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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of October 17, 2014

Title 47Chapter ISubchapter D → Part 87


Title 47: Telecommunication


PART 87—AVIATION SERVICES


Contents

Subpart A—General Information

§87.1   Basis and purpose.
§87.3   Other applicable rule parts.
§87.5   Definitions.

Subpart B—Applications and Licenses

§87.17   Scope.
§87.18   Station license required.
§87.19   Basic eligibility.
§87.25   Filing of applications.
§87.27   License term.
§87.29   Partial grant of application.
§87.35   Cancellation of license.
§87.39   Equipment acceptable for licensing.
§87.41   Frequencies.
§87.43   Operation during emergency.
§87.45   Time in which station is placed in operation.
§87.47   Application for a portable aircraft station license.
§87.51   Aircraft earth station commissioning.

Subpart C—Operating Requirements and Procedures

Operating Requirements

§87.69   Maintenance tests.
§87.71   Frequency measurements.
§87.73   Transmitter adjustments and tests.
§87.75   Maintenance of antenna structure marking and control equipment.
§87.77   Availability for inspections.

Radio Operator Requirements

§87.87   Classification of operator licenses and endorsements.
§87.89   Minimum operator requirements.
§87.91   Operation of transmitter controls.

Operating Procedures

§87.103   Posting station license.
§87.105   Availability of operator permit or license.
§87.107   Station identification.
§87.109   Station logs.
§87.111   Suspension or discontinuance of operation.

Subpart D—Technical Requirements

§87.131   Power and emissions.
§87.133   Frequency stability.
§87.135   Bandwidth of emission.
§87.137   Types of emission.
§87.139   Emission limitations.
§87.141   Modulation requirements.
§87.143   Transmitter control requirements.
§87.145   Acceptability of transmitters for licensing.
§87.147   Authorization of equipment.
§87.149   Special requirements for automatic link establishment (ALE).
§87.151   Special requirements for differential GPS receivers.

Subpart E—Frequencies

§87.169   Scope.
§87.171   Class of station symbols.
§87.173   Frequencies.

Subpart F—Aircraft Stations

§87.185   Scope of service.
§87.187   Frequencies.
§87.189   Requirements for public correspondence equipment and operations.
§87.191   Foreign aircraft stations.

Emergency Locator Transmitters

§87.193   Scope of service.
§87.195   Frequencies.
§87.197   ELT test procedures.
§87.199   Special requirements for 406.0-406.1 MHz ELTs.

Subpart G—Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms)

§87.213   Scope of service.
§87.215   Supplemental eligibility.
§87.217   Frequencies.
§87.219   Automatic operations.

Subpart H—Aeronautical Multicom Stations

§87.237   Scope of service.
§87.239   Supplemental eligibility.
§87.241   Frequencies.

Subpart I—Aeronautical Enroute Stations, Aeronautical Fixed Stations, and Aircraft Data Link Land Test Stations

Aeronautical Enroute Stations

§87.261   Scope of service.
§87.263   Frequencies.
§87.265   Administrative communications.

Aeronautical Fixed Stations

§87.275   Scope of service.
§87.277   Supplemental eligibility.
§87.279   Frequencies.

Aircraft Data Link Land Test Stations

§87.285   Scope of service.
§87.287   Frequencies.

Subpart J—Flight Test Stations

§87.299   Scope of service.
§87.301   Supplemental eligibility.
§87.303   Frequencies.
§87.305   Frequency coordination.
§87.307   Cooperative use of facilities.

Subpart K—Aviation Support Stations

§87.319   Scope of service.
§87.321   Supplemental eligibility.
§87.323   Frequencies.

Subpart L—Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations

§87.345   Scope of service.
§87.347   Supplemental eligibility.
§87.349   Frequencies.
§87.351   Frequency changes.

Subpart M—Aeronautical Search and Rescue Stations

§87.371   Scope of service.
§87.373   Supplemental eligibility.
§87.375   Frequencies.

Subpart N—Emergency Communications

§87.393   Scope of service.
§87.395   Plan for the Security Control of Air Traffic and Air Navigation Aids (Short Title: SCATANA).
§87.397   Emergency operations.

Subpart O—Airport Control Tower Stations

§87.417   Scope of service.
§87.419   Supplemental eligibility.
§87.421   Frequencies.
§87.423   Hours of operation.
§87.425   Interference.

Subpart P—Operational Fixed Stations

§87.445   Scope of service.
§87.447   Supplemental eligibility.
§87.449   Frequencies.
§87.451   Licensing limitations.

Subpart Q—Stations in the Radiodetermination Service

§87.471   Scope of service.
§87.473   Supplemental eligibility.
§87.475   Frequencies.
§87.477   Condition of grant for radionavigation land stations.
§87.479   Harmful interference to radionavigation land stations.
§87.481   Unattended operation of domestic radiobeacon stations.
§87.483   Audio visual warning systems.

Subpart R [Reserved]

Subpart S—Automatic Weather Stations (AWOS/ASOS)

§87.525   Scope of service.
§87.527   Supplemental eligibility.
§87.529   Frequencies.

Authority: 47 U.S.C. 154, 303 and 307(e), unless otherwise noted.

Source: 53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A—General Information

§87.1   Basis and purpose.

This section contains the statutory basis and provides the purpose for which this part is issued.

(a) Basis. The rules for the aviation services in this part are promulgated under the provisions of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, which vests authority in the Federal Communications Commission (Commission) to regulate radio transmission and to issue licenses for radio stations. These rules conform with applicable statutes and international treaties, agreements and recommendations to which the United States is a party. The most significant of these documents are listed with the short title appearing in parentheses:

(1) Communications Act of 1934, as amended—(Communications Act).

(2) International Telecommunication Union Radio Regulations, in force for the United States—(Radio Regulations).

(3) The Convention on International Civil Aviation—(ICAO Convention).

(b) Purpose. This part states the conditions under which radio stations may be licensed and used in the aviation services. These rules do not govern U.S. Government radio stations.

§87.3   Other applicable rule parts.

Other applicable CFR title 47 parts include:

(a) Part 0 contains the Commission's organizations and delegations of authority. Part 0 also lists Commission publications, standards and procedures for access to Commission records and location of Commission monitoring stations.

(b) Part 1 contains rules of practice and procedure for license applications, adjudicatory proceedings, rule making proceedings, procedures for reconsideration and review of the Commission's actions; provisions concerning violation notices and forfeiture proceedings; and the environmental processing requirements that, together with the procedures specified in §17.4(c) of this chapter, if applicable, must be complied with prior to the initiation of construction.

(c) Part 2 contains the Table of Frequency Allocations and special requirements in international regulations, recommendations, agreements, and treaties. This part also contains standards and procedures concerning marketing of radio frequency devices, and for obtaining equipment authorization.

(d) Part 13 contains information and rules for the licensing of commercial radio operators.

(e) Part 17 contains requirements for construction, marking and lighting of antenna towers, and the environmental notification process that must be completed before filing certain antenna structure registration applications.

(f) Part 80 contains rules for the maritime services. Certain maritime frequencies are available for use by aircraft stations for distress and safety, public correspondence and operational communications.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 77 FR 3955, Jan. 26, 2012]

§87.5   Definitions.

Aeronautical advisory station (unicom). An aeronautical station used for advisory and civil defense communications primarily with private aircraft stations.

Aeronautical enroute station. An aeronautical station which communicates with aircraft stations in flight status or with other aeronautical enroute stations.

Aeronautical fixed service. A radiocommunication service between specified fixed points provided primarily for the safety of air navigation and for the regular, efficient and economical operation of air transport. A station in this service is an aeronautical fixed station.

Aeronautical Mobile Off-Route (OR) Service. An aeronautical mobile service intended for communications, including those relating to flight coordination, primarily outside national or international civil air routes.(RR)

Aeronautical Mobile Route (R) Service. An aeronautical mobile service reserved for communications relating to safety and regularity of flight, primarily along national or international civil air routes.(RR)

Aeronautical Mobile-Satellite Off-Route (OR) Service. An aeronautical mobile-satellite service intended for communications, including those relating to flight coordination, primarily outside national and international civil air routes.(RR)

Aeronautical Mobile-Satellite Route (R) Service. An aeronautical mobile-satellite service reserved for communications relating to safety and regularity of flights, primarily along national or international civil air routes.(RR)

Aeronautical Mobile-Satellite Service. A mobile-satellite service in which mobile earth stations are located on board aircraft.

Aeronautical mobile service. A mobile service between aeronautical stations and aircraft stations, or between aircraft stations, in which survival craft stations may also participate; emergency position-indicating radiobeacon stations may also participate in this service on designated distress and emergency frequencies.

Aeronautical multicom station. An aeronautical station used to provide communications to conduct the activities being performed by, or directed from, private aircraft.

Aeronautical radionavigation service. A radionavigation service intended for the benefit and for the safe operation of aircraft.

Aeronautical search and rescue station. An aeronautical station for communication with aircraft and other aeronautical search and rescue stations pertaining to search and rescue activities with aircraft.

Aeronautical station. A land station in the aeronautical mobile service. In certain instances an aeronautical station may be located, for example, on board ship or on a platform at sea.

Aeronautical utility mobile station. A mobile station used on airports for communications relating to vehicular ground traffic.

Air carrier aircraft station. A mobile station on board an aircraft which is engaged in, or essential to, the transportation of passengers or cargo for hire.

Aircraft data link system. A system used to provide data communications between the aircraft and ground personnel necessary for the safe, efficient and economic operation of the aircraft.

Aircraft data link land test station. A station which is used to test and calibrate aircraft data link system communications equipment.

Aircraft earth station (AES). A mobile earth station in the aeronautical mobile-satellite service located on board an aircraft.

Aircraft station. A mobile station in the aeronautical mobile service other than a survival craft station, located on board an aircraft.

Air operations area. All airport areas where aircraft can operate, either under their own power or while in tow. The airport operations area includes runways, taxiways, apron areas, and all unpaved surfaces within the airport's perimeter fence. An apron area is a surface in the air operations area where aircraft park and are serviced (refueled, loaded with cargo, and/or boarded by passengers).

Airport. An area of land or water that is used or intended to be used for the landing and takeoff of aircraft, and includes its buildings and facilities, if any.

Airport control tower (control tower) station. An aeronautical station providing communication between a control tower and aircraft.

Automatic dependent surveillance—broadcast (ADS-B) Service. Broadcast transmissions from aircraft, supporting aircraft-to-aircraft or aircraft-to-ground surveillance applications, including position reports, velocity vector, intent and other relevant information about the aircraft.

Automatic terminal information service-broadcast (ATIS-B). The automatic provision of current, routine information to arriving and departing aircraft throughout a 24-hour period or a specified portion thereof.

Automatic weather observation station (AWOS) or automatic surface observation station (ASOS). A land station located at an airport and used to automatically transmit weather information to aircraft.

Aviation service organization. Any business firm which maintains facilities at an airport for the purposes of one or more of the following general aviation activities: (a) Aircraft fueling; (b) aircraft services (e.g. parking, storage, tie-downs); (c) aircraft maintenance or sales; (d) electronics equipment maintenance or sales; (e) aircraft rental, air taxi service or flight instructions; and (f) baggage and cargo handling, and other passenger or freight services.

Aviation services. Radio-communication services for the operation of aircraft. These services include aeronautical fixed service, aeronautical mobile service, aeronautical radiodetermination service, and secondarily, the handling of public correspondence on frequencies in the maritime mobile and maritime mobile satellite services to and from aircraft.

Aviation support station. An aeronautical station used to coordinate aviation services with aircraft and to communicate with aircraft engaged in unique or specialized activities. (See subpart K)

Differential GPS (DGPS). A system which transmits corrections to the GPS derived position.

Emergency locator transmitter (ELT). A transmitter of an aircraft or a survival craft actuated manually or automatically that is used as an alerting and locating aid for survival purposes.

Emergency locator transmitter (ELT) test station. A land station used for testing ELTs or for training in the use of ELTs.

Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV). A booster rocket that can be used only once to launch a payload, such as a missile or space vehicle.

Flight Information Service-Broadcast (FIS-B). A broadcast service provided for the purpose of giving advice and information useful for the safe and efficient conduct of flights.

Flight test aircraft station. An aircraft station used in the testing of aircraft or their major components.

Flight test land station. An aeronautical station used in the testing of aircraft or their major components.

Glide path station. A radionavigation land station which provides vertical guidance to aircraft during approach to landing.

Instrument landing system (ILS). A radionavigation system which provides aircraft with horizontal and vertical guidance just before and during landing and, at certain fixed points, indicates the distance to the reference point of landing.

Instrument landing system glide path. A system of vertical guidance embodied in the instrument landing system which indicates the vertical deviation of the aircraft from its optimum path of descent.

Instrument landing system localizer. A system of horizontal guidance embodied in the instrument landing system which indicates the horizontal deviation of the aircraft from its optimum path of descent along the axis of the runway or along some other path when used as an offset.

Land station. A station in the mobile service not intended to be used while in motion.

Localizer station. A radionavigation land station which provides horizontal guidance to aircraft with respect to a runway center line.

Marker beacon station. A radionavigation land station in the aeronautical radionavigation service which employs a marker beacon. A marker beacon is a transmitter which radiates vertically a distinctive pattern for providing position information to aircraft.

Mean power (of a radio transmitter). The average power supplied to the antenna transmission line by a transmitter during an interval of time sufficiently long compared with the lowest frequency encountered in the modulation taken under normal operating conditions.

Microwave landing system. An instrument landing system operating in the microwave spectrum that provides lateral and vertical guidance to aircraft having compatible avionics equipment.

Mobile service. A radiocommunication service between mobile and land stations, or between mobile stations. A mobile station is intended to be used while in motion or during halts at unspecified points.

Operational fixed station. A fixed station, not open to public correspondence, operated by and for the sole use of persons operating their own radiocommunication facilities in the public safety, industrial, land transportation, marine, or aviation services.

Peak envelope power (of a radio transmitter). The average power supplied to the antenna transmission line by a transmitter during one radio frequency cycle at the crest of the modulation envelope taken under normal operating conditions.

Private aircraft station. A mobile station on board an aircraft not operated as an air carrier. A station on board an air carrier aircraft weighing less than 12,500 pounds maximum certified takeoff gross weight may be licensed as a private aircraft station.

Racon station. A radionavigation land station which employs a racon. A racon (radar beacon) is a transmitter-receiver associated with a fixed navigational mark, which when triggered by a radar, automatically returns a distinctive signal which can appear on the display of the triggering radar, providing range, bearing and identification information.

Radar. A radiodetermination system based upon the comparison of reference signals with radio signals reflected, or re-transmitted, from the position to be determined.

Radio altimeter. Radionavigation equipment, on board an aircraft or spacecraft, used to determine the height of the aircraft or spacecraft above the Earth's surface or another surface.

Radiobeacon station. A station in the radionavigation service the emissions of which are intended to enable a mobile station to determine its bearing or direction in relation to the radiobeacon station.

Radiodetermination service. A radiocommuncation service which uses radiodetermination. Radiodetermination is the determination of the position, velocity and/or other characteristics of an object, or the obtaining of information relating to these parameters, by means of the propagation of radio waves. A station in this service is called a radiodetermination station.

Radiolocation service. A radiodetermination service for the purpose of radiolocation. Radiolocation is the use of radiodetermination for purposes other than those of radionavigation.

Radionavigation land test stations. A radionavigation land station which is used to transmit information essential to the testing and calibration of aircraft navigational aids, receiving equipment, and interrogators at predetermined surface locations. The Maintenance Test Facility (MTF) is used primarily to permit maintenance testing by aircraft radio service personnel. The Operational Test Facility (OTF) is used primarily to permit the pilot to check a radionavigation system aboard the aircraft prior to takeoff.

Radionavigation service. A radiodetermination service for the purpose of radionavigation. Radionavigation is the use of radiodetermination for the purpose of navigation, including obstruction warning.

Re-usable launch vehicle (RLV). A booster rocket that can be recovered after launch, refurbished and re-launched.

Surveillance radar station. A radionavigation land station in the aeronautical radionavigation service employing radar to detect the presence of aircraft within its range.

Survival craft station. A mobile station in the maritime or aeronautical mobile service intended solely for survival purposes and located on any lifeboat, life raft or other survival equipment.

Traffic information services—broadcast (TIS-B). Traffic information broadcasts derived from ground-based radar systems.

Universal access transceiver (UAT). A radio datalink system authorized to operate on the frequency 978 MHz to support Automatic Dependent Surveillance—Broadcast (ADS-B) Service, Traffic Information Services—Broadcast (TIS-B) and Flight Information Service—Broadcast (FIS-B).

VHF Omni directional range station (VOR). A radionavigation land station in the aeronautical radionavigation service providing direct indication of the bearing (omni-bearing) of that station from an aircraft.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 54 FR 11719, Mar. 22, 1989; 54 FR 49995, Dec. 4, 1989; 55 FR 4175, Feb. 7, 1990; 57 FR 45749, Oct. 5, 1992; 64 FR 27474, May 20, 1999; 69 FR 32879, June 14, 2004; 71 FR 70676, Dec. 6, 2006; 78 FR 45074, July 26, 2013; 78 FR 61205, Oct. 3, 2013]

Subpart B—Applications and Licenses

§87.17   Scope.

Part 1 of the Commission's rules contains the general rules of practice and procedure applicable to proceedings before the Commission and for the filing of applications for radio station licenses in the aviation services. Specific guidance for each type of radio service license in aviation services is set forth in this part.

[63 FR 68957, Dec. 14, 1998]

§87.18   Station license required.

(a) Except as noted in paragraph (b) of this section, stations in the aviation service must be licensed by the FCC either individually or by fleet.

(b) An aircraft station is licensed by rule and does not need an individual license issued by the FCC if the aircraft station is not required by statute, treaty, or agreement to which the United States is signatory to carry a radio, and the aircraft station does not make international flights or communications. Even though an individual license is not required, an aircraft station licensed by rule must be operated in accordance with all applicable operating requirements, procedures, and technical specifications found in this part.

[61 FR 58011, Nov. 12, 1996]

§87.19   Basic eligibility.

(a) General. Foreign governments or their representatives cannot hold station licenses.

(b) Aeronautical enroute and aeronautical fixed stations. The following persons cannot hold an aeronautical enroute or an aeronautical fixed station license.

(1) Any alien or the representative of any alien;

(2) Any corporation organized under the laws of any foreign government;

(3) Any corporation of which more than one-fifth of the capital stock is owned of record or voted by aliens or their representatives or by a foreign government or its representative, or by a corporation organized under the laws of a foreign country; or

(4) Any corporation directly or indirectly controlled by any other corporation of which more than one-fourth of the capital stock is owned of record or voted by aliens, their representatives, or by a foreign government or its representatives, or by any corporation organized under the laws of a foreign country, if the Commission finds that the public interest will be served by the refusal or revocation of such license.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 61 FR 55581, Oct. 28, 1996]

§87.25   Filing of applications.

(a) [Reserved]

(b) An application must be filed with the Commission in accordance with part 1, subpart F of this chapter. Applications requiring fees as set forth at part 1, subpart G of this chapter must be filed in accordance with §0.401(b) of the rules.

(c) One application may be submitted for the total number of aircraft stations in the fleet (fleet license).

(d) One application for aeronautical land station license may be submitted for the total number of stations in the fleet.

(e) One application for modification or transfer of control may be submitted for two or more stations when the individual stations are clearly identified and the following elements are the same for all existing or requested station licenses involved:

(1) Applicant;

(2) Specific details of request;

(3) Rule part.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 56 FR 64715, Dec. 12, 1991; 63 FR 68957, Dec. 14, 1998; 64 FR 53241, Oct. 1, 1999; 69 FR 32879, June 14, 2004]

§87.27   License term.

Licenses for stations in the aviation services will normally be issued for a term of ten years from the date of original issuance, or renewal.

[78 FR 25175, Apr. 29, 2013]

§87.29   Partial grant of application.

Whenever the Commission, without a hearing, grants an application in part or with any privileges, terms, or conditions other than those requested, the action will be considered as a grant of the application unless the applicant, within 30 days from the date on which such grant is made, or from its effective date if a later day is specified, files with the Commission a written protest, rejecting the grant as made. Upon receipt of such protest, the Commission will vacate its original action upon the application and, if necessary, set the application for hearing.

§87.35   Cancellation of license.

When a station permanently discontinues operation the station license must be canceled in accordance with the procedures set forth in part 1 of this chapter.

[63 FR 68957, Dec. 14, 1998]

§87.39   Equipment acceptable for licensing.

Transmitters listed in this part must be certificated for a particular use by the Commission based upon technical requirements contained in subpart D of this part.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 63 FR 36607, July 7, 1998]

§87.41   Frequencies.

(a) Applicant responsibilities. The applicant must propose frequencies to be used by the station consistent with the applicant's eligibility, the proposed operation and the frequencies available for assignment. Applicants must cooperate in the selection and use of frequencies in order to minimize interference and obtain the most effective use of stations. See subpart E and the appropriate subpart applicable to the class of station being considered.

(b) Licensing limitations. Frequencies are available for assignment to stations on a shared basis only and will not be assigned for the exclusive use of any licensee. The use of any assigned frequency may be restricted to one or more geographical areas.

(c) Government frequencies. Frequencies allocated exclusively to federal government radio stations may be licensed. The applicant for a government frequency must provide a satisfactory showing that such assignment is required for inter-communication with government stations or required for coordination with activities of the federal government. The Commission will coordinate with the appropriate government agency before a government frequency is assigned.

(d) Assigned frequency. The frequency coinciding with the center of an authorized bandwidth of emission must be specified as the assigned frequency. For single sideband emission, the carrier frequency must also be specified.

