coverage.

(a) This subpart applies to employees in the following agencies and positions:

(1) The Federal Election Commission;

(2) The Federal Bureau of Investigation;

(3) The Secret Service;

(4) The Central Intelligence Agency;

(5) The National Security Council;

(6) The National Security Agency;

(7) The Defense Intelligence Agency;

(8) The Merit Systems Protection Board;

(9) The Office of Special Counsel;

(10) The Office of Criminal Investigation of the Internal Revenue Service.

(11) The Office of Investigative Programs of the United States Customs Service;

(12) The Office of Law Enforcement of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms;

(13) The Criminal Division of the Department of Justice;

(14) The Central Imagery Office;

(15) Career Senior Executive Service positions described in 5 U.S.C. 3132(a)(4);

(16) Administrative Law Judge positions described in 5 U.S.C. 5372;

(17) Contract Appeals Board Member positions described in 5 U.S.C. 5372a.

(b) Employees appointed by the President by and with the advice and consent of the Senate in the agencies and positions described in paragraph (a) of this section are excluded from coverage under this subpart.

(c) All employees covered under this subpart are free to engage in political activity to the widest extent consistent with the restrictions imposed by law and this subpart.

[59 FR 48769, Sept. 23, 1994, as amended at 61 FR 35101, July 5, 1996]

§734.402   Expression of an employee's individual opinion.

Each employee covered under this subpart retains the right to participate in any of the following political activities, as long as such activity is not performed in concert with a political party, partisan political group, or a candidate for partisan political office:

(a) Express his or her opinion as an individual privately and publicly on political subjects and candidates;

(b) Display a political picture, sign, sticker, badge, or button, as long as these items are displayed in accordance with the provisions of §734.406;

(c) Sign a political petition as an individual;

(d) Be politically active in connection with a question which is not specifically identified with a political party, such as a constitutional amendment, referendum, approval of a municipal ordinance, or any other question or issue of a similar character; and

(e) Otherwise participate fully in public affairs, except as prohibited by other Federal law, in a manner which does not compromise his or her efficiency or integrity as an employee or the neutrality, efficiency, or integrity of the agency or instrumentality of the United States Government in which he or she is employed.

Example 1: An employee may purchase air time on a radio or television station to endorse a partisan political candidate. However, he or she may not endorse such a candidate in a commercial or program which is sponsored by the candidate's campaign committee, a political party, or a partisan political group.

Example 2: An employee may address a political convention or rally but not on behalf, or at the request of, a political party, partisan political group, or an individual who is running for the nomination or as a candidate for election to partisan political office.

Example 3: An employee may print at her own expense one thousand fliers which state her personal opinion that a partisan political candidate is the best suited for the job. She may distribute the fliers at a shopping mall on the weekend. However, she may not distribute fliers printed by the candidate's campaign committee, a political party, or a partisan political group.

Example 4: An employee may place in his or her yard a sign supporting a candidate for partisan political office.

Example 5: An employee may stand outside of a political party convention with a homemade sign which states his or her individual opinion that one of the candidates for nomination is the best qualified candidate.

Example 6: An employee, including a career SES employee, may wear a button with a partisan political theme when the employee is not on duty or at his or her place of work.

[59 FR 48769, Sept. 23, 1994, as amended at 61 FR 35101, July 5, 1996]

§734.403   Participation in elections.

Each employee covered under this subpart retains the right to:

(a) Register and vote in any election;

(b) Take an active part, as a candidate or in support of a candidate, in a nonpartisan election; and

(c) Serve as an election judge or clerk, or in a similar position, to perform nonpartisan duties as prescribed by State or local law.

§734.404   Participation in political organizations.

(a) Each employee covered under this subpart retains the right to:

(1) Participate in the nonpartisan activities of a civic, community, social, labor, or professional organization, or of a similar organization;

(2) Be a member of a political party or other partisan political group and participate in its activities to the extent consistent with other Federal law;

(3) Attend a political convention, rally, fund-raising function, or other political gathering; and

(4) Make a financial contribution to a political party, partisan political group, or to the campaign committee of a candidate for partisan political office.

(b) Subject to the provisions in §734.406, an employee covered under this subpart may make a financial contribution to a political action committee through a voluntary allotment made under §550.311(b) of this chapter if the head of the employee's agency permits agency employees to make such allotments to political action committees.

