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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of April 21, 2014

Title 46: Shipping


PART 185—OPERATIONS


Contents

Subpart A—General Provisions

§185.100   General requirement.
§185.115   Applicability; preemptive effect.

Subpart B—Marine Casualties and Voyage Records

§185.202   Notice of casualty.
§185.203   Notice of hazardous conditions.
§185.206   Written report of marine casualty.
§185.208   Accidents to machinery.
§185.210   Alcohol or drug use by individuals directly involved in casualties.
§185.212   Mandatory chemical testing following serious marine incidents.
§185.220   Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty.
§185.230   Report of accident to aid to navigation.
§185.260   Reports of potential vessel casualty.
§185.280   Official Logbook for foreign voyages.

Subpart C—Miscellaneous Operating Requirements

§185.304   Navigation underway.
§185.315   Verification of vessel compliance with applicable stability requirements.
§185.320   Steering gear, controls, and communication system tests.
§185.330   Hatches and other openings.
§185.335   Loading doors.
§185.340   Vessels carrying vehicles.
§185.350   Fueling of vessels using fuel having a flash point of 43.3   °C (110   °F) or lower (such as gasoline).
§185.352   Ventilation of gasoline machinery spaces.
§185.356   Carriage of hazardous materials.
§185.360   Use of auto pilot.

Subpart D—Crew Requirements

§185.402   Officers.
§185.410   Watchmen.
§185.420   Crew training.

Subpart E—Preparations for Emergencies

§185.502   Crew and passenger list.
§185.503   Voyage plan.
§185.504   Passenger count.
§185.506   Passenger safety orientation.
§185.508   Wearing of life jackets.
§185.510   Emergency instructions.
§185.512   Recommended emergency instructions format.
§185.514   Station bill.
§185.516   Life jacket placards.
§185.518   Inflatable survival craft placards.
§185.520   Abandon ship and man overboard drills and training.
§185.524   Fire fighting drills and training.
§185.530   Responsibilities of licensed individuals.

Subpart F—Markings Required

§185.602   Hull markings.
§185.604   Lifesaving equipment markings.
§185.606   Escape hatches and emergency exits.
§185.608   Fuel shutoff valves.
§185.610   Watertight doors and watertight hatches.
§185.612   Fire protection equipment.
§185.614   Portable watertight containers for distress flares and smoke signals.

Subpart G—Operational Readiness, Maintenance, and Inspection of Lifesaving Equipment

§185.700   Operational readiness.
§185.702   Maintenance.
§185.704   Maintenance of falls.
§185.720   Weekly maintenance and inspections.
§185.722   Monthly inspections.
§185.724   Quarterly inspections.
§185.726   Annual inspections.
§185.728   Testing and servicing of Emergency Position Indicating Radiobeacons (EPIRB).
§185.730   Servicing of inflatable liferafts, inflatable buoyant apparatus, inflatable life jackets, and inflated rescue boats.
§185.740   Periodic servicing of hydrostatic release units.

Subpart H—Penalties

§185.900   Penalty for violations.
§185.910   Suspension and revocation.

Authority: 46 U.S.C. 2103, 3306, 6101; E.O. 12234, 45 FR 58801, 3 CFR, 1980 Comp., p. 277; Department of Homeland Security Delegation No. 0170.1.

Source: CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart A—General Provisions

§185.100   General requirement.

A vessel must be operated in accordance with applicable laws and regulations and in such a manner as to afford adequate precaution against hazards that might endanger the vessel and the persons being transported.

§185.115   Applicability; preemptive effect.

(a) An existing vessel need not comply with the hull marking requirements in §185.602(c) until completion of a vessel's first drydock required by §176.600 of this subchapter, which occurs after March 11, 1996.

(b) An existing vessel need not comply with the marking requirement in §§185.604 and 185.610, where the size and contents of the markings required by these sections vary from the size and contents of required markings on lifesaving equipment, watertight doors, and watertight hatches on the vessel prior to March 11, 1996, until the existing markings are no longer legible as determined by the cognizant Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection (OCMI).

(c) An existing vessel need not comply with the requirements of §§185.514, 185.516, and 185.604(i) until completion of the first inspection for certification that occurs after March 11, 1996.

(d) The regulations in this part have preemptive effect over State or local regulations in the same field.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996; 61 FR 24465, May 15, 1996, as amended by USCG-2006-24797, 77 FR 33892, June 7, 2012]

Subpart B—Marine Casualties and Voyage Records

§185.202   Notice of casualty.

(a) Immediately after the addressing of resultant safety concerns, the owner, agent, master, or person in charge of a vessel involved in a marine casualty shall notify the nearest Sector Office, Marine Inspection Office, or Coast Guard Group Office whenever a vessel is involved in a marine casualty consisting of:

(1) An unintended grounding, or an unintended strike of (allision with) a bridge;

(2) An intended grounding, or an intended strike of a bridge, that creates a hazard to navigation, the environment, or the safety of a vessel, or that meets any criterion of paragraphs (a)(3) through (a)(7) of this section;

(3) Loss of main propulsion or primary steering, or any associated component or control system, that reduces the maneuverability of the vessel;

(4) An occurrence materially and adversely affecting the vessel's seaworthiness or fitness for service or route, including but not limited to fire, flooding, failure of or damage to fixed fire extinguishing systems, lifesaving equipment, auxiliary power generating equipment, or bilge pumping systems;

(5) Loss of life;

(6) Injury that requires professional medical treatment (treatment beyond first aid) and, if the person is engaged or employed on board a vessel in commercial service, which renders the individual unfit to perform his or her routine duties; or

(7) An occurrence not meeting any of the above criteria but causing property damage in excess of $25,000. This damage includes the cost of labor and material to restore the property to its condition before the occurrence, but does not include the cost of salvage, cleaning, gas freeing, drydocking, or demurrage.