§87.43   Operation during emergency.

A station may be used for emergency communications in a manner other than that specified in the station license or in the operating rules when normal communication facilities are disrupted. The Commission may order the discontinuance f any such emergency service.

§87.45   Time in which station is placed in operation.

This section applies only to unicom stations and radionavigation land stations, excluding radionavigation land test stations. When a new license has been issued or additional operating frequencies have been authorized, the station or frequencies must be placed in operation no later than one year from the date of the grant. The licensee must notify the Commission in accordance with §1.946 of this chapter that the station or frequencies have been placed in operation.

[69 FR 32879, June 14, 2004]

§87.47   Application for a portable aircraft station license.

A person may apply for a portable aircraft radio station license if the need exists to operate the same station on more than one U.S. aircraft.

§87.51   Aircraft earth station commissioning.

(a) [Reserved]

(b) Aircraft earth stations authorized to operate in the Inmarsat space segment must display the Commission license together with the commissioning certificate issued by Inmarsat. Notwithstanding the requirements of this paragraph, aircraft earth stations may operate in the Inmarsat space segment without an Inmarsat-issued commissioning certificate if written approval is obtained from Inmarsat in addition to the license from the Commission.

[57 FR 45749, Oct. 5, 1992, as amended at 63 FR 68957, Dec. 14, 1998]

Subpart C—Operating Requirements and Procedures

Operating Requirements

§87.69   Maintenance tests.

The licensee may make routine maintenance tests on equipment other than emergency locator transmitters if there is no interference with the communications of any other station. Procedures for conducting tests on emergency locator transmitters are contained in subpart F.

§87.71   Frequency measurements.

A licensed operator must measure the operating frequencies of all land-based transmitters at the following times:

(a) When the transmitter is originally installed;

(b) When any change or adjustment is made in the transmitter which may affect an operating frequency; or

(c) When an operating frequency has shifted beyond tolerance.

§87.73   Transmitter adjustments and tests.

A general radiotelephone operator must directly supervise and be responsible for all transmitter adjustments or tests during installation, servicing or maintenance of a radio station. A general radiotelephone operator must be responsible for the proper functioning of the station equipment.

§87.75   Maintenance of antenna structure marking and control equipment.

The owner of each antenna structure required to be painted and/or illuminated under the provisions of Section 303(q) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, shall operate and maintain the antenna structure painting and lighting in accordance with part 17 of this chapter. In the event of default by the owner, each licensee or permittee shall be individually responsible for conforming to the requirements pertaining to antenna structure painting and lighting.

[61 FR 4368, Feb. 6, 1996]

§87.77   Availability for inspections.

The licensee must make the station and its records available for inspection upon request.

Radio Operator Requirements

§87.87   Classification of operator licenses and endorsements.

(a) Commercial radio operator licenses issued by the Commission are classified in accordance with the Radio Regulations of the International Telecommunication Union.

(b) The following licenses are issued by the Commission. International classification, if different from the license name, is given in parentheses. The licenses and their alphanumeric designator are listed in descending order.

(1) T-1. First Class Radiotelegraph Operator's Certificate. Beginning May 20, 2013, no applications for new First Class Radiotelegraph Operator's Certificates will be accepted for filing.

(2) T-2. Second Class Radiotelegraph Operator's Certificate. Beginning May 20, 2013, no applications for new Second Class Radiotelegraph Operator's Certificates will be accepted for filing.

(3) T-3. Third Class Radiotelegraph Operator's Certificate (radiotelegraph operator's special certificate). Beginning May 20, 2013, no applications for new Third Class Radiotelegraph Operator's Certificates will be accepted for filing.

(4) T. Radiotelegraph Operator License.

(5) G General Radiotelephone Operator Licenes (radiotelephone operator's general certificate)

(6) MP Marine Radio Operator Permit (radiotelephone operator's restricted certificate)

(7) RP Restricted Radiotelephone Operator Permit (radiotelephone operator's restricted certificate)

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 78 FR 23158, Apr. 18, 2013]

§87.89   Minimum operator requirements.

(a) A station operator must hold a commercial radio operator license or permit, except as listed in paragraph (d).

(b) The minimum operator license or permit required for operation of each specific classification is:

Minimum Operator License or Permit

Land stations, all classes

  • —All frequencies except VHF telephony transmitters providing domestic serviceRP

Aircraft stations, all classes

  • —Frequencies below 30 MHz allocated exclusively to aeronautical mobile servicesRP
  • —Frequencies below 30 MHz not allocated exclusively to aeronautical mobile servicesMP or higher
  • —Frequencies above 30 MHz not allocated exclusively to aeronautical mobile services and assigned for international useMP or higher
  • —Frequencies above 30 MHz not assigned for international usenone
  • —Frequencies not used solely for telephone or exceeding 250 watts carrier power or 1000 watts peak envelope powerG or higher

(c) The operator of a telephony station must directly supervise and be responsible for any other person who transmits from the station, and must ensure that such communications are in accordance with the station license.

(d) No operator license is required to:

(1) Operate an aircraft radar set, radio altimeter, transponder or other aircraft automatic radionavigation transmitter by flight personnel;

(2) Test an emergency locator transmitter or a survival craft station used solely for survival purposes;

(3) Operate an aeronautical enroute station which automatically transmits digital communications to aircraft stations;

(4) Operate a VHF telephony transmitter providing domestic service or used on domestic flights.

§87.91   Operation of transmitter controls.

The holder of a marine radio operator permit or a restricted radiotelephone operator permit must perform only transmitter operations which are controlled by external switches. These operators must not perform any internal adjustment of transmitter frequency determining elements. Further, the stability of the transmitter frequencies at a station operated by these operators must be maintained by the transmitter itself. When using an aircraft radio station on maritime mobile service frequencies the carrier power of the transmitter must not exceed 250 watts (emission A3E) or 1000 watts (emission R3E, H3E, or J3E).

Operating Procedures

§87.103   Posting station license.

(a) Stations at fixed locations. The license or a photocopy must be posted or retained in the station's permanent records.

(b) Aircraft radio stations. The license must be either posted in the aircraft or kept with the aircraft registration certificate. If a single authorization covers a fleet of aircraft, a copy of the license must be either posted in each aircraft or kept with each aircraft registration certificate.

(c) Aeronautical mobile stations. The license must be retained as a permanent part of the station records.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 54 FR 11720, Mar. 22, 1989]

§87.105   Availability of operator permit or license.

All operator permits or licenses must be readily available for inspection.

§87.107   Station identification.

(a) Aircraft station. Identify by one of the following means:

(1) Aircraft radio station call sign.

(2) The type of aircraft followed by the characters of the registration marking (“N” number) of the aircraft, omitting the prefix letter “N.” When communication is initiated by a ground station, an aircraft station may use the type of aircraft followed by the last three characters of the registration marking. Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, an aircraft being moved by maintenance personnel from one location in an airport to another location in that airport may be identified by a station identification consisting of the name of the company owning or operating the aircraft, followed by the word “Maintenance” and additional alphanumeric characters of the licensee's choosing.

(3) The FAA assigned radiotelephony designator of the aircraft operating organization followed by the flight identification number.

(4) An aircraft identification approved by the FAA for use by aircraft stations participating in an organized flying activity of short duration.

(b) Land and fixed stations. Identify by means of radio station call sign, its location, its assigned FAA identifier, the name of the city area or airport which it serves, or any additional identification required. An aeronautical enroute station which is part of a multistation network may also be identified by the location of its control point.

(c) Survival craft station. Identify by transmitting a reference to its parent aircraft. No identification is required when distress signals are transmitted automatically. Transmissions other than distress or emergency signals, such as equipment testing or adjustment, must be identified by the call sign or by the registration marking of the parent aircraft followed by a single digit other than 0 or 1.

(d) Exempted station. The following types of stations are exempted from the use of a call sign: Airborne weather radar, radio altimeter, air traffic control transponder, distance measuring equipment, collision avoidance equipment, racon, radio relay, radionavigation land test station (MTF), and automatically controlled aeronautical enroute stations.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 71 FR 70676, Dec. 6, 2006]

§87.109   Station logs.

(a) A station at a fixed location in the international aeronautical mobile service must maintain a log in accordance with Annex 10 of the ICAO Convention.

(b) A station log must contain the following information:

(1) The name of the agency operating the station.

(2) The identification of the station.

(3) The date.

(4) The time of opening and closing the station.

(5) The frequencies being guarded and the type of watch (continuous or scheduled) being maintained on each frequency.

(6) Except at intermediate mechanical relay stations where the provisions of this paragraph need not be complied with, a record of each communication showing text of communication, time communications completed, station(s) communicated with, and frequency used.

(7) All distress communications and action thereon.

(8) A brief description of communications conditions and difficulties, including harmful interference. Such entries should include, whenever practicable, the time at which interference was experienced, the character, radio frequency and identification of the interfering signal.

(9) A brief description of interruption to communications due to equipment failure or other troubles, giving the duration of the interruption and action taken.

(10) Such additional information as may be considered by the operator to be of value as part of the record of the stations operations.

(c) Stations maintaining written logs must also enter the signature of each operator, with the time the operator assumes and relinquishes a watch.

[69 FR 32879, June 14, 2004]

§87.111   Suspension or discontinuance of operation.

The licensee of any airport control tower station or radionavigation land station must notify the nearest FAA regional office upon the temporary suspension or permanent discontinuance of the station. The FAA regional office must be notified again when service resumes.

[69 FR 32880, June 14, 2004]

Subpart D—Technical Requirements

§87.131   Power and emissions.

The following table lists authorized emissions and maximum power. Power must be determined by direct measurement.

Class of stationFrequency band/frequencyAuthorized emission(s)9Maximum power1
Aeronautical advisoryVHFA3E10 watts.10
Aeronautical multicomVHFA3E10 watts.
Aeronautical enroute and aeronautical fixedHFR3E, H3E, J3E, J7B, H2B, J2D6 kw.
   HFA1A, F1B, J2A, J2B1.5 kw.
   VHFA3E, A9W G1D, A2D
Aeronautical search and rescueVHF
HF
A3E
R3E, H3E, J3E
10 watts.
100 watts.
Operational fixedVHFG3E, F2D30 watts.
Flight test landVHFA3E200 watts.
   UHFF2D, F9D, F7D25 watts.3
   HFH2B, J3E, J7D, J9W6.0 kw.
Aviation supportVHFA3E50 watts.
Airport control towerVHFA3E, G1D, G7D50 watts.
   Below 400 kHzA3E15 watts.
Aeronautical utility mobileVHFA3E10 watts.
   1090 MHzM1D20 watts.
Aircraft data link land test131.450 MHz, 131.550 MHz, 131.725 MHz, 131.825 MHz, 136.850 MHzA2D100 microwatts.
   136.900 MHz, 136.925 MHz, 136.950 MHz, 136.975 MHzG1D100 microwatts.
Radionavigation land test108.150 MHzA9W1 milliwatt.
   334.550 MHzA1N1 milliwatt.
   Other VHFM1A, XXA, A1A, A1N, A2A, A2D, A9W1 watt.
   Other UHFM1A, XXA, A1A, A1N, A2A, A2D, A9W1 watt.
   5031.0 MHzF7D1 watt.
Radionavigation landVarious4Various4Various.4
   Aeronautical Frequencies
Aircraft (Communication)UHFF2D, F9D, F7D25 watts.
   VHFA3E, A9W, G1D, G7D, A2D55 watts.
   HFR3E, H3E, J3E, J7B, H2B, J7D, J9W400 watts.
   HFA1A, F1B, J2A, J2B100 watts.
   Marine Frequencies5
   156.300 MHzG3E5 watts.
   156.375 MHzG3E5 watts.
   156.400 MHzG3E5 watts.
   156.425 MHzG3E5 watts.
   156.450 MHzG3E5 watts.
   156.625 MHzG3E5 watts.
   156.800 MHzG3E5 watts.
   156.900 MHzG3E5 watts.
   157.425 MHzG3E5 watts.
   HF6R3E, H3E, J3E, J2B, F1B, A3E1000 watts.
250 watts.
   MF6R3E, H3E, J3E, J2B, F1B1000 watts.
   HF6A3E250 watts.
(Radionavigation)Various7Various7Various.7
Aircraft earthUHFG1D, G1E, G1W60 watts.8
Differential GPSVHFG7DVarious.2

1The power is measured at the transmitter output terminals and the type of power is determined according to the emission designator as follows:

(i) Mean power (pY) for amplitude modulated emissions and transmitting both sidebands using unmodulated full carrier.

(ii) Peak envelope power (pX) for all emission designators other than those referred to in paragraph (i) of this note.

2Power and antenna height are restricted to the minimum necessary to achieve the required service.

3Transmitter power may be increased to overcome line and duplexer losses but must not exceed 25 watts delivered to the antenna.

4Frequency, emission, and maximum power will be determined after coordination with appropriate Government agencies.

5To be used with airborne marine equipment certificated for part 80 (ship) and used in accordance with part 87.

6Applicable onIy to marine frequencies used for public correspondence.

7Frequency, emission, and maximum power will be determined by appropriate standards during the certification process.

8Power may not exceed 60 watts per carrier, as measured at the input of the antenna subsystem, including any installed diplexer. The maximum EIRP may not exceed 2000 watts per carrier.

9Excludes automatic link establishment.

10Power is limited to 0.5 watt, but may not exceed 2 watts when station is used in an automatic unattended mode.

[54 FR 11720, Mar. 22, 1989, as amended at 57 FR 45749, Oct. 5, 1992; 62 FR 40308, July 28, 1997; 63 FR 36607, July 7, 1998; 64 FR 27474, May 20, 1999; 66 FR 26798, May 15, 2001; 69 FR 32880, June 14, 2004; 78 FR 61205, Oct. 3, 2013]

§87.133   Frequency stability.

(a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d), (f), and (g) of this section, the carrier frequency of each station must be maintained within these tolerances:

Frequency band (lower limit exclusive, upper limit inclusive), and categories of stations Tolerance1 Tolerance2
(1) Band-9 to 535 kHz:
Aeronautical stations100100
Aircraft stations200100
Survival craft stations on 500 kHz5,00020 Hz3
Radionavigation stations100100
(2) Band-1605 to 4000 kHz:
Aeronautical fixed stations:
Power 200 W or less1001008
Power above 200 W50508
Aeronautical stations:
Power 200 W or less10071007 8
Power above 200 W507507 8
Aircraft stations10071007
Survival craft stations on 2182 kHz20020 Hz3
(3) Band-4 to 29.7 MHz:
Aeronautical fixed stations:
Power 500 W or less50
Power above 500 W15
Single-sideband and Independent-sideband emission:
Power 500 W or less50 Hz
Power above 500 W20 Hz
Class F1B emissions10 Hz
Other classes of emission:
Power 500 W or less20
Power above 500 W10
Aeronautical stations:
Power 500 W or less71001007
Power above 500 W750507
Aircraft stations71001007
Survival craft stations on 8364 kHz20050 Hz3
(4) Band-29.7 to 100 MHz:
Aeronautical fixed stations:
Power 200 W or less50
Power above 200 W30
Power 50 W or less30
Power above 50 W20
Operational fixed stations:
73-74.6 MHz (Power 50 W or less)5030
73-74.6 MHz (Power above 50 W)2020
72-73.0 MHz and 75.4-76.0 MHz55
Radionavigation stations10050
(5) Band-108 to 137 MHz:
Aeronautical stations4501220
Emergency locator transmitter test stations5050
Survival craft stations on 121.5 MHz5050
Emergency locator stations5050
Aircraft and other mobile stations in the Aviation Services5501330
Radionavigation stations2020
Differential GPS   2
(6) Band-137 to 470MHz:
Aeronautical stations5020
Survival craft stations on 243 MHz5050
Aircraft stations5053010
Radionavigation stations5050
Emergency locator transmitters on 406 MHzN/A5
(7) Band-470 to 2450 MHz:
Aeronautical stations10020
Aircraft stations10020
Aircraft earth station   320 Hz11
Radionavigation stations:
470-960 MHz500500
960-1215 MHz2020
1215-2450 MHz500500
Aeronautical utility mobile stations on 1090 MHz10001000
(8) Band-2450 to 10500 MHz:
Radionavigation stations6 9125012506 9
(9) Band-10.5 GHz to 40 GHz:
Radionavigation stations50005000

1This tolerance is the maximum permitted until January 1, 1990, for transmitters installed before January 2, 1985, and used at the same installation. Tolerance is indicated in parts in 106 unless shown as Hertz (Hz).

2This tolerance is the maximum permitted after January 1, 1985 for new and replacement transmitters and to all transmitters after January 1, 1990. Tolerance is indicated in parts in 106 unless shown as Hertz (Hz).

3For transmitters first approved after November 30, 1977.

4The tolerance for transmitters approved between January 1, 1966, and January 1, 1974, is 30 parts in 106. The tolerance for transmitters approved after January 1, 1974, and stations using offset carrier techniques is 20 parts in 106.

5The tolerance for transmitters approved after January 1, 1974, is 30 parts in 106.

6In the 5000 to 5250 MHz band, the FAA requires a tolerance of ±10 kHz for Microwave Landing System stations which are to be a part of the National Airspace System (FAR 171).

7For single-sideband transmitters operating in the frequency bands 1605-4000 kHz and 4-29.7 MHz which are allocated exclusively to the Aeronautical Mobile (R) Service, the tolerance is: Aeronautical stations, 10 Hz; aircraft stations, 20 Hz.

8For single-sideband radiotelephone transmitters the tolerance is: In the bands 1605-4000 kHz and 4-29.7 MHz for peak envelope powers of 200 W or less and 500 W or less, respectively, 50 Hz; in the bands 1605-4000 kHz and 4-29.7 MHz for peak envelope powers above 200 W and 500 W, respectively, 20 Hz.

9Where specific frequencies are not assigned to radar stations, the bandwidth occupied by the emissions of such stations must be maintained within the band allocated to the service and the indicated tolerance does not apply.

10Until January 1, 1997, the maximum frequency tolerance for transmitters with 50 kHz channel spacing installed before January 2, 1985, is 50 parts in 106.

11For purposes of certification, a tolerance of 160 Hz applies to the reference oscillator of the AES transmitter. This is a bench test.

12For emissions G1D and G7D, the tolerance is 2 parts per 106.

13For emissions G1D and G7D, the tolerance is 5 parts per 106.

(b) The power shown in paragraph (a) of this section is the peak envelope power for single-sideband transmitters and the mean power for all other transmitters.

(c) For single-sideband transmitters, the tolerance is:

(1) All aeronautical stations on land—10 Hz.

(2) All aircraft stations—20 Hz.

(d) For radar transmitters, except non-pulse signal radio altimeters, the frequency at which maximum emission occurs must be within the authorized frequency band and must not be closer than 1.5/T MHz to the upper and lower limits of the authorized bandwidth, where T is the pulse duration in microseconds.

(e) The Commission may authorize tolerances other than those specified in this section upon a satisfactory showing of need.

(f) The carrier frequency tolerance of transmitters operating in the 1435-1535 MHz and 2310-2390 MHz bands manufactured before January 2, 1985, is 0.003 percent. The carrier frequency tolerance of transmitters operating in the 1435-1535 MHz and 2310-2390 MHz bands manufactured after January 1, 1985, is 0.002 percent. After January 1, 1990, the carrier frequency tolerance of all transmitters operating in the 1435-1535 MHz and 2310-2390 MHz bands is 0.002 percent.

(g) Any aeronautical enroute service transmitter operating in U.S. controlled airspace with 8.33 kHz channel spacing (except equipment being tested by avionics equipment manufacturers and flight test stations prior to delivery to their customers for use outside U.S. controlled airspace) must achieve 0.0005% frequency stability when operating in that mode.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 56 FR 38084, Aug. 12, 1991; 57 FR 45749, Oct. 5, 1992; 58 FR 31027, May 26, 1993; 63 FR 36607, July 7, 1998; 64 FR 27474, May 20, 1999; 66 FR 26799, May 15, 2001; 69 FR 32880, June 14, 2004; 76 FR 17350, Mar. 29, 2011; 78 FR 61205, Oct. 3, 2013]

§87.135   Bandwidth of emission.

(a) Occupied bandwidth is the width of a frequency band such that, below the lower and above the upper frequency limits, the mean powers emitted are each equal to 0.5 percent of the total mean power of a given emission.

(b) The authorized bandwidth is the maximum occupied bandwidth authorized to be used by a station.

(c) The necessary bandwidth for a given class of emission is the width of the frequency band which is just sufficient to ensure the transmission of information at the rate and with the quality required under specified conditions.

§87.137   Types of emission.

(a) The assignable emissions, corresponding emission designators and authorized bandwidths are as follows:

Class of emission Emission designator Authorized bandwidth (kilohertz)
Below 50 MHz Above 50 MHz Frequency deviation
A1A1100HA1A0.25
A1N300HA1N   0.75
A2A2K04A2A2.7450
A2D6K0A2D   50
A2D513K0A2D   50
A3E26K00A3E503
A3E5K6A3E8.33 kHz17
A3X43K20A3X   25
A9W513K0A9W   25
F1B11K70F1B1.7
F1B12K40F1B2.5
F1D181M30F1D1300 kHz312.5 kHz
F2D5M0F2D   (9)
F3E616K0F3E   205
F3E736K0F3E   4015
F7D85M0F7D   9
F9D5M0F9D9
G1D16K0G1D20 kHz
G1D1621K0G1D   25
G1D14K0G1D25
F9D5M0F9D9
G1D16K0G1D20 kHz
G3E616K0G3E   205
G7D14K0G7D   25
H2B10 112K80H2B3.0
H3E11 122K80H3E3.0
J2A1100HJ2A0.25
J2B11K70J2B1.7
   2K40J2B2.5
J3E11 122K80J3E3.0
J7B112K80J7B3.0
J7D5M0J7D   9
J9W112K80J9W3.0
M1A620HM1A
M1D14M0M1D14.0
NONNON   None15
PON139   9
R3E11 122K80R3E3.0
XXA141K12XXA2.74

Notes:

1A1A, F1B, J2A and J2B are permitted provided they do not cause harmful interference to H2B, J3E, J7B and J9W.