(c) An employee who is covered under this subpart and is a payroll official in an agency where employees are permitted to make allotments to political action committees may process the completed direct deposit forms for voluntary allotments which have been made to such committees under §550.311(b) of this chapter.

Example 1: An employee, or a noncareer SES employee who is subject to subpart D of part 734, may attend a political convention or rally solely as a spectator. However, the employee and noncareer SES employee may not participate in demonstrations or parades which are sponsored by a political party, a partisan political group, or an individual who is running for nomination to be a candidate for partisan political office.

Example 2: An employee may attend a political party's annual barbecue, but he or she may not organize, distribute invitations to, or sell tickets to the barbecue.

Example 3: An employee who desires to contribute to a political action committee through an allotment personally may obtain blank direct deposit forms from his or her payroll office. The employee may not complete the direct deposit form while he or she is on duty, on Federal property, or in a Federally owned or leased vehicle. The employee also may not personally deliver his or her completed direct deposit form, or the completed direct deposit form of another employee, to his or her payroll office. However, the employee may mail the completed form to his or her agency payroll office.

[61 FR 35101, July 5, 1996]

§734.405   Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

An employee covered under this subpart who is the spouse or family member of either a candidate for partisan political office, or a candidate for political party office, may appear in photographs of the candidate's family which might appear in a political advertisement, a broadcast, campaign literature, or similar material. A spouse or a family member who is covered by the Hatch Act Reform Amendments also may attend political functions with the candidate. However, the spouse or family member may not distribute campaign literature or solicit, accept, or receive political contributions.

Example 1: An employee who is the spouse of a candidate for partisan political office may stand in the receiving line and sit at the head table during a political dinner honoring the spouse.

Example 2: An employee who is the daughter of a candidate for partisan political office may appear in a family photograph which is printed in a campaign flier, but she may not distribute the flier at a campaign rally.

§734.406   Participation in political activities while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties, or using a Federal vehicle; prohibition.

(a) An employee covered under this subpart may not participate in political activities:

(1) While he or she is on duty;

(2) While he or she is wearing a uniform, badge, or insignia that identifies the employing agency or instrumentality or the position of the employee;

(3) While he or she is in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties by an individual employed or holding office in the Government of the United States or any agency or instrumentality thereof; or

(4) While using a Government-owned or leased vehicle or while using a privately owned vehicle in the discharge of official duties.

Example 1: An employee who uses his or her privately owned vehicle on a recurrent basis for official business may place a bumper sticker on the vehicle, as long as he or she covers the bumper sticker while the vehicle is being used for official duties.

Example 2: An employee who uses his or her privately owned vehicle on official business, must cover any partisan political bumper sticker while the vehicle is being used for official duties, if the vehicle is clearly identified as being on official business.

Example 3: An employee or career SES employee who uses his or her privately owned vehicle only on an occasional basis to drive to another Federal agency for a meeting, or to take a training course, if not required to cover a partisan political bumper sticker on his or her vehicle.

Example 4: An employee may not place a partisan political bumper sticker on any Government owned or Government leased vehicle.

Example 5: An employee may place a bumper sticker on his or her privately owned vehicle and park the vehicle in a parking lot of an agency or instrumentality of the United States Government or in a non-Federal facility for which the employee receives a subsidy from his or her employing agency or instrumentality.

Example 6: An employee, or noncareer SES employee who is subject to subpart D of this part 734, may not wear partisan political buttons or display partisan political pictures, signs, stickers, or badges while he or she is on duty or at his or her place of work.

Example 7: An employee who contributes financially to a political action committee through a voluntary allotment made under §550.311(b) of this title may not complete the direct deposit forms while he or she is on duty, in a “room or building” defined in §734.101, or in a Federally owned or leased vehicle.

Example 8: An employee who contributes financially to a political action committee may not personally deliver his or her completed direct deposit form, or the completed direct deposit form of another employee, to the payroll employees who would process or administer such forms. However, the employee may mail his or her direct deposit form to his or her agency payroll office.

(b) [Reserved]

[59 FR 48769, Sept. 23, 1994, as amended at 61 FR 35102, July 5, 1996]

§734.407   Use of official authority; prohibition.

An employee covered under this subpart may not use his or her official authority or influence for the purpose of interfering with or affecting the result of an election.

§734.408   Participation in political management and political campaigning; prohibitions.