(b) A vessel is excluded from the requirements of paragraphs (a)(5) and (a)(6) of this section with respect to the death or injury of shipyard or harbor workers when such accidents are not the result of either a vessel casualty (e.g., collision) or a vessel equipment casualty (e.g., cargo boom failure) and are subject to the reporting requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 1904.

(c) Notice given as required by §185.203 satisfies the requirement of this section if the marine casualty involves a hazardous condition.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended by USCG-2006-25556, 72 FR 36331, July 2, 2007]

§185.203   Notice of hazardous conditions.

Whenever there is a hazardous condition, as defined by §175.400 of this subchapter, on board the vessel, the owner, master, agent, or person in charge shall immediately notify the Captain of the Port of the port of place of destination and the Captain of the Port of the port or place in which the vessel is located of the hazardous condition.

§185.206   Written report of marine casualty.

(a) The owner, master, agent, or person in charge shall, within five days, file a written report of any marine casualty. This written report is in addition to the immediate notice required by 185.202. This written report must be delivered to a Coast Guard Sector Office, or Marine Inspection Office. It must be provided on Form CG-2692 (Report of Marine Accident, Injury, or Death), Supplemented as necessary by appended Forms CG-2692A (Barge Addendum) and CG-2692B (Report of Required Chemical Drug and Alcohol Testing Following a Serious Marine Incident).

(b) If filed without delay after the occurrence of the marine casualty, the notice required by paragraph (a) of this section suffices as the notice required by §185.202.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended by USCG-2006-25556, 72 FR 36331, July 2, 2007]

§185.208   Accidents to machinery.

The owner, managing operator, or master shall report damage to a boiler, unfired pressure vessel, or machinery that renders further use of the item unsafe until repairs are made, to the OCMI at the port in which the casualty occurred or nearest the port of first arrival, as soon as practicable after the damage occurs.

§185.210   Alcohol or drug use by individuals directly involved in casualties.

(a) For each marine casualty required to be reported by §185.202, the owner, agent, master, or person in charge of the vessel shall determine whether there is any evidence of alcohol or drug use by individuals directly involved in the casualty.

(b) The owner, agent, master, or person in charge of the vessel shall include in the written report, Form CG 2692, submitted for the casualty information that:

(1) Identifies those individuals for whom evidence of drug or alcohol use, or evidence of intoxication, has been obtained; and

(2) Specifies the method used to obtain such evidence, such as personal observation of the individual, or by chemical testing of the individual.

(c) An entry must be made in the Official Logbook if carried, pertaining to those individuals for whom evidence of intoxication is obtained. The individual shall be informed of this entry and the entry shall be witnessed by a second person.

(d) If an individual directly involved in a casualty refuses to submit to, or cooperate in, the administration of a timely chemical test, when directed by a Coast Guard commissioned, warrant, or petty officer, or any other law enforcement officer authorized to obtain a chemical test under Federal, state, or local law, or by the owner, agent, master, or person in change, this fact must be noted in the Official Logbook, if carried, and in the written report (Form CG 2692), and will be admissible as evidence in any administrative proceeding.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended by CGD 97-057, 62 FR 51050, Sept. 30, 1997]

§185.212   Mandatory chemical testing following serious marine incidents.

A marine employer whose vessel is involved in a casualty or incident that is, or is likely to become, a serious marine incident as defined in §4.03-2 of subchapter A of this chapter shall comply with the requirements of §4.06 in subchapter A of this chapter.

§185.220   Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty.

The owner, agent, master, or person in charge of any vessel involved in a marine casualty for which a report is required under §185.202 of this part shall retain all voyage records maintained by the vessel, including rough and smooth deck and engine room logs, bell books, navigation charts, navigation work books, compass deviation cards, gyrocompass records, stowage plans, records of draft, aids to mariners, night order books, radiograms sent and received, radio logs, crew and passenger lists and counts, articles of shipment, official logs, and other material that might be of assistance in investigating and determining the cause of the casualty. The owner, agent, master, other officer, or person responsible for the custody thereof, shall make these records available upon request, to a duly authorized investigating officer, administrative law judge, officer or employee of the Coast Guard.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended by CGD 97-057, 62 FR 51050, Sept. 30, 1997]

§185.230   Report of accident to aid to navigation.

Whenever a vessel collides with a buoy, or other aid to navigation under the jurisdiction of the Coast Guard, or is connected with any such collision, the person in charge of such vessel shall report the accident to the nearest OCMI. No report on Form CG 2692 is required unless otherwise required under 185.202.

§185.260   Reports of potential vessel casualty.

(a) An owner, charterer, managing operator, or agent of a vessel shall immediately notify either of the following Coast Guard offices if there is reason to believe the vessel is lost or imperiled:

(1) The Coast Guard district rescue coordination center (RCC) cognizant over the area in which the vessel was last operating; or

(2) The Coast Guard search and rescue authority nearest to where the vessel was last operating.

(b) Reasons for belief that a vessel is in distress include, but are not limited to, lack of communication with or nonappearance of the vessel.

(c) The owner, charterer, managing operator, or agent notifying the Coast Guard under paragraph (a) of this section, shall provide the name and identification number of the vessel, a description of the vessel, the names or number of individuals on board, and other information that may be requested by the Coast Guard.

§185.280   Official Logbook for foreign voyages.

(a) Every vessel on a voyage from a port in the United States to a foreign port except to a port in Canada, or vice versa, must have an Official Logbook.