2For use with an authorized bandwidth of 8.0 kilohertz at radiobeacon stations. A3E will not be authorized:

(i) At existing radiobeacon stations that are not authorized to use A3 and at new radiobeacon stations unless specifically recommended by the FAA for safety purposes.

(ii) At existing radiobeacon stations currently authorized to use A3, subsequent to January 1, 1990, unless specifically recommended by the FAA for safety purposes.

3In the band 117.975-136 MHz, the authorized bandwidth is 25 kHz for transmitters approved after January 1, 1974.

4Applicable only to Survival Craft Stations and to the emergency locator transmitters and emergency locator transmitter test stations employing modulation in accordance with that specified in §87.141 of the Rules. The specified bandwidth and modulation requirements shall apply to emergency locator transmitters for which approval is granted after October 21, 1973.

5This emission may be authorized for audio frequency shift keying and phase shift keying for digital data links on any frequency listed in §87.263(a)(1), §87.263(a)(3) or §87.263(a)(5). 13K0A2D emission may be authorized on frequencies not used for voice communications. If the channel is used for voice communications, 13K0A9W emission may be authorized, provided the data is multiplexed on the voice carrier without derogating voice communications.

6Applicable to operational fixed stations in the bands 72.0-73.0 MHz and 75.4-76.0 MHz and to CAP stations using F3 on 143.900 MHz and 148.150 MHz.

7Applicable to operational fixed stations presently authorized in the band 73.0-74.6 MHz.

8The authorized bandwidth is equal to the necessary bandwidth for frequency or digitally modulated transmitters used in aeronautical telemetering and associated aeronautical telemetry or telecommand stations operating in the 1435-1535 MHz and 2310-2390 MHz bands. The necessary bandwidth must be computed in accordance with part 2 of this chapter.

9To be specified on license.

10H2B must be used by stations employing digital selective calling.

11For A1A, F1B and single sideband emissions, except H2B, the assigned frequency must be 1400 Hz above the carrier frequency.

12R3E, H3E, and J3E will be authorized only below 25000 kHz. Only H2B, J3E, J7B, and J9W are authorized, except that A3E and H3E may be used only on 3023 kHz and 5680 kHz for search and rescue operations.

13The letters “K, L, M, Q, V, W, and X” may also be used in place of the letter “P” for pulsed radars.

14Authorized for use at radiobeacon stations.

15Applicable only to transmitters of survival craft stations, emergency locator transmitter stations and emergency locator transmitter test stations approved after October 21, 1973.

16Authorized for use by aircraft earth stations. Lower values of necessary and authorized bandwidth are permitted.

17In the band 117.975-137 MHz, the Commission will not authorize any 8.33 kHz channel spaced transmissions or the use of their associated emission designator within the U.S. National Airspace System, except, on an optional basis, by Aeronautical Enroute Stations and Flight Test Stations, or by avionics equipment manufacturers which are required to perform installation and checkout of such radio systems prior to delivery to their customers. For transmitters certificated to tune to 8.33 kHz channel spacing as well as 25 kHz channel spacing, the authorized bandwidth is 8.33 kHz when tuned to an 8.33 kHz channel.

18Authorized only for Universal Access Transceiver use at 978 MHz.

(b) For other emissions, an applicant must determine the emission designator by using part 2 of this chapter.

(c) A license to use radiotelephony includes the use of tone signals or signaling devices whose sole function is to establish or maintain voice communications.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 55 FR 7333, Mar. 1, 1990; 55 FR 13535, Apr. 11, 1990; 55 FR 28627, July 12, 1990; 56 FR 11518, Mar. 19, 1991; 57 FR 45749, Oct. 5, 1992; 58 FR 30127, May 26, 1993; 63 FR 36607, July 7, 1998; 63 FR 68957, Dec. 14, 1998; 64 FR 27475, May 20, 1999; 66 FR 26799, May 15, 2001; 69 FR 32881, June 14, 2004; 71 FR 70676, Dec. 6, 2006; 76 FR 17351, Mar. 29, 2011; 78 FR 61205, Oct. 3, 2013]

§87.139   Emission limitations.

(a) Except for ELTs and when using single sideband (R3E, H3E, J3E), or frequency modulation (F9) or digital modulation (F9Y) for telemetry or telecommand in the frequency bands 1435-1535 MHz and 2310-2390 MHz or digital modulation (G7D) for differential GPS, the mean power of any emission must be attenuated below the mean power of the transmitter (pY) as follows:

(1) When the frequency is removed from the assigned frequency by more than 50 percent up to and including 100 percent of the authorized bandwidth the attenuation must be at least 25 dB;

(2) When the frequency is removed from the assigned frequency by more than 100 percent up to and including 250 percent of the authorized bandwidth the attenuation must be at least 35 dB.

(3) When the frequency is removed from the assigned frequency by more than 250 percent of the authorized bandwidth the attenuation for aircraft station transmitters must be at least 40 dB; and the attenuation for aeronautical station transmitters must be at least 43 + 10 log10 pY dB.

(b) For aircraft station transmitters and for aeronautical station transmitters first installed before February 1, 1983, and using H2B, H3E, J3E, J7B or J9W, the mean power of any emissions must be attenuated below the mean power of the transmitter (pY) as follows:

(1) When the frequency is removed from the assigned frequency by more than 50 percent up to and including 150 percent of the authorized bandwidth of 4.0 kHz, the attenuation must be at least 25 dB.

(2) When the frequency is removed from the assigned frequency by more than 150 percent up to and including 250 percent of the authorized bandwidth of 4.0 kHz, the attenuation must be at least 35 dB.

(3) When the frequency is removed from the assigned frequency by more than 250 percent of the authorized bandwidth of 4.0 kHz for aircraft station transmitters the attenuation must be at least 40 dB; and for aeronautical station transmitters the attenuation must be at least 43 + 10 log10 pY dB.

(c) For aircraft station transmitters first installed after February 1, 1983, and for aeronautical station transmitters in use after February 1, 1983, and using H2B, H3E, J3E, J7B or J9W, the peak envelope power of any emissions must be attenuated below the peak envelope power of the transmitter (pX) as follows:

(1) When the frequency is removed from the assigned frequency by more than 50 percent up to and including 150 percent of the authorized bandwidth of 3.0 kHz, the attenuation must be at least 30 dB.

(2) When the frequency is removed from the assigned frequency by more than 150 percent up to and including 250 percent of the authorized bandwidth of 3.0 kHz, the attenuation must be at least 38 dB.

(3) When the frequency is removed from the assigned frequency by more than 250 percent of the authorized bandwidth of 3.0 kHz for aircraft transmitters the attenuation must be at least 43 dB. For aeronautical station transmitters with transmitter power up to and including 50 watts the attenuation must be at least 43 + 10 log10 pX dB and with transmitter power more than 50 watts the attenuation must be at least 60 dB.

(d) Except for telemetry in the 1435-1535 MHz band, when the frequency is removed from the assigned frequency by more than 250 percent of the authorized bandwidth for aircraft stations above 30 MHz and all ground stations the attenuation must be at least 43+10 log10 pY dB.

(e) When using frequency modulation or digital modulation for telemetry or telecommand in the 1435-1535 MHz and 2310-2390 MHz frequency bands with an authorized bandwidth equal to or less than 1 MHz the emissions must be attenuated as follows:

(1) On any frequency removed from the assigned frequency by more than 100 percent of the authorized bandwidth up to and including 100 percent plus 0.5 MHz, the attenuation must be at least 60 dB, when measured in a 3.0 kHz bandwidth. This signal need not be attenuated more than 25 dB below 1 milliwatt.

(2) On any frequency removed from the assigned frequency by more than 100 percent of the authorized bandwidth plus 0.5 MHz, the attenuation must be at least 55 + 10 log10 pY dB when measured in a 3.0 kHz bandwidth.

(f) When using frequency modulation or digital modulation for telemetry or telecommand in the 1435-1535 MHz or 2310-2390 MHz frequency bands with an authorized bandwidth greater than 1 MHz, the emissions must be attenuated as follows:

(1) On any frequency removed from the assigned frequency by more than 50 percent of the authorized bandwidth plus 0.5 MHz up to and including 50 percent of the authorized bandwidth plus 1.0 MHz, the attenuation must be 60 dB, when measured in a 3.0 kHz bandwidth. The signal need not be attenuated more than 25 dB below 1 milliwatt.

(2) On any frequency removed from the assigned frequency by more than 50 percent of the authorized bandwidth plus 1.0 MHz, the attenuation must be at least 55 + 10 log10 pY dB, when measured in a 3.0 kHz bandwidth.

(g) The requirements of paragraphs (e) and (f) of this section apply to transmitters approved after January 1, 1977, and to all transmitters first installed after January 1, 1983.

(h) For ELTs operating on 121.500 MHz, 243.000 MHz and 406.0-406.1 MHz the mean power of any emission must be attenuated below the mean power of the transmitter (pY) as follows:

(1) When the frequency is moved from the assigned frequency by more than 50 percent up to and including 100 percent of the authorized bandwidth the attenuation must be at least 25 dB;

(2) When the frequency is removed from the assigned frequency by more than 100 percent of the authorized bandwidth the attenuation must be at least 30 dB.

(i) In case of conflict with other provisions of §87.139, the provisions of this paragraph shall govern for aircraft earth stations. When using G1D, G1E, or G1W emissions in the 1646.5-1660.5 MHz frequency band, the emissions must be attenuated as shown below.

(1) At rated output power, while transmitting a modulated single carrier, the composite spurious and noise output shall be attenuated by at least:

Frequency (MHz) Attenuation (dB)1
0.01 to 1525−135 dB/4 kHz
1525 to 1559−203 dB/4 kHz
1559 to 1585−155 dB/MHz
1585 to 1605−143 dB/MHz
1605 to 1610−117 dB/MHz
1610 to 1610.6−95 dB/MHz
1610.6 to 1613.8−80 dBW/MHz3
1613.8 to 1614−95 dB/MHz
1614 to 1626.5−70 dB/4 kHz
1626.5 to 1660−70 dB/4 kHz2 3 4
1660 to 1670−49.5 dBW/20 kHz2 3 4
1670 to 1735−60 dB/4 kHz
1735 to 12000−105 dB/4 kHz
12000 to 18000−70 dB/4 kHz

1These values are expressed in dB referenced to the carrier for the bandwidth indicated, and relative to the maximum emission envelope level, except where the attenuation is shown in dBW, the attenuation is expressed in terms of absolute power referenced to the bandwidth indicated.

2Attenuation measured within the transmit band excludes the band ±35 kHz of the carrier frequency.

3This level is not applicable for intermodulation products.

4The upper limit for the excess power for any narrow-band spurious emission (excluding intermodulation products within a 30 kHz measurement bandwidth) shall be 10 dB above the power limit in this table.

(2) The transmitter emission limit is a function of the modulation type and symbol rate (SR). Symbol Rate is expressed in symbols per second.

(3) While transmitting a single modulated signal at the rated output power of the transmitter, the emissions must be attenuated below the maximum emission level by at least:

Frequency Offset (normalized to SR) Attenuation (dB)
±0.75 × SR0
±1.40 × SR20
±2.95 × SR40

Where:

SR = Symbol Rate,

SR = 1 × channel rate for BPSK,

SR = 0.5 × channel rate for QPSK.

The mask shall be defined by drawing straight lines through the above points.

(j) When using G7D for differential GPS in the 112-118 MHz band, the amount of power during transmission under all operating conditions when measured over a 25 kHz bandwidth centered on either of the second adjacent channels shall not exceed −25 dBm and shall decrease 5 dB per octave until −52 dBm.

(k) For VHF aeronautical stations and aircraft stations operating with G1D or G7D emissions:

(1) The amount of power measured across either first adjacent 25 kHz channel shall not exceed 2 dBm.

(2) For stations first installed before January 1, 2002, the amount of power measured across either second adjacent channel shall be less than −25 dBm and the power measured in any other adjacent 25 kHz channels shall monotonically decrease at a rate of at least 5 dB per octave to a maximum value of −52 dBm. For stations first installed on or after January 1, 2002,

(i) The amount of power measured across either second adjacent 25 kHz channel shall be less than −28 dBm;

(ii) The amount of power measured across either fourth adjacent 25 kHz channel shall be less than −38 dBm; and

(iii) From thereon the power measured in any other adjacent 25 kHz channel shall monotonically decrease at a rate of at least 5 dB per octave to a maximum value of −53 dBm.

(3) The amount of power measured over a 16 kHz channel bandwidth centered on the first adjacent 25 kHz channel shall not exceed −18 dBm.

(l)(1) For Universal Access Transceiver transmitters, the average emissions measured in a 100 kHz bandwidth must be attenuated below the maximum emission level contained within the authorized bandwidth by at least:

Frequency (MHz)Attenuation
(dB)
+/−0.50
+/−1.018
+/−2.2550
+/−3.2560

(2) Universal Access Transceiver transmitters with an output power of 5 Watts or more must limit their emissions by at least 43 + 10 log (P) dB on any frequency removed from the assigned frequency by more than 250% of the authorized bandwidth. Those emissions shall be measured with a bandwidth of 100 kHz. P in the above equation is the average transmitter power measured within the occupied bandwidth in Watts.

(3) Universal Access Transceiver transmitters with less than 5 Watts of output power must limit their emissions by at least 40 dB relative to the carrier peak on any frequency removed from the assigned frequency by more than 250% of the authorized bandwidth. Those emissions shall be measured with a bandwidth of 100 kHz.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 56 FR 11518, Mar. 19, 1991; 57 FR 45749, Oct. 5, 1992; 58 FR 30127, May 26, 1993; 58 FR 67695, Dec. 22, 1993; 59 FR 35269, July 11, 1994; 63 FR 36607, July 7, 1998; 64 FR 27475, May 20, 1999; 66 FR 26799, May 15, 2001; 67 FR 4676, Jan. 31, 2002; 69 FR 32881, June 14, 2004; 71 FR 70676, Dec. 6, 2006]

§87.141   Modulation requirements.

(a) When A3E emission is used, the modulation percentage must not exceed 100 percent. This requirement does not apply to emergency locator transmitters or survival craft transmitters.

(b) A double sideband full carrier amplitude modulated radiotelephone transmitter with rated carrier power output exceeding 10 watts must be capable of automatically preventing modulation in excess of 100 percent.

(c) If any licensed radiotelephone transmitter causes harmful interference to any authorized radio service because of excessive modulation, the Commission will require the use of the transmitter to be discontinued until it is rendered capable of automatically preventing modulation in excess of 100 percent.

(d) Single sideband transmitters must be able to operate in the following modes:

Carrier modeLevel N(dB) of the carrier with respect to peak envelope power
Full carrier (H3E)O>N>−6.
Suppressed carrier (J3E)Aircraft stations N<−26;
   Aeronautical stations N<−40.

(e) Each frequency modulated transmitter operating in the band 72.0-76.0 MHz must have a modulation limiter.

(f) Each frequency modulated transmitter equipped with a modulation limiter must have a low pass filter between the modulation limiter and the modulated stage. At audio frequencies between 3 kHz and 15 kHz, the filter must have an attenuation greater than the attenuation at 1 kHz by at least 40 log10 (f/3) db where “f” is the frequency in kilohertz. Above 15 kHz, the attenuation must be at least 28 db greater than the attenuation at 1 kHz.

(g) Except that symmetric side bands are not required, the modulation characteristics for ELTs must be in accordance with specifications contained in the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Standard Order (TSO) Document TSO-C91a titled “Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) Equipment” dated April 29, 1985. TSO-C91a is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a). TSO-C91a may be obtained from the Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Airworthiness, 800 Independence Avenue SW., Washington DC 20591.

(h) ELTs must use A3X emission and may use A3E or NON emissions on an optional basis while transmitting. Each transmission of a synthesized or recorded voice message from an ELT must be preceded by the words “this is a recording”; transmission of A3E or NON emission must not exceed 90 seconds; and any transmission of A3E or NON emissions must be followed by at least three minutes of A3X emission.

(i) ELTs manufactured on or after October 1, 1988, must have a clearly defined carrier frequency distinct from the modulation sidebands for the mandatory emission, A3X, and, if used, the A3E or NON emissions. On 121.500 MHz at least thirty per cent of the total power emitted during any transmission cycle with or without modulation must be contained within plus or minus 30 Hz of the carrier frequency. On 243.000 MHz at least thirty percent of the total power emitted during any transmission cycle with or without modulation must be contained within plus or minus 60 Hz of the carrier frequency. Additionally, if the type of emission is changed during transmission, the carrier frequency must not shift more than plus or minus 30 Hz on 121.500 MHz and not more than plus or minus 60Hz on 243.000 MHz. The long term stability of the carrier frequency must comply with the requirements in §87.133 of this part.

(j) Transmitters used at Aircraft earth stations must employ BPSK for transmission rates up to and including 2400 bits per second, and QPSK for higher rates.

(k) Universal Access Transceiver transmitters must use F1D modulation without phase discontinuities.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 54 FR 11721, Mar. 22, 1989; 56 FR 11518, Mar. 19, 1991; 57 FR 45749, Oct. 5, 1992; 71 FR 70676, Dec. 6, 2006]

§87.143   Transmitter control requirements.

(a) Each transmitter must be installed so that it is not accessible to, or capable of being operated by persons other than those authorized by the licensee.

(b) Each station must be provided with a control point at the location of the transmitting equipment, unless otherwise specifically authorized. Except for aeronautical enroute stations governed by paragraph (e) of this section, a control point is the location at which the radio operator is stationed. It is the position at which the transmitter(s) can immediately be turned off.

(c) Applicants for additional control points at aeronautical advisory (unicom) stations must specify the location of each proposed control point.

(d) Except for aeronautical enroute stations governed by paragraph (f) of this section, the control point must have the following facilities installed:

(1) A device that indicates when the transmitter is radiating or when the transmitter control circuits have been switched on. This requirement does not apply to aircraft stations;

(2) Aurally monitoring of all transmissions originating at dispatch points;

(3) A way to disconnect dispatch points from the transmitter; and

(4) A way to turn off the transmitter.

(e) A dispatch point is an operating position subordinate to the control point. Dispatch points may be installed without authorization from the Commission, and dispatch point operators are not required to be licensed.

(f) In the aeronautical enroute service, the control point for an automatically controlled enroute station is the computer facility which controls the transmitter. Any computer controlled transmitter must be equipped to automatically shut down after 3 minutes of continuous transmission of an unmodulated carrier.

§87.145   Acceptability of transmitters for licensing.

(a) Each transmitter must be certificated for use in these services, except as listed in paragraph (c) of this section. However, aircraft stations which transmit on maritime mobile frequencies must use transmitters certificated for use in ship stations in accordance with part 80 of this chapter. Certification under part 80 is not required for aircraft earth stations transmitting on maritime mobile-satellite frequencies. Such stations must be certificated under part 87.

(b) Some radio equipment installed on air carrier aircraft must meet the requirements of the Commission and the requirements of the FAA. The FAA requirements may be obtained from the FAA, Aircraft Maintenance Division, 800 Independence Ave., SW., Washington, DC 20591.

(c) The equipment listed below is exempted from certification. The operation of transmitters which have not been certificated must not result in harmful interference due to the failure of those transmitters to comply with technical standards of this subpart.

(1) Flight test station transmitters for limited periods where justified.

(2) U.S. Government transmitters furnished in the performance of a U.S. Government contract if the use of certificated equipment would increase the cost of the contract or if the transmitter will be incorporated in the finished product. However, such equipment must meet the technical standards contained in this subpart.

(3) ELTs verified in accordance with §87.147(e).

(4) Signal generators when used as radionavigation land test stations (MTF).

(d) Aircraft earth stations must correct their transmit frequencies for Doppler effect relative to the satellite. The transmitted signal may not deviate more than 335 Hz from the desired transmit frequency. (This is a root sum square error which assumes zero error for the received ground earth station signal and includes the AES transmit/receive frequency reference error and the AES automatic frequency control residual errors.) The applicant must attest that the equipment provides adequate Doppler effect compensation and where applicable, that measurements have been made that demonstrate compliance. Submission of data demonstrating compliance is not required unless requested by the Commission.

[63 FR 36607, July 7, 1998, as amended at 69 FR 32881, June 14, 2004]

§87.147   Authorization of equipment.

(a) Certification may be requested by following the procedures in part 2 of this chapter. Aircraft transmitters must meet the requirements over an ambient temperature range of −20 degrees to +50 degrees Celsius.

(b) ELTs manufactured after October 1, 1988, must meet the output power characteristics contained in §87.141(i) when tested in accordance with the Signal Enhancement Test contained in subpart N, part 2 of this chapter. A report of the measurements must be submitted with each application for certification. ELTs that meet the output power characteristics of the section must have a permanent label prominently displayed on the outer casing state, “Meets FCC Rule for improved satellite detection.” This label, however, must not be placed on the equipment without authorization to do so by the Commission. Application for such authorization may be made either by submission of a new application for certification accompanied by the required fee and all information and test data required by parts 2 and 87 of this chapter or, for ELTs approved prior to October 1, 1988, a letter requesting such authorization, including appropriate test data and a showing that all units produced under the original equipment authorization comply with the requirements of this paragraph without change to the original circuitry.