An employee covered under this subpart may not take an active part in political management or in a political campaign, except as permitted by subpart D of this part.

[61 FR 35102, July 5, 1996]

§734.409   Participation in political organizations; prohibitions.

An employee covered under this subpart may not:

(a) Serve as an officer of a political party, a member of a national, State, or local committee of a political party, an officer or member of a committee of a partisan political group, or be a candidate for any of these positions;

(b) Organize or reorganize a political party organization or partisan political group;

(c) Serve as a delegate, alternate, or proxy to a political party convention; and

(d) Address a convention, caucus, rally, or similar gathering of a political party or partisan political group in support of or in opposition to a candidate for partisan political office or political party office, if such address is done in concert with such a candidate, political party, or partisan political group.

§734.410   Participation in political fundraising; prohibitions.

An employee covered under this subpart may not:

(a) Solicit, accept, or receive political contributions; or

(b) Organize, sell tickets to, promote, or actively participate in a fundraising activity of a candidate for partisan political office or of a political party, or partisan political group.

§734.411   Participation in political campaigning; prohibitions.

An employee covered under this subpart may not:

(a) Take an active part in managing the political campaign of a candidate for partisan political office or a candidate for political party office;

(b) Campaign for partisan political office;

(c) Canvass for votes in support of or in opposition to a candidate for partisan political office or a candidate for political party office, if such canvassing is done in concert with such a candidate, or of a political party, or partisan political group;

(d) Endorse or oppose a candidate for partisan political office or a candidate for political party office in a political advertisement, broadcast, campaign literature, or similar material if such endorsement or opposition is done in concert with such a candidate, political party, or partisan political group;

(e) Initiate or circulate a partisan nominating petition.

§734.412   Participation in elections; prohibitions.

An employee covered under this subpart may not:

(a) Be a candidate for partisan political office;

(b) Act as recorder, watcher, challenger, or similar officer at polling places in concert with a political party, partisan political group, or a candidate for partisan political office;

(c) Drive voters to polling places in concert with a political party, partisan political group, or a candidate for partisan political office.

[59 FR 48769, Sept. 23, 1994, as amended at 61 FR 35102, July 5, 1996]

§734.413   Employees of the Federal Election Commission; prohibitions.

(a) An employee of the Federal Election Commission may not request or receive from, or give to, an employee, a Member of Congress, or an officer of a uniformed service a political contribution.

(b) This section does not cover employee of the Federal Election Commission who are appointed by the President by and with the advice and consent of the Senate.

Subpart E—Special Provisions for Certain Presidential Appointees and Employees Paid from the Appropriation for the Executive Office of the President

§734.501   Permitted and prohibited activities.

Except as otherwise specified in this part 734, employees who are appointed by the President by and with the advice and consent of the Senate are subject to the provisions of subparts B and C of this part.

§734.502   Participation in political activity while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties, or using a Federal vehicle.

(a) This section applies to an employee:

(1) The duties and responsibilities of whose position continue outside normal duty hours and while away from the normal duty post; and

(2) Who is—

(i) An employee paid from an appropriation for the Executive Office of President; or

(ii) An employee appointed by the President by and with the advice and consent of the Senate whose position is located within the United States, who determines policies to be pursued by the United States in relations with foreign powers or in the nationwide administration of Federal laws;

(b) For the purposes of this subpart, normal duty hours and normal duty post will be determined by the head of each agency or instrumentality of the United States or District of Columbia Government.

(c) An employee described in paragraph (a) of this section may participate, subject to any restrictions that may be imposed in accordance with §734.104, in political activities:

(1) While he or she is on duty;

(2) While he or she is wearing a uniform, badge, or insignia that identifies the agency or instrumentality of the United States Government or the position of the employee;

(3) While he or she is in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties by an individual employed or holding office in the Government of the United States or any agency or instrumentality thereof; or

(4) While using a Government-owned or leased vehicle or while using a privately-owned vehicle in the discharge of official duties.

(d) An employee, to whom subpart E of this part does not apply, who is not on duty may participate in political activities in rooms of the White House or the Residence of the Vice President which are part of the Residence area or which are not regularly used solely in the discharge of official duties.

