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Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of November 26, 2014

Title 12Chapter VIISubchapter A → Part 747


Title 12: Banks and Banking


PART 747—ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS, ADJUDICATIVE HEARINGS, RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE, AND INVESTIGATIONS


Contents
§747.0   Scope of part 747.

Subpart A—Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure

§747.1   Scope.
§747.2   Rules of construction.
§747.3   Definitions.
§747.4   Authority of the NCUA Board.
§747.5   Authority of the administrative law judge.
§747.6   Appearance and practice in adjudicatory proceedings.
§747.7   Good faith certification.
§747.8   Conflicts of interest.
§747.9   Ex parte communications.
§747.10   Filing of papers.
§747.11   Service of papers.
§747.12   Construction of time limits.
§747.13   Change of time limits.
§747.14   Witness fees and expenses.
§747.15   Opportunity for informal settlement.
§747.16   NCUA's right to conduct examination.
§747.17   Collateral attacks on adjudicatory proceeding.
§747.18   Commencement of proceeding and contents of notice.
§747.19   Answer.
§747.20   Amended pleadings.
§747.21   Failure to appear.
§747.22   Consolidation and severance of actions.
§747.23   Motions.
§747.24   Scope of document discovery.
§747.25   Request for document discovery from parties.
§747.26   Document subpoenas to nonparties.
§747.27   Deposition of witness unavailable for hearing.
§747.28   Interlocutory review.
§747.29   Summary disposition.
§747.30   Partial summary disposition.
§747.31   Scheduling and prehearing conferences.
§747.32   Prehearing submissions.
§747.33   Public hearings.
§747.34   Hearing subpoenas.
§747.35   Conduct of hearings.
§747.36   Evidence.
§747.37   Post-hearing filings.
§747.38   Recommended decision and filing of record.
§747.39   Exceptions to recommended decision.
§747.40   Review by the NCUA Board.
§747.41   Stays pending judicial review.

Subpart B—Local Rules of Practice and Procedure

§747.100   Discovery limitations.

Subpart C—Local Rules and Procedures Applicable to Proceedings for the Involuntary Termination of Insured Status

§747.201   Scope.
§747.202   Grounds for termination of insurance.
§747.203   Notice of charges.
§747.204   Notice of intention to terminate insured status.
§747.205   Order terminating insured status.
§747.206   Consent to termination of insured status.
§747.207   Notice of termination of insured status.
§747.208   Duties after termination.

Subpart D—Local Rules and Procedures Applicable to Suspensions and Prohibitions Where Felony Charged

§747.301   Scope.
§747.302   Rules of practice; remainder of board of directors.
§747.303   Notice of suspension or prohibition.
§747.304   Removal or permanent prohibition.
§747.305   Effectiveness of suspension or removal until completion of hearing.
§747.306   Notice of opportunity for hearing.
§747.307   Hearing.
§747.308   Waiver of hearing; failure to request hearing or review based on written submissions; failure to appear.
§747.309   Decision of the NCUA Board.
§747.310   Reconsideration by the NCUA Board.
§747.311   Relevant considerations.

Subpart E—Local Rules and Procedures Applicable to Proceedings Relating to the Suspension or Revocation of Charters and to Involuntary Liquidations Under Title I

§747.401   Scope.
§747.402   Grounds for suspension or revocation of charter and for involuntary liquidation.
§747.403   Notice of intent to suspend or revoke charter; notice of suspension.
§747.404   Notice of hearing.
§747.405   Issuance of order.
§747.406   Cancellation of charter.

Subpart F—Local Rules and Procedures Applicable to Proceedings Relating to the Termination of Membership in the Central Liquidity Facility [Reserved]

Subpart G—Local Rules and Procedures Applicable to Recovery of Attorneys Fees and Other Expenses Under the Equal Access to Justice Act in NCUA Board Adjudications

§747.601   Purpose and scope.
§747.602   Eligibility of applicants.
§747.603   Prevailing party.
§747.604   Standards for award.
§747.605   Allowable fees and expenses.
§747.606   Contents of application.
§747.607   Statement of net worth.
§747.608   Documentation of fees and expenses.
§747.609   Filing and service of applications.
§747.610   Answer to application.
§747.611   Comments by other parties.
§747.612   Settlement.
§747.613   Further proceedings.
§747.614   Recommended decision.
§747.615   Decision of the NCUA Board.
§747.616   Payment of award.

Subpart H—Local Rules and Procedures Applicable to Investigations

§747.701   Applicability.
§747.702   Information obtained in investigations.
§747.703   Authority to conduct investigations.

Subpart I—Local Rules Applicable to Formal Investigative Proceedings

§747.801   Applicability.
§747.802   Non-public formal investigative proceedings.
§747.803   Subpoenas.
§747.804   Oath; false statements.
§747.805   Self-incrimination; immunity.
§747.806   Transcripts.
§747.807   Rights of witnesses.

Subpart J—Local Procedures and Standards Applicable to a Notice of Change in Senior Executive Officers, Directors or Committee Members Pursuant to Section 212 of the Act

§747.901   Scope.
§747.902   Grounds for disapproval of notice.
§747.903   Procedures where notice of disapproval issued; reconsideration.
§747.904   Appeal.
§747.905   Judicial review.

Subpart K—Inflation Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties

§747.1001   Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation.

Subpart L—Issuance, Review and Enforcement of Orders Imposing Prompt Corrective Action

§747.2001   Scope.
§747.2002   Review of orders imposing discretionary supervisory action.
§747.2003   Review of order reclassifying a credit union on safety and soundness criteria.
§747.2004   Review of order to dismiss a director or senior executive officer.
§747.2005   Enforcement of orders.

Subpart M—Issuance, Review and Enforcement of Orders Imposing Prompt Corrective Action on Corporate Credit Unions

§747.3001   Scope.
§747.3002   Review of orders imposing discretionary supervisory action.
§747.3003   Review of order reclassifying a corporate credit union on safety and soundness criteria.
§747.3004   Review of order to dismiss a director or senior executive officer.
§747.3005   Enforcement of directives.
§747.3006   Conservatorship or liquidation of critically undercapitalized corporate credit union.

Authority: 12 U.S.C. 1766, 1782, 1784, 1785, 1786, 1787, 1790a, 1790d; 42 U.S.C. 4012a; Pub. L. 101-410; Pub. L. 104-134; Pub. L. 109-351; 120 Stat. 1966.

Source: 56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, unless otherwise noted.

§747.0   Scope of part 747.

(a) This part describes the various formal and informal adjudicative actions and non-adjudicative proceedings available to the National Credit Union Administration Board (“NCUA Board”), the grounds for those actions and proceedings, and the procedures used in formal and informal hearings related to each available action. As mandated by section 916 of the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989 (“FIRREA”) (12 U.S.C. 1818 note), this part incorporates uniform rules of practice and procedure governing formal adjudications generally, as well as proceedings involving cease-and-desist actions, assessment of civil money penalties, and removal, prohibition and suspension actions. In addition, the Uniform Rules are incorporated in other subparts of this part which provide for formal adjudications. The administrative actions and proceedings described herein, as well as the grounds and hearing procedures for each, are controlled by sections 120(b) (except where the Federal credit union is closed due to insolvency), 202(a)(3) and 206 of the Federal Credit Union Act (“the Act”), 12 U.S.C. 1766(b), 1782(a)(3), 1786. Should any provision of this part be inconsistent with these or any other provisions of the Act, as amended, the Act shall control. Judicial enforcement of any action or order described in this part, as well as judicial review thereof, shall be as prescribed under the Act (12 U.S.C. 1751 et seq.) and the Administrative Procedure Act (5 U.S.C. 500 et seq.).

(b) As used in this part, the term insured credit union means any Federal credit union or any state chartered credit union insured under subchapter II of the Act unless the context indicates otherwise.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992]

Subpart A—Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure

§747.1   Scope.

This subpart prescribes uniform rules of practice and procedure applicable to adjudicatory proceedings required to be conducted on the record after opportunity for a hearing under the following statutory provisions:

(a) Cease-and-desist proceedings under section 206(e) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1786(e));

(b) Removal and prohibition proceedings under section 206(g) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1786(g));

(c) Assessment of civil money penalties by the NCUA Board against institutions and institution-affiliated parties for any violation of:

(1) Section 202 of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1782);

(2) Section 1120 of FIRREA (12 U.S.C. 3349), or any order or regulation issued thereunder;

(3) The terms of any final or temporary order issued under section 206 of the Act or any written agreement executed by the National Credit Union Administration (“NCUA”), any condition imposed in writing by the NCUA in connection with any action on any application, notice, or other request by the credit union or institution-affiliated party, certain unsafe or unsound practices or breaches of fiduciary duty, or any law or regulation not otherwise provided herein, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1786(k); and

(4) Any provision of law referenced in section 102(f) of the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 (42 U.S.C. 4012a(f)) or any order or regulation issued thereunder;

(d) Remedial action under section 102(g) of the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 (42 U.S.C. 4012a(g)); and

(e) This subpart also applies to all other adjudications required by statute to be determined on the record after opportunity for an agency hearing, unless otherwise specifically provided for in subparts B through J of this part.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992, as amended at 61 FR 28025, June 4, 1996; 71 FR 67440, Nov. 22, 2006]

§747.2   Rules of construction.

For purposes of this subpart:

(a) Any term in the singular includes the plural, and the plural includes the singular, if such use would be appropriate;

(b) Any use of a masculine, feminine, or neuter gender encompasses all three, if such use would be appropriate;

(c) The term counsel includes a non-attorney representative; and

(d) Unless the context requires otherwise, a party's counsel of record, if any, may, on behalf of that party, take any action required to be taken by the party.

§747.3   Definitions.

For purposes of this subpart, unless explicitly stated to the contrary:

(a) Administrative law judge means one who presides at an administrative hearing under authority set forth at 5 U.S.C. 556.

(b) Adjudicatory proceeding means a proceeding conducted pursuant to this subpart and leading to the formulation of a final order other than a regulation.

(c) Decisional employee means any member of the NCUA's or administrative law judge's staff who has not engaged in an investigative or prosecutorial role in a proceeding and who may assist the Agency or the administrative law judge, respectively, in preparing orders, recommended decisions, decisions, and other documents under the Uniform Rules.