(b) The master shall make or have made in the Official Logbook the following entries:

(1) Each legal conviction of a seaman of the vessel and the punishment inflicted;

(2) Each offense committed by a seaman of the vessel for which it is intended to prosecute or to enforce under a forfeiture, together with statements about reading the entry and the reply made to the charge as required by 46 U.S.C. 11502;

(3) A statement of the conduct, character, and qualifications of each seaman of the vessel or a statement that the master declines to give an opinion about that conduct, character, and qualifications;

(4) Each illness of or injury to a seaman of the vessel, the nature of the illness or injury, and the medical treatment;

(5) Each death on board, with the cause of death, and if a seaman, the information required by 46 U.S.C. 10702:

(i) The wages due to a seaman who dies during the voyage and the gross amount of all deductions to be made from the wages;

(ii) The sale of the property of a seaman who dies during the voyage, including a statement of each article sold and the amount received for the property;

(6) Each birth on board, with the sex of the infant and the name of the parents;

(7) Each marriage on board, with the names and ages of the parties;

(8) The name of each seaman who ceases to be a crew member (except by death), with the place, time, manner, and the cause why the seaman ceased to be a crew member;

(9) When a marine casualty occurs, a statement about the casualty and the circumstances under which it occurred, made immediately after the casualty when practicable to do so.

Subpart C—Miscellaneous Operating Requirements

§185.304   Navigation underway.

(a) The movement of vessel shall be under the direction and control of the master or a licensed mate at all times. The master shall operate the vessel keeping the safety of the passengers and crew foremost in mind by directing the vessel in order to prevent a casualty. Special attention should be paid to:

(1) The current(s) velocity and direction of the transiting area;

(2) Tidal state;

(3) Prevailing and forecasted visibility and environmental conditions, including wind and waves;

(4) Density of marine traffic;

(5) Potential damage caused by own wake;

(6) The danger of each closing visual or radar contact;

(7) Vessel's handling characteristics; and

(8) Magnetic variation and deviation errors of the compass.

(b) Masters of vessels not greater than 65 ft (19.8 m) in length must have means available, satisfactory to the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection (OCMI), to obtain or monitor the latest marine broadcast in order to comply with the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 51359, Sept. 30, 1997; USCG-2007-0030, 75 FR 78092, Dec. 14, 2010]

§185.315   Verification of vessel compliance with applicable stability requirements.

(a) After loading and prior to departure and at all other times necessary to assure the safety of the vessel, the master shall determine that the vessel complies with all applicable stability requirements in the vessel's trim and stability book, stability letter, Certificate of Inspection, and Load Line Certificate, as the case may be. The vessel may not depart until it is in compliance with these requirements.

(b) In order to fulfill the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section and avoid overloading the vessel, the master must take into account the total weight of passengers, crew, and variable loads.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended by USCG-2007-0030, 75 FR 78092, Dec. 14, 2010]

§185.320   Steering gear, controls, and communication system tests.

The master of a vessel shall have examined and tested the steering gear, signaling whistle, propulsion controls, and communication systems of the vessel prior to getting underway for a voyage, except that such examination and testing need not be conducted more than once in any 24 hour period.

§185.330   Hatches and other openings.

(a) Except when operating on lakes, bays, and sounds, or rivers routes in calm weather, all hatches and openings in the hull, except loading doors, of a vessel must be kept tightly closed except when being used.

(b) All watertight doors in subdivision bulkheads must be kept tightly closed during the navigation of the vessel except when being used for transit between compartments.

§185.335   Loading doors.

(a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, the master of a vessel fitted with loading doors shall assure that all loading doors are closed and secured during the entire voyage.

(b) Loading doors, other than bow visors, may be opened when operating in protected or partially protected waters, provided the master of the vessel determines that the safety of the vessel is not impaired.

(c) For the purpose of this section, “loading doors” include all weathertight ramps, bow visors, and openings used to load personnel, equipment, and stores, in the collision bulkhead, the side shell, and the boundaries of enclosed superstructures that are continuous with the shell of the vessel.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 51359, Sept. 30, 1997]

§185.340   Vessels carrying vehicles.

(a) Automobiles or other vehicles must be stowed in such a manner as to permit both passengers and crew to get out and away from the vehicles freely in the event of fire or other disaster. The decks, where necessary, must be distinctly marked with painted lines to indicate the vehicle runways and the aisle spaces.

(b) The master shall take any necessary precautions to see that automobiles or other vehicles have their motors turned off and their emergency brakes set when the vessel is underway, and that the motors are not started until the vessel is secured to the landing. In addition, a vehicle at each end of a line of vehicles or next to a loading ramp must have its wheels securely blocked, while the vessel is being navigated.

(c) The master shall have appropriate “NO SMOKING” signs posted and shall take all necessary precautions to prevent smoking or carrying of lighted or smoldering pipes, cigars, cigarettes, or similar items in the deck area assigned to automobiles or other vehicles.

(d) The master shall, prior to getting underway, ensure that vehicles are properly distributed consistent with the guidance in the vessel's stability letter and Certificate of Inspection, if applicable.

§185.350   Fueling of vessels using fuel having a flash point of 43.3   °C (110   °F) or lower (such as gasoline).

A vessel must not take on fuel having a flash point of 43.3   °C (110   °F) or lower when passengers are on board.

§185.352   Ventilation of gasoline machinery spaces.

The mechanical exhaust for the ventilation of a gasoline machinery space, required by §182.460(a)(1)(ii) of this chapter, must be operated prior to starting gasoline engines for the time sufficient to insure at least one complete change of air in the space served.

§185.356   Carriage of hazardous materials.

A vessel that transports a hazardous material, listed in 49 CFR 172.101, in commerce shall ensure the material is handled and transported in accordance with 49 CFR parts 171 and 176.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 51359, Sept. 30, 1997]

§185.360   Use of auto pilot.