Example 1: An Inspector General is appointed under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. According to section 3(c) of that Act, he or she does not qualify as an employee who determines policies to be pursued by the United States in the nationwide administration of Federal laws. therefore, he or she may not participate in political activities while on duty, while wearing a uniform, badge, or insignia that identifies his or her office or position, while in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties, or while using a Government-owned or leased vehicle or while using a privately-owned vehicle in the discharge of official duties.

Example 2: An employee who is covered by this subpart and wears a uniform as an incident of her office may wear the uniform while she is giving a speech at a political fundraiser.

Example 3: The head of an executive department may hold a partisan political meeting or host a reception which is not a fundraiser in his conference room during normal business hours.

Example 4: An employee accompanies the Secretary of Transportation to a political party convention as part of the Secretary's security or administrative detail. The employee is considered to be on duty while protecting or performing official duties for the Secretary regardless of the nature of the function that the Secretary is attending.

Example 5: An American Ambassador overseas obtains authorization from the Department of State to depart post in order to take a vacation away from post. During the period she is authorized to be on vacation away from post, she is not considered to be on duty for the purpose of the Hatch Act Reform Amendments and may engage in any political activity permitted under the Hatch Act Reform Amendments of 1993.

[59 FR 48769, Sept. 23, 1994, as amended at 61 FR 35102, July 5, 1996]

§734.503   Allocation and reimbursement of costs associated with political activities.

(a) The costs associated with the political activities described in §733.502(c) of this chapter may not be paid for by money derived from the Treasury of the United States. Costs associated with a political activity are deemed not to be paid for by money derived from the Treasury of the United States if the Treasury is reimbursed for the costs within a reasonable period of time.

(b) For the purposes of this section, costs associated with a political activity do not include any costs that the Government would have or have incurred regardless of whether the activity was political. Examples of such costs are:

(1) The compensation of the employee described in §734.502(a);

(2) The value of any office or other real property owned or leased by the Government;

(3) The compensation and expenses of any Government employee that is required in the performance of his or her duties to accompany or assist the person engaging in the political activity; and

(4) The cost of special security arrangements for the person engaging in the political activity, including special transportation vehicles or methods.

(c)(1) An employee covered under this subpart must apportion the costs of mixed travel based on the time spent on political activities and the time spent performing official duties. Prorating the cost of travel involves determining the “total activity time” which is the amount of time actually spent by the employee in meetings, receptions, rallies, and similar activities. Time spent in actual travel, private study, or rest and recreation is not included in the computation of the “total activity time”. The proration of the cost then is determined based on how the “total activity time” was spent. The formula is as follows:

Time spent in official meetings, receptions, etc. + Time spent in political meetings, receptions, rallies = Total activity time

Time spent in official activity ÷ Total activity time = Percentage of trip that is official

Time spent in political activity ÷ Total activity time = Percentage of trip that is political

The percentage figure that represents the political portion of the trip is then multiplied by the amount that would be reimbursed to the Government if all of the travel was political. The product of that calculation represents the amount to be paid by the political entity or organization.

(2) The allocation method must be applied to all of the relevant costs of mixed travel.

(3) Expenses that are associated specifically with a political activity and not with any official activity must be treated as political, and expenses associated specifically with an official activity and not with any political activity must be treated as official.

(4) In allocating the costs of travel other than air travel, the allocation formula should be applied to any Government maximum for that type of expenditure.

(5) The determination of the proper amount of allocation must be based on the facts and circumstances involved.

(6) In the event that a minor, clearly incidental percentage of the activity of a mixed trip is devoted to either official or political activity, e.g. less than 3%, the entire trip should be treated as if it was wholly of the type represented by the substantial figure. The balance should be treated as de minimis and need not be reimbursed as political or charged as official.

(d) For any cost of a political activity of an employee that is required to be reported to the Federal Election Commission under the Federal Election Campaign Act (FECA) or the Presidential Election Campaign Fund Act (PECFA), the employee shall use the same method of allocation as used under the FECA or PECFA and regulations thereunder in lieu of the allocation method in paragraph (c) of this section.

Example 1: The Secretary, an employee described by section 7324(b)(2) of title 5 of the United States Code, holds a catered political activity (other than a fundraiser) in her office. Her security detail attends the reception as part of their duty to provide security for her. The Secretary will not be in violation of the Hatch Act Reform Amendments if the costs of her office, her compensation, and her security detail are not reimbursed to the Treasury. A violation of the Hatch Act Amendments occurs if Government funds, including reception or discretionary funds, are used to cater the political activity, unless the Treasury is reimbursed for the cost of the catering within a reasonable time.