(d) Enforcement Counsel means any individual who files a notice of appearance as counsel on behalf of the NCUA in an adjudicatory proceeding.

(e) Final order means an order issued by the NCUA with or without the consent of the affected institution or the institution-affiliated party, that has become final, without regard to the pendency of any petition for reconsideration or review.

(f) Institution includes: (1) Any Federal credit union as that term is defined in section 101(1) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1752(1)); and

(2) Any insured state credit union as that term is defined in section 101(7) of the FCUA (12 U.S.C. 1752(7)).

(g) Institution-affiliated party means any institution-affiliated party as that term is defined in section 206(r) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1786(r)).

(h) Local Rules means those rules promulgated by the NCUA in the subparts of this part other than subpart A of this part.

(i) OFIA means the Office of Financial Institution Adjudication, which is the executive body charged with overseeing the administration of administrative enforcement proceedings for the NCUA, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”), the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (“Board”), the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”), and the Office of Thrift Supervision (“OTS”).

(j) Party means the NCUA and any person named as a party in any notice.

(k) Person means an individual, sole proprietor, partnership, corporation, unincorporated association, trust, joint venture, pool, syndicate, agency or other entity or organization, including an institution as defined in paragraph (f) of this section.

(l) Respondent means any party other than the NCUA.

(m) Uniform Rules means those rules in subpart A of this part that are common to the NCUA, the OCC, the Board, the FDIC and the OTS.

(n) Violation includes any action (alone or with another or others) for or toward causing, bringing about, participating in, counseling, or aiding or abetting a violation.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992]

§747.4   Authority of the NCUA Board.

The NCUA Board may, at any time during the pendency of a proceeding perform, direct the performance of, or waive performance of, any act which could be done or ordered by the administrative law judge.

§747.5   Authority of the administrative law judge.

(a) General rule. All proceedings governed by this part shall be conducted in accordance with the provisions of chapter 5 of title 5 of the United States Code. The administrative law judge shall have all powers necessary to conduct a proceeding in a fair and impartial manner and to avoid unnecessary delay.

(b) Powers. The administrative law judge shall have all powers necessary to conduct the proceeding in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section, including the following powers:

(1) To administer oaths and affirmations;

(2) To issue subpoenas, subpoenas duces tecum, and protective orders, as authorized by this part, and to quash or modify any such subpoenas and orders;

(3) To receive relevant evidence and to rule upon the admission of evidence and offers of proof;

(4) To take or cause depositions to be taken as authorized by this subpart;

(5) To regulate the course of the hearing and the conduct of the parties and their counsel;

(6) To hold scheduling and/or pre-hearing conferences as set forth in §747.31;

(7) To consider and rule upon all procedural and other motions appropriate in an adjudicatory proceeding, provided that only the NCUA Board shall have the power to grant any motion to dismiss the proceeding or to decide any other motion that results in a final determination of the merits of the proceeding;

(8) To prepare and present to the NCUA Board a recommended decision as provided herein;

(9) To recuse himself or herself by motion made by a party or on his or her own motion;

(10) To establish time, place and manner limitations on the attendance of the public and the media for any public hearing; and

(11) To do all other things necessary and appropriate to discharge the duties of a presiding officer.

§747.6   Appearance and practice in adjudicatory proceedings.

(a) Appearance before the NCUA or an administrative law judge—(1) By attorneys. Any member in good standing of the bar of the highest court of any state, commonwealth, possession, territory of the United States, or the District of Columbia may represent others before the NCUA if such attorney is not currently suspended or debarred from practice before the NCUA.

(2) By non-attorneys. An individual may appear on his or her own behalf; a member of a partnership may represent the partnership; a duly authorized officer, director, or employee of any government unit, agency, institution, corporation or authority may represent that unit, agency, institution, corporation or authority if such officer, director, or employee is not currently suspended or debarred from practice before the NCUA.

(3) Notice of appearance. Any individual acting as counsel on behalf of a party, including the NCUA Board, shall file a notice of appearance with OFIA at or before the time that the individual submits papers or otherwise appears on behalf of a party in the adjudicatory proceeding. The notice of appearance must include a written declaration that the individual is currently qualified as provided in paragraph (a)(1) or (a)(2) of this section and is authorized to represent the particular party. By filing a notice of appearance on behalf of a party in an adjudicatory proceeding, the counsel agrees and represents that he or she is authorized to accept service on behalf of the represented party and that, in the event of withdrawal from representation, he or she will, if required by the administrative law judge, continue to accept service until new counsel has filed a notice of appearance or until the represented party indicates that he or she will proceed on a pro se basis.

(b) Sanctions. Dilatory, obstructionist, egregious, contemptuous or contumacious conduct at any phase of any adjudicatory proceeding may be grounds for exclusion or suspension of counsel from the proceeding.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 28025, June 4, 1996]

§747.7   Good faith certification.

(a) General requirement. Every filing or submission of record following the issuance of a notice shall be signed by at least one counsel of record in his or her individual name and shall state that counsel's address and telephone number. A party who acts as his or her own counsel shall sign his or her individual name and state his or her address and telephone number on every filing or submission of record.

(b) Effect of signature. (1) The signature of counsel or a party shall constitute a certification that: the counsel or party has read the filing or submission of record; to the best of his or her knowledge, information, and belief formed after reasonable inquiry, the filing or submission of record is well-grounded in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing law; and the filing or submission of record is not made for any improper purpose, such as to harass or to cause unnecessary delay or needless increase in the cost of litigation.

(2) If a filing or submission of record is not signed, the administrative law judge shall strike the filing or submission of record, unless it is signed promptly after the omission is called to the attention of the pleader or movant.

(c) Effect of making oral motion or argument. The act of making any oral motion or oral argument by any counsel or party constitutes a certification that to the best of his or her knowledge, information, and belief formed after reasonable inquiry, his or her statements are well-grounded in fact and are warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing law, and are not made for any improper purpose, such as to harass or to cause unnecessary delay or needless increase in the cost of litigation.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 75 FR 34622, June 18, 2010]

§747.8   Conflicts of interest.

(a) Conflict of interest in representation. No person shall appear as counsel for another person in an adjudicatory proceeding if it reasonably appears that such representation may be materially limited by that counsel's responsibilities to a third person or by the counsel's own interests. The administrative law judge may take corrective measures at any stage of a proceeding to cure a conflict of interest in representation, including the issuance of an order limiting the scope of representation or disqualifying an individual from appearing in a representative capacity for the duration of the proceeding.

(b) Certification and waiver. If any person appearing as counsel represents two or more parties to an adjudicatory proceeding or also represents a non-party on a matter relevant to an issue in the proceeding, counsel must certify in writing at the time of filing the notice of appearance required by §747.6(a):

(1) That the counsel has personally and fully discussed the possibility of conflicts of interest with each such party and non-party; and

(2) That each such party and non-party waives any right it might otherwise have had to assert any known conflicts of interest or to assert any non-material conflicts of interest during the course of the proceeding.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 28025, June 4, 1996]

§747.9   Ex parte communications.

(a) Definition—(1) Ex parte communication means any material oral or written communication relevant to the merits of an adjudicatory proceeding that was neither on the record nor on reasonable prior notice to all parties that takes place between—

(i) An interested person outside the NCUA (including such person's counsel); and

(ii) The administrative law judge handling that proceeding, the NCUA Board, or a decisional employee.

(2) Exception. A request for status of the proceeding does not constitute an ex parte communication.

(b) Prohibition of ex parte communications. From the time the notice is issued by the NCUA Board until the date that the NCUA Board issues its final decision pursuant to §747.40(c):

(1) No interested person outside the NCUA shall make or knowingly cause to be made an ex parte communication to any member of the NCUA Board, the administrative law judge, or a decisional employee; and

(2) No member of the NCUA Board, administrative law judge, or decisional employee shall make or knowingly cause to be made to any interested person outside the NCUA any ex parte communication.

(c) Procedure upon occurrence of ex parte communication. If an ex parte communication is received by the administrative law judge, a member of the NCUA Board or any other person identified in paragraph (a) of this section, that person shall cause all such written communications (or, if the communication is oral, a memorandum stating the substance of the communication) to be placed on the record of the proceeding and served on all parties. All other parties to the proceeding shall have an opportunity, within ten days of receipt of service of the ex parte communication, to file responses thereto and to recommend any sanctions, in accordance with paragraph (d) of this section, that they believe to be appropriate under the circumstances.

(d) Sanctions. Any party or his or her counsel who makes a prohibited ex parte communication, or who encourages or solicits another to make any such communication, may be subject to any appropriate sanction or sanctions imposed by the NCUA Board or the administrative law judge including, but not limited to, exclusion from the proceedings and an adverse ruling on the issue which is the subject of the prohibited communication.

(e) Separation of functions. Except to the extent required for the disposition of ex parte matters as authorized by law, the administrative law judge may not consult a person or party on any matter relevant to the merits of the adjudication, unless on notice and opportunity for all parties to participate. An employee or agent engaged in the performance of investigative or prosecuting functions for the NCUA in a case may not, in that or a factually related case, participate or advise in the decision, recommended decision, or agency review of the recommended decision under section 747.40, except as witness or counsel in public proceedings.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992, as amended at 61 FR 28025, June 4, 1996]

§747.10   Filing of papers.

(a) Filing. Any papers required to be filed, excluding documents produced in response to a discovery request pursuant to §§747.25 and 747.26, shall be filed with the OFIA, except as otherwise provided.

(b) Manner of filing. Unless otherwise specified by the NCUA Board or the administrative law judge, filing may be accomplished by:

(1) Personal service;

(2) Delivering the papers to a reliable commercial courier service, overnight delivery service, or to the U.S. Post Office for Express Mail delivery;

(3) Mailing the papers by first class, registered, or certified mail; or

(4) Transmission by electronic media, only if expressly authorized, and upon any conditions specified, by the NCUA Board or the administative law judge. All papers filed by electronic media shall also concurrently be filed in accordance with paragraph (c) of this section.

(c) Formal requirements as to papers filed—(1) Form. All papers filed must set forth the name, address, and telephone number of the counsel or party making the filing and must be accompanied by a certification setting forth when and how service has been made on all other parties. All papers filed must be double-spaced and printed or typewritten on 812 × 11 inch paper, and must be clear and legible.

(2) Signature. All papers must be dated and signed as provided in §747.7.