(c) An applicant for a station license may request certification for an individual transmitter by following the procedure in part 2 of this chapter. Such a transmitter will be individually certified and so noted on the station license.

(d) An applicant for certification of equipment intended for transmission in any of the frequency bands listed in paragraph (d)(3) of this section must notify the FAA of the filing of a certification application. The letter of notification must be mailed to: FAA, Office of Spectrum Policy and Management, ASR-1, 800 Independence Ave., SW., Washington, DC 20591 prior to the filing of the application with the Commission.

(1) The notification must describe the equipment, give the manufacturer's identification, antenna characteristics, rated output power, emission type and characteristics, the frequency or frequencies of operation, and essential receiver characteristics if protection is required.

(2) The certification application must include a copy of the notification letter to the FAA. The Commission will not act until it receives the FAA's determination regarding whether it objects to the application for equipment authorization. The FAA should mail its determination to: Office of Engineering and Technology Laboratory, Authorization and Evaluation Division, 7435 Oakland Mills Rd., Columbia, MD 21046. The Commission will consider the FAA determination before taking final action on the application.

(3) The frequency bands are as follows:

90-110 kHz

190-285 kHz

325-435 kHz

74.800 MHz to 75.200 MHz

108.000 MHz to 137.000 MHz

328.600 MHz to 335.400 MHz

960.000 MHz to 1215.000 MHz

1545.000 MHz to 1626.500 MHz

1646.500 MHz to 1660.500 MHz

5000.000 MHz to 5250.000 MHz

14.000 GHz to 14.400 GHz

15.400 GHz to 15.700 GHz

24.250 GHz to 25.250 GHz

31.800 GHz to 33.400 GHz

(e) Verification reports for ELTs capable of operating on the frequency 406.0-406.1 MHz must include sufficient documentation to show that the ELT meets the requirements of §87.199(a). A letter notifying the FAA of the ELT verification must be mailed to: FAA, Office of Spectrum Policy and Management, ASR-1, 800 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20591.

(f) Certification may be requested for equipment that has the capability to transmit in the 138-144 MHz, 148-149.9 MHz, or 150.5-150.8 MHz bands as well as frequency bands set forth in §87.173. The Commission will only certify this equipment for use in the bands regulated by this part.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 54 FR 11721, Mar. 22, 1989; 56 FR 11518, Mar. 19, 1991; 57 FR 45750, Oct. 5, 1992; 58 FR 30127, May 26, 1993; 58 FR 67696, Dec. 22, 1993; 63 FR 36608, July 7, 1998; 69 FR 32881, June 14, 2004]

§87.149   Special requirements for automatic link establishment (ALE).

Brief signalling for the purposes of measuring the quality of a radio channel and thereafter establishing communication shall be permitted within the 2 MHz-30 MHz band. Public coast stations licensed under part 80 of this chapter providing high seas service are authorized by rule to use such signalling under the following conditions:

(a) The transmitter power shall not exceed 100 W ERP;

(b) Transmissions must sweep linearly in frequency at a rate of at least 60 kHz per second, occupying any 3 kHz bandwidth for less than 50 milliseconds;

(c) The transmitter shall scan the band no more than four times per hour;

(d) Transmissions within 6 kHz of the following protected frequencies and frequency bands must not exceed 10 µW peak ERP:

(1) Protected frequencies (kHz)

2091.04188.06312.012290.016420.0
2174.54207.58257.012392.016522.0
2182.05000.08291.012520.016695.0
2187.55167.58357.512563.016750.0
2500.05680.08364.012577.016804.5
3023.06215.08375.015000.020000.0
4000.06268.08414.516000.025000.0
4177.56282.010000.0

(2) Protected bands (kHz)

4125.0-4128.0

8376.25-8386.75

13360.0-13410.0

25500.0-25670.0

(e) The instantaneous signal, which refers to the peak power that would be measured with the frequency sweep stopped, along with spurious emissions generated from the sweeping signal, must be attenuated below the peak carrier power (in watts) as follows:

(1) On any frequency more than 5 Hz from the instantaneous carrier frequency, at least 3 dB;

(2) On any frequency more than 250 Hz from the instantaneous carrier frequency, at least 40 dB; and

(3) On any frequency more than 7.5 kHz from the instantaneous carrier frequency, at least 43 + 10log10 (peak power in watts) db.

[62 FR 40308, July 28, 1997]

§87.151   Special requirements for differential GPS receivers.

(a) The receiver shall achieve a message failure rate less than or equal to one failed message per 1000 full-length (222 bytes) application data messages, while operating over a range from −87 dBm to −1 dBm, provided that the variation in the average received signal power between successive bursts in a given time slot shall not exceed 40 dB. Failed messages include those lost by the VHF data receiver system or which do not pass the cyclic redundancy check (CRC) after application of the forward error correction (FEC).

(b) The aircraft receiving antenna can be horizontally or vertically polarized. Due to the difference in the signal strength of horizontally and vertically polarized components of the broadcast signal, the total aircraft implementation loss is limited to 15 dB for horizontally polarized receiving antennas and 11 dB for vertically polarized receiving antennas.

(c) Desensitization. The receiver shall meet the requirements specified in paragraph (a) of this section in the presence of VHF-FM broadcast signals in accord with following tables.

(1) Maximum levels of undesired signals.

Frequency1 Maximum level of undesired signal at the receiver input (dBm)
50 kHz up to 88 MHz−13
88 MHz-107.900 MHz[see paragraph (c)(2)]
108.000 MHz-117.975 MHzexcluded
118MHz−44
118.025 MHz−41
118.050 MHz up to 1660.5 MHz−13

1The relationship is linear between single adjacent points designated by the above frequencies.

(2) Desensitization frequency and power requirements for the frequencies 108.025 MHz to 111.975 MHz.

Frequency1 Maximum level of undesired signal at the receiver input (dBm)
88 MHz ≤f ≤102 MHz15
104 MHz10
106 MHz5
107.9 MHz−10

1The relationship is linear between single adjacent points designated by the above frequencies.

(3) Desensitization frequency and power requirements for the frequencies 112.00 MHz to 117.975 MHz.

Frequency1 Maximum level of undesired signal at the receiver input (dBm)
88 MHz ≤f ≤104 MHz15
106 MHz10
107 MHz5
107.9 MHz0

1The relationship is linear between single adjacent points designated by the above frequencies.

(d) Intermodulation immunity. The receiver shall meet the requirements specified in paragraph (a) of this section in the presence of interference from two-signal, third order intermodulation products of two VHF-FM broadcast signals having levels in accordance with the following:

(1) 2N1 + N2 + 72 ≤0 for VHF-FM sound broadcasting signals in the range 107.7-108 MHz; and

(2) 2N1 + N2 + 3 (24 −20log delta f/0.4) ≤0 for VHF-FM sound broadcasting signals below 107.7 MHz, where the frequencies of the two VHF-FM sound broadcasting signals produce, within the receiver, a two signal, third-order intermodulation product on the desired VDB frequency.

(3) In the formulas in paragraphs (d)(1) and (d)(2) of this section, N1 and N2 are the levels (dBm) of the two VHF FM sound broadcasting signals at the VHF data broadcast (VDB) receiver input. Neither level shall exceed the desensitization criteria set forth in paragraph (c) of this section. Delta f = 108.1 − f1, where f1 is the frequency of N1, the VHF FM sound broadcasting signal closer to 108.1 MHz.

[69 FR 32881, June 14, 2004]

Subpart E—Frequencies

§87.169   Scope.

This subpart contains class of station symbols and a frequency table which lists assignable frequencies. Frequencies in the Aviation Services will transmit communications for the safe, expeditious, and economic operation of aircraft and the protection of life and property in the air. Each class of land station may communicate in accordance with the particular sections of this part which govern these classes. Land stations in the Aviation Services in Alaska may transmit messages concerning sickness, death, weather, ice conditions or other matters relating to safety of life and property if there is no other established means of communications between the points in question and no charge is made for the communications service.

[69 FR 32882, June 14, 2004]

§87.171   Class of station symbols.

The two or three letter symbols for the classes of station in the aviation services are:

Symbol and class of station

AX—Aeronautical fixed

AVW—Audio visual warning systems

AXO—Aeronautical operational fixed

DGP—Differential GPS

DLT—Aircraft data link land test

FA—Aeronautical land (unspecified)

FAU—Aeronautical advisory (unicom)

FAC—Airport control tower

FAE—Aeronautical enroute

FAM—Aeronautical multicom

FAR—Aeronautical search and rescue

FAS—Aviation support

FAT—Flight test

FAW—Automatic weather observation

GCO—Ground Communication Outlet

MA—Aircraft (Air carrier and Private)

MA1—Air carrier aircraft only

MA2—Private aircraft only

MOU—Aeronautical utility mobile

MRT—ELT test

RCO—Remote Communications Outlet

RL—Radionavigation land (unspecified)

RLA—Marker beacon

RLB—Radiobeacon

RLD—RADAR/TEST

RLG—Glide path

RLL—Localizer

RLO—VHF omni-range

RLS—Surveillance radar

RLT—Radionavigation land test

RLW—Microwave landing system

RNV—Radio Navigation Land/DME

RPC—Ramp Control

TJ—Aircraft earth station in the Aeronautical Mobile-Satellite Service

UAT—Universal Access Transceiver

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 57 FR 45750, Oct. 5, 1992; 64 FR 27475, May 20, 1999; 69 FR 32882, June 14, 2004; 71 FR 70676, Dec. 6, 2006; 76 FR 17351, Mar. 29, 2011; 78 FR 61206, Oct. 3, 2013]

§87.173   Frequencies.

(a) The table in paragraph (b) of this section lists assignable carrier frequencies or frequency bands.

(1) The single letter symbol appearing in the “Subpart” column indicates the subpart of this part which contains additional applicable regulations.

(2) The two or three letter symbol appearing in the “Class of Station” column indicates the class of station to which the frequency is assignable.

(b) Frequency table:

Frequency or frequency band Subpart Class of station Remarks
90-110 kHzQRLLORAN “C”.
190-285 kHzQRLBRadiobeacons.
200-285 kHzOFACAir traffic control.
325-405 kHzOFACAir traffic control.
325-435 kHzQRLBRadiobeacons.
410.0 kHzFMAInternational direction-finding for use outside of United States.
457.0 kHzFMAWorking frequency for aircraft on over-water flights.
500.0 kHzFMAInternational calling and distress frequency for ships and aircraft on over-water flights.
510-535 kHzQRLBRadiobeacons.
2182.0 kHzFMAInternational distress and calling.
2648.0 kHzIAXAlaska station.
2850.0-3025.0 kHzIMA, FAEInternational HF.
2851.0 kHzI, JMA, FAE, FATInternational HF; Flight Test.
2866.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF; (Alaska).
2875.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF.
2878.0 kHzIMA1, FAEDomestic HF; International HF.
2911.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF.
2956.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF.
3004.0 kHzI, JMA, FAE, FATInternational HF; Flight Test.
3019.0 kHzIMA1, FAEDomestic HF; International HF.
3023.0 kHzF, M, OMA1, FAR, FACSearch and rescue communications.
3281.0 kHzKMA, FASLighter-than-air craft and aeronautical stations serving lighter-than-air craft.
3400.0-3500.0 kHzIMA, FAEInternational HF.
3434.0 kHzIMA1, FAEDomestic HF.
3443.0 kHzJMA, FATFlight Test.
3449.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF.
3470.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF; International HF.
4125.0 kHzFMADistress and safety with ships and coast stations.
4550.0 kHzIAXGulf of Mexico.
4645.0 kHzIAXAlaska.
4650.0-4700.0 kHzIMA, FAEInternational HF.
4672.0 kHzIMA1, FAEDomestic HF.
4947.5 kHzIAXAlaska.
5036.0 kHzIAXGulf of Mexico.
5122.5 kHzIAXAlaska.
5167.5 kHzIFAAlaska emergency.
5310.0 kHzIAXAlaska.
5450.0-5680.0 kHzIMA, FAEInternational HF.
5451.0 kHzJMA, FATFlight Test.
5463.0 kHzIMA1, FAEDomestic HF.
5469.0 kHzJMA, FATFlight Test.
5472.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF.
5484.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF.
5490.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF.
5496.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF.
5508.0 kHzIMA1, FAEDomestic HF.
5571.0 kHzJMA, FATFlight Test.
5631.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF.
5680.0 kHzF, M, OMA1, FAC, FARSearch and rescue communications.
5887.5 kHzIAXAlaska.
6525.0-6685.0 kHzIMA, FAEInternational HF.
6550.0 kHzJMA, FATFlight Test.
6580.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF.
6604.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF.
8015.0 kHzIAXAlaska.
8364.0 kHzFMASearch and rescue communications.
8815.0-8965.0 kHzIMA, FAEInternational HF.
8822.0 kHzJMA, FATFlight Test.
8855.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF; international HF.
8876.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF.
10005.0-10100.0 kHzIMA, FAEInternational HF.
10045.0 kHzJMA, FATFlight Test.
10066.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF; international HF.
11275.0-11400.0 kHzIMA, FAEInternational HF.
11288.0 kHzJMA, FATFlight Test.
11306.0 kHzJMA, FATFlight Test.
11357.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF.
11363.0 kHzIMA, FAEDomestic HF.
13260.0-13360.0 kHzIMA, FAEInternational HF.
13312.0 kHzI, JMA, FAE, FATInternational HF; Flight Test.
17900.0-17970.0 kHzIMA, FAEInternational HF.
17964.0 kHzJMA, FATFlight Test.
21924.0-22000.0 kHzIMA, FAEInternational HF.
21931.0 kHzJMA, FATFlight Test.
72.02-72.98 MHzPFA, AXOOperational fixed.
75.000 MHzQRLAMarker beacon.
75.42-75.98 MHzPFA, AXOOperational fixed.
108.000 MHzQRLT   
108.000-117.950 MHzQRLOVHF omni-range.
108.000-117.975 MHzQDGPDifferential GPS.
108.050 MHzQRLT   
108.100-111.950 MHzQRLLILS Localizer.
108.100 MHzQRLT   
108.150 MHzQRLT   
118.000-121.400 MHzO, SMA, FAC, FAW, GCO
RCO, RPC
25 kHz channel spacing
121.500 MHzG, H, I, J, K, M, OMA, FAU, FAE, FAT, FAS, FAC, FAMEmergency and distress.
121.600-121.925 MHzO, L, QMA, FAC, MOU, RLT, GCO, RCO, RPC25 kHz channel spacing.
121.950 MHzKFAS   
121.975 MHzF, SMA2, FAW, FAC, MOUAir traffic control operations.
122.000 MHzFMA, FAC, MOUAir carrier and private aircraft enroute flight advisory service provided by FAA.
122.025 MHzF, SMA2, FAW, FAC, MOUAir traffic control operations.
122.050 MHzFMA, FAC, MOUAir traffic control operations.
122.075 MHzF, SMA2, FAW, FAC, MOUAir traffic control operations.
122.100 MHzF, OMA, FAC, MOUAir traffic control operations.
122.125-122.675 MHzFMA2, FAC, MOUAir traffic control operations; 25 kHz spacing.
122.700 MHzG, L, QMA, FAU, MOU, AVWUnicom at airports with no control tower; Aeronautical utility stations.
122.725 MHzG, L, QMA, FAU, MOU, AVWUnicom at airports with no control tower; Aeronautical utility stations.
122.750 MHzF, QMA2, AVWPrivate fixed wing aircraft air-to-air communications.
122.775 MHzKMA, FAS   
122.800 MHzG, L, QMA, FAU, MOU, AVWUnicom at airports with no control tower; Aeronautical utility stations.
122.825 MHzIMA, FAEDomestic VHF.
122.850 MHzH, K, QMA, FAM, FAS, AVW.
122.875 MHzIMA, FAEDomestic VHF.
122.900 MHzF, H, L, M, QMA, FAR, FAM, MOU, AVW
122.925 MHzHMA2, FAM
122.950 MHzG, L, QMA, FAU, MOU, AVWUnicom at airports with control tower; Aeronautical utility stations.
122.975 MHzG, L, QMA, FAU, MOU, AVWUnicom at airports with no control tower; Aeronautical utility stations.
123.000 MHzG, L, QMA, FAU, MOU, AVWUnicom at airports with no control tower; Aeronautical utility stations.
123.025 MHzF, QMA2, AVWHelicopter air-to-air communications; Air traffic control operations.
123.050 MHzG, L, QMA, FAU, MOU, AVWUnicom at airports with no control tower; Aeronautical utility stations.
123.075 MHzG, L, QMA, FAU, MOU, AVWUnicom at airports with no control tower; Aeronautical utility stations.
123.100 MHzM, OMA, FAC, FAR   
123.125 MHzJMA, FATItinerant.
123.150 MHzJMA, FATItinerant.
123.175 MHzJMA, FATItinerant.
123.200 MHzJMA, FAT   
123.225 MHzJMA, FAT   
123.250 MHzJMA, FAT   
123.275 MHzJMA, FAT   
123.300 MHzK, QMA, FAS, AVW.
123.325 MHzJMA, FAT   
123.350 MHzJMA, FAT   
123.375 MHzJMA, FAT   
123.400 MHzJMA, FATItinerant.
123.425 MHzJMA, FAT   
123.450 MHzJMA, FAT   
123.475 MHzJMA, FAT   
123.500 MHzK, QMA, FAS, AVW.
123.525 MHzJMA, FAT   
123.550 MHzJMA, FAT   
123.575 MHzJMA, FAT   
123.6-128.8 MHzO, SMA, FAC, FAW, GCO, RCO, RPC25 kHz channel spacing.
128.825-132.000 MHzIMA, FAEDomestic VHF.
131.450 MHzIDLT.
131.550 MHzIDLT.
131.725 MHzIDLT.
131.825 MHzIDLT.
132.025-135.975 MHzO, SMA, FAC, FAW, GCO RCO RPC25 kHz channel spacing.
136.000-136.400 MHzO, SMA, FAC, FAW, GCO, RCO, RPCAir traffic control operations; 25 kHz channel spacing.
136.425 MHzO, SMA, FAC, FAW, GCO, RCO, RPCAir traffic control operations.
136.450 MHzO, SMA, FAC, FAW, GCO, RCO, RPCAir traffic control operations.
136.475 MHzO, SMA, FAC, FAW, GCO, RCO, RPCAir traffic control operations.
136.500-136.875 MHzIMA, FAEDomestic VHF; 25 kHz channel spacing.
136.850 MHzIDLT.
136.900 MHzIMA, FAE, DLTInternational and Domestic VHF.
136.925 MHzIMA, FAE, DLTInternational and Domestic VHF.
136.950 MHzIMA, FAE, DLTInternational and Domestic VHF.
136.975 MHzIMA, FAE, DLTInternational and Domestic VHF.
156.300 MHzFMAFor communications with ship stations under specific conditions.
156.375 MHzFMAFor communications with ship stations under specific conditions; Not authorized in New Orleans Vessel traffic service area.
156.400 MHzFMAFor communications with ship stations under specific conditions.
156.425 MHzFMAFor communications with ship stations under specific conditions.
156.450 MHzFMAFor communications with ship stations under specific conditions.
156.625 MHzFMAFor communications with ship stations under specific conditions.
156.800 MHzFMADistress, safety and calling frequency; For communications with ship stations under specific conditions.
156.900 MHzFMAFor communications with ship stations under specific conditions.
157.425 MHzFMAFor communications with commercial fishing vessels under specific conditions except in Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway Areas.
243.000 MHzFMAEmergency and distress frequency for use of survival craft and emergency locator transmitters.
328.600-335.400 MHzQRLGILS glide path.
334.550 MHzQRLT
334.700 MHzQRLT
406.0-406.1 MHzF, G, H, I, J, K, M, OMA, FAU, FAE, FAT, FAS, FAC, FAMEmergency and distress.
960-1215 MHzF, QMA, RL, RNVElectronic aids to air navigation.
978.000 MHzF, L, QMA, MOU, UATUniversal Access Transceivers.
   UAT
   QRLT
979.000 MHzQRLT
1030.000 MHzQRLT.
1090.000 MHzLMOU, RLTVehicle Squitter.
1104.000 MHzQRLT
1300-1350 MHzF, QMA, RLSSurveillance radars and transponders.
1435-1525 MHzF, JMA, FATAeronautical telemetry and telecommand operations.
1559-1610 MHzQDGPDifferential GPS.
1559-1626.5 MHzF, QMA, RLAeronautical radionavigation.
1646.5-1660.5 MHzFTJAeronautical Mobile-Satellite (R).
2310-2320 MHzJMA, FATAeronautical telemetry and telecommand operations.
2345-2395 MHzJMA, FATAeronautical telemetry and telecommand operations.
2700-2900 MHzQRLS, RLDAirport surveillance and weather radar.
4200-4400 MHzFMARadio altimeters.
5000-5250 MHzQMA, RLWMicrowave landing systems.
5031.000 MHzQRLT
5350-5470 MHzFMAAirborne radars and associated airborne beacons.
8750-8850 MHzFMAAirborne doppler radar.
9000-9200 MHzQRLS, RLDLand-based radar.
9300-9500 MHzF, QMAAirborne radars and associated airborne beacons.
13250-13400 MHzFMAAirborne doppler radar.
15400-15700 MHzQRLAeronautical radionavigation.
24750-25050 MHzF, QMA, RLAeronautical radionavigation.
32300-33400 MHzF, QMA, RLAeronautical radionavigation.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §87.183, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys.gov.