Example 2: There should be no allocation between official and political funds for a sound system rented for a single event.

Example 3: If on a mixed trip a Government employee is only entitled to $26 per diem for food on a wholly official trip and the trip is 50% political and 50% official, the Government share would be 50% of $26, not 50% of the actual amount spent.

Example 4: The President is transported by special motorcade to and from the site of the political event. The expense of the motorcade is for special security arrangements. Thus, it would not be a violation of the Hatch Act Reform Amendments if the costs of the security arrangements, including the cost of the motorcade, are not reimbursed to the Treasury.

§734.504   Contributions to political action committees through voluntary payroll allotments prohibited.

An employee described in §734.502(a) may not financially contribute to a political action committee through a voluntary allotment made under §550.311(b) of this title.

[61 FR 35102, July 5, 1996]

Subpart F—Employees Who Work on An Irregular or Occasional Basis

§734.601   Employees who work on an irregular or occasional basis.

An employee who works on an irregular or occasional basis or is a special Government employee as defined in 18 U.S.C. 202(a) is subject to the provisions of the applicable subpart of this part when he or she is on duty.

Example: An employee appointed to a special commission or task force who does not have a regular tour of duty may run as a partisan political candidate, but may actively campaign only when he or she is not on duty.

Subpart G—Related Statutes and Executive Orders

§734.701   General.

In addition to the provisions regulating political activity set forth in subparts A through G of this part, there are a number of statutes and Executive orders that establish standards to which the political activity of an employee, a Federal labor organization, a Federal employee organization, and a multicandidate political committee must conform. The list set forth in §734.702 references some of the more significant of those statutes. It is not comprehensive and includes only references to statutes of general applicability.

§734.702   Related statutes and Executive orders.

(a) The prohibition against offering anything of value in consideration of the use or promise of use of influence to procure appointive office (18 U.S.C. 210).

(b) The prohibition against solicitation or acceptance of anything of value to obtain public office for another (18 U.S.C. 211).

(c) The prohibition against intimidating, threatening, or coercing voters in Federal elections (18 U.S.C. 594).

(d) The prohibition against use of official authority to interfere with a Federal election by a person employed in any administrative position by the United States in connection with any activity financed in whole or in part by Federal funds (18 U.S.C. 595).

(e) The prohibition against the promise of employment, compensation, or benefits from Federal funds in exchange for political activity (18 U.S.C. 600).

(f) The prohibition against the deprivation of or threat of deprivation of employment in exchange for political contributions (18 U.S.C. 601).

(g) The prohibition against soliciting political contributions (18 U.S.C. 602).

(h) The prohibition against making certain political contributions (18 U.S.C. 603).

(i) The prohibition against soliciting or receiving assessments, subscriptions, or contributions for political purposes from persons on Federal relief or work relief (18 U.S.C. 604).

(j) The prohibition against disclosing and receiving lists or names of persons on relief for political purposes (18 U.S.C. 605).

(k) The prohibition against intimidating employees to give or withhold a political contribution (18 U.S.C. 606).

(l) The prohibition against soliciting political contributions in navy yards, forts, or arsenals (18 U.S.C. 607).

(m) The prohibition against coercing employees of the Federal Government to engage in, or not to engage in, any political activity (18 U.S.C. 610).

(n) The prohibition against certain personnel practices (5 U.S.C. 2302).

(o) The prohibition against making, requesting, considering, or accepting political recommendations (5 U.S.C. 3303).

(p) The prohibitions against misuse of a Government vehicle (31 U.S.C. 1344).

(q) The requirements and prohibitions stated in the Federal Election Campaign Act (2 U.S.C. 431-455).

(r) The prohibitions against soliciting for gifts to superiors, giving donations for such gifts, and accepting gifts from employees who receive a lower rate of pay (5 U.S.C. 7351).

(s) The prohibitions against soliciting or accepting things of value from specified persons (5 U.S.C. 7353).

(t) The prohibitions and requirements stated in the Ethics in Government Act of 1978 (5 U.S.C. App.) and Executive Order 12674 (54 FR 15159-15162; 3 CFR 1989 Comp. 215-218) as modified by Executive Order 12731 (55 FR 42547-42550; 3 CFR 1990 Comp. 306-311).



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