(3) Caption. All papers filed must include at the head thereof, or on a title page, the name of the NCUA and of the filing party, the title and docket number of the proceeding, and the subject of the particular paper.

(4) Number of copies. Unless otherwise specified by the NCUA Board, or the administrative law judge, an original and one copy of all documents and papers shall be filed, except that only one copy of transcripts of testimony and exhibits shall be filed.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 75 FR 34622, June 18, 2010]

§747.11   Service of papers.

(a) By the parties. Except as otherwise provided, a party filing papers shall serve a copy upon the counsel of record for all other parties to the proceeding so represented, and upon any party not so represented.

(b) Method of service. Except as provided in paragraphs (c)(2) and (d) of this section, a serving party shall use one or more of the following methods of service:

(1) Personal service;

(2) Delivering the papers to a reliable commercial courier service, overnight delivery service, or to the U.S. Post Office for Express Mail delivery;

(3) Mailing the papers by first class, registered, or certified mail; or

(4) Transmission by electronic media, only if the parties mutually agree. Any papers served by electronic media shall also concurrently be served in accordance with the requirements of §747.10(c).

(c) By the NCUA Board or the administrative law judge. (1) All papers required to be served by the NCUA Board or the administrative law judge upon a party who has appeared in the proceeding in accordance with §747.6, shall be served by any means specified in paragraph (b) of this section.

(2) If a party has not appeared in the proceeding in accordance with §747.6, the NCUA Board or the administrative law judge shall make service by any of the following methods:

(i) By personal service;

(ii) If the person to be served is an individual, by delivery to a person of suitable age and discretion at the physical location where the individual resides or works;

(iii) If the person to be served is a corporation or other association, by delivery to an officer, managing or general agent, or to any other agent authorized by appointment or by law to receive service and, if the agent is one authorized by statute to receive service and the statute so requires, by also mailing a copy to the party;

(iv) By registered or certified mail addressed to the person's last known address; or

(v) By any other method reasonably calculated to give actual notice.

(d) Subpoenas. Service of a subpoena may be made:

(1) By personal service;

(2) If the person to be served is an individual, by delivery to a person of suitable age and discretion at the physical location where the individual resides or works;

(3) By delivery to an agent, which, in the case of a corporation or other association, is delivery to an officer, managing or general agent, or to any other agent authorized by appointment or by law to receive service and, if the agent is one authorized by statute to receive service and the statute so requires, by also mailing a copy to the party;

(4) By registered or certified mail addressed to the person's last known address; or

(5) By any other method reasonably calculated to give actual notice.

(e) Area of service. Service in any state, territory, possession of the United States, or the District of Columbia, on any person or company doing business in any state, territory, possession of the United States, or the District of Columbia, or on any person as otherwise provided by law, is effective without regard to the place where the hearing is held, provided that if service is made on a foreign bank in connection with an action or proceeding involving one or more of its branches or agencies located in any state, territory, possession of the United States, or the District of Columbia, service shall be made on at least one branch or agency so involved.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 28025, June 4, 1996]

§747.12   Construction of time limits.

(a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed by this subpart, the date of the act or event that commences the designated period of time is not included. The last day so computed is included unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday. When the last day is a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday, the period runs until the end of the next day that is not a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday. Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays are included in the computation of time. However, when the time period within which an act is to be performed is ten days or less, not including any additional time allowed for in §747.12(c), intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays are not included.

(b) When papers are deemed to be filed or served. (1) Filing and service are deemed to be effective:

(i) In the case of personal service or same day commercial courier delivery, upon actual service;

(ii) In the case of overnight commercial delivery service, U.S. Express Mail delivery, or first class, registered, or certified mail, upon deposit in or delivery to an appropriate point of collection;

(iii) In the case of transmission by electronic media, as specified by the authority receiving the filing, in the case of filing, and as agreed among the parties, in the case of service.

(2) The effective filing and service dates specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section may be modified by the NCUA Board or administrative law judge in the case of filing or by agreement of the parties in the case of service.

(c) Calculation of time for service and filing of responsive papers. Whenever a time limit is measured by a prescribed period from the service of any notice or paper, the applicable time limits are calculated as follows:

(1) If service is made by first class, registered, or certified mail, add three calendar days to the prescribed period;

(2) If service is made by express mail or overnight delivery service, add one calendar day to the prescribed period; or

(3) If service is made by electronic media transmission, add one calendar day to the prescribed period, unless otherwise determined by the NCUA Board or the administrative law judge in the case of filing, or by agreement among the parties in the case of service.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 28026, June 4, 1996]

§747.13   Change of time limits.

Except as otherwise provided by law, the administrative law judge may, for good cause shown, extend the time limits prescribed by the Uniform Rules or by any notice or order issued in the proceedings. After the referral of the case to the NCUA Board pursuant to §747.38, the NCUA Board may grant extensions of the time limits for good cause shown. Extensions may be granted upon the motion of a party after notice and opportunity to respond is afforded all non-moving parties, or upon the NCUA Board's or the administrative law judge's own motion.

§747.14   Witness fees and expenses.

Witnesses subpoenaed for testimony or depositions shall be paid the same fees for attendance and mileage as are paid in the United States district courts in proceedings in which the United States is a party, provided that, in the case of a discovery subpoena addressed to a party, no witness fees or mileage need be paid. Fees for witnesses shall be tendered in advance by the party requesting the subpoena, except that fees and mileage need not be tendered in advance where the NCUA is the party requesting the subpoena. The NCUA shall not be required to pay any fees to, or expenses of, any witness not subpoenaed by the NCUA.

§747.15   Opportunity for informal settlement.

Any respondent may, at any time in the proceeding, unilaterally submit to Enforcement Counsel written offers or proposals for settlement of a proceeding, without prejudice to the rights of any of the parties. No such offer or proposal shall be made to any NCUA representative other than Enforcement Counsel. Submission of a written settlement offer does not provide a basis for adjourning or otherwise delaying all or any portion of a proceeding under this part. No settlement offer or proposal, or any subsequent negotiation or resolution, is admissible as evidence in any proceeding.

§747.16   NCUA's right to conduct examination.

Nothing contained in this subpart limits in any manner the right of the NCUA to conduct any examination, inspection, or visitation of any institution or institution-affiliated party, or the right of the NCUA to conduct or continue any form of investigation authorized by law.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992]

§747.17   Collateral attacks on adjudicatory proceeding.

If an interlocutory appeal or collateral attack is brought in any court concerning all or any part of an adjudicatory proceeding, the challenged adjudicatory proceeding shall continue without regard to the pendency of that court proceeding. No default or other failure to act as directed in the adjudicatory proceeding within the times prescribed in this subpart shall be excused based on the pendency before any court of any interlocutory appeal or collateral attack.

§747.18   Commencement of proceeding and contents of notice.

(a) Commencement of proceeding. (1) A proceeding governed by this subpart is commenced by issuance of a notice by the NCUA Board.

(2) The notice must be served by the NCUA Board upon the respondent and given to any other appropriate financial institution supervisory authority where required by law.

(3) The notice must be filed with the OFIA.

(b) Contents of notice. The notice must set forth:

(1) The legal authority for the proceeding and for the NCUA's jurisdiction over the proceeding;

(2) A statement of the matters of fact or law showing that the NCUA is entitled to relief;

(3) A proposed order or prayer for an order granting the requested relief;

(4) The time, place, and nature of the hearing as required by law or regulation;

(5) The time within which to file an answer as required by law or regulation;

(6) The time within which to request a hearing as required by law or regulation; and

(7) That the answer and/or request for a hearing shall be filed with OFIA.

§747.19   Answer.

(a) When. Within 20 days of service of the notice, respondent shall file an answer as designated in the notice. In a civil money penalty proceeding, respondent shall also file a request for a hearing within 20 days of service of the notice.

(b) Content of answer. An answer must specifically respond to each paragraph or allegation of fact contained in the notice and must admit, deny, or state that the party lacks sufficient information to admit or deny each allegation of fact. A statement of lack of information has the effect of a denial. Denials must fairly meet the substance of each allegation of fact denied; general denials are not permitted. When a respondent denies part of an allegation, that part must be denied and the remainder specifically admitted. Any allegation of fact in the notice which is not denied in the answer must be deemed admitted for purposes of the proceeding. A respondent is not required to respond to the portion of a notice that constitutes the prayer for relief or proposed order. The answer must set forth affirmative defenses, if any, asserted by the respondent.

(c) Default—(1) Effect of failure to answer. Failure of a respondent to file an answer required by this section within the time provided constitutes a waiver of his or her right to appear and contest the allegations in the notice. If no timely answer is filed, the administrative law judge, upon motion of the Enforcement Counsel, shall file with the NCUA Board a recommended decision containing the findings and the relief sought in the notice. Any final order issued by the NCUA Board based upon a respondent's failure to answer is deemed to be an order issued upon consent.

(2) Effect of failure to request a hearing in civil money penalty proceedings. If respondent fails to request a hearing as required by law within the time provided, the notice of assessment constitutes a final and unappealable order.

§747.20   Amended pleadings.

(a) Amendments. The notice or answer may be amended or supplemented at any stage of the proceeding. The respondent must answer an amended notice within the time remaining for the respondent's answer to the original notice, or within ten days after service of the amended notice, whichever period is longer, unless the NCUA Board or administrative law judge orders otherwise for good cause.

(b) Amendments to conform to the evidence. When issues not raised in the notice or answer are tried at the hearing by express or implied consent of the parties, they will be treated in all respects as if they had been raised in the notice or answer, and no formal amendments are required. If evidence is objected to at the hearing on the ground that it is not within the issues raised by the notice or answer, the administrative law judge may admit the evidence when admission is likely to assist in adjudicating the merits of the action and the objecting party fails to satisfy the administrative law judge that the admission of such evidence would unfairly prejudice that party's action or defense upon the merits. The administrative law judge may grant a continuance to enable the objecting party to meet such evidence.

[61 FR 28026, June 4, 1996]

§747.21   Failure to appear.

Failure of a respondent to appear in person at the hearing or by a duly authorized counsel constitutes a waiver of respondent's right to a hearing and is deemed an admission of the facts as alleged and consent to the relief sought in the notice. Without further proceedings or notice to the respondent, the administrative law judge shall file with the NCUA Board a recommended decision containing the findings and the relief sought in the notice.