Subpart F—Aircraft Stations

§87.185   Scope of service.

(a) Aircraft stations must limit their communications to the necessities of safe, efficient, and economic operation of aircraft and the protection of life and property in the air, except as otherwise specifically provided in this part. Contact with an aeronautical land station must only be attempted when the aircraft is within the serivce area of the land station. however, aircraft stations may transmit advisory information on air traffic control, unicom or aeronautical multicom frequencies for the benefit and use of other stations monitoring these frequencies in accordance with FAA recommended traffic advisory practices.

(b) Aircraft public correspondence service must be made available to all persons without discrimination and on reasonable demand, and must communicate without discrimination with any public coast station or mobile-satellite earth station authorized to provide aircraft public correspondence service.

(c) Aircraft public correspondence service on maritime mobile frequencies may only be carried by aircraft stations licensed to use maritime mobile frequencies and must follow the rules for public correspondence in part 80.

(d) Aircraft public correspondence service on Aeronautical Mobile-Satellite (R) Service frequencies may only be carried on aircraft earth stations licensed to use Aeronautical Mobile-Satellite (R) frequencies and are subject to the rules for public correspondence in this part. Aircraft public correspondence service on Maritime Mobile-Satellite Service frequencies may only be carried by aircraft earth stations licensed to use Maritime Mobile-Satellite frequencies and are subject to the rules for public correspondence in part 80.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 57 FR 45750, Oct. 5, 1992]

§87.187   Frequencies.

(a) Frequencies used for air-ground Communications are listed in subpart E. Aircraft stations may use frequencies assigned to Government or non-Government aeronautical stations or radionavigation land stations if the communications are within the aeronautical or radionavigation land station scope of service.

(b) 410 kHz is the international direction-finding frequency for use outside the continental United States.

(c) 457 kHz is an authorized working frequency for flights over the high seas.

(d) 500 kHz an international calling and distress frequency for aircraft on flights over the high seas. Except for distress, urgency or safety messages an aircraft station must not transmit on 500 kHz during the silence periods for three minutes twice each hour beginning at x h. 15 and x h.45 Coordinated Universal Time (u.t.c.).

(e) The frequency 2182 khz is an international distress and calling frequency for use by ship, aircraft and survival craft stations. Aircraft stations must use J3E emission when operating on 2182 kHz and communicating with domestic public and private coast stations. The emission H3E may be used when communicating with foreign coast and ship stations.

(f) The frequencies 3023 kHz, 5680 kHz, 122.900 MHz and 123.100 MHz are authorized for use by aircraft engaged in seach and rescue activities in accordance with subpart M. These frequencies may be used for air-air and air-ground communications.

(g) The frequency 4125 kHz may be used for distress and safety communications between aircraft and ship and coast maritime mobile stations.

(h) The frequency 8364.0 kHz is authorized for use of survival craft for search and rescue communications with stations in the maritime mobile service.

(i) The frequencies in the band 121.975-122.675 MHz are authorized for use by private aircraft of air traffic control operations.

(1) The frequencies 122.00 and 122.050 MHz are authorized for use by air carrier and private aircraft stations for enroute flight advisory service (EFAS) provided by the FAA;

(2) The frequency 122.100 MHz is authorized for use by air carrier aircraft stations for air traffic control operations at locations in Alaska where other frequencies are not available for air traffic control.

(j) The frequency 122.750 MHz is authoried for use by private fixed wing aircraft for air-air communications. The frequency 123.025 MHz is authorized for use by helicopters for air-air Communications.

(k) The frequencies 121.500 MHz and 243.000 MHz are emergency and distress frequences available for use by survival craft stations, emergency locator transmitters and equipment used for survival pruposes. Use of 121.500 MHz and 243.00 MHz shall be limited to transmission of signals and communications for survival purposes. Type A2A, A3E or A3N emission may be employed, except in the case of emergency locator transmitters where A3E, A3X and NON are permitted.

(l) The frequencies 156.300, 156.375, 156,400, 156,425, 156.450, 156.625, 156.800 156.900 and 157.425 MHz may be used by aircraft stations to communicate with ship stations in accordance with part 80 and the following conditions:

(1) The altitude of aircraft stations must not exceed 300 meters (1,000 feet), except for reconnaissance aircraft participating in icebreaking operations where an altitude of 450 meters (1,500 feet) is allowed;

(2) Aircraft station transmitter power must not exceed five watts;

(3) The frequency 156.300 MHz may be used for safety purposes only. The frequency 156.800 MHz may be used for distress, safety and calling purposes only.

(4) Except in the Great Lakes and along the St. Lawrence Seaway the frequency 157.425 MHz is available for communications with commerical fishing vessels.

(5) The frequency 156.375 MHz cannot be used in the New Orleans, LA, VTS protection area. No harmful interference shall be caused to the VTS.

(m) The frequency 406.0-406.1 MHz is an emergency and distress frequency available for use by emergency locator transmitters. Use of this frequency must be limited to transmission of distress and safety communications.

(n) The frequency band 960-1215 MHz is for the use of airborne electronic aids to air navigation and directly associated land stations.

(o) The frequency band 1300-1350 MHz is for surveillance radar stations and associated airborne transponders.

(p) The frequency band 1435-1525 MHz is available on a primary basis and the frequency band 1525-1535 MHz is available on a secondary basis for telemetry and telecommand associated with the flight testing of aircraft, missiles, or related major components. This includes launching into space, reentry into the earth's atmosphere and incidental orbiting prior to reentry. The following frequencies are shared with flight telemetry mobile stations: 1444.5, 1453.5, 1501.5, 1515.5, and 1524.5 MHz. See §87.303(d).

Note to paragraph (p): Aeronautical telemetry operations must protect mobile-satellite operations in the 1525-2535 MHz band and maritime mobile-satellite operations in the 1530-1535 MHz band.

(q) The frequencies in the band 1545.000-1559.000 MHz and 1646.500-1660.500 MHz are authorized for use by the Aeronautical Mobile-Satellite (R) Service. The use of the bands 1544.000-1545.000 MHz (space-to-Earth) and 1645.500-1646.500 MHz (Earth-to-space) by the Mobile-Satellite Service is limited to distress and safety operations. In the frequency bands 1549.500-1558.500 MHz and 1651.000-1660.000 MHz, the Aeronautical Mobile-Satellite (R) requirements that cannot be accommodated in the 1545.000-1549.500 MHz, 1558.500-1559.000 MHz, 1646.500-1651.000 MHz, and 1660.000-1660.500 MHz bands shall have priority access with real-time preemptive capability for communications in the Mobile-Satellite Service. Systems not interoperable with the Aeronautical Mobile-Satellite (R) Service shall operate on a secondary basis. Account shall be taken of the priority of safety-related communications in the Mobile-Satellite Service.

(r) The frequency band 1559-1626.5 MHz is available for airborne electronic aids to air navigation and any associated land station.

(s) The frequency band 4200-4400 MHz is reserved exclusively for radio altimeters.

(t) The frequency band 5350-5470 MHz in the aeronautical radionavigation service is limited to airborne radars and associated airborne beacons.

(u) The frequency band 8750-8850 MHz is available for use by airborne doppler radars in the aeronautical radionavigation service only on the condition that they must accept any interference which may be experienced from stations in the radiolocation service in the band 8500-10,000 MHz.

(v) The frequency band 9300-9500 MHz is limited to airborne radars and associated airborne beacons.

(w) The frequency band 13250-13400 MHz available for airborne doppler radar use.

(x) The frequency bands 24450-24650 MHz, 24750-25050 MHz and 32300-33400 MHz are available for airborne radionavigation devices.

(y) Brief keyed RF signals (keying the transmitter by momentarily depressing the microphone “push-to-talk” button) may be transmitted from aircraft for the control of automated unicoms on the unicom frequencies listed in paragraph (y)(3) of this section, or for the control of airport lights on the following frequencies:

(1) Any air traffic control frequency listed in §87.421.

(2) FAA Flight Service Station frequencies 121.975-122.675 MHz.

(3) The unicom frequencies 122.700, 122.725, 122.800, 122.950, 122.975, 123.000, 123.050 and 123.075 MHz.

(4) Aviation support station frequencies listed in §87.323(b): 121.950, 123.300 and 123.500 MHz if the frequency is assigned to a station at the airport and no harmful interference is caused to voice communications. If no such station is located at the concerned airport, aircraft may use one of the aviation support station frequencies for the control of airport lights.

(5) The frequency 122.9 MHz when it is used as the common traffic advisory frequency at the concerned airport.

(z) Frequencies for public correspondence between ships and public coast stations in the maritime mobile service (except frequencies in the 156-174 MHz band) and coast earth stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service are available for public correspondence between aircraft and public coast stations and coast earth stations, respectively. The transmission of public correspondence from aircraft must not cause interference to maritime communications.

(aa) Frequencies in the 454.675-459.975 MHz band are available in the Public Mobile Radio Service (part 22) for use on board aircraft for communications with land mobile stations which are interconnected to the nationwide public telephone system.

(bb) The frequencies 121.950 MHz, 122.850 MHz and 127.0501 MHz are authorized for air-to-air use for aircraft up to and including 3 km (10,000 ft) mean sea level in the vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona within the area bounded by the following coordinates (all coordinates are referenced to North American Datum 1983 (NAD83)):

1Until further notice this frequency is available for air-to-air use as described in the Grand Canyon vicinity. Availability is a result of the FAA's assignment of this frequency. If the FAA reassigns this frequency the Commission may require air-to-air use to cease.

36-27-59.9 N. Lat; 112-47-2.7 W. Long.

36-27-59.9 N. Lat; 112-48-2.7 W. Long.

35-50-00.0 N. Lat; 112-48-2.7 W. Long.

35-43-00.0 N. Lat; 112-47-2.7 W. Long.

(cc) The frequency 120.650 MHz1 is authorized for air-to-air use for aircraft up to and including 3 km (10,000 ft) mean sea level within the area bounded by the following coordinates (all coordinates are referenced to North American Datum 1983 (NAD83)):

35-59-44.9 N. Lat; 114-51-48.0 W. Long.

36-09-29.9 N. Lat; 114-50-3.0 W. Long.

36-09-29.9 N. Lat; 114-02-57.9 W. Long.

35-54-45.0 N. Lat; 113-48-47.8 W. Long.

(dd) The frequencies 136.425, 136.450, and 136.475 MHz are designated for flight information services—broadcast (FIS-B) and may not be used by aircraft for transmission.

(ee) The frequency 121.95 MHz is authorized for air-to-ground and air-to-air communications for aircraft up to 13000 feet above mean sea level (AMSL) within the area bounded by the following coordinates (all coordinates are referenced to North American Datum 1983 (NAD83)):

32-35-00 N. Lat.; 117-12-00 W. Long.

32-42-00 N. Lat.; 116-56-00 W. Long.

32-41-00 N. Lat.; 116-41-00 W. Long.

32-35-00 N. Lat.; 116-38-00 W. Long.

32-31-00 N. Lat.; 117-11-00 W. Long.

(ff) The frequency 978 MHz is authorized for Universal Access Transceiver data transmission.

(gg) (1) The frequency 120.650 MHz is authorized for air-to-air communications for aircraft over and within five nautical miles of the shoreline of the Hawaiian Island of Maui.

(2) The frequency 121.950 MHz is authorized for air-to-air use for aircraft over and within five nautical miles of the shoreline of the Hawaiian Island of Molokai.

(3) The frequency 122.850 MHz is authorized for air-to-air use for aircraft over and within five nautical miles of the shoreline of the Hawaiian Island of Oahu.

(4) The frequency 122.850 MHz is authorized for aircraft over and within five nautical miles of the shoreline of the Hawaiian Island of Hawaii when aircraft are south and east of the 215 degree radial of very high frequency omni-directional radio range of Hilo International Airport.

(5) The frequency 127.050 MHz is authorized for air-to-air use for aircraft over and within five nautical miles of the shoreline of the Hawaiian Island of Hawaii when aircraft are north and west of the 215 degree radial of very high frequency omni-directional radio range of Hilo International Airport.

(6) The frequency 127.050 MHz is authorized for air-to-air use for aircraft over and within five nautical miles of the Hawaiian Island of Kauai.

(hh) (1) The frequency 121.95 MHz is authorized for air-to-air communications for aircraft within the area bounded by the following coordinates (all coordinates are referenced to North American Datum 1983 (NAD83)):

33-46-00 N. Lat.; 118-27-00 W. Long.

33-47-00 N. Lat.; 118-12-00 W. Long.

33-40-00 N. Lat.; 118-00-00 W. Long.

33-35-00 N. Lat.; 118-08-00 W. Long.

34-00-00 N. Lat.; 118-26-00 W. Long.

(2) The frequency 122.775 MHz is authorized for air-to-air communications for aircraft within the area bounded by the following coordinates (all coordinates are referenced to North American Datum 1983 (NAD83)):

34-22-00 N. Lat.; 118-30-00 W. Long.

34-35-00 N. Lat.; 118-15-00 W. Long.

34-27-00 N. Lat.; 118-15-00 W. Long.

34-16-00 N. Lat.; 118-35-00 W. Long.

34-06-00 N. Lat.; 118-35-00 W. Long.

34-05-00 N. Lat.; 118-50-00 W. Long.

(3) The frequency 123.30 MHz is authorized for air-to-air communications for aircraft within the area bounded by the following coordinates (all coordinates are referenced to North American Datum 1983 (NAD83)):

34-08-00 N. Lat.; 118-00-00 W. Long.

34-10-00 N. Lat.; 117-08-00 W. Long.

34-00-00 N. Lat.; 117-08-00 W. Long.

33-53-00 N. Lat.; 117-42-00 W. Long.

33-58-00 N. Lat.; 118-00-00 W. Long.

(4) The frequency 123.50 MHz is authorized for air-to-air communications for aircraft within the area bounded by the following coordinates (all coordinates are referenced to North American Datum 1983 (NAD83)):

33-53-00 N. Lat.; 117-37-00 W. Long.

34-00-00 N. Lat.; 117-15-00 W. Long.

34-00-00 N. Lat.; 117-07-00 W. Long.

33-28-00 N. Lat.; 116-55-00 W. Long.

33-27-00 N. Lat.; 117-12-00 W. Long.

(5) The frequency 123.50 MHz is authorized for air-to-air communications for aircraft within the area bounded by the following coordinates (all coordinates are referenced to North American Datum 1983 (NAD83)):

33-50-00 N. Lat.; 117-48-00 W. Long.

33-51-00 N. Lat.; 117-41-00 W. Long.

33-38-00 N. Lat.; 117-30-00 W. Long.

33-30-00 N. Lat.; 117-30-00 W. Long.

33-30-00 N. Lat.; 117-49-00 W. Long.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §87.187, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys.gov.

§87.189   Requirements for public correspondence equipment and operations.

(a) Transmitters used for public correspondence by aircraft stations in the maritime mobile frequency bands must be authorized by the Commission in conformity with part 80 of this chapter.

(b) Transmitters used for public correspondence by aircraft stations in the Aeronautical Mobile-Satellite (R) or Maritime Mobile-Satellite frequencies must be certificated by the Commission in conformity with part 87. Aircraft earth stations that are required to be commissioned to use a privately owned satellite system also must meet the provisions of §87.51.

(c) A continuous watch must be maintained on the frequencies used for safety and regularity of flight while public correspondence communications are being handled. For aircraft earth stations, this requirement is satisfied by compliance with the priority and preemptive access requirements of §87.187(q).

(d) All communications in the Aeronautical Mobile Service and the Aeronautical Mobile-Satellite (R) Service have priority over public correspondence.

(e) Transmission of public correspondence must be suspended when such operation will delay or interfere with message pertaining to safety of life and property or regularity of flight, or when ordered by the captain of the aircraft.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 57 FR 45750, Oct. 5, 1992; 63 FR 36608, July 7, 1998; 69 FR 32884, June 14, 2004]

§87.191   Foreign aircraft stations.

(a) Aircraft of member States of the International Civil Aviation Organization may carry and operate radio transmitters in the United States airspace only if a license has been issued by the State in which the aircraft is registered and the flight crew is provided with a radio operator license of the proper class, issued or recognized by the State in which the aircraft is registered. The use of radio transmitters in the United States airspace must comply with these rules and regulations.

(b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a) of this section where an agreement with a foreign government has been entered into with respect to aircraft registered in the United States but operated by an aircraft operator who is subject to regulation by that foreign government, the aircraft radio station license and aircraft radio operator license may be issued by such foreign government.

Emergency Locator Transmitters

§87.193   Scope of service.

Transmissions by emergency locator transmitters (ELTs) are intended to be actuated manually or automatically and operated automatically as part of an aircraft or a survival craft station as a locating aid for survival purposes.

§87.195   Frequencies.

(a) ELTs transmit on the frequency 121.500 MHz, using A3E, A3X or NON emission. ELTs that transmit on the frequency 406.0-406.1 MHz use G1D emission.

(b) The frequency 243.000 MHz is an emergency and distress frequency available for use by survival craft stations, ELTs and equipment used for survival purposes which are also equipped to transmit on the frequency 121.500 MHz. Use of 243.000 MHz must be limited to transmission of signals and communications for survival purposes. In the case of ELTs use of A3E, A3X or NON emission is permitted.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 56 FR 11518, Mar. 19, 1991; 58 FR 30128, May 26, 1993; 69 FR 32884, June 14, 2004]

Effective Date Note: At 76 FR 17353, Mar. 29, 2011, §87.195 was stayed indefinitely.

Editorial Note: At 76 FR 17352, Mar. 29, 2011, §87.195 was amended by revising the section heading, and adding introductory text, however these amendments could not be incorporated because the section is suspended. For the convenience of the user, the revised and added text is set forth as follows:

§87.195   Prohibition of 121.5 MHz ELTs.

The manufacture, importation, sale or use of 121.5 MHz ELTs is prohibited.

*   *   *   *   *

§87.197   ELT test procedures.

ELT testing must avoid outside radiation. Bench and ground tests conducted outside of an RF-shielded enclosure must be conducted with the ELT terminated into a dummy load.

§87.199   Special requirements for 406.0-406.1 MHz ELTs.

(a) 406.0-406.1 ELTs use G1D emission. Except for the spurious emission limits specified in §87.139(h), 406.0-406.1 MHz ELTs must meet all the technical and performance standards contained in the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics document titled “Minimum Operational Performance Standards 406 MHz Emergency Locator Transmitters (ELT)” Document No. RTCA/DO-204 dated September 29, 1989. The Director of the Federal Register approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of this standard can be inspected at the Federal Communications Commission, 445 12th Street, SW., Washington, DC (Reference Information Center) or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. Copies of the RTCA standards also may be obtained from the Radio Technical Commission of Aeronautics, One McPherson Square, 1425 K Street, NW., Washington, DC 20005.

(b) The 406.0-406.1 MHz ELT must contain as an integral part a homing beacon operating only on 121.500 MHz that meets all the requirements described in the RTCA Recommended Standards document described in paragraph (a) of this section. The 121.500 MHz homing beacon must have a continuous duty cycle that may be interrupted during the transmission of the 406.0-406.1 MHz signal only.

(c) Prior to verification of a 406.0-406.1 MHz ELT, the ELT must be certified by a test facility recognized by one of the COSPAS/SARSAT Partners that the equipment satisfies the design characteristics associated with the COSPAS/SARSAT document COSPAS/SARSAT 406 MHz Distress Beacon Type Approval Standard (C/S T.007). Additionally, an independent test facility must certify that the ELT complies with the electrical and environmental standards associated with the RTCA Recommended Standards.

(d) The procedures for verification are contained in subpart J of part 2 of this chapter.

(e) An identification code, issued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the United States Program Manager for the 406.0-406.1 MHz COSPAS/SARSAT satellite system, must be programmed in each ELT unit to establish a unique identification for each ELT station. With each marketable ELT unit the manufacturer or grantee must include a postage pre-paid registration card printed with the ELT identification code addressed to: NOAA/SARSAT Beacon Registration, E/SP3, Federal Building 4, Room 3320, 5200 Auth Road, Suitland, MD 20746-4304. The registration card must request the owner's name, address, telephone, type of aircraft, alternate emergency contact, and other information as required by NOAA. The registration card must also contain information regarding the availability to register the ELT at NOAA's online Web-based registration database at: http://www.beaconregistration.noaa.gov. Further, the following statement must be included: “WARNING “ Failure to register this ELT with NOAA before installation could result in a monetary forfeiture being issued to the owner.”

(f) To enhance protection of life and property, it is mandatory that each 406.0-406.1 MHz ELT must be registered with NOAA before installation and that information be kept up-to-date. In addition to the identification plate or label requirements contained in §§2.925 and 2.926 of this chapter, each 406.0-406.1 MHz ELT must be provided on the outside with a clearly discernable permanent plate or label containing the following statement: “The owner of this 406.0-406.1 MHz ELT must register the NOAA identification code contained on this label with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), whose address is: NOAA/SARSAT Beacon Registration, E/SP3, Federal Building 4, Room 3320, 5200 Auth Road, Suitland, MD 20746-4304.” Aircraft owners shall advise NOAA in writing upon change of aircraft or ELT ownership, or any other change in registration information. Fleet operators must notify NOAA upon transfer of ELT to another aircraft outside of the owner's control, or an other change in registration information. NOAA will provide registrants with proof of registration and change of registration postcards.

(g) For 406.0-406.1 MHz ELTs whose identification code can be changed after manufacture, the identification code shown on the plant or label must be easily replaceable using commonly available tools.

[69 FR 32885, June 14, 2004, as amended at 76 FR 17352, Mar. 29, 2011]

Subpart G—Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms)

§87.213   Scope of service.