Whenever an automatic pilot is used the master shall ensure that:

(a) It is possible to immediately establish manual control of the vessel's steering;

(b) A competent person is ready at all times to take over steering control; and

(c) The changeover from automatic to manual steering and vice versa is made by, or under the supervision of, the master or the mate on watch.

Subpart D—Crew Requirements

§185.402   Officers.

Each officer employed on any vessel subject to this subchapter must have his or her license or merchant mariner credential onboard and available for examination at all times when the vessel is operating.

[USCG-2006-24371, 74 FR 11267, Mar. 16, 2009]

§185.410   Watchmen.

The owner, charterer, master, or managing operator of a vessel carrying overnight passengers shall have a suitable number of watchmen patrol throughout the vessel during the nighttime, whether or not the vessel is underway, to guard against, and give alarm in case of, a fire, man overboard, or other dangerous situation.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 51359, Sept. 30, 1997]

§185.420   Crew training.

(a) The owner, charterer, master or managing operator shall instruct each crew member, upon first being employed and prior to getting underway for the first time on a particular vessel and at least once every three months, as to the duties that the crew member is expected to perform in an emergency including, but not limited to, the emergency instructions listed on the emergency instruction placard required by §185.510 of this part and, when applicable, the duties listed in the station bill required by §185.514 of this part.

(b) Training conducted on a sister vessel may be considered equivalent to the initial and quarterly training requirements contained in paragraph (a) of this section.

(c) Crew training shall be logged or otherwise documented for review by the Coast Guard upon request. The training entry shall include the following information.

(1) Date of the training; and

(2) General description of the training topics.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 51359, Sept. 30, 1997]

Subpart E—Preparations for Emergencies

§185.502   Crew and passenger list.

(a) The owner, charterer, managing operator, or master of the following vessels must keep a correct list of the names of all persons that embark on and disembark from the vessel:

(1) A vessel making a coastwise or oceans voyage where:

(i) Passengers embark or disembark from the vessel to another vessel or port other than at the port of origin; or

(ii) Passengers are carried overnight;

(2) A vessel making a voyage of more than 300 miles on the Great Lakes, except from a Canadian to a United States port; and

(3) A vessel arriving from a foreign port, except at a United States Great Lakes port from a Canadian Great Lakes port.

(b) The master of a vessel required to prepare a crew and passenger list by paragraph (a) of this section shall see that the list is prepared prior to departing on a voyage. The list must be communicated verbally or in writing ashore at the vessel's normal berthing location or with a representative of the owner or managing operator of the vessel. The crew and passenger list shall be available to the Coast Guard upon request.

§185.503   Voyage plan.

(a) The master of the following vessels shall prepare a voyage plan:

(1) A vessel making an oceans or coastwise voyage;

(2) A vessel making a voyage of more than 300 miles on the Great Lakes, except from a Canadian to a United States port;

(3) A vessel, with overnight accommodations for passengers, making an overnight voyage; and

(4) A vessel arriving from a foreign port, except at a United States Great Lakes port from a Canadian Great Lakes port.

(b) The voyage plan required by paragraph (a) of this section must be prepared prior to departing on a voyage and communicated verbally or in writing, ashore at the vessel's normal berthing location or with a representative of the owner or managing operator of the vessel. The voyage plan shall be available to the Coast Guard upon request.

§185.504   Passenger count.

The master of a vessel, except a vessel listed in §185.502(a) of this part, shall keep a correct, written count of all passengers that embark on and disembark from the vessel. Prior to departing on a voyage, the passenger count must be communicated verbally or in writing, and available ashore at the vessel's normal berthing location or with a representative of the owner or managing operator of the vessel. The passenger count shall be available to the Coast Guard upon request.

§185.506   Passenger safety orientation.

(a) Except as allowed by paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, before getting underway on a voyage or as soon as practicable thereafter, the master of a vessel shall ensure that suitable public announcements are made informing all passengers of the following:

(1) The location of emergency exits, survival craft embarkation areas, and ring life buoys;

(2) The stowage location(s) of life jackets;

(3) Either:

(i) The proper method of donning and adjusting life jackets of the type(s) carried on the vessel including a demonstration of the proper donning of a lifejacket, or

(ii) That passengers may contact a crew member for a demonstration as appropriate, prior to beginning an oceans or coastwise voyage;

(4) The location of the instruction placards for life jackets and other lifesaving devices;

(5) That all passengers will be required to don life jackets when possible hazardous conditions exist, as directed by the master; and

(6) If the vessel is operating with reduced manning or equipment requirements in §176.114 of this chapter.

(b) As an alternative to an announcement that complies with paragraph (a) of this section, the master or other designated person may—

(1) Prior to getting underway, deliver to each passenger or, on a vessel that does not carry vehicles and that has seats for each passenger, place near each seat, a card or pamphlet that has the information listed in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(6) of this section; and

(2) Make an abbreviated announcement consisting of:

(i) A statement that passengers should follow the instructions of the crew in an emergency;

(ii) The location of life jackets; and

(iii) That further information concerning emergency procedures including the donning of life jackets, location of other emergency equipment, and emergency evacuation procedures are located on the card or pamphlet that was given to each passenger or is located near each seat.

(c) Ferries operating on short runs of less than 15 minutes may substitute bulkhead placards or signs for the announcement required in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section if the OCMI determines that the announcements are not practical due to the vessel's unique operation.

(d) The master of a vessel shall ensure that a passenger, who boards the vessel on a voyage after the initial public announcement has been made as required by paragraphs (a) or (b) of this section, is also informed of the required safety information.