§747.22   Consolidation and severance of actions.

(a) Consolidation. (1) On the motion of any party, or on the administrative law judge's own motion, the administrative law judge may consolidate, for some or all purposes, any two or more proceedings, if each such proceeding involves or arises out of the same transaction, occurrence or series of transactions or occurrences, or involves at least one common respondent or a material common question of law or fact, unless such consolidation would cause unreasonable delay or injustice.

(2) In the event of consolidation under paragraph (a)(1) of this section, appropriate adjustment to the prehearing schedule must be made to avoid unnecessary expense, inconvenience, or delay.

(b) Severance. The administrative law judge may, upon the motion of any party, sever the proceeding for separate resolution of the matter as to any respondent only if the administrative law judge finds that:

(1) Undue prejudice or injustice to the moving party would result from not severing the proceeding; and

(2) Such undue prejudice or injustice would outweigh the interests of judicial economy and expedition in the complete and final resolution of the proceeding.

§747.23   Motions.

(a) In writing. (1) Except as otherwise provided herein, an application or request for an order or ruling must be made by written motion.

(2) All written motions must state with particularity the relief sought and must be accompanied by a proposed order.

(3) No oral argument may be held on written motions except as otherwise directed by the administrative law judge. Written memorandum, briefs, affidavits or other relevant material or documents may be filed in support of or in opposition to a motion.

(b) Oral motions. A motion may be made orally on the record unless the administrative law judge directs that such motion be reduced to writing.

(c) Filing of motions. Motions must be filed with the administrative law judge, except that upon the filing of the recommended decision, motions must be filed with the NCUA Board.

(d) Responses. (1) Except as otherwise provided herein, within ten days after service of any written motion, or within such other period of time as may be established by the administrative law judge or the NCUA Board, any party may file a written response to a motion. The administrative law judge shall not rule on any oral or written motion before each party has had an opportunity to file a response.

(2) The failure of a party to oppose a written motion or an oral motion made on the record is deemed a consent by that party to the entry of an order substantially in the form of the order accompanying the motion.

(e) Dilatory motions. Frivolous, dilatory or repetitive motions are prohibited. The filing of such motions may form the basis for sanctions.

(f) Dispositive motions. Dispositive motions are governed by §§747.29 and 747.30.

§747.24   Scope of document discovery.

(a) Limits on discovery. (1) Subject to the limitations set out in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section, a party to a proceeding under this subpart may obtain document discovery by serving a written request to produce documents. For purposes of a request to produce documents, the term “documents” may be defined to include drawings, graphs, charts, photographs, recordings, data stored in electronic form, and other data compilations from which information can be obtained, or translated, if necessary, by the parties through detection devices into reasonably usable form, as well as written material of all kinds.

(2) Discovery by use of deposition is governed by subpart I of this part.

(3) Discovery by use of interrogatories is not permitted.

(b) Relevance. A party may obtain document discovery regarding any matter, not privileged, that has material relevance to the merits of the pending action. Any request to produce documents that calls for irrelevant material, that is unreasonable, oppressive, excessive in scope, unduly burdensome, or repetitive of previous requests, or that seeks to obtain privileged documents will be denied or modified. A request is unreasonable, oppressive, excessive in scope, or unduly burdensome if, among other things, it fails to include justifiable limitations on the time period covered and the geographic locations to be searched, the time provided to respond in the request is inadequate, or the request calls for copies of documents to be delivered to the requesting party and fails to include the requester's written agreement to pay in advance for the copying, in accordance with §747.25.

(c) Privileged matter. Privileged documents are not discoverable. Privileges include the attorney-client privilege, work-product privilege, any government's or government agency's deliberative-process privilege, and any other privileges the Constitution, any applicable act of Congress, or the principles of common law provide.

(d) Time limits. All discovery, including all responses to discovery requests, shall be completed at least 20 days prior to the date scheduled for the commencement of the hearing, except as provided in the Local Rules. No exceptions to this time limit shall be permitted, unless the administrative law judge finds on the record that good cause exists for waiving the requirements of this paragraph.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 28026, June 4, 1996]

§747.25   Request for document discovery from parties.

(a) General rule. Any party may serve on any other party a request to produce for inspection any discoverable documents that are in the possession, custody, or control of the party upon whom the request is served. The request must identify the documents to be produced either by individual item or by category, and must describe each item and category with reasonable particularity. Documents must be produced as they are kept in the usual course of business or must be organized to correspond with the categories in the request.

(b) Production or copying. The request must specify a reasonable time, place, and manner for production and performing any related acts. In lieu of inspecting the documents, the requesting party may specify that all or some of the responsive documents be copied and the copies delivered to the requesting party. If copying of fewer than 250 pages is requested, the party to whom the request is addressed shall bear the cost of copying and shipping charges. If a party requests 250 pages or more of copying, the requesting party shall pay for the copying and shipping charges. Copying charges are the current per-page copying rate imposed by 12 CFR 792.5(b) implementing the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552). The party to whom the request is addressed may require payment in advance before producing the documents.

(c) Obligation to update responses. A party who has responded to a discovery request with a response that was complete when made is not required to supplement the response to include documents thereafter acquired, unless the responding party learns that:

(1) The response was materially incorrect when made; or

(2) The response, though correct when made, is no longer true and a failure to amend the response is, in substance, a knowing concealment.

(d) Motions to limit discovery. (1) Any party that objects to a discovery request may, within ten days of being served with such request, file a motion in accordance with the provisions of §747.23 to strike or otherwise limit the request. If an objection is made to only a portion of an item or category in a request, the portion objected to shall be specified. Any objections not made in accordance with this paragraph and §747.23 are waived.

(2) The party who served the request that is the subject of a motion to strike or limit may file a written response within five days of service of the motion. No other party may file a response.

(e) Privilege. At the time other documents are produced, the producing party must reasonably identify all documents withheld on the grounds of privilege and must produce a statement of the basis for the assertion of privilege. When similar documents that are protected by deliberative process, attorney work-product, or attorney-client privilege are voluminous, these documents may be identified by category instead of by individual document. The administrative law judge retains discretion to determine when the identification by category is insufficient.

(f) Motions to compel production. (1) If a party withholds any documents as privileged or fails to comply fully with a discovery request, the requesting party may, within ten days of the assertion of privilege or of the time the failure to comply becomes known to the requesting party, file a motion in accordance with the provisions of §747.23 for the issuance of a subpoena compelling production.

(2) The party who asserted the privilege or failed to comply with the request may file a written response to a motion to compel within five days of service of the motion. No other party may file a response.

(g) Ruling on motions. After the time for filing responses pursuant to this section has expired, the administrative law judge shall rule promptly on all motions filed pursuant to this section. If the administrative law judge determines that a discovery request, or any of its terms, calls for irrelevant material, is unreasonable, oppressive, excessive in scope, unduly burdensome, or repetitive of previous requests, or seeks to obtain privileged documents, he or she may deny or modify the request, and may issue appropriate protective orders, upon such conditions as justice may require. The pendency of a motion to strike or limit discovery or to compel production is not a basis for staying or continuing the proceeding, unless otherwise ordered by the administrative law judge. Notwithstanding any other provision in this part, the administrative law judge may not release, or order a party to produce, documents withheld on grounds of privilege if the party has stated to the administrative law judge its intention to file a timely motion for interlocutory review of the administrative law judge's order to produce the documents, and until the motion for interlocutory review has been decided.

(h) Enforcing discovery subpoenas. If the administrative law judge issues a subpoena compelling production of documents by a party, the subpoenaing party may, in the event of noncompliance and to the extent authorized by applicable law, apply to any appropriate United States district court for an order requiring compliance with the subpoena. A party's right to seek court enforcement of a subpoena shall not in any manner limit the sanctions that may be imposed by the administrative law judge against a party who fails to produce subpoenaed documents.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 28026, June 4, 1996; 61 FR 45876, Aug. 30, 1996]

§747.26   Document subpoenas to nonparties.

(a) General rules. (1) Any party may apply to the administrative law judge for the issuance of a document discovery subpoena addressed to any person who is not a party to the proceeding. The application must contain a proposed document subpoena and a brief statement showing the general relevance and reasonableness of the scope of documents sought. The subpoenaing party shall specify a reasonable time, place, and manner for making production in response to the document subpoena.

(2) A party shall only apply for a document subpoena under this section within the time period during which such party could serve a discovery request under §747.24(d). The party obtaining the document subpoena is responsible for serving it on the subpoenaed person and for serving copies on all parties. Document subpoenas may be served in any state, territory, or possession of the United States, the District of Columbia, or as otherwise provided by law.

(3) The administrative law judge shall promptly issue any document subpoena requested pursuant to this section. If the administrative law judge determines that the application does not set forth a valid basis for the issuance of the subpoena, or that any of its terms are unreasonable, oppressive, excessive in scope, or unduly burdensome, he or she may refuse to issue the subpoena or may issue it in a modified form upon such conditions as may be consistent with the Uniform Rules.

(b) Motion to quash or modify. (1) Any person to whom a document subpoena is directed may file a motion to quash or modify such subpoena, accompanied by a statement of the basis for quashing or modifying the subpoena. The movant shall serve the motion on all parties, and any party may respond to such motion within ten days of service of the motion.

(2) Any motion to quash or modify a document subpoena must be filed on the same basis, including the assertion of privilege, upon which a party could object to a discovery request under §747.25(d), and during the same time limits during which such an objection could be filed.

(c) Enforcing document subpoenas. If a subpoenaed person fails to comply with any subpoena issued pursuant to this section or any order of the administrative law judge which directs compliance with all or any portion of a document subpoena, the subpoenaing party or any other aggrieved party may, to the extent authorized by applicable law, apply to an appropriate United States district court for an order requiring compliance with so much of the document subpoena as the administrative law judge has not quashed or modified. A party's right to seek court enforcement of a document subpoena shall in no way limit the sanctions that may be imposed by the administrative law judge on a party who induces a failure to comply with subpoenas issued under this section.

§747.27   Deposition of witness unavailable for hearing.