(a) An aeronautical advisory station (unicom) must provide service to any aircraft station upon request and without discrimination. A unicom must provide impartial information concerning available ground services.

(b)(1) Unicom transmissions must be limited to the necessities of safe and expeditious operation of aircraft such as condition of runways, types of fuel available, wind conditions, weather information, dispatching, or other necessary information. At any airport at which a control tower, control tower remote communications outlet station (RCO) or FAA flight service station is located, unicoms must not transmit information pertaining to the conditions of runways, wind conditions, or weather information during the hours of operation of the control tower, RCO or FAA service station.

(2) On a secondary basis, unicoms may transmit communications which pertain to the efficient portal-to-portal transit of an aircraft, such as requests for ground transportation, food or lodging.

(3) Communications between unicoms and air carrier must be limited to the necessities of safety of life and property.

(4) Unicoms may communicate with aeronautical utility stations and ground vehicles concerning runway conditions and safety hazards on the airport when neither a control tower nor FAA flight service station is in operation.

(c) Unicoms must not be used for air traffic control (ATC) purposes other than to relay ATC information between the pilot and air traffic controller. Relaying of ATC information is limited to the following:

(1) Revisions of proposed departure time;

(2) Takeoff, arrival or flight plan cancellation time;

(3) ATC clearances, provided a letter of agreement is obtained from the FAA by the licensee of the unicom.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 55 FR 30464, July 26, 1990]

§87.215   Supplemental eligibility.

(a) A unicom and any associated dispatch or control points must be located on the airport to be served.

(b) Only one unicom will be authorized to operate at an airport which does not have a control tower, RCO or FAA flight service station that operates on the published common traffic advisory frequency. At any other airport, the one unicom limitation does not apply, and the airport operator and all aviation services organizations may be licensed to operate a unicom on the assigned frequency.

(c) At an airport where only one unicom may be licensed, eligibility for new unicom licenses is restricted to State or local government entities, and to nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) that are authorized to apply for the license by a State or local government entity whose primary mission is the provision of public safety services. All applications submitted by NGOs must be accompanied by a new, written certification of support (for the NGO applicant to operate the applied for station) by the state or local government entity. Applications for a unicom license at the same airport, where only one unicom may be licensed, that are filed by two or more applicants meeting these eligibility criteria must be resolved through settlement or technical amendment.

(d) At an airport where only one unicom may be licensed, the license may be assigned or transferred only to an entity meeting the requirements of paragraph (c) of this section.

(e) An applicant for renewal of a unicom license shall be granted a presumptive renewal expectancy regardless of whether the applicant is eligible for a new unicom license under paragraph (c) of this section. Unless the renewal expectancy is defeated, applications that are mutually exclusive with the renewal application will not be accepted. The renewal expectancy may be defeated only upon a determination, following a hearing duly designated on the basis of a petition to deny or on the Commission's own motion, that the renewal applicant has not provided substantial service. For purposes of this paragraph, substantial service means service which is sound, favorable, and substantially above a level of mediocre service during the applicant's past license term. If the renewal expectancy is defeated, the renewal application will be dismissed unless the renewal applicant is eligible for a new unicom license pursuant to paragraph (c) of this section.

(f) At an airport where only one unicom may be licensed, when the Commission believes that the unicom has been abandoned or has ceased operation, another unicom may be licensed on an interim basis pending final determination of the status of the original unicom. An applicant for an interim license must notify the present licensee and must comply with the notice requirements of paragraph (g) of this section.

(g) An applicant for a unicom license, renewal or modification of frequency assignment at an airport which does not have a control tower, RCO or FAA flight service station must notify in writing the owner of the airport and all aviation service organizations located at the airport. The notice must include the applicant's name and address, the name of the airport and a statement that the applicant intends to file an application with the Commission for a unicom. The notice must be given within the ten days preceding the filing of the application with the Commission. Each applicant must certify upon application that either notice has been given and include the date of notification, or notice is not required because the applicant owns the airport and there are no organizations that should be notified.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 55 FR 30464, July 26, 1990; 63 FR 68957, Dec. 14, 1998; 69 FR 32885, June 14, 2004; 76 FR 17352, Mar. 29, 2011]

§87.217   Frequencies.

(a) Only one unicom frequency will be assigned at any one airport. Applicants must request a particular frequency, which will be taken into consideration when the assignment is made. The frequencies assignable to unicoms are:

(1) 122.950 MHz at airports which have a full-time control tower or full-time FAA flight service station.

(2) 122.700, 122.725, 122.800, 122.975, 123.000, 123.050 or 123.075 MHz at all other airports.

(b) 121.500 MHz: emergency and distress only.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 55 FR 30464, July 26, 1990; 58 FR 67696, Dec. 22, 1993; 69 FR 32885, June 14, 2004]

§87.219   Automatic operations.

(a) A station operator need not be present when an automated unicom is in operation.

(b) Unicoms operating in an automated mode must comply with the requirements of paragraphs (1)-(5) of this section, in addition to the requirements applicable to non-automated unicom operations.

(1) An automated unicom must transmit only in response to interrogating signals from aircraft, including but not limited to the brief keyed RF signals specified in §87.187(y).

(2) An automated unicom must monitor the unicom frequency prior to transmission, and provide a brief delay between the aircraft's interrogating signal and the automatic unicom's response.

(3) Automated advisory transmissions must be as brief as possible, and must never exceed one minute in length.

(4) An automated unicom may not provide weather information at an airport that has an operational, FAA-certified, automatic weather facility, unless the unicom itself is certified by the FAA.

(5) If weather information is provided by an automated unicom:

(i) Weather sensors must be placed in order to adequately represent the weather conditions at the airport(s) to be served;

(ii) The weather information must be proceeded by the word “advisory;”

(iii) The phrase “automated advisory” must be included when the weather information was gathered by real-time sensors or within the last minute; and,

(iv) The time and date of the last update must be included when the weather information was not gathered within the last minute.

(c) Only one automated unicom may be operated at an uncontrolled airport. Prior to the operation of an automated unicom at an airport with more than one unicom licensee, all of the licensees at that airport must sign a letter of agreement stating which licensee(s) control the automated unicom operations, and, if control is to be shared among several operators, how that control will be divided or scheduled. The original or a copy of the letter of agreement must be kept with each licensees' station records. Within 90 days of the date upon which a new unicom operator is licensed at an airport where more than one unicom is authorized, and an automated unicom is being operated, an amended letter of agreement that includes the new licensee's signature must be signed or automated unicom operations must cease.

[64 FR 27475, May 20, 1999]

Subpart H—Aeronautical Multicom Stations

§87.237   Scope of service.

(a) The communications of an aeronautical multicom station (multicom) must pertain to activities of a temporary, seasonal or emergency nature involving aircraft in flight. Communications are limited to directing or coordinating ground activities from the air or aerial activities from the ground. Air-to-air communications will be authorized if the communications are directly connected with the air-to-ground or ground-to-air activities described above. Multicom communications must not include those air/ground communications provided for elsewhere in this part.

(b) If there is not unicom and an applicant is unable to meet the requirements for a unicom license, the applicant will be eligible for a multicom license.

(1) The multicom license becomes invalid when a unicom is established at the landing area.

(2) Multicoms must not be used for ATC purposes other than the relay of ATC information between the pilot and air traffic controller. Relaying of ATC information is limited to the following:

(i) Revisions of proposed departure time;

(ii) Takeoff, arrival flight plan cancellation time;

(iii) ATC clearances, provided a letter of agreement is obtained from the FAA by the licensee of the multicom.

(3) Communications by a multicom must be limited to the safe and expeditious operation of private aircraft, pertaining to the conditions of runways, types of fuel available, wind conditions, weather information, dispatching or other information. On a secondary basis, multicoms may transmit communictions which pertain to efficient portal-to-portal transit of an aircraft such as requests for ground transportation, food or lodging.

§87.239   Supplemental eligibility.

Each applicant for a multicom may be required to demonstrate why such a station is necessary, based on the scope of service defined above.

[63 FR 68957, Dec. 14, 1998]

§87.241   Frequencies.

(a) 121.500 MHz: emergency and distress only;

(b) 122.850 or 122.900 MHz;

(c) 122.925 MHz: available for assignment to communicate with aircraft when coordinating foresty management and fire suppression, fish and game management and protection, and environmental monitoring and protection.

Subpart I—Aeronautical Enroute Stations, Aeronautical Fixed Stations, and Aircraft Data Link Land Test Stations

Aeronautical Enroute Stations

§87.261   Scope of service.

(a) Aeronautical enroute stations provide operational control communications to aircraft along domestic or international air routes. Operational control communications include the safe, efficient and economical operation of aircraft, such as fuel, weather, position reports, aircraft performance, and essential services and supplies. Public correspondence is prohibited.

(b) Service must be provided to any aircraft station licensee who makes cooperative arrangements for the operation, maintenance and liability of the stations which are to furnish enroute service. In emergency or distress situations service must be provided without prior arrangements.

(c) Except in Alaska, only one aeronautical enroute station licensee will be authorized at any one location. In Alaska, only one aeronautical enroute station licensee in the domestic service and one aeronautical enroute station licensee in the international service will be authorized at any one location. (Because enroute stations may provide service over a large area containing a number of air routes or only provide communications in the local area of an airport, location here means the area which can be adequately served by the particular station.)

(d) In Alaska, only stations which serve scheduled air carriers will be licensed to operate aeronautical enroute stations. Applicants must show that the station will provide communications only along routes served by scheduled air carriers.

(e) Mobile units may be operated under an aeronautical enroute station authorization so long as the units are limited to use at an airport and are only used to communicate with aircraft on the ground or the associated aeronautical enroute station. Mobile units are further limited to operation on the VHF frequencies listed in 87.263(a)(1).

(f) Mobile units licensed under paragraph (e) of this section shall not be operated on air traffic control frequencies, nor cause harmful interference to, communications on air traffic control frequencies.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 64 FR 27476, May 20, 1999]

§87.263   Frequencies.

(a) Domestic VHF service. (1) Frequencies in the 128.8125-132.125 MHz and 136.4875-137.00 MHz bands are available to serve domestic routes, except that the frequency 136.750 MHz is available only to aeronautical enroute stations located at least 288 kilometers (180 miles) from the Gulf of Mexico shoreline (outside the Gulf of Mexico region). The frequencies 136.900 MHz, 136.925 MHz, 136.950 MHz and 136.975 MHz are available to serve domestic and international routes. Frequency assignments may be based on either 8.33 kHz or 25 kHz spacing. Use of these frequencies must be compatible with existing operations and must be in accordance with pertinent international treaties and agreements.

(2) A system or network of interconnected enroute stations may employ offset carrier techniques on the frequencies listed in paragraph (a)(1). The carrier frequencies of the individual transmitters must not be offset by more than ±8kHz.

(3) The frequencies 122.825 and 122.875 MHz are available for assignment to enroute stations which provide local area service to aircraft approaching or departing a particular airport. These frequencies will be assigned without regard to the restrictions contained in §87.261 (c) and (d). Only organizations operating aircraft with a maximum capacity of 56 passengers or 8,200 kg (18,000 lbs) cargo will be authorized use of these enroute frequencies.

(4) In Alaska, the frequencies 131.500, 131.600, 131.800 and 131.900 MHz may be assigned to aeronautical enroute stations without regard to the restrictions contained in §87.261 (c) and (d).

(5) The frequency 136.750 MHz is available in the Gulf of Mexico Region to serve domestic routes over the Gulf of Mexico and adjacent coastal areas. Assignment of this frequency in the Gulf of Mexico Region shall be to licensees first licensed on this frequency in the Gulf of Mexico Region prior to January 1, 1994, their successors and assigns, and is not subject to the conditions in §87.261(c) and paragraph (a)(2) of this section. For the purpose of this paragraph, the Gulf of Mexico Region is defined as an area bounded on the east, north, and west by a line 288 km (180 miles) from the Gulf of Mexico shore line. Inland stations must be located within forty-eight kilometers (30 miles) of the Gulf of Mexico shore line.

(b) Domestic HF service. (1) Regular use of high frequencies for aeronautical enroute or any aeronautical mobile (R) communications in the domestic service within the continental United States (excluding Alaska) will not be authorized.

(2) These frequencies (carrier) are available for assignment to serve aircraft operating in support of offshore drilling operations in open sea areas beyond the range of VHF propagation:

kHz

2878.0   4672.0
3019.0   5463.0
3434.0   5508.0

(3) Alaska: The following frequencies (carrier) are available for assignment to serve domestic air routes in the Alaska area:

(i) Throughout Alaska: Shared with the FAA and assigned where an applicant shows the need for a service not provided by the FAA.

kHz

2866.05631.0

(ii) Alaska Aleutian chain and feeders.

kHz

2911.08855.0
2956.010066.0
5496.011363.0
6580.0

(iii) Central and Southeast Alaska and feeders.

kHz

2875.06580.0
2911.06604.0
3470.08876.0
5484.011357.0

(iv) The following frequencies (carrier) are available to enroute stations in Alaska without regard to the restrictions contained in §87.261 (c) or (d). These frequencies may also be used for communications between enroute stations concerning matters directly affecting aircraft with which they are engaged. Enroute stations located at an uncontrolled airport shall not transmit information concerning runway, wind or weather conditions during the operating hours of a unicom.

kHz

3449.05472.0
5167.515490.0

1The frequency 5167.5 kHz is available to any station for emergency communications in Alaska. No airborne operations are permitted. Peak envelope power of stations operating on this frequency must not exceed 150 watts. This frequency may also be used by Alaska private fixed stations for calling purposes, but only for establishing communications.

(c) International VHF service. Frequencies in the 128.825-132.000 and 136.000-137.000 MHz bands are available to enroute stations serving international flight operations. Frequency assignments are based on either 8.33 kHz or 25 kHz channel spacing. Proposed operations must be compatible with existing operations in the band.

(d) International HF service. High frequencies (carrier) available to enroute stations serving international flight operations on the Major World Air Route Areas (MWARA's), as defined in the international Radio Regulations and the ICAO Assignment Plan, are:

(1) Central East Pacific (CEP):

kHz

2869.08843.0
3413.010057.0
4657.011282.0
5547.013300.0
5574.017904.0
6673.0

(2) Central West Pacific (CWP):

kHz

2998.06562.0
3455.08903.0
4666.010081.0
5652.011384.0
5661.013300.0
6532.017904.0

(3) North Pacific (NP):

kHz

2932.010048.0
5628.011330.0
6655.013300.0
6661.017904.0

(4) South Pacific (SP):

kHz

3467.010084.0
5559.011327.0
5643.013300.0
8867.017904.0

(5) North Atlantic (NAT):

kHz

2872.08825.0
2899.08831.0
2962.08864.0
2971.08879.0
3016.08891.0
3476.08906.0
4675.011279.0
5598.011309.0
5616.011336.0
5649.013291.0
6622.013306.0
6628.017946.0

(6) Europe (EUR):

kHz

3479.010084.0
5661.013288.0
6598.017961.0

(7) South America (SAM):

kHz

2944.010024.0
3479.010096.0
4669.011360.0
5526.013297.0
6649.017907.0
8855.0

(8) South Atlantic (SAT):

kHz

2854.08861.0
2935.011291.0
3452.013315.0
5565.013357.0
6535.017955.0

(9) Southeast Asia (SEA):

kHz

3470.010066.0
3485.011396.0
5649.013309.0
5655.013318.0
6556.017907.0
8942.0

(10) East Asia (EA):

kHz

3016.010042.0
3485.011396.0
3491.013297.0
5655.013303.0
5670.013309.0
6571.017907.0
8897.0

(11) Middle East (MID):

kHz

2944.06631.0
2992.08918.0
3467.08951.0
3473.010018.0
4669.011375.0
5658.013288.0
5667.013312.0
6625.017961.0

(12) Africa (AFI):

kHz

2851.06673.0
2878.08894.0
3419.08903.0
3425.08894.0
3467.011300.0
4657.011330.0
5493.013273.0
5652.013288.0
5658.013294.0
6559.017961.0
6574.0

(13) Indian Ocean (INO):

kHz

3476.013306.0
5634.017961.0
8879.0

(14) North Central Asia (NCA):

kHz

3004.06592.0
3019.010096.0
4678.013303.0
5646.013315.0
5664.017958.0

(15) Caribbean (CAR):

kHz

2887.08846.0
3455.08918.0
5520.011387.0
5550.011396.0
6577.013297.0
6586.017907.0

(e) Long distance operational control. Long distance operational control frequencies provide communications between aeronautical enroute stations and aircraft stations anywhere in the world for control of the regularity and efficiency of flight and safety of aircraft. World-wide frequencies are not assigned by administrations for MWARA and Regional and Domestic Air Route Area (RDARA).

kHz

3013.010075.0
3494.011342.0
5529.011348.0
5538.013330.0
6637.013348.0
6640.017925.0
8933.021964.0
10033.0

(f) 121.500 MHz: Emergency and distress only.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 54 FR 11721, Mar. 22, 1989; 55 FR 28628, July 12, 1990; 56 FR 21084, May 7, 1991; 58 FR 44954, Aug. 25, 1993; 66 FR 26800, May 15, 2001; 76 FR 17352, Mar. 29, 2011]

§87.265   Administrative communications.

Domestic VHF aeronautical enroute stations authorized to use A9W emission on any frequency listed in §87.263(a)(1) or §87.263(a)(3) may transmit digital administrative communications on a secondary basis, in addition to the operational and control communications routinely permitted under §87.261(a) above. Such secondary administrative communications must directly relate to the business of a participating aircraft operator in providing travel and transportation services to the flying public or to the travel, transportation or scheduling activities of the aircraft operator itself. Stations transmitting administrative communications must provide absolute priority for operational control and other safety communications by means of an automatic priority control system.

[54 FR 11721, Mar. 22, 1989]

Aeronautical Fixed Stations

§87.275   Scope of service.

Aeronautical fixed stations provide non-public point-to-point communications service pertaining to safety, regularity and economy of flight. These stations must transmit, without discrimination, messages from aircraft which have entered into cooperative arrangements governing the operation and maintenance of such stations. Aeronautical fixed station licensees are required to transmit, without charge or discrimination, all emergency communications.

§87.277   Supplemental eligibility.

Aeronautical fixed station licenses will only be issued to the licensees of associated aeronautical enroute stations. Aeronautical fixed station licenses will not be issued where adequate land line facilities are available.

§87.279   Frequencies.

(a) United States (except Alaska). The applicant must request specific frequencies in accordance with §2.106 of this chapter. The Commission will determine the suitability of the applicant's selection based on the probability of interference to and from existing services assigned on the same or adjacent frequencies. All new assignments of frequencies will be subject to such conditions as may be required to minimize the possibility of harmful interference to existing services.

(b) Alaska. (1) Only stations which serve scheduled air carriers will be licensed. Applicants must show that the station will provide communications only along routes served by the scheduled operations of such carriers.

(2) The following frequencies are available in Alaska. These frequencies will only be licensed in conjunction with licenses for use of the aeronautical enroute frequencies specified in §87.263(c).

kHz

2648.05310.0
4645.05887.5
4947.58015.0
5122.5

(c) Gulf of Mexico. In addition to the provisions of paragraph (a) of this section, the frequencies 4550.0 and 5036.0 kHz are available in the Gulf of Mexico.

Aircraft Data Link Land Test Stations

§87.285   Scope of service.

The frequencies indicated in §87.287 of this chapter may be used to test aircraft data link systems on a secondary basis to other licensed stations. Equipment must be designed so that it will engage in data link exchange only with the aircraft whose identification has been programmed into the device, and must comply with the applicable specifications for VDL Mode 2 operation set forth in the ICAO “Manual on VHF Digital Link (VDL) Mode 2” First Edition-2001, and RTCA DO-281A,” Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Aircraft VDL Mode 2 Physical, Link and Network Layer”, November 8, 2005. These documents are incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a), and 1 CFR part 51 and approved by the Director of the Federal Register. The RTCA document is available and may be obtained from RTCA, Inc., 1828 L Street NW., Suite 805, Washington, DC 20036 and by email to info@rtca.org or go to http://RTCA.org. The ICAO document is available and may be obtained from the ICAO, Customer Services Unit, 999 University Street, Montréal, Quebec H3C 5H7, Canada, by email to icaohq@icao.int or go to: http://www.ICAO.int. You may inspect a copy at the Federal Communications Commission, 445 12th Street SW., Washington, DC 20554, or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html.

[78 FR 61207, Oct. 3, 2013]

§87.287   Frequencies.

(a) The frequencies assignable to aircraft data link land test stations are 131.450 MHz, 131.550 MHz, 131.725 MHz, 131.825 MHz, 136.850 MHz, 136.900 MHz, 136.925 MHz, 136.950 MHz, and 136.975 MHz. Interstitial frequencies separated by 8.33 kilohertz from these frequencies may also be assigned.

(b) Before submitting an application for an aircraft data link land test station, an applicant must obtain written permission from the licensee of the aeronautical enroute stations serving the areas in which the aircraft data link land test station will operate on a co-channel basis. The Commission may request an applicant to provide documentation as to this fact.

[78 FR 61207, Oct. 3, 2013]

Subpart J—Flight Test Stations

§87.299   Scope of service.

The use of flight test stations is restricted to the transmission of necessary information or instructions relating directly to tests of aircraft or components thereof.

§87.301   Supplemental eligibility.

(a) The following entities are eligible for flight test station licenses:

(1) Manufacturers of aircraft or major aircraft components;

(2) A parent corporation or its subsidiary if either corporation is a manufacturer of aircraft or major aircraft components; or

(3) Educational institutions and persons primarily engaged in the design, development, modification, and flight test evaluation of aircraft or major aircraft components.