(e) On a vessel on a voyage of more than 24 hours duration, passengers shall be requested to don life jackets and go to the appropriate embarkation station during the safety orientation. If only a small number of passengers embark at a port after the original muster has been held, these passengers must be given the passenger safety orientation required by paragraphs (a) or (b) of this section if another muster is not held.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996; 61 FR 20557, May 7, 1996, as amended by CGD 97-057, 62 FR 51050, Sept. 30, 1997; 62 FR 51359, Sept. 30, 1997]

§185.508   Wearing of life jackets.

(a) The master of a vessel shall require passengers to don life jackets when possible hazardous conditions exist, including, but not limited to:

(1) When transiting hazardous bars and inlets;

(2) During severe weather;

(3) In event of flooding, fire, or other events that may possibly call for evacuation; and

(4) When the vessel is being towed, except a non-self-propelled vessel under normal operating conditions.

(b) The master or crew shall assist each passenger in obtaining a life jacket and donning it, as necessary.

§185.510   Emergency instructions.

(a) The master and crew of a vessel will be familiar with the content of and have mounted at the operating station, emergency instructions containing the actions to be taken in the event of fire, heavy weather, or man overboard conditions.

(b) Except when in the judgment of the cognizant OCMI the operation of a vessel does not present one of the hazards listed, the emergency instruction placard should contain at least the applicable portions of the “Emergency Instructions” listed in §185.512. The emergency instructions must be designed to address the particular equipment, arrangement, and operation of each individual vessel.

(c) If the cognizant OCMI determines that there is no suitable mounting surface aboard the vessel, the emergency instructions need not be posted but must be carried aboard the vessel and be available to the crew for familiarization.

§185.512   Recommended emergency instructions format.

An emergency instruction placard containing the following information will satisfy the requirements of §185.510.

(a) Emergency instructions—(1) Rough weather at sea, crossing hazardous bars, or flooding. (i) Close all watertight and weathertight doors, hatches, and airports to prevent taking water aboard or further flooding in the vessel.

(ii) Keep bilges dry to prevent loss of stability due to water in bilges. Use power driven bilge pump, hand pump, and buckets to dewater.

(iii) Align fire pumps to use as bilge pump if possible.

(iv) Check all intake and discharge lines, which penetrate the hull, for leakage.

(v) Passengers must remain seated and evenly distributed.

(vi) Passengers must don life jackets if the going becomes very rough, the vessel is about to cross a hazardous bar, or when otherwise instructed by the master.

(vii) Never abandon the vessel unless actually forced to do so.

(viii) If assistance is needed follow the procedures on the emergency broadcast placard posted by the radiotelephone.

(ix) Prepare survival craft (life floats, (inflatable) rafts, (inflatable) buoyant apparatus, boats) for launching.

(2) Man overboard. (i) Throw a ring buoy overboard as close to the person as possible.

(ii) Post a lookout to keep the person overboard in sight.

(iii) Launch rescue boat and maneuver to pick up person in the water, or maneuver the vessel to pick up the person in the water.

(iv) Have crew member put on life jacket, attach a safety line to him or her, and have him or her stand by jump into the water to assist the person overboard if necessary.

(v) If person is not immediately located, notify Coast Guard and other vessels in vicinity by radiotelephone.

(vi) Continue search until released by Coast Guard.

(3) Fire. (i) Cut off air supply to fire—close items such as hatches, ports, doors, ventilators, and louvers, and shut off ventilation system.

(ii) Cut off electrical system supplying affected compartment if possible.

(iii) If safe, immediately use portable fire extinguishers at base of flames for flammable liquid or grease fires or water for fires in ordinary combustible materials. Do not use water on electrical fires.

(iv) If fire is in machinery spaces, shut off fuel supply and ventilation and activate fixed extinguishing system if installed.

(v) Maneuver vessel to minimize effect of wind on fire.

(vi) If unable to control fire, immediately notify the Coast Guard and other craft in the vicinity by radiotelephone.

(vii) Move passengers away from fire, have them put on life jackets, and if necessary, prepare to abandon the vessel.

(b) [Reserved]

§185.514   Station bill.

(a) A station bill must be posted by the master on a vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length having a Certificate of Inspection requiring more than four crew members at any one time, including the master.

(b) The station bill required by paragraph (a) of this section must set forth the special duties and duty station of each crew member for various emergencies. The duties must, as far as possible, be comparable with the regular work of the individual. The duties must include at least the following and any other duties necessary for the proper handling of a particular emergency:

(1) The closing of hatches, airports, watertight doors, vents, scuppers, and valves for intake and discharge lines that penetrate the hull, the stopping of fans and ventilating systems, and the operating of all safety equipment;

(2) The preparing and launching of survival craft and rescue boats;

(3) The extinguishing of fire; and

(4) The mustering of passengers including the following:

(i) Warning the passengers;

(ii) Assembling the passengers and directing them to their appointed stations; and

(iii) Keeping order in the passageways and stairways and generally controlling the movement of the passengers.

(c) The station bill must be posted at the operating station and in a conspicuous location in each crew accommodation space.

§185.516   Life jacket placards.

(a) Placards containing instructions for the donning and use of the life jackets aboard the vessel must be posted in conspicuous places that are regularly accessible and visible to the crew and passengers.

(b) If the cognizant OCMI determines that there is no suitable mounting surface aboard the vessel, the life jacket placards need not be posted but must be carried aboard the vessel and be available to the crew and passengers for familiarization.

§185.518   Inflatable survival craft placards.

(a) Every vessel equipped with an inflatable survival craft must have approved placards or other cards containing instructions for launching and inflating inflatable survival craft for the information of persons on board posted in conspicuous places by each inflatable survival craft.

(b) Under the requirement in §160.051-6(c)(1) of this chapter, the manufacturer of approved inflatable liferafts is required to provide approved placards containing such instructions with each liferaft. Similar placards must be used for other inflatable survival craft.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended by CGD 97-057, 62 FR 51050, Sept. 30, 1997; 62 FR 51359, Sept. 30, 1997]

§185.520   Abandon ship and man overboard drills and training.