(a) General rules. (1) If a witness will not be available for the hearing, a party desiring that witness' testimony for the record may apply in accordance with the procedures set forth in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, to the administrative law judge for the issuance of a subpoena, including a subpoena duces tecum, requiring the attendance of the witness at a deposition. The administrative law judge may issue a deposition subpoena under this section upon showing that:

(i) The witness will be unable to attend or may be prevented from attending the hearing because of age, sickness or infirmity, or will otherwise be unavailable;

(ii) The witness' unavailability was not procured or caused by the subpoenaing party;

(iii) The testimony is reasonably expected to be material; and

(iv) Taking the deposition will not result in any undue burden to any other party and will not cause undue delay of the proceeding.

(2) The application must contain a proposed deposition subpoena and a brief statement of the reasons for the issuance of the subpoena. The subpoena must name the witness whose deposition is to be taken and specify the time and place for taking the deposition. A deposition subpoena may require the witness to be deposed at any place within the country in which that witness resides or has a regular place of employment or such other convenient place as the administrative law judge shall fix.

(3) Any requested subpoena that sets forth a valid basis for its issuance must be promptly issued, unless the administrative law judge on his or her own motion, requires a written response or requires attendance at a conference concerning whether the requested subpoena should be issued.

(4) The party obtaining a deposition subpoena is responsible for serving it on the witness and for serving copies on all parties. Unless the administrative law judge orders otherwise, no deposition under this section shall be taken on fewer than ten days' notice to the witness and all parties. Deposition subpoenas may be served in any state, territory, possession of the United States, or the District of Columbia, on any person or company doing business in any state, territory, possession of the United States, or the District of Columbia, or as otherwise permitted by law.

(b) Objections to deposition subpoenas. (1) The witness and any party who has not had an opportunity to oppose a deposition subpoena issued under this section may file a motion with the administrative law judge to quash or modify the subpoena prior to the time for compliance specified in the subpoena, but not more than ten days after service of the subpoena.

(2) A statement of the basis for the motion to quash or modify a subpoena issued under this section must accompany the motion. The motion must be served on all parties.

(c) Procedure upon deposition. (1) Each witness testifying pursuant to a deposition subpoena must be duly sworn, and each party shall have the right to examine the witness. Objections to questions or documents must be in short form, stating the grounds for the objection. Failure to object to questions or documents is not deemed a waiver except where the ground for the objection might have been avoided if the objection had been timely presented. All questions, answers, and objections must be recorded.

(2) Any party may move before the administrative law judge for an order compelling the witness to answer any questions the witness has refused to answer or submit any evidence the witness has refused to submit during the deposition.

(3) The deposition must be subscribed by the witness, unless the parties and the witness, by stipulation, have waived the signing, or the witness is ill, cannot be found, or has refused to sign. If the deposition is not subscribed by the witness, the court reporter taking the deposition shall certify that the transcript is a true and complete transcript of the deposition.

(d) Enforcing subpoenas. If a subpoenaed person fails to comply with any order of the administrative law judge which directs compliance with all or any portion of a deposition subpoena under paragraph (b) or (c)(3) of this section, the subpoenaing party or other aggrieved party may, to the extent authorized by applicable law, apply to an appropriate United States district court for an order requiring compliance with the portions of the subpoena that the administrative law judge has ordered enforced. A party's right to seek court enforcement of a deposition subpoena in no way limits the sanctions that may be imposed by the administrative law judge on a party who fails to comply with, or procures a failure to comply with, a subpoena issued under this section.

§747.28   Interlocutory review.

(a) General rule. The NCUA Board may review a ruling of the administrative law judge prior to the certification of the record to the NCUA Board only in accordance with the procedures set forth in this section and §747.23.

(b) Scope of review. The NCUA Board may exercise interlocutory review of a ruling of the administrative law judge if the NCUA Board finds that:

(1) The ruling involves a controlling question of law or policy as to which substantial grounds exist for a difference of opinion;

(2) Immediate review of the ruling may materially advance the ultimate termination of the proceeding;

(3) Subsequent modification of the ruling at the conclusion of the proceeding would be an inadequate remedy; or

(4) Subsequent modification of the ruling would cause unusual delay or expense.

(c) Procedure. Any request for interlocutory review shall be filed by a party with the administrative law judge within ten days of his or her ruling and shall otherwise comply with §747.23. Any party may file a response to a request for interlocutory review in accordance with §747.23(d). Upon the expiration of the time for filing all responses, the administrative law judge shall refer the matter to the NCUA Board for final disposition.

(d) Suspension of proceeding. Neither a request for interlocutory review nor any disposition of such a request by the NCUA Board under this section suspends or stays the proceeding unless otherwise ordered by the administrative law judge or the NCUA Board.

§747.29   Summary disposition.

(a) In general. The administrative law judge shall recommend that the NCUA Board issue a final order granting a motion for summary disposition if the undisputed pleaded facts, admissions, affidavits, stipulations, documentary evidence, matters as to which official notice may be taken, and any other evidentiary materials properly submitted in connection with a motion for summary disposition show that:

(1) There is no genuine issue as to any material fact; and

(2) The moving part is entitled to a decision in its favor as a matter of law.

(b) Filing of motions and responses. (1) Any party who believes that there is no genuine issue of material fact to be determined and that he or she is entitled to a decision as a matter of law may move at any time for summary disposition in its favor of all or any part of the proceeding. Any party, within 20 days after service of such a motion, or within such time period as allowed by the administrative law judge, may file a response to such motion.

(2) A motion for summary disposition must be accompanied by a statement of the material facts as to which the moving party contends there is no genuine issue. Such motion must be supported by documentary evidence, which may take the form of admissions in pleadings, stipulations, depositions, investigatory depositions, transcripts, affidavits and any other evidentiary materials that the moving party contends support his or her position. The motion must also be accompanied by a brief containing the points and authorities in support of the contention of the moving party. Any party opposing a motion for summary disposition must file a statement setting forth those material facts as to which he or she contends a genuine dispute exists. Such opposition must be supported by evidence of the same type as that submitted with the motion for summary disposition and a brief containing the points and authorities in support of the contention that summary disposition would be inappropriate.

(c) Hearing on motion. At the request of any party or on his or her own motion, the administrative law judge may hear oral argument on the motion for summary disposition.

(d) Decision on motion. Following receipt of a motion for summary disposition and all responses thereto, the administrative law judge shall determine whether the moving party is entitled to summary disposition. If the administrative law judge determines that summary disposition is warranted, the administrative law judge shall submit a recommended decision to that effect to the NCUA Board. If the administrative law judge finds that no party is entitled to summary disposition, he or she shall make a ruling denying the motion.

§747.30   Partial summary disposition.

If the administrative law judge determines that a party is entitled to summary disposition as to certain claims only, he or she shall defer submitting a recommended decision as to those claims. A hearing on the remaining issues must be ordered. Those claims for which the administrative law judge has determined that summary disposition is warranted will be addressed in the recommended decision filed at the conclusion of the hearing.

§747.31   Scheduling and prehearing conferences.

(a) Scheduling conference. Within 30 days of service of the notice or order commencing a proceeding or such other time as parties may agree, the administrative law judge shall direct counsel for all parties to meet with him or her in person at a specified time and place prior to the hearing or to confer by telephone for the purpose of scheduling the recourse and conduct of the proceeding. This meeting or telephone conference is called a “scheduling conference.” The identification of potential witnesses, the time for and manner of discovery, and the exchange of any prehearing materials including witness lists, statements of issues, stipulations, exhibits and any other materials may also be determined at the scheduling conference.

(b) Prehearing conferences. The administrative law judge may, in addition to the scheduling conference, on his or her own motion or at the request of any party, direct counsel for the parties to meet with him or her (in person or by telephone) at a prehearing conference to address any or all of the following:

(1) Simplification and clarification of the issues;

(2) Stipulations, admissions of fact, and the contents, authenticity and admissibility into evidence of documents;

(3) Matters of which official notice may be taken;

(4) Limitation of the number of witnesses;

(5) Summary disposition of any or all issues;

(6) Resolution of discovery issues or disputes;

(7) Amendments to pleadings; and

(8) Such other matters as may aid in the orderly disposition of the proceeding.

(c) Transcript. The administrative law judge, in his or her discretion, may require that a scheduling or prehearing conference be recorded by a court reporter. A transcript of the conference and any materials filed, including orders, becomes part of the record of the proceeding. A party may obtain a copy of the transcript at its expense.

(d) Scheduling or prehearing orders. At or within a reasonable time following the conclusion of the scheduling conference or any prehearing conference, the administrative law judge shall serve on each party an order setting forth any agreements reached and any procedural determinations made.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 75 FR 34622, June 18, 2010]

§747.32   Prehearing submissions.

(a) Within the time set by the administrative law judge, but in no case later than 14 days before the start of the hearing, each party shall serve on every other party, his or her:

(1) Prehearing statement;

(2) Final list of witnesses to be called to testify at the hearing, including name and address of each witness and a short summary of the expected testimony of each witness;

(3) List of the exhibits to be introduced at the hearing along with a copy of each exhibit; and

(4) Stipulations of fact, if any.

(b) Effect of failure to comply. No witness may testify and no exhibits may be introduced at the hearing if such witness or exhibit is not listed in the prehearing submissions pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section, except for good cause shown.

§747.33   Public hearings.

(a) General rule. All hearings shall be open to the public, unless the NCUA Board, in its discretion, determines that holding an open hearing would be contrary to the public interest. Within 20 days of service of the notice, any respondent may file with the NCUA Board a request for a private hearing, and any party may file a reply to such a request. A party must serve on the administrative law judge a copy of any request or reply the party files with the NCUA Board. The form of, and procedure for, these requests and replies are governed by §747.23. A party's failure to file a request or a reply constitutes a waiver of any objections regarding whether the hearing will be public or private.

(b) Filing document under seal. Enforcement Counsel, in his or her discretion, may file any document or part of a document under seal if disclosure of the document would be contrary to the public interest. The administrative law judge shall take all appropriate steps to preserve the confidentiality of such documents or parts thereof, including closing portions of the hearing to the public.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992, as amended at 61 FR 28027, June 4, 1996]

§747.34   Hearing subpoenas.

(a) Issuance. (1) Upon application of a party showing general relevance and reasonableness of scope of the testimony or other evidence sought, the administrative law judge may issue a subpoena or a subpoena duces tecum requiring the attendance of a witness at the hearing or the production of documentary or physical evidence at the hearing. The application for a hearing subpoena must also contain a proposed subpoena specifying the attendance of a witness or the production of evidence from any state, territory, or possession of the United States, the District of Columbia, or as otherwise provided by law at any designated place where the hearing is being conducted. The party making the application shall serve a copy of the application and the proposed subpoena on every other party.