(b) Each application must include a certification sufficient to establish the applicant's eligibility under the criteria in paragraph (a) of this section.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 63 FR 68957, Dec. 14, 1998]

§87.303   Frequencies.

(a) These frequencies are available for assignment to flight test land and aircraft stations:

kHzMHzMHzMHz
3281.01123.1752123.2253123.4002
   123.2003123.3753123.4503

(b) These additional frequencies are available for assignment only to flight test stations of aircraft manufacturers:

MHzMHzMHzMHz
123.1252123.2753123.4253123.5503
123.1502123.3253123.4753123.5752
123.2503123.3503123.5253

1When R3E, H3E or J3E emission is used, the assigned frequency will be 3282.4 kHz (3281.0 kHz carrier frequency).

2This frequency is available only to itinerant stations that have a requirement to be periodically transferred to various locations.

3Mobile station operations on these frequencies are limited to an area within 320 km (200 mi) of an associated flight test land station.

(c) These frequencies are available for equipment test, emergency and backup use with aircraft beyond the range of VHF propagation. Either H2B, J3E, J7B or J9W emission may be used.

Frequencies (carrier) available kHz:

kHz

2851.08822.0
3004.010045.0
3443.011288.0
5451.011306.0
5469.013312.0
5571.017964.0
6550.021931.0

(d)(1) Frequencies in the bands 1435-1525 MHz and 2360-2395 MHz are assigned in the mobile service primarily for aeronautical telemetry and associated telecommand operations for flight testing of aircraft and missiles, or their major components. The bands 2310-2320 MHz and 2345-2360 MHz are also available for these purposes on a secondary basis. Permissible uses of these bands include telemetry and associated telecommand operations associated with the launching and reentry into the Earth's atmosphere, as well as any incidental orbiting prior to reentry, of objects undergoing flight tests. In the band 1435-1525 MHz, the following frequencies are shared with flight telemetry mobile stations: 1444.5, 1453.5, 1501.5, 1515.5, and 1524.5 MHz. In the band 2360-2395 MHz, the following frequencies may be assigned for telemetry and associated telecommand operations of expendable and re-usable launch vehicles, whether or not such operations involve flight testing: 2364.5, 2370.5 and 2382.5 MHz. In the band 2360-2395 MHz, all other mobile telemetry uses shall not cause harmful interference to, or claim protection from interference from, the above uses.

(2) The authorized bandwidths for stations operating in the bands 1435.0-1525.0 MHz, 1525.0-1535.0 MHz and 2310.0-2390.0 MHz are normally 1, 3 or 5 MHz. Applications for greater bandwidths will be considered in accordance with the provisions of §87.135. Each assignment will be centered on a frequency between 1435.5 MHz and 1534.5 MHz or between 2310.5 MHz and 2389.5 MHz, with 1 MHz channel spacing.

(e) 121.500 MHz: Emergency and distress only.

(f) Frequency assignments for Flight Test VHF Stations may be based on either 8.33 kHz or 25 kHz spacing. Assignable frequencies include the interstitial frequencies 8.33 kHz from the VHF frequencies listed in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section. Each 8.33 kHz interstitial frequency is subject to the same eligibility criteria and limitations as the nearest frequency listed in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 55 FR 4175, Feb. 7, 1990; 58 FR 44954, Aug. 25, 1993; 58 FR 67696, Dec. 22, 1993; 60 FR 37829, July 24, 1995; 62 FR 11107, Mar. 11, 1997; 68 FR 74388, Dec. 23, 2003; 69 FR 77950, Dec. 29, 2004; 71 FR 29818, May 24, 2006; 76 FR 17352, Mar. 29, 2011]

§87.305   Frequency coordination.

(a)(1) Each application for a new station license, renewal or modification of an existing license concerning flight test frequencies, except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, must be accompanied by a statement from a frequency advisory committee. The committee must comment on the frequencies requested or the proposed changes in the authorized station and the probable interference to existing stations. The committee must consider all stations operating on the frequencies requested or assigned within 320 km (200 mi) of the proposed area of operation and all prior coordinations and assignments on the proposed frequency(ies). The committee must also recommend frequencies resulting in the minimum interference. The Committee must coordinate in writing all requests for frequencies or proposed operating changes in the 1435-1535 MHz and 2310-2390 MHz bands with the responsible Government Area Frequency Coordinators listed in the NTIA “Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management.” In addition, committee recommendations may include comments on other technical factors and may contain recommended restrictions which it believes should appear on the license.

(2) The frequency advisory committee must be organized to represent all persons who are eligible for non-Government radio flight test stations. A statement of organization service area and composition of the committee must be submitted to the Commission for approval. The functions of any advisory committee are purely advisory to the applicant and the Commission, and its recommendations are not binding upon either the applicant or the Commission.

(b) These applications need not be accompanied by evidence of frequency coordination:

(1) Any application for modification not involving change in frequency(ies), power, emission, antenna height, antenna location or area of operation.

(2) Any application for 121.5 MHz.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 54 FR 11721, Mar. 22, 1989; 58 FR 44954, Aug. 25, 1993]

§87.307   Cooperative use of facilities.

(a) The Commission will license only one flight test land station per airport, except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section.

(b) Flight test land stations located at an airport are required to provide service without discrimination, on a cooperative maintenance basis, to anyone eligible for a flight test station license.

(c) When the licensee of a flight test land station intends to conduct flight tests at an area served by another flight test land station, which may result in interference, the licensees must coordinate their schedules in advance. If no agreement is reached, the Commission will determine the time division upon request by either licensee.

(d) Applicants for an additional flight test land station at an airport where such a station is already authorized may be required to submit a factual showing to include the following:

(1) Reasons why shared use of the currently licensed flight test land station is not possible; and

(2) Results of coordination with the current licensee of the flight test station at the airport demonstrating that an additional station can be accommodated without significant degradation of the reliability of existing facilities.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 63 FR 68958, Dec. 14, 1998]

Subpart K—Aviation Support Stations

§87.319   Scope of service.

Aviation support stations are used for the following types of operations:

(a) Pilot training;

(b) Coordination of soaring activities between gliders, tow aircraft and land stations;

(c) Coordination of activities between free balloons or lighter-than-air aircraft and ground stations;

(d) Coordination between aircraft and aviation service organizations located on an airport concerning the safe and efficient portal-to-portal transit of the aircraft, such as the types of fuel and ground services available; and

(e) Promotion of safety of life and property.

§87.321   Supplemental eligibility.

Each applicant must certify as to its eligibility under the scope of service described above.

[63 FR 68958, Dec. 14, 1998]

§87.323   Frequencies.

(a) 121.500 MHz: Emergency and distress only.

(b) The frequencies 121.950, 123.300 and 123.500 MHz are available for assignment to aviation support stations used for pilot training, coordination of lighter-than-air aircraft operations, or coordination of soaring or free ballooning activities. Applicants for 121.950 MHz must coordinate their proposal with the appropriate FAA Regional Spectrum Management Office. The application must specify the FAA Region notified and the date notified. Applicants for aviation support land stations may request frequency(ies) based upon their eligibility although the Commission reserves the right to specify the frequency of assignment. Aviation support mobile stations will be assigned 123.300 and 123.500 MHz. However, aviation support mobile stations must operate only on a noninterference basis to communications between aircraft and aviation support land stations.

(c) The frequency 122.775 MHz and, secondary to aeronautical multicom stations, the frequency 122.850 MHz are available for assignment to aviation support stations. These frequencies may be used for communications between aviation service organizations and aircraft in the airport area. These frequencies must not be used for air traffic control purposes or to transmit information pertaining to runway, wind or weather conditions.

(d) The frequency 3281.0 kHz is available for assignment to aviation support stations used for coordination of lighter-than-air aircraft operations.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 63 FR 68958, Dec. 14, 1998]

Subpart L—Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations

§87.345   Scope of service.

Aeronautical utility mobile stations provide communications for vehicles operating on an airport movement area. An airport movement area is defined as the runways, taxiways and other areas utilized for taxiing, takeoff and landing of aircraft, exclusive of loading ramp and parking areas.

(a) An aeronautical utility mobile station must monitor its assigned frequency during periods of operation.

(b) At an airport which has a control tower, control tower remote communications outlet station (RCO) or FAA flight service station in operation, communications by an aeronautical utility mobile station are limited to the management of ground vehicular traffic.

(c) Aeronautical utility mobile stations which operate on the airport's unicom frequency or the frequency 122.900 MHz are authorized only to transmit information relating to safety, such as runway conditions and hazards on the airport. These stations are authorized primarily for monitoring communications from and to aircraft approaching or departing the airport.

(d) Transmissions by an aeronautical utility mobile station are subject to the control of the control tower, the FAA flight service station or the unicom, as appropriate. When requested by the control tower, the flight service station or the unicom, an aeronautical utility station must discontinue transmitting immediately.

(e) Communications between aeronautical utility mobile stations are not authorized.

(f) Transmissions by aeronautical utility mobile stations for Universal Access Transceiver service are authorized.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 55 FR 7333, Mar. 1, 1990; 55 FR 30464, July 26, 1990; 71 FR 70680, Dec. 6, 2006]

§87.347   Supplemental eligibility.

(a) Aeronautical utility stations may transmit on unicom frequencies only at airports which have a unicom and a part-time or no control tower, an RCO or an FAA flight service station.

(b) An applicant for an aeronautical utility station operating on a unicom frequency or the frequency 122.900 MHz must:

(1) Have a need to routinely operate a ground vehicle on the airport movement area;

(2) Maintain a list of the vehicle(s) in which the station is to be located;

(3) Certify on the application that either the applicant is the airport owner or operator, or a state or local government aeronautical agency, or that the airport owner or operator has granted permission to operate the vehicle(s) on the airport movement area.

(c) An applicant for an aeronautical utility station requesting authority to transmit on the local control (tower) frequency or on the control tower remote communications outlet (RCO) frequency must certify that the Air Traffic Manager of the airport control tower approves the requested use of the tower or RCO frequency.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 55 FR 30464, July 26, 1990; 55 FR 30908, July 30, 1990; 63 FR 68958, Dec. 14, 1998]

§87.349   Frequencies.

(a) The frequency assigned to an aeronautical utility station at an airport served by a control tower, RCO or FAA flight service station is the frequency used by the control tower for ground traffic control or by the flight service station for communications with vehicles. In addition to the ground control frequency, an aeronautical utility station at an airport served by a control tower or RCO may be assigned the tower or RCO frequency if the assignment is specifically approved by the FAA as provided for in §87.347(c). The frequencies assigned are normally from the band 121.600-121.925 MHz.

(b) The frequency assigned to the unicom is available to aeronautical utility stations on a noninterference basis at airports which have a part-time control tower, part-time RCO or part-time FAA flight service station and a unicom.

(c) At airports which have a unicom but no control tower, RCO or FAA flight service station, the frequency assigned to the unicom is available to aeronautical utility stations on a noninterference basis. The frequencies available for assignment to unicoms are described in subpart G of this part.

(d) At airports which have no control tower, RCO, flight service station or unicom, the frequency 122.900 MHz is available for assignment to aeronautical utility stations.

(e) The frequency 978.0 MHz is authorized for Universal Access Transceiver data transmission.

(f) The Commission will assign frequency 1090 MHz for use by aeronautical utility mobile stations for ground vehicle identification and collision avoidance after coordination with the FAA, subject to the following conditions:

(1) The applicant must notify the appropriate Regional Office of the FAA prior to submission to the Commission of an application for a new station or for modification of an existing station. Each application must include the FAA Regional Office notified and date of notification.

(2) Eligibility is restricted to airport operators holding an FAA Airport Operating Certificate, and other entities approved by the FAA on a case-by-case basis to use frequency 1090 MHz for use by aeronautical utility mobile stations for ground vehicle identification and collision avoidance;

(3) No more than two hundred 1090 MHz aeronautical utility mobile stations will be authorized at one airport;

(4) Licenses are limited to only those locations that are within the vicinity of an FAA ASDE-X multilateration system or ADS-B equipment, and/or where the primary purpose for seeking transmit authorization is to provide surface data to aircraft and air traffic control authorities.

(5) Message transmission rates are limited as indicated in the table below:

ADS-B MessageRate when movingRate when stationary
Surface Position Message (Types 5, 6, 7, 8)Every 0.4 to 0.6 secondsEvery 4.8 to 5.2 seconds.
Aircraft Operational Status (Type 31)Every 4.8 to 5.2 secondsEvery 4.8 to 5.2 seconds.
Aircraft Identification and Type (Type 2)Every 4.8 to 5.2 secondsEvery 9.8 to 10.2 seconds.

[55 FR 30464, July 26, 1990, as amended at 55 FR 30908, July 30, 1990; 71 FR 70680, Dec. 6, 2006; 78 FR 61207, Oct. 3, 2013]

§87.351   Frequency changes.

When the aeronautical utility frequency is required to be changed because of an action by the FAA or the Commission (such as a change in the ground control of unicom frequency) the licensee must submit an application for modification to specify the new frequency within 10 days from the date the station begins operation on the new frequency. The licensee has temporary authority to use the new frequency from the date of the change pending receipt of the modified license.

Subpart M—Aeronautical Search and Rescue Stations

§87.371   Scope of service.

Aeronautical search and rescue land and mobile stations must be used only for communications with aircraft and other aeronautical search and rescue stations engaged in search and rescue activities. Aeronautical land search and rescue stations can be moved for temporary periods from a specified location to an area where actual or practice search and rescue operations are being conducted.

§87.373   Supplemental eligibility.

Licenses for aeronautical search and rescue stations will be granted only to governmental entities or private organizations chartered to perform aeronautical search and rescue functions.

§87.375   Frequencies.

(a) The frequency 123.100 MHz is available for assignment to aeronautical search and rescue stations for actual search and rescue missions. Each search and rescue station must be equipped to operate on this frequency.

(b) The frequency 122.900 MHz is available for assignment to aeronautical search and rescue stations for organized search and rescue training and for practice search and rescue missions.

(c) The frequencies 3023.0 kHz and 5680.0 kHz are available for assignment to aircraft and ship stations for search and rescue scene-of-action coordination, including communications with participating land stations. Ship stations communicating with aircraft stations must employ 2K80J3E emission.

(d) 121.500 MHz: Emergency and distress only.

Subpart N—Emergency Communications

§87.393   Scope of service.

This subpart provides the rules governing operation of stations in the Aviation Services during any national or local emergency situation constituting a threat to national security or safety of life and property. This subpart is consistent with the Aeronautical Emergency Communications System Plan for all Aviation Services licensees of the Commission which was developed pursuant to sections 1, 4(o), 301 and 303 of the Communications Act, and Executive Order 11490, as amended. This Plan provides for emergency communications to meet the requirements of the Plan for the Security Control of Air Traffic and Air Navigation Aids (SCATANA), Civil Reserve Air Fleet (CRAF), War Air Service Program (WASP) and, where applicable, State and Regional Disaster Airlift Planning (SARDA).

§87.395   Plan for the Security Control of Air Traffic and Air Navigation Aids (Short Title: SCATANA).

(a) The Plan for the Security Control of Air Traffic and Air Navigation Aids (SCATANA) is promulgated in furtherance of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958, as amended, the Communications Act and Executive Order 11490, as amended. SCATANA defines the responsibilities of the Commission for the security control of non-Federal air navigation aids.

(b) Under the responsibilities defined in SCATANA, an FCC Support Plan for the Security Control of Non-Federal Air Navigation Aids has been developed by the Commission. The FCC Support Plan defines responsibilities, procedures, and instructions in consonance with SCATANA which will effect control of non-Federal air navigation aids when SCATANA is implemented. It permits the use of such navigation aids by aircraft of military and civil agencies when SCATANA is implemented. The FCC Support Plan highlights those parts of SCATANA which deal specifically with non-Federal air navigation aids. SCATANA and the FCC Support Plan apply to radionavigation stations authorized by the Commission in the following manner:

(1) All licensees are subject to restrictions imposed by appropriate military authorities pursuant to SCATANA and the FCC Support Plan when an Air Defense Emergency or Defense Emergency exists or is imminent. The restrictions will be imposed through FAA Air Route Traffic Control Centers (ARTCCs).

(2) All licensees of aeronautical radionavigation (VOR/DME, ILS, MLS, LF and MF non-directional beacons) stations will comply with SCATANA implementation instructions from FAA ARTCCs as follows:

(i) Shut down the above navigation aids as directed. These instructions will permit time to land or disperse airborne aircraft, and will permit extension of time when the air traffic situation dictates.

(ii) Shut down as soon as possible stations which require more than five minutes control time, unless directed otherwise or unless such stations are essential for the handling of existing air traffic.

(iii) Operate aeronautical radionavigation stations to ensure that required stations, as indicated in flight plans, will be available for authorized aircraft flights.

(3) Licensees of aeronautical radionavigation stations will be notified of the reduction or removal of SCATANA restrictions by FAA ARTCCs when notice of the termination is issued.

(4) Licensees of aeronautical radionavigation stations may voluntarily participate in SCATANA tests as requested by an ARTCC. SCATANA testing must not interrupt the normal service of non-Federal air navigation aids.

§87.397   Emergency operations.

(a) The licensee of any land station in the Aviation services, during a local emergency involving the safety of life and property may communicate in a manner other than that specified in the license (See §87.395). Such emergency operations may include operation at other locations or with equipment not specified in the license or by unlicensed personnel provided that:

(1) Such operations are under the control and supervision of the station licensee,

(2) The emergency use is discontinued as soon as practicable upon termination of the emergency,

(3) In no event shall any station transmit on frequencies other than or with power in excess of that specified in the license,

(4) The details of the emergency must be retained with the station license, and

(5) At a controlled airport these communications must be coordinated with the FAA.

(b) The unicom frequencies listed in subpart G may also be used for communications with private aircraft engaged in organized civil defense activities in preparation for, during an enemy attack or immediately after an enemy attack. When used for these purposes, unicoms may be moved from place to place or operated at unspecified locations, except at landing areas served by other unicoms or control towers.

(c) In any case in which a license for unattended operation has been granted, the Commission may at any time, for national defense, modify the license.

Subpart O—Airport Control Tower Stations

§87.417   Scope of service.

(a) Airport control tower stations (control towers) and control tower remote communications outlet stations (RCOs) must limit their communications to the necessities of safe and expeditious operations of aircraft operating on or in the vicinity of the airport. Control towers and RCOs provide air traffic control services to aircraft landing, taking off and taxing on the airport as well as aircraft transiting the airport traffic area. Additionally, control towers and RCOs can provide air traffic control services to vehicles operating on airport movement areas (see subpart L of this part). Control towers and RCOs must serve all aircraft without discrimination. An RCO must be remotely operated from a control tower or other FAA control facility located at a nearby airport.

(b) A control tower must maintain a continuous watch on the following frequencies during the hours of operation:

121.500 MHz

3023.0 kHz (Alaska only)

5680.0 kHz (Alaska only)

The Commission may exempt from these watch requirements the licensee of an airport control tower station if a satisfactory showing has been made that such an exemption will not adversely affect life and property in the air.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 54 FR 11721, Mar. 22, 1989; 55 FR 30464, July 26, 1990]

§87.419   Supplemental eligibility.

Only one control tower or RCO will be licensed at an airport.

[64 FR 27476, May 20, 1999]

§87.421   Frequencies.

The Commission will assign VHF frequencies after coordination with the FAA. Frequencies in the following bands are available to control towers and RCOs. Channel spacing is 25 kHz.

118.000-121.400 MHz

121.600-121.925 MHz

123.600-128.800 MHz

132.025-135.975 MHz

(a) The frequency 123.100 MHz is available for use by control towers and RCOs at special aeronautical events on the condition that no harmful interference is caused to search and rescue operations in the locale involved.

(b) Frequencies in the bands 200.0-285.0 and 325.0-405.0 kHz will normally be assigned only to control towers and RCOs authorized to operate on at least one VHF frequency. The Commission may assign frequencies in these bands to entities that do not provide VHF service in cases where granting such an application will not adversely affect life and property in the air.

(c) Frequencies listed in the introductory paragraph of this section are available to control towers and RCOs for communications with ground vehicles and aircraft on the ground. The antenna heights shall be restricted to the minimum necessary to achieve the required coverage. Channel spacing is 25 kHz.

(d) 121.500 MHz: emergency and distress only.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 55 FR 30464, July 26, 1990; 63 FR 68958, Dec. 14, 1998; 69 FR 32886, June 14, 2004; 71 FR 70680, Dec. 6, 2006]

§87.423   Hours of operation.

The control tower must render a communications service 24 hours a day unless the Commission determines, in coordination with the NTIA IRAC, that reduced hours of service will not adversely affect life and property in the air.

[63 FR 68958, Dec. 14, 1998]

§87.425   Interference.

Control towers and RCOs must not cause harmful interference to control towers or RCOs at adjacent airports. If interference between adjacent control towers or RCOs exists, the Commission will direct the licensees how to eliminate the interference.

[55 FR 30465, July 26, 1990]

Subpart P—Operational Fixed Stations

§87.445   Scope of service.

An operational fixed station provides control, repeater or relay functions for its associated aeronautical station.

§87.447   Supplemental eligibility.

An applicant for an operational fixed station must certify that:

(a) The applicant is the licensee of an aeronautical land station in the aeronautical mobile service; and

(b) Common carrier facilities are not available to satisfy the aeronautical station's requirements.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 63 FR 68958, Dec. 14, 1998]

§87.449   Frequencies.