(a) The master shall conduct sufficient drills and give sufficient instructions to make sure that all crew members are familiar with their duties during emergencies that necessitate abandoning ship or the recovery of persons who have fallen overboard.

(b) Each abandon ship drill must include:

(1) Summoning the crew to report to assigned stations and prepare for assigned duties;

(2) Summoning passengers on a vessel on an overnight voyage to muster stations or embarkation stations and ensuring that they are made aware of how the order to abandon ship will be given;

(3) Checking that life jackets are correctly donned;

(4) Operation of any davits used for launching liferafts; and

(5) Instruction on the automatic and manual deployment of survival craft.

(c) Each abandon ship drill must, as far as practicable, be conducted as if there were an actual emergency.

(d) Each rescue boat required in accordance with §180.210 of this chapter must be launched with its assigned crew aboard and maneuvered in the water as if during an actual man overboard situation:

(1) Once each month, if reasonable and practicable; but

(2) At least once within a 3 month period before the vessel gets underway with passengers.

(e) Onboard training in the use of davit launched liferafts must take place at intervals of not more than 3 months on a vessel with a davit launched liferaft.

(f) Abandon ship and man overboard drills and training shall be logged or otherwise documented for review by the Coast Guard upon request. The drill entry shall include the following information:

(1) Date of the drill and training; and

(2) General description of the drill scenario and training topics.

§185.524   Fire fighting drills and training.

(a) The master shall conduct sufficient fire drills to make sure that each crew member is familiar with his or her duties in case of a fire.

(b) Each fire drill must include:

(1) Summoning passengers on a vessel on an overnight voyage to muster or embarkation stations;

(2) Summoning the crew to report to assigned stations and to prepare for and demonstrate assigned duties; and

(3) Instruction in the use and location of fire alarms, extinguishers, and any other fire fighting equipment on board.

(c) Each fire drill must, as far as practicable, be conducted as if there were an actual emergency.

(d) Fire fighting drills and training shall be logged or otherwise documented for review by the Coast Guard upon request. The drill entry shall include the following information:

(1) Date of the drill and training; and

(2) General description of the drill scenario and training topics.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 51359, Sept. 30, 1997]

§185.530   Responsibilities of licensed individuals.

Nothing in the emergency instructions or a station bill required by this subpart exempts any licensed individual from the exercise of good judgment in an emergency situation.

Subpart F—Markings Required

§185.602   Hull markings.

(a) Each vessel must be marked as required by part 67, subpart I, of this chapter.

(b) Paragraphs (c) through (g) of this section apply to each vessel that does not demonstrate compliance in accordance with §178.310(c) of this chapter.

(c) Each vessel must—

(1) Have permanent draft marks at each end of the vessel; or

(2) Have permanent loading marks placed on each side of the vessel forward and aft to indicate the maximum allowable trim and amidships to indicate the maximum allowable draft.

(d) A loading mark required by paragraph (c)(2) of this section must be a horizontal line of at least 205 millimeters (8 inches) in length and 25 millimeters (1 inch) in height, with its upper edge passing through the point of maximum draft. The loading mark must be painted in a contrasting color to the sideshell paint.

(e) On a vessel that has a load line, the amidships marks required by paragraph (c)(2) of this section must be those required by the International Convention on Load Lines, 1966.

(f) In cases where draft marks are obscured due to operational constraints or by protrusions, the vessel must be fitted with a reliable draft indicating system from which the bow and stern drafts can be determined.

(g) On a vessel on which the number of passengers permitted on upper decks is limited by stability criteria, as indicated by the vessel's stability letter, the maximum number of passengers allowed on an upper deck must be indicated by a durable marking of at least 25 millimeters (1 inch) numbers and letters at the entranceway to that deck.

[CGD 85-080, 62 FR 51359, Sept. 30, 1997, as amended by USCG-2007-0030, 75 FR 78092, Dec. 14, 2010]

§185.604   Lifesaving equipment markings.

(a) The name of a vessel must be marked or painted in clearly legible letters and numbers:

(1) On each side of the bow of each rescue boat; and

(2) On each life float and buoyant apparatus.

(b) Each life jacket, immersion suit, and ring life buoy must be marked in clearly legible block capital letters with the vessel's name. The marking is not required on a life jacket carried to meet a temporary need for additional life jackets, if the life jacket has the name of another vessel or company marked on it. For an immersion suit, the name of the person to whom the immersion suit is assigned is an acceptable alternative to the name of the vessel.

(c) The name of the vessel must be marked or painted in clearly legible letters on each Emergency Position Indicating Radiobeacon (EPIRB), except on an EPIRB in an inflatable liferaft.

(d) The number of persons capacity must be marked or painted in clearly legible letters and numbers on each side of the bow of each rescue boat.

(e) The number of persons capacity must be marked or painted in clearly legible letters and numbers on each life float and buoyant apparatus. This number must:

(1) Be the number of persons the device is equipped for; and

(2) Not be greater than the number of persons the device is approved for as shown on its nameplate.

(f) The number and identification of the items stowed inside, and their sizes, must be marked in clearly legible letters and numbers on each container for life jackets and immersion suits. Identification of the items may be in words, or the appropriate symbols in IMO Resolution A.760(18) (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 175.600). Letters and numbers must be at least 50 millimeters (2 inches) high. Symbols must be at least 100 mm (4 inches) square.

(g) The name of the vessel must be marked or painted in clearly legible letters on each life float paddle.

(h) Each life jacket must be marked with Type I retroreflective material approved in 46 CFR 164.018 or other standard specified by the Commandant. The arrangement of the retroreflective material applied after March 11, 1996, must be as specified by IMO Resolution A.658(16) (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 175.600).