(2) A party may apply for a hearing subpoena at any time before the commencement of a hearing. During a hearing, a party may make an application for a subpoena orally on the record before the administrative law judge.

(3) The administrative law judge shall promptly issue any hearing subpoena requested pursuant to this section. If the administrative law judge determines that the application does not set forth a valid basis for the issuance of the subpoena, or that any of its terms are unreasonable, oppressive, excessive in scope, or unduly burdensome, he or she may refuse to issue the subpoena or may issue it in a modified form upon any conditions consistent with this subpart. Upon issuance by the administrative law judge, the party making the application shall serve the subpoena on the person named in the subpoena and on each party.

(b) Motion to quash or modify. (1) Any person to whom a hearing subpoena is directed or any party may file a motion to quash or modify the subpoena, accompanied by a statement of the basis for quashing or modifying the subpoena. The movant must serve the motion on each party and on the person named in the subpoena. Any party may respond to the motion within ten days of service of the motion.

(2) Any motion to quash or modify a hearing subpoena must be filed prior to the time specified in the subpoena for compliance, but not more than ten days after the date of service of the subpoena upon the movant.

(c) Enforcing subpoenas. If a subpoenaed person fails to comply with any subpoena issued pursuant to this section or any order of the administrative law judge which directs compliance with all or any portion of a document subpoena, the subpoenaing party or any other aggrieved party may seek enforcement of the subpoena pursuant to §747.26(c).

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 28027, June 4, 1996]

§747.35   Conduct of hearings.

(a) General rules. (1) Hearings shall be conducted so as to provide a fair and expeditious presentation of the relevant disputed issues. Each party has the right to present its case or defense by oral and documentary evidence and to conduct such cross examination as may be required for full disclosure of the facts.

(2) Order of hearing. Enforcement Counsel shall present its case-in-chief first, unless otherwise ordered by the administrative law judge, or unless otherwise expressly specified by law or regulation. Enforcement Counsel shall be the first party to present an opening statement and a closing statement, and may make a rebuttal statement after the respondent's closing statement. If there are multiple respondents, respondents may agree among themselves as to their order of presentation of their cases, but if they do not agree the administrative law judge shall fix the order.

(3) Examination of witnesses. Only one counsel for each party may conduct an examination of a witness, except that in the case of extensive direct examination, the administrative law judge may permit more than one counsel for the party presenting the witness to conduct the examination. A party may have one counsel conduct the direct examination and another counsel conduct re-direct examination of a witness, or may have one counsel conduct the cross examination of a witness and another counsel conduct the re-cross examination of a witness.

(4) Stipulations. Unless the administrative law judge directs otherwise, all stipulations of fact and law previously agreed upon by the parties, and all documents, the admissibility of which have been previously stipulated, will be admitted into evidence upon commencement of the hearing.

(b) Transcript. The hearing must be recorded and transcribed. The reporter will make the transcript available to any party upon payment by that party to the reporter of the cost of the transcript. The administrative law judge may order the record corrected, either upon motion to correct, upon stipulation of the parties, or following notice to the parties upon the administrative law judge's own motion.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 28027, June 4, 1996]

§747.36   Evidence.

(a) Admissibility. (1) Except as is otherwise set forth in this section, relevant, material, and reliable evidence that is not unduly repetitive is admissible to the fullest extent authorized by the Administrative Procedure Act and other applicable law.

(2) Evidence that would be admissible under the Federal Rules of Evidence is admissible in a proceeding conducted pursuant to this subpart.

(3) Evidence that would be inadmissible under the Federal Rules of Evidence may not be deemed or ruled to be inadmissible in a proceeding conducted pursuant to this subpart if such evidence is relevant, material, reliable and not unduly repetitive.

(b) Official notice. (1) Official notice may be taken of any material fact which may be judicially noticed by a United States district court and any material information in the official public records of any Federal or state government agency.

(2) All matters officially noticed by the administrative law judge or NCUA Board shall appear on the record.

(3) If official notice is requested or taken of any material fact, the parties, upon timely request, shall be afforded an opportunity to object.

(c) Documents. (1) A duplicate copy of a document is admissible to the same extent as the original, unless a genuine issue is raised as to whether the copy is in some material respect not a true and legible copy of the original.

(2) Subject to the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section, any document, including a report of examination, supervisory activity, inspection or visitation, prepared by an appropriate Federal financial institution regulatory agency or by a state regulatory agency, is admissible either with or without a sponsoring witness.

(3) Witnesses may use existing or newly created charts, exhibits, calendars, calculations, outlines or other graphic material to summarize, illustrate, or simplify the presentation of testimony. Such materials may, subject to the administrative law judge's discretion, be used with or without being admitted into evidence.

(d) Objections. (1) Objections to the admissibility of evidence must be timely made and rulings on all objections must appear on the record.

(2) When an objection to a question or line of questioning propounded to a witness is sustained, the examining counsel may make a specific proffer on the record of what he or she expected to prove by the expected testimony of the witness, either by representation of counsel or by direct interrogation of the witness.

(3) The administrative law judge shall retain rejected exhibits, adequately marked for identification, for the record, and transmit such exhibits to the NCUA Board.

(4) Failure to object to admission of evidence or to any ruling constitutes a waiver of the objection.

(e) Stipulations. The parties may stipulate as to any relevant matters of fact or the authentication of any relevant documents. Such stipulations must be received in evidence at a hearing, and are binding on the parties with respect to the matters therein stipulated.

(f) Depositions of unavailable witnesses. (1) If a witness is unavailable to testify at a hearing, and that witness has testified in a deposition to which all parties in a proceeding had notice and an opportunity to participate, a party may offer as evidence all or any part of the transcript of the deposition, including deposition exhibits, if any.

(2) Such deposition transcript is admissible to the same extent that testimony would have been admissible had that person testified at the hearing, provided that if a witness refused to answer proper questions during the depositions, the administrative law judge may, on that basis, limit the admissibility of the deposition in any manner that justice requires.

(3) Only those portions of a deposition received in evidence at the hearing constitute a part of the record.

§747.37   Post-hearing filings.

(a) Proposed findings and conclusions and supporting briefs. (1) Using the same method of service for each party, the administrative law judge shall serve notice upon each party that the certified transcript, together with all hearing exhibits and exhibits introduced but not admitted into evidence at the hearing, has been filed. Any party may file with the administrative law judge proposed findings of fact, proposed conclusions of law, and a proposed order within 30 days following service of this notice by the administrative law judge or within such longer period as may be ordered by the administrative law judge.

(2) Proposed findings and conclusions must be supported by citation to any relevant portions of the record. A post-hearing brief may be filed in support of proposed findings and conclusions, either as part of the same document or in a separate document. Any party who fails to file timely with the administrative law judge any proposed finding or conclusion is deemed to have waived the right to raise in any subsequent filing or submission any issue not addressed in such party's proposed finding or conclusion.

(b) Reply briefs. Reply briefs may be filed within 15 days after the date on which the parties' proposed findings, conclusions, and order are due. Reply briefs must be strictly limited to responding to new matters, issues, or arguments raised in another party's papers. A party who has not filed proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law or a post-hearing brief may not file a reply brief.

(c) Simultaneous filing required. The administrative law judge shall not order the filing by any party of any brief or reply brief in advance of the other party's filing of its brief.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 61 FR 28027, June 4, 1996]

§747.38   Recommended decision and filing of record.

(a) Filing of recommended decision and record. Within 45 days after expiration of the time allowed for filing reply briefs under §747.37(b), the administrative law judge shall file with and certify to the NCUA Board, for decision, the record of the proceeding. The record must include the administrative law judge's recommended decision, recommended findings of fact, recommended conclusions of law, and proposed order; all prehearing and hearing transcripts, exhibits, and rulings; and the motions, briefs, memoranda, and other supporting papers filed in connection with the hearing. The administrative law judge shall serve upon each party the recommended decision, findings, conclusions, and proposed order.

(b) Filing of index. At the same time the administrative law judge files with and certifies to the NCUA Board for final determination the record of the proceeding, the administrative law judge shall furnish to the NCUA Board a certified index of the entire record of the proceeding. The certified index shall include, at a minimum, an entry for each paper, document or motion filed with the administrative law judge in the proceeding, the date of the filing, and the identity of the filer. The certified index shall also include an exhibit index containing, at a minimum, an entry consisting of exhibit number and title or description for: Each exhibit introduced and admitted into evidence at the hearing; each exhibit introduced but not admitted into evidence at the hearing; each exhibit introduced and admitted into evidence after the completion of the hearing; and each exhibit introduced but not admitted into evidence after the completion of the hearing.

[61 FR 28027, June 4, 1996]

§747.39   Exceptions to recommended decision.

(a) Filing exceptions. Within 30 days after service of the recommended decision, findings, conclusions, and proposed order under §747.38, a party may file with the NCUA Board written exceptions to the administrative law judge's recommended decision, findings, conclusions or proposed order, to the admission or exclusion of evidence, or to the failure of the administrative law judge to make a ruling proposed by a party. A supporting brief may be filed at the time the exceptions are filed, either as part of the same document or in a separate document.

(b) Effect of failure to file or raise exceptions. (1) Failure of a party to file exceptions to those matters specified in paragraph (a) of this section within the time prescribed is deemed a waiver of objection thereto.

(2) No exception need be considered by the NCUA Board if the party taking exception had an opportunity to raise the same objection, issue, or argument before the administrative law judge and failed to do so.

(c) Contents. (1) All exceptions and briefs in support of such exceptions must be confined to the particular matters in, or omissions from, the administrative law judge's recommendations to which that party takes exception.

(2) All exceptions and briefs in support of exceptions must set forth page or paragraph references to the specific parts of the administrative law judge's recommendations to which exception is taken, the page or paragraph references to those portions of the record relied upon to support each exception, and the legal authority relied upon to support each exception.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 75 FR 34622, June 18, 2010]

§747.40   Review by the NCUA Board.

(a) Notice of submission to NCUA Board. When the NCUA Board determines that the record in the proceeding is complete, the NCUA Board shall serve notice upon the parties that the proceeding has been submitted to the NCUA Board for final decision.