The following frequencies in the 72-76 MHz band are assignable to operational fixed stations using vertical polarization, if no harmful interference is caused to TV reception on Channels 4 and 5. These frequencies are shared with the Land Mobile and the Maritime Mobile Services.

Operational frequencies in the 72-76 MHz band

Carrier frequency in MHz

72.02   72.80
72.04   72.82
72.06   72.84
72.08   72.86
72.10   72.88
72.12   72.90
72.14   72.92
72.16   72.94
72.18   72.96
72.20   72.98
72.22   75.42
72.24   75.46
72.26   75.50
72.28   75.54
72.30   75.58
72.32   75.62
72.34   75.64
72.36   75.66
72.38   75.68
72.40   75.70
72.42   75.72
72.46   75.74
72.50   75.76
72.54   75.78
72.58   75.80
72.62   75.82
72.64   75.84
72.66   75.86
72.68   75.88
72.70   75.90
72.72   75.92
72.74   75.94
72.76   75.96
72.78   75.98

§87.451   Licensing limitations.

Operational fixed stations are subject to the following licensing limitations:

(a) A maximum of four frequencies will be assigned.

(b) Stations will not be authorized when applications indicate less than 16 km (10 miles) separation between a proposed station and a TV transmitter operating on either Channel 4 or 5, or from the post office of a community in which either channel is assigned but not in operation.

(c) Stations located between 16 km (10 miles) and 128 km (80 miles) of a TV transmitter operating on either Channel 4 or 5, or from the post office of a community in which either channel is assigned but not in operation, are secondary to TV operations within the Grade B service contour.1

1OET Bulletin No. 67, March 1988, entitled “Potential Interference from Operational Fixed Stations in the 72-76 MHz Band to Television Channels 4 and 5” describes an analytical model that can be used to calculate the potential interference that might result from a given fixed station operation. Copies of the bulletin may be obtained from the Commission's current duplication contractor. Information concerning the current duplication contractor may be obtained from the Office of Public Affairs, Consumer Assistance and Small Business Division, Telephone (202) 632-5050.

Subpart Q—Stations in the Radiodetermination Service

§87.471   Scope of service.

Stations in the aeronautical radiodetermination service provide radionavigation and radiolocation services.

(a) Transmission by radionavigation land stations must be limited to aeronautical navigation, including obstruction warning.

(b) Radionavigation land test stations are used for the testing and calibration of aircraft navigational aids and associated equipment. When used as radionavigation land test stations (MTF) signal generators must be licensed as radionavigation land test stations (MTF). Transmission must be limited to cases when radiation is necessary and there is no alternative.

(c) Transmissions by emergency locator transmitter (ELT) test stations must be limited to necessary testing of ELTs and to training operations related to the use of such transmitters.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 58 FR 67696, Dec. 22, 1993]

§87.473   Supplemental eligibility.

(a) Licenses for radionavigation land test stations (MTF) will be granted only to applicants engaged in the development, manufacture or maintenance of aircraft radionavigation equipment. Licenses for radionavigation land test stations (OTF) will be granted only to applicants who agree to establish the facility at an airport for the use of the public.

(b) Licenses for ELT test stations will be granted only to applicants to train personnel in the operation and location of ELTs, or for testing related to the manufacture or design of ELTs.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 63 FR 68958, Dec. 14, 1998]

§87.475   Frequencies.

(a) Frequency coordination. The Commission will assign frequencies to radionavigation land stations and radionavigation land test stations after coordination with the FAA. The applicant must notify the appropriate Regional Office of the FAA prior to submission to the Commission of an application for a new station or for modification of an existing station to change frequency, power, location or emission. Each application must include the FAA Regional Office notified and date of notification.

(b) Frequencies available for radionavigation land stations. (1) LORAN-C is a long range navigation system which operates in the 90-110 kHz band.

(2) Radiobeacon stations enable an aircraft station to determine bearing or direction in relation to the radiobeacon station. Radiobeacons operate in the bands 190-285 kHz; 325-435 kHz; 510-525 kHz; and 525-535 kHz. Radiobeacons may be authorized, primarily for off-shore use, in the band 525-535 kHz on a non-interference basis to travelers information stations.

(3) Aeronautical marker beacon stations radiate a vertical distinctive pattern on 75 MHz which provides position information to aircraft.

(4) The following table lists the specific frequencies in the 108.100-111.950 MHz band which are assignable to localizer stations with simultaneous radiotelephone channels and their associated glide path station frequency from the 328.600-335.400 MHz band.

Localizer (MHz)Glide path (MHz)
108.100334.700
108.150334.550
108.300334.100
108.350333.950
108.500329.900
108.550329.750
108.700330.500
108.750330.350
108.900329.300
108.950329.150
109.100331.400
109.150331.250
109.300332.000
109.350331.850
109.500332.600
109.550332.450
109.700333.200
109.750333.050
109.900333.800
109.950333.650
110.100334.400
110.150334.250
110.300335.000
110.350334.850
110.500329.600
110.550329.450
110.700330.200
110.750330.050
110.900330.800
110.950330.650
111.100331.700
111.150331.550
111.300332.300
111.350332.150
111.500332.900
111.550332.750
111.700333.500
111.750333.350
111.900331.100
111.950330.950

(5) VHF omni-range (VOR) stations are to be assigned frequencies in the 112.050-117.950 MHz band (50 kHz channel spacing) and the following frequencies in the 108-112 MHz band:

108.200   110.200
108.250   110.250
108.400   110.400
108.450   110.450
108.600   110.600
108.650   110.650
108.800   110.800
108.850   110.850
109.000   111.000
109.050   111.050
109.200   111.200
109.250   111.250
109.400   111.400
109.450   111.450
109.600   111.600
109.650   111.650
109.800   111.800
109.850   111.850
110.000   112.000
110.050 

(6) The band 960-1215 MHz is available for the use of land stations and associated airborne electronic aids to air navigation. When distance measuring equipment (DME) is intended to operate with a single VHF navigation station in the 108-117.975 MHz band, the DME operating channel must be paired with the VHF channel as shown in the following table:

DME Channeling and Pairing

[MHz]

VHF channelAirborne interrogating frequencyGround reply frequency
108.0001041.000978.000
108.0501041.0001104.000
108.1001042.000979.000
108.1501042.0001105.000
108.2001043.000980.000
108.2501043.0001106.000
108.3001044.000981.000
108.3501044.0001107.000
108.4001045.000982.000
108.4501045.0001108.000
108.5001046.000983.000
108.5501046.0001109.000
108.6001047.000984.000
108.6501047.0001110.000
108.7001048.000985.000
108.7501048.0001111.000
108.8001049.000986.000
108.8501049.0001112.000
108.9001050.000987.000
108.9501050.0001113.000
109.0001051.000988.000
109.0501051.0001114.000
109.1001052.000989.000
109.1501052.0001115.000
109.2001053.000990.000
109.2501053.0001116.000
109.3001054.000991.000
109.3501054.0001117.000
109.4001055.000992.000
109.4501055.0001118.000
109.5001056.000993.000
109.5501056.0001119.000
109.6001057.000994.000
109.6501057.0001120.000
109.7001058.000995.000
109.7501058.0001121.000
109.8001059.000996.000
109.8501059.0001122.000
109.9001060.000997.000
109.9501060.0001123.000
110.0001061.000998.000
110.0501061.0001124.000
110.1001062.000999.000
110.1501062.0001125.000
110.2001063.0001000.000
110.2501063.0001126.000
110.3001064.0001001.000
110.3501064.0001127.000
110.4001065.0001002.000
110.4501065.0001128.000
110.5001066.0001003.000
110.5501066.0001129.000
110.6001067.0001004.000
110.6501067.0001130.000
110.7001068.0001005.000
110.7501068.0001131.000
110.8001069.0001006.000
110.8501069.0001132.000
110.9001070.0001007.000
110.9501070.0001133.000
111.0001071.0001008.000
111.0501071.0001134.000
111.1001072.0001009.000
111.1501072.0001135.000
111.2001073.0001010.000
111.2501073.0001136.000
111.3001074.0001011.000
111.3501074.0001137.000
111.4001075.0001012.000
111.4501075.0001138.000
111.5001076.0001013.000
111.5501076.0001139.000
111.6001077.0001014.000
111.6501077.0001140.000
111.7001078.0001015.000
111.7501078.0001141.000
111.8001079.0001016.000
111.8501079.0001142.000
111.9001080.0001017.000
111.9501080.0001143.000
112.0001081.0001018.000
112.0501081.0001144.000
112.1001082.0001019.000
112.1501082.0001145.000
112.2001083.0001020.000
112.2501083.0001146.000
112.3001094.0001157.000
112.3501094.0001031.000
112.4001095.0001158.000
112.4501095.0001032.000
112.5001096.0001159.000
112.5501096.0001033.000
112.6001097.0001160.000
112.6501097.0001034.000
112.7001098.0001161.000
112.7501098.0001035.000
112.8001099.0001162.000
112.8501099.0001036.000
112.9001100.0001163.000
112.9501100.0001037.000
113.0001101.0001164.000
113.0501101.0001038.000
113.1001102.0001165.000
113.1501102.0001039.000
113.2001103.0001166.000
113.2501103.0001040.000
113.3001104.0001167.000
113.3501104.0001041.000
113.4001105.0001168.000
113.4501105.0001042.000
113.5001106.0001169.000
113.5501106.0001043.000
113.6001107.0001170.000
113.6501107.0001044.000
113.7001108.0001171.000
113.7501108.0001045.000
113.8001109.0001172.000
113.8501109.0001046.000
113.9001110.0001173.000
113.9501110.0001047.000
114.0001111.0001174.000
114.0501111.0001048.000
114.1001112.0001175.000
114.1501112.0001049.000
114.2001113.0001176.000
114.2501113.0001050.000
114.3001114.0001177.000
114.3501114.0001051.000
114.4001115.0001178.000
114.4501115.0001052.000
114.5001116.0001179.000
114.5501116.0001053.000
114.6001117.0001180.000
114.6501117.0001054.000
114.7001118.0001181.000
114.7501118.0001055.000
114.8001119.0001182.000
114.8501119.0001056.000
114.9001120.0001183.000
114.9501120.0001057.000
115.0001121.0001184.000
115.0501121.0001058.000
115.1001122.0001185.000
115.1501122.0001059.000
115.2001123.0001186.000
115.2501123.0001060.000
115.3001124.0001187.000
115.3501124.0001061.000
115.4001125.0001188.000
115.4501125.0001062.000
115.5001126.0001189.000
115.5501126.0001063.000
115.6001127.0001190.000
115.6501127.0001064.000
115.7001128.0001191.000
115.7501128.0001065.000
115.8001129.0001192.000
115.8501129.0001066.000
115.9001130.0001193.000
115.9501130.0001067.000
116.0001131.0001194.000
116.0501131.0001068.000
116.1001132.0001195.000
116.1501132.0001069.000
116.2001133.0001196.000
116.2501133.0001070.000
116.3001134.0001197.000
116.3501134.0001071.000
116.4001135.0001198.000
116.4501135.0001072.000
116.5001136.0001199.000
116.5501136.0001073.000
116.6001137.0001200.000
116.6501137.0001074.000
116.7001138.0001201.000
116.7501138.0001075.000
116.8001139.0001202.000
116.8501139.0001076.000
116.9001140.0001203.000
116.9501140.0001077.000
117.0001141.0001204.000
117.0501141.0001078.000
117.1001142.0001205.000
117.1501142.0001079.000
117.2001143.0001206.000
117.2501143.0001080.000
117.3001144.0001207.000
117.3501144.0001081.000
117.4001145.0001208.000
117.4501145.0001082.000
117.5001146.0001209.000
117.5501146.0001083.000
117.6001147.0001210.000
117.6501147.0001084.000
117.7001148.0001211.000
117.7501148.0001085.000
117.8001149.0001212.000
117.8501149.0001086.000
117.9001150.0001213.000
117.9501150.0001087.000

(7) 978.0 MHz is authorized for Universal Access Transceiver service.

(8) 1300-1350 MHz: The use of this band is restricted to surveillance radar stations and associated airborne transponders.

(9) 1559-1626.5 MHz: The use of this band is limited to airborne electronic aids to air navigation and any associated land stations.

(10) 2700-2900 MHz: Non-Government land-based radars may be licensed. U.S. Government coordination is required. Applicants must demonstrate a need for the service which the Government is not prepared to render.

(11) 5000-5250 MHz: This band is to be used for the operation of the international standard system (microwave landing system).

(12) 9000-9200 MHz: This band is available to land-based radars. Stations operating in this band may receive interference from stations operating in the radiolocation service.

(13) 15,400-15,700 MHz: This band is available for use of land stations associated with airborne electronic aids to air navigation.

(14) 24,250-25,250, 32,300-33,400 MHz: In these bands, land-based radionavigation aids are permitted where they operate with airborne radionavigation devices.

(c) Frequencies available for radionavigation land test stations. (1) The frequencies set forth in §§87.187(c), (e) through (j), (r), (t), and (ff); and 87.475(b)(6) through (b)(11) may be assigned to radionavigation land test stations for the testing of aircraft transmitting equipment that normally operate on these frequencies and for the testing of land-based receiving equipment that operate with airborne radionavigation equipment.

(2) The frequencies available for assignment to radionavigation land test stations for the testing of airborne receiving equipment are 108.000 and 108.050 MHz for VHF omni-range; 108.100 and 108.150 MHz for localizer; 334.550 and 334.700 MHz for glide slope; 978 and 979 MHz (X channel)/1104 MHz (Y channel) for DME; 978 MHz for Universal Access Transceiver; 1030 MHz for air traffic control radar beacon transponders; 1090 MHz for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems (TCAS); and 5031.0 MHz for microwave landing systems. Additionally, the frequencies in paragraph (b) of this section may be assigned to radionavigation land test stations after coordination with the FAA. The following conditions apply:after coordination with the FAA. The following conditions apply:

(i) The maximum power authorized on the frequencies 108.150 and 334.550 MHz is 1 milliwatt. The maximum power authorized on all other frequencies is one watt.

(ii) The pulse repetition rate (PRR) of the 1030 MHz ATC radar beacon test set will be 235 pulses per second (pps) ±5pps.

(iii) The assignment of 108.000 MHz is subject to the condition that no interference will be caused to the reception of FM broadcasting stations and stations using the frequency are not protected against interference from FM broadcasting stations.

(d) Frequencies available for ELT test stations. The frequencies available for assignment to ELT test stations are 121.600, 121.650, 121.700, 121.750, 121.800, 121.850, and 121.900 MHz. Licensees must:

(1) Not cause harmful interference to voice communications on these frequencies or any harmonically related frequency.

(2) Coordinate with the appropriate FAA Regional Spectrum Management Office prior to each activation of the transmitter.

(e) Frequencies available for differential GPS stations. Frequencies in the 112-118 MHz band may be assigned to Special Category I (SCAT-I) ground stations for differential GPS data links.

(1) The frequencies available are on 25 kHz centers with the lowest assignable frequency being centered at 112.000 MHz and the highest assignable frequency being centered at 117.950 MHz.

(2) Applicants must coordinate a frequency, time slot assignment, and three-letter identifier with the FAA and provide this information to the Commission upon application.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 54 FR 11721, Mar. 22, 1989; 63 FR 68958, Dec. 14, 1998; 64 FR 27476, May 20, 1999; 69 FR 32886, June 14, 2004; 71 FR 70680, Dec. 6, 2006; 78 FR 61207, Oct. 3, 2013]

§87.477   Condition of grant for radionavigation land stations.

Radionavigation land stations may be designated by the FAA as part of the National Airspace System. Stations so designated will be required to serve the public under IFT conditions. This condition of grant is applicable to all radionavigation land stations.

§87.479   Harmful interference to radionavigation land stations.

(a) Military or other Government stations have been authorized to establish wide-band systems using frequency-hopping spread spectrum techniques in the 960-1215 MHz band. Authorization for a Joint Tactical Information Distribution Systems (JTIDS) has been permitted on the basis of non-interference to the established aeronautical radionavigation service in this band. In order to accommodate the requirements for the system within the band, restrictions are imposed. Transmissions will be automatically prevented if:

(1) The frequency-hopping mode fails to distribute the JTIDS spectrum uniformly across the band;

(2) The radiated pulse varies from the specified width of 6.4 microseconds ±5%;

(3) The energy radiated within ±7 MHz of 1030 and 1090 MHz exceeds a level of 60 dB below the peak of the JTIDS spectrum as measured in a 300 kHz bandwidth. The JTIDS will be prohibited from transmitting if the time slot duty factor exceeds a 20 percent duty factor for any single user and a 40 percent composite duty factor for all JTIDS emitters in a geographic area.

(b) If radionavigation systems operating in the 960-1215 MHz band experience interference or unexplained loss of equipment performance, the situation must be reported immediately to the nearest office of the FAA, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, Washington, DC 20504, or the nearest Federal Communications Commission field office. The following information must be provided to the extent available:

(1) Name, call sign and category of station experiencing the interference;

(2) Date and time of occurrence;

(3) Geographical location at time of occurrence;

(4) Frequency interfered with;

(5) Nature of interference; and

(6) Other particulars.

§87.481   Unattended operation of domestic radiobeacon stations.

(a) Radiobeacons may be licensed for unattended operation. An applicant must comply with the following:

(1) The transmitter is crystal controlled and specifically designed for radiobeacon service and capable of transmitting by self-actuating means;

(2) The emissions of the transmitter must be continuously monitored by a licensed operator, or by a direct positive automatic monitor, supplemented by aural monitoring at suitable intervals;

(3) If as a result of aural monitoring it is determined that a deviation from the terms of the station license has occurred, the transmitters must be disabled immediately by a properly authorized person. If automatic monitoring is used, the monitor must insure that the operation of the transmitter meets the license terms or is disabled;

(4) A properly authorized person must be able to reach the transmitter and disable it in a reasonable amount of time, so as not to adversely affect life or property in the air;

(5) The equipment must be inspected at least every 180 days. Results of inspections must be kept in the station maintenance records;

(6) The transmitter is not operable by or accessible to, other than authorized persons;

(7) The transmitter is in a remote location.

(b) Authority for unattended operation must be expressly stated in the station license.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 63 FR 68958, Dec. 14, 1998]

§87.483   Audio visual warning systems.

An audio visual warning system (AVWS) is a radar-based obstacle avoidance system. AVWS activates obstruction lighting and transmits VHF audible warnings to alert pilots of potential collisions with land-based obstructions. The AVWS operations are limited to locations where natural and man-made obstructions exist. The continuously operating radar calculates the location, direction and groundspeed of nearby aircraft that enter one of two warning zones reasonably established by the licensee. As aircraft enter the first warning zone, the AVWS activates obstruction lighting. If the aircraft continues toward the obstacle and enters the second warning zone, the VHF radio transmits an audible warning describing the obstacle.

(a) Radiodetermination (radar) frequencies. Frequencies authorized under §87.475(b)(8) of this chapter are available for use by an AVWS. The frequency coordination requirements in §87.475(a) of this chapter apply.

(b) VHF audible warning frequencies. Frequencies authorized under §87.187(j), §87.217(a), §87.241(b), and §87.323(b) (excluding 121.950 MHz) of this chapter are available for use by an AVWS. Multiple frequencies may be authorized for an individual station, depending on need and the use of frequencies assigned in the vicinity of a proposed AVWS facility. Use of these frequencies is subject to the following limitations:

(1) The output power shall not exceed −3 dBm watts for each frequency authorized.

(2) The antenna used in transmitting the audible warnings must be omnidirectional with a maximum gain equal to or lower than a half-wave centerfed dipole above 30 degrees elevation, and a maximum gain of +5 dBi from horizontal up to 30 degrees elevation.

(3) The audible warning shall not exceed two seconds in duration. No more than six audible warnings may be transmitted in a single transmit cycle, which shall not exceed 12 seconds in duration. An interval of at least twenty seconds must occur between transmit cycles.

[78 FR 61207, Oct. 3, 2013]

Subpart R [Reserved]

Subpart S—Automatic Weather Stations (AWOS/ASOS)

§87.525   Scope of service.

Automatic weather observation stations (AWOS) and automatic surface observation stations (ASOS) must provide up-to-date weather information including the time of the latest weather sequence, altimeter setting, wind speed and direction, dew point, temperature, visibility and other pertinent data needed at airports having neither a full-time control tower nor a full-time FAA Flight Service Station. When a licensee has entered into an agreement with the FAA, an AWOS or an ASOS may also operate as an automatic terminal information station (ATIS) during the control tower's operating hours.

[64 FR 27476, May 20, 1999]

§87.527   Supplemental eligibility.

(a) Licenses will be granted only upon FAA approval.

(b) Eligibility for an AWOS, an ASOS, or an ATIS is limited to the owner or operator of an airport or to a person who has entered into a written agreement with the owner or operator for exclusive rights to operate and maintain the station. Where applicable a copy of the agreement between the applicant and owner or operator of the airport must be submitted with an application.

(c) Only one AWOS, ASOS, or ATIS will be licensed at an airport.

[53 FR 28940, Aug. 1, 1988, as amended at 64 FR 27476, May 20, 1999]

§87.529   Frequencies.

Prior to submitting an application, each applicant must notify the applicable FAA Regional Frequency Management Office. Each application must be accompanied by a statement showing the name of the FAA Regional Office and date notified. The Commission will assign the frequency. Normally, frequencies available for air traffic control operations set forth in subpart E will be assigned to an AWOS, ASOS, or to an ATIS. When a licensee has entered into an agreement with the FAA to operate the same station as both an AWOS and as an ATIS, or as an ASOS and an ATIS, the same frequency will be used in both modes of operation.

[69 FR 52886, June 14, 2004]



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