(i) Each rescue boat and ring life buoy must be marked with Type II retroreflective material approved in accordance with 46 CFR 164.018 or other standard specified by the Commandant. The arrangement of the retroreflective material applied after March 11, 1996, must be as specified by IMO Resolution A.658(16).

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 51359, Sept. 30, 1997; 62 FR 64306, Dec. 5, 1997; USCG-2003-16630, 73 FR 65210, Oct. 31, 2008]

§185.606   Escape hatches and emergency exits.

All escape hatches and other emergency exits used as means of escape must be marked on both sides in clearly legible letters at least 50 millimeters (2 inches) high: “EMERGENCY EXIT, KEEP CLEAR”, unless such markings are deemed unnecessary by the cognizant OCMI.

§185.608   Fuel shutoff valves.

Remote fuel shutoff stations must be marked in clearly legible letters at least 25 millimeters (1 inch) high indicating purpose of the valve and direction of operation.

§185.610   Watertight doors and watertight hatches.

Watertight doors and watertight hatches must be marked on both sides in clearly legible letters at least 25 millimeters (1 inch) high: “WATERTIGHT DOOR—KEEP CLOSED” or “WATERTIGHT HATCH—KEEP CLOSED”, unless such markings are deemed unnecessary by the cognizant OCMI.

§185.612   Fire protection equipment.

(a) Complete but simple instructions for the operation of a fixed gas fire extinguishing system must be located in a conspicuous place at or near each pull box and stop valve control and in the space where the extinguishing agent cylinders are stored. If the storage cylinders are separate from the protected space, the instructions must also include a schematic diagram of the system and instructions detailing alternate methods of releasing the extinguishing agent should the local manual release or stop valve controls fail to operate. Each control valve to a distribution line must be marked to indicate the space served.

(b) An alarm for a fixed gas fire extinguishing system must be clearly and conspicuously marked “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS-VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED”. Where a different extinguishing agent is installed, that agent shall be marked in place of “carbon dioxide.”

(c) Each distribution line valve of a fixed gas fire extinguishing system and the fire main, must be plainly, conspicuously, and permanently marked indicating the space served.

(d) An alarm for an automatic sprinkler system must be conspicuously marked in clearly legible letters “SPRINKLER ALARM”.

(e) An alarm bell for a smoke detecting system must be conspicuously marked in clearly legible letters “SMOKE DETECTION ALARM”.

(f) The control cabinets or spaces containing valves, manifolds or controls for the various fire extinguishing systems must be marked in conspicuous red letters at least 2 inches high: “[STEAM/CARBON DIOXIDE/CLEAN AGENT/FOAM/WATER SPRAY—as appropriate] FIRE APPARATUS.”.

(g) Each entrance to a space storing carbon dioxide cylinders, a space protected by carbon dioxide systems, or any space into which carbon dioxide might migrate must be conspicuously marked as follows:

(1) Spaces storing carbon dioxide—“CARBON DIOXIDE GAS CAN CAUSE INJURY OR DEATH. VENTILATE THE AREA BEFORE ENTERING. A HIGH CONCENTRATION CAN OCCUR IN THIS AREA AND CAN CAUSE SUFFOCATION.”.

(2) Spaces protected by carbon dioxide—“CARBON DIOXIDE GAS CAN CAUSE INJURY OR DEATH. WHEN ALARM OPERATES OR WINTERGREEN SCENT IS DETECTED, DO NOT ENTER UNTIL VENTILATED. LOCK OUT SYSTEM WHEN SERVICING.” The reference to wintergreen scent may be omitted for carbon dioxide systems not required to have odorizing units and not equipped with such units.

(3) Spaces into which carbon dioxide might migrate—“CARBON DIOXIDE GAS CAN CAUSE INJURY OR DEATH. DISCHARGE INTO NEARBY SPACE CAN COLLECT HERE. WHEN ALARM OPERATES OR WINTERGREEN SCENT IS DETECTED VACATE IMMEDIATELY.” The reference to wintergreen scent may be omitted for carbon dioxide systems not required to have odorizing units and not equipped with such units.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended by USCG-2006-24797, 77 FR 33892, June 7, 2012]

§185.614   Portable watertight containers for distress flares and smoke signals.

Portable watertight containers for distress flares and smoke signals shall be of a bright color, and containers shall be clearly marked in legible contrasting letters at least 12.7 millimeters (0.5 inches) high: “DISTRESS SIGNALS”.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996; 61 FR 24465, May 15, 1996]

Subpart G—Operational Readiness, Maintenance, and Inspection of Lifesaving Equipment

§185.700   Operational readiness.

(a) Each launching appliance and each survival craft and rescue boat on a vessel must be in good working order and ready for immediate use before the vessel leaves port and at all times when the vessel is underway.

(b) Each deck where survival craft or rescue boats are stowed or boarded must be kept clear of obstructions that would interfere with the boarding and launching of the survival craft or rescue boat.

§185.702   Maintenance.

(a) The manufacturer's instructions for onboard maintenance of survival craft, rescue boats, and launching appliances, manufactured on or after March 11, 1996, must be onboard a vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length and readily available for a vessel of not more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length. The instructions must also be readily available at each inspection for certification and reinspection.

(b) The owner or managing operator shall make sure that maintenance is carried out in accordance with the instructions required under paragraph (a) of this section.

(c) The cognizant OCMI may accept, instead of the instructions required under paragraph (a) of this section, a shipboard planned maintenance program that includes the items listed in that paragraph.

(d) The inspection and maintenance of the equipment listed in paragraph (a) of this section shall be logged or otherwise documented for review by the Coast Guard upon request.

§185.704   Maintenance of falls.

(a) Each fall used in a launching appliance on a vessel must be turned end for end at intervals of not more than 30 months.