(b) Oral argument before NCUA Board. Upon the initiative of the NCUA Board or on the written request of any party filed with the NCUA Board within the time for filing exceptions, the NCUA Board may order and hear oral argument on the recommended findings, conclusions, decision, and order of the administrative law judge. A written request by a party must show good cause for oral argument and state reasons why arguments cannot be presented adequately in writing. A denial of a request for oral argument may be set forth in the NCUA Board's final decision. Oral argument before the NCUA Board must be on the record.

(c) Final Decision of NCUA Board. (1) Decisional employees may advise and assist the NCUA Board in the consideration and disposition of the case. The final decision of the NCUA Board will be based upon review of the entire record of the proceeding, except that the NCUA Board may limit the issues to be reviewed to those findings and conclusions to which opposing arguments or exceptions have been filed by the parties.

(2) The NCUA Board shall render a final decision within 90 days after notification of the parties that the case has been submitted for final decision, or 90 days after oral argument, whichever is later, unless the NCUA Board orders that the action or any aspect thereof be remanded to the administrative law judge for further proceedings. Copies of the final decision and order of the NCUA Board shall be served upon each party to the proceeding, upon other persons required by statute, and, if directed by the NCUA Board or required by statute, upon any appropriate state or Federal supervisory authority.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 75 FR 34622, June 18, 2010]

§747.41   Stays pending judicial review.

The commencement of proceedings for judicial review of a final decision and order of the NCUA Board may not, unless specifically ordered by the NCUA Board or a reviewing court, operate as a stay of any order issued by the NCUA Board. The NCUA Board may, in its discretion, and on such terms as it finds just, stay the effectiveness of all or any part of its order pending a final decision on a petition for review of that order.

Subpart B—Local Rules of Practice and Procedure

§747.100   Discovery limitations.

(a) Parties to a proceeding set forth either at §747.1 of subpart A or in subpart C, E or G of this part may obtain discovery only through the production of documents. No other form of discovery shall be allowed.

(b) In the event that a person producing documents pursuant to a document subpoena is permitted to be deposed, all questioning shall be strictly limited to the identification of documents produced by that person and a reasonable examination to determine whether the subpoenaed person made an adequate search for, and has produced, all subpoenaed documents.

Subpart C—Local Rules and Procedures Applicable to Proceedings for the Involuntary Termination of Insured Status

§747.201   Scope.

Under the authority of section 206(b) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1786(b)), the NCUA Board may terminate the insured status of an insured credit union upon the grounds set forth therein and enumerated in §747.202. The procedure for terminating the insured status of an insured credit union as therein prescribed will be followed and hearings required thereunder will be conducted in accordance with the rules and procedures set forth in this subpart and subpart A of this part. To the extent any rule or procedure of subpart A is inconsistent with a rule or procedure prescribed in this subpart C, subpart C shall control.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992]

§747.202   Grounds for termination of insurance.

The NCUA Board may institute proceedings to terminate the insured status of an insured credit union whenever it determines that an insured credit union is:

(a) Engaging or has engaged in unsafe or unsound practices in conducting its business;

(b) In unsafe or unsound condition to continue as an insured credit union; or

(c) Violating or has violated any applicable law, rule, regulation, order, written condition imposed by the NCUA Board in response to any action on any application, notice, or other request by the credit union or institution-affiliated party, or any written agreement entered into with the NCUA Board.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 71 FR 67440, Nov. 22, 2006]

§747.203   Notice of charges.

(a) Whenever the NCUA Board determines that grounds for termination of insured status exists, it will, for the purpose of securing correction of errant or illegal conditions, serve a Notice of Charges upon the concerned credit union. This notice will contain a statement describing the unsafe or unsound practices, condition or the relevant violations.

(b) In the case of an insured State-chartered credit union, the NCUA Board shall send a copy of the Notice of Charges to the appropriate State authority, if any, having supervision over the credit union.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 75 FR 34622, June 18, 2010]

§747.204   Notice of intention to terminate insured status.

Unless correction of the practices, condition, or violations set forth in the Notice of Charges is made within 120 days after service of such statement, or within a shorter period of not less than 20 days after such service as the NCUA Board may require in any case where it determines that the insurance risk with respect to such credit union could be unduly jeopardized by further delay or as the appropriate State supervisory authority shall require in the case of an insured State-chartered credit union, the Board, if it determines to proceed further, shall give to the credit union not less than 30 days written notice of its intent to terminate the status of the credit union as an insured credit union. The notice shall contain a statement of the facts constituting the alleged unsafe or unsound practices or conditions or violations on which a hearing will be held. Such hearing shall commence not earlier than 30 days nor later than 60 days after the date of service of such notice upon the credit union, unless an earlier or later date is set by the NCUA Board at the request of the credit union.

§747.205   Order terminating insured status.

If, upon the record of the hearing held pursuant to §747.204, the NCUA Board finds that any unsafe or unsound practice or condition or violation specified in the notice has been established and has not been corrected within the time prescribed under §747.204, the NCUA Board may issue and serve upon the credit union an order terminating its status as an insured credit union on a date subsequent to the date of such finding and subsequent to the expiration of the time specified in the Notice.

§747.206   Consent to termination of insured status.

Unless the credit union appears at the hearing designated in the notice of hearing by a duly authorized representative, it will be deemed to have consented to the termination of its status as an insured credit union. In the event the credit union fails to so appear at such hearing, the administrative law judge shall forthwith report the matter to the NCUA Board and the NCUA Board may thereupon issue an order terminating the credit union's insured status.

§747.207   Notice of termination of insured status.

Prior to the effective date of the termination of the insured status of an insured credit union under section 206(b) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1786(b)) and at such time as the Board shall specify, the credit union shall mail to each member at his or her last address of record on the books of the credit union, and publish in not less than two issues of a local newspaper of general circulation, notices of the termination of its insured status, and the credit union shall furnish the NCUA Board with proof of publication of such notice. The notice shall be as follows:

NOTICE

(Date)

1. The status of the ___ as an insured credit union under the provisions of the Federal Credit Union Act, will terminate as of the close of business on the __ day of __;

2. Any deposits made by you after that date, either new deposits or additions to existing accounts, will not be insured by the National Credit Union Administration;

3. Accounts in the credit union on the __ day of __, __ up to a maximum of $100,000 for each member, will continue to be insured, as provided by the Federal Credit Union Act, for one (1) year after the close of business on the __ day of __, __: Provided, however, That any withdrawals after the close of business on the day of __, __; will reduce the insurance coverage by the amount of such withdrawals.

(Name of Credit Union)

(Address)

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992, as amended at 75 FR 34622, June 18, 2010]

§747.208   Duties after termination.

(a) After the termination of the insured status of any credit union under section 206(b) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1786(b)), insurance of its member accounts to the extent they were insured on the effective date of such termination, less any amounts thereafter withdrawn which reduce the accounts below the amount covered by insurance on the effective date of such termination, shall continue for a period of one year, but no shares issued by the credit union or deposits made after the date of such termination shall be insured by the NCUA Board.

(b) The credit union shall continue to pay premiums to the NCUA Board during such period and the Board shall have the right to examine the credit union from time to time during the period. The credit union shall, in all other respects, be subject to the duties and obligations of an insured credit union during the one year period. If the credit union is closed for liquidation within this period, the Board shall have the same powers and rights with respect to such credit union as in the case of an insured credit union.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992]

Subpart D—Local Rules and Procedures Applicable to Suspensions and Prohibitions Where Felony Charged

§747.301   Scope.

The rules and procedures set forth in this subpart are applicable to informal proceedings conducted by the NCUA Board, or a Presiding Officer designated by the Board, pursuant to section 206(i) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1786(i)), to suspend, remove and/or prohibit from office or from further participation any institution-affiliated party of an insured credit union who:

(a) Is charged in a state, Federal or territorial information or indictment or complaint with committing or participating in a crime involving dishonesty or breach of trust, which crime is punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year under state or Federal law; or

(b) Enters a pretrial diversion or other similar program as result of being charged in such information or indictment or complaint with participating or committing such crime; or

(c) Is convicted of such crime.

Subpart A of this part does not apply to proceedings under this subpart.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992]

§747.302   Rules of practice; remainder of board of directors.

Except as otherwise specifically provided in this subpart, the following provisions shall apply to proceedings conducted under this subpart:

(a)(1) Power of attorney and notice of appearance. Any person who is a member in good standing of the bar of the highest court of any State, possession, territory, Commonwealth, or the District of Columbia may represent others before the NCUA Board or Presiding Officer designated by the NCUA Board upon filing with the NCUA Board a written declaration that he or she is currently qualified as provided by this paragraph, and is authorized to represent the particular party on whose behalf he acts. Any other person desiring to appear before or transact business with the NCUA Board in a representative capacity may be required to file with the NCUA Board a power of attorney showing his or her authority to act in such capacity, and he or she may be required to show to the satisfaction of the NCUA Board that he or she has the requisite qualifications. Attorneys and representatives of parties to proceedings shall file a written notice of appearance with the NCUA Board or with the Presiding Officer designated by the NCUA Board.

(2) Summary suspension. Contemptuous conduct by any person at an argument before the NCUA Board or at the hearing before a Presiding Officer shall be grounds for exclusion therefrom and suspension for the duration of the argument or hearing.

(b)(1) Notice of hearing. Whenever a hearing within the scope of this subpart is ordered by the NCUA Board, a notice of hearing shall be given by the NCUA Board to the party afforded the hearing and to any appropriate state supervisory authority. The notice shall state the time, place, and nature of the hearing and the legal authority and jurisdiction under which the hearing is to be held, and shall contain a statement of the matters of fact or law constituting the grounds for the hearing. It shall be delivered by personal service, by registered or certified mail to the last known address, or by other appropriate means, not later than 30 nor earlier than 60 days before the hearing.

(2) Party. The term “party” means a person or agency named or admitted as a party, or any person or agency who has filed a written request and is entitled as of right to be admitted as a party; but a person or agency may be admitted for a limited purpose.

(c)(1) Computation of time. In computing any period of time prescribed or allowed by this subpart, the date of the act, event or default from which the designated period of time begins to run is not to be included. The last day so computed shall be included, unless it is a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday in the District of Columbia, in which event the period shall run until the end of the next day which is neither a Saturday, Sunday, nor such legal holiday. Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays shall be included in the computation unless the time within which the act is to be performed is ten days or less in which event Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays shall not be included.

(2) Service by mail. Whenever any party has the right or is required to do some act or take some proceeding, within a period of time prescribed in this subpart, after the service upon him of any document or other paper of any kind, and such service is made by mail, three days shall be added to the prescribed period from the date when the matter served is deposited in the U.S. mail.

(d) Nonpublication of submissions. Unless and until otherwise ordered by the NCUA Board, the notice of hearing, the transcript, written materials submitted during the hearing, the Presiding Officer's recommendation to the NCUA Board and any other papers filed in connection with a hearing under this subpart, shall not be made public, and shall be for the confidential use only of the NCUA Board, the Presiding Officer, the parties and appropriate authorities.

(e) Remainder of board of directors. (1) If at any time, because of the suspension of one or more directors pursuant to this subpart, there shall be on the board of directors of an insured credit union less than a quorum of directors not so suspended, all powers and functions vested in or exercisable by such board shall vest in and be exercisable by the director or directors on the board not so suspended, until such time as there shall be a quorum on the board of directors.

(2) In the event all of the directors of an insured credit union are suspended pursuant to this subpart, the NCUA Board shall appoint persons to serve temporarily as directors in their place pending the termination of such suspensions, or until such time as those who have been suspended cease to be directors of the credit union and their respective successors have been elected by the members at an annual or special meeting and have taken office.

(3) Directors appointed temporarily by the NCUA Board pursuant to paragraph (e)(2) of this section, shall, within 30 days following their appointment, call a special meeting for the election of new directors, unless during such 30-day period—

(i) The regular annual meeting is convened; or

(ii) The suspensions giving rise to the appointment of temporary directors are terminated.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 75 FR 34622, June 18, 2010]

§747.303   Notice of suspension or prohibition.

Whenever an institution-affiliated party of an insured credit union is charged in any state, Federal or territorial information or indictment or complaint with the commission of or participation in a crime involving dishonesty or breach of trust, which crime is punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year under state or Federal law, the NCUA Board may, if continued service or participation by the concerned party may pose a threat to the interests of any credit union's members or may threaten to impair public confidence in any credit union, by written notice served upon such party, suspend him or her from office, or prohibit him or her from further participation in any manner in the affairs of any credit union, or both. A copy of the notice of suspension or prohibition shall also be served upon the credit union of which the subject of the order is, or most recently was, an institution-affiliated party.

[71 FR 67440, Nov. 22, 2006]

§747.304   Removal or permanent prohibition.

(a) In the event that a judgment of conviction or an agreement to enter a pretrial diversion or other similar program is entered against the institution-affiliated party, and at such time as the judgment, if any, is not subject to further appellate review, the NCUA Board may, if continued service or participation by such party may pose a threat to the interests of any credit union's members or may threaten to impair public confidence in any credit union, issue and serve upon the individual an order removing him or her from office or prohibiting him or her from further participation in any manner in the conduct of the affairs of any credit union except with the consent of the NCUA Board. A copy of such order will also be served upon the credit union of which the subject of the order is, or most recently was, an institution-affiliated party.

(b) The NCUA Board may issue such order with respect to an individual who is an institution-affiliated party at a credit union at the time of the offense without regard to whether such individual is an institution-affiliated party at any credit union at the time the order is considered or issued by the Board or whether the credit union at which the individual was an institution-affiliated party at the time of the offense remains in existence at the time the order is considered or issued by the board.

(c) A finding of not guilty or other disposition of the charge will not preclude the Board from thereafter instituting proceedings, pursuant to the provisions of section 206(g) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1786(g)) and subpart A of this part, to remove such director, committee member, officer, or other person from office or to prohibit his or her further participation in the affairs of the credit union.

[71 FR 67441, Nov. 22, 2006]

§747.305   Effectiveness of suspension or removal until completion of hearing.

Any notice of suspension or prohibition issued under §747.303 and any order of removal or prohibition issued under §747.304 will be effective upon service on the concerned party and will remain effective and outstanding until the completion of any hearing or appeal authorized under section 206(i) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1786(i)) and this subpart, unless such notice of suspension or order of removal is terminated by the NCUA Board.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992]

§747.306   Notice of opportunity for hearing.

(a) Any notice of suspension or prohibition issued pursuant to §747.303, and any order of removal or prohibition issued pursuant to §747.304, shall be accompanied by a further notice to the concerned individual that he or she may, within 30 days of service of such notice, request in writing an informal hearing at which he or she may present evidence and argument that his or her continued service to or participation in the conduct of the affairs of the credit union does not, or is not likely to, pose a threat to the interests of the credit union's members or threaten to impair confidence in the credit union. Any notice of the opportunity for such a hearing shall be accompanied by a description of the hearing procedure and the criteria to be considered.

(b) A request for a hearing filed pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section shall state with state with particularity the relief desired, the grounds thereof, and shall include, when available, supporting evidence. The request and supporting evidence shall be filed in writing with the Secretary of the Board, National Credit Union Administration, 1775 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-3428.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992, as amended at 59 FR 36041, July 15, 1994; 75 FR 34622, June 18, 2010]

§747.307   Hearing.

(a) Upon receipt of a request for a hearing which complies with §747.306, the NCUA Board will order an informal hearing to commence within the following 30 days in the Washington, DC metropolitan area or at such other place as the NCUA Board designates before a Presiding Officer designated by the NCUA Board to conduct the hearing. At the request of the concerned party, the NCUA Board may order the hearing to commence at a time more than 30 days after the receipt of the request for such hearing.

(b) The notice of hearing shall be served by the NCUA Board upon the party or parties afforded the hearing and shall set forth the time and place of the hearing and the name and address of the Presiding Officer.

(c) The subject individual may appear at the hearing personally, through counsel, or personally with counsel. The individual shall have the right to introduce relevant and material written materials (or, at the discretion of the NCUA Board, oral testimony), and to present an oral argument before the Presiding Officer. A member of the enforcement staff of the Office of General Counsel of the NCUA may attend the hearing and may participate as a party. Neither the formal rules of evidence nor the adjudicative procedures of the Administrative Procedure Act (5 U.S.C. 554-557), nor subpart A of this part shall apply to the hearing. The proceedings shall be recorded and a transcript furnished to the individual upon request and after the payment of the cost thereof. The NCUA Board shall have the discretion to permit the presentation of witnesses, within specified time limits, so long as a list of such witnesses is furnished to the Presiding Officer at least ten days prior to the hearing. Witnesses shall not be sworn, unless specifically requested by either party or directed by the Presiding Officer. The Presiding Officer may examine any witnesses and each party shall have the opportunity to cross-examine any witness presented by an opposing party. Upon the request of either the subject individual or the representative of the Office of General Counsel, the record shall remain open for a period of five business days following the hearing, during which time the parties may make any additional submissions to the record. Thereafter, the record shall be closed.

(d) In the course of or in connection with any proceeding under this subpart, the NCUA Board and the Presiding Officer will have the power to administer oaths and affirmations, to take or cause depositions to be taken, and to issue, revoke, quash, or modify subpoenas and subpoenas duces tecum. If the NCUA Board permits the presentation of witnesses, the NCUA Board or the Presiding Officer may require the attendance of witnesses from any place in any state or in any territory or other place subject to the jurisdiction of the United States at any designated place where such proceeding is being conducted. Witnesses subpoenaed shall be paid the same fees and mileage as are paid witnesses in the District Courts of the United States. The NCUA Board or the Presiding Officer may require the production of documents from any place in any such state, territory, or other place.

(e) The Presiding Officer will make his or her recommendations to the Board, where possible, within ten business days following the close of the record.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 59 FR 36042, July 15, 1994]

§747.308   Waiver of hearing; failure to request hearing or review based on written submissions; failure to appear.

(a) The subject individual may, in writing, waive an oral hearing and instead elect to have the matter determined by the NCUA Board on the basis of written submissions alone.

(b) Should any concerned party fail to request in writing an oral hearing or consideration based on written submissions alone within 30 days of service of the notice described in §747.306, he or she will be deemed to have consented to the NCUA Board's action.

(c) Unless the concerned party appears at the hearing personally or by duly appointed representative, he or she will be deemed to have consented to the NCUA Board's action.

§747.309   Decision of the NCUA Board.

Within 60 days following the hearing, or receipt of the subject individual's written submissions where hearing has been waived pursuant to §747.308, the NCUA Board shall notify the institution-affiliated party whether the suspension or prohibition will be continued, terminated, or otherwise modified, or whether the order of removal or prohibition will be rescinded or otherwise modified. Such notification shall contain a statement of the basis for the decision of the NCUA Board, if that decision is adverse to the respondent party. In the case of a decision favorable to the respondent on the subject of a prior order of removal or prohibition, the NCUA Board shall take prompt action to rescind or otherwise modify the order of removal or prohibition.

§747.310   Reconsideration by the NCUA Board.

(a) The subject individual shall have ten business days following receipt of the decision of the NCUA Board in which to petition the NCUA Board for initial reconsideration.

(b) The subject individual also shall be entitled to petition the NCUA Board for reconsideration of its decision any time after the expiration of a 12-month period from the date of the NCUA Board's decision, but no petition for reconsideration may be made within 12 months of a previous petition.

(c) Any petition shall state with particularity the basis for reconsideration, the relief sought, and any exceptions the individual has to the NCUA Board's findings. An individual's petition may be accompanied by a memorandum of points and authorities in support of his or her petition and any supporting documentation the individual may wish to have considered.

(d) No hearing need be granted on such petition for reconsideration. Promptly following receipt of the petition, the Board shall render its decision.

§747.311   Relevant considerations.

In deciding the question of suspension, prohibition, or removal under this subpart, the NCUA Board will consider the following:

(a) Whether the alleged offense is a crime which is punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year under state or Federal law, and which involves dishonesty or breach of trust;

(b) Whether the continued presence of the subject individual in his or her position may pose a threat to the interests of the credit union's members because of the nature and extent of the individual's participation in the affairs of the insured credit union and/or the nature of the offense with the commission of or participation in which the individual has been charged;

(c) Whether there is cause to believe that there may be an erosion of public confidence in the integrity, safety, or soundness of a particular credit union (either generally or in the particular locality in which