(b) Each fall must be renewed when necessary due to deterioration or at intervals of not more than 5 years, whichever is earlier.

(c) Each fall must have a corrosion resistant tag with the following permanently marked on it:

(1) The date the new fall was installed; and

(2) If the fall has been turned end for end, the date it was turned.

§185.720   Weekly maintenance and inspections.

The following tests and inspections must be carried out weekly on a vessel:

(a) Each survival craft, rescue boat, and launching appliance must be visually inspected to ensure its readiness for use;

(b) Each rescue boat engine must be run ahead and astern for not less than 3 minutes, unless the ambient temperature is below the minimum temperature required for starting the engine; and

(c) Each battery for rescue boat engine starting must be brought up to full charge at least once each week if:

(1) The battery is of a type that requires recharging; and

(2) The battery is not connected to a device that keeps it continuously charged.

§185.722   Monthly inspections.

Each survival craft, rescue boat, and launching appliance on a vessel must be inspected monthly, using the manufacturers instructions to make sure it is complete and in good order.

§185.724   Quarterly inspections.

(a) Each winch control apparatus of a launching appliance on a vessel, including motor controllers, emergency switches, master switches, and limit switches, must be examined once in each 3 months.

(b) The examination required by paragraph (a) of this section must include the removal of drain plugs and the opening of drain valves to make sure that enclosures are free of water.

§185.726   Annual inspections.

(a) Each rescue boat must be stripped, cleaned, and thoroughly inspected, and any necessary repairs made at least once each year, including emptying and cleaning of each fuel tank, and refilling it with fresh fuel.

(b) Each davit, winch, fall and other launching appliance must be thoroughly inspected, and any necessary repairs made, at least once each year.

(c) Each item of lifesaving equipment with an expiration date must be replaced during the annual inspection and repair if the expiration date has passed.

(d) Each battery used in an item of lifesaving equipment, except inflatable survival craft equipment, must be replaced during the annual inspection if the expiration date of the battery has passed. The expiration date of the battery may be marked on the battery or the owner or managing operator may have a record of the expiration date from the manufacturer of a battery marked with a serial number.

(e) Except for a storage battery used in a rescue boat, each battery without an expiration date indicated on it or for which the owner or managing operator does not have a record of the expiration date, used in an item of lifesaving equipment, must be replaced during the annual inspection.

§185.728   Testing and servicing of Emergency Position Indicating Radiobeacons (EPIRB).

The master of the vessel shall ensure that:

(a) Each EPIRB, other than an EPIRB in an inflatable liferaft, must be tested monthly, using the integrated test circuit and output indicator, to determine that it is operative;

(b) The EPIRB's battery is replaced after it is used, or before the date required by FCC regulations in 47 CFR part 80, whichever comes sooner; and

(c) The EPIRB test required by paragraph (a) shall be logged or otherwise documented, as applicable.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended by CGD 97-057, 62 FR 51050, Sept. 30, 1997]

§185.730   Servicing of inflatable liferafts, inflatable buoyant apparatus, inflatable life jackets, and inflated rescue boats.

(a) An inflatable liferaft or inflatable buoyant apparatus must be serviced at a facility specifically approved by the Commandant for the particular brand, and in accordance with servicing procedures meeting the requirements of part 160, subpart 160.151, of this chapter—

(1) No later than the month and year on its servicing sticker affixed under 46 CFR 160.151-57(n), except that servicing may be delayed until the next scheduled inspection of the vessel, provided that the delay does not exceed 5 months; and

(2) Whenever the container is damaged or the container straps or seals are broken.

(b) Each inflatable lifejacket and hybrid inflatable lifejacket or work vest must be serviced:

(1) Within 12 months of its initial packing; and

(2) Within 12 months of each subsequent servicing, except that servicing may be delayed until the next scheduled inspection of the vessel, provided that the delay does not exceed 5 months.

(c) Each inflatable life jacket must be serviced in accordance with the servicing procedure under §160.176 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant.

(d) Each hybrid inflatable life jacket or work vest must be serviced in accordance with the servicing procedure under §160.077 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant.

(e) Repair and maintenance of inflated rescue boats must be in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. All repairs must be made at a servicing facility approved by the Commandant, except for emergency repairs carried out on board the vessel.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended at 62 FR 51359, Sept. 30, 1997; USCG-2001-11118, 67 FR 58542, Sept. 17, 2002]

§185.740   Periodic servicing of hydrostatic release units.

(a) Each hydrostatic release unit, other than a disposable unit, must be serviced:

(1) Within 12 months of its manufacture and within 12 months of each subsequent servicing, except when servicing is delayed until the next scheduled inspection of the vessel, provided that the delay does not exceed 5 months; and

(2) In accordance with the repair and testing procedures under §160.062 in subchapter Q of this chapter, or other standard specified by the Commandant.

(b) Each disposable hydrostatic release unit must be marked with an expiration date of two years after the date on which the unit is installed.

Subpart H—Penalties

§185.900   Penalty for violations.

Violation of the provisions of this subchapter will subject the violator to the applicable penalty provisions of Subtitle II of Title 46, United States Code.

§185.910   Suspension and revocation.

An individual holding a merchant mariner credential, license, certificate of registry, or merchant mariner's document who commits an act of misconduct, negligence, or incompetence, or who violates or fails to comply with this subchapter or any other law or regulation intending to promote marine safety, is subject to proceedings under the provisions of 46 U.S.C. 7703 and part 5 of this chapter with respect to suspension or revocation of a merchant mariner credential, license, certificate, or document.

[CGD 85-080, 61 FR 1005, Jan. 10, 1996, as amended by USCG-2006-24371, 74 FR 11267, Mar. 16, 2009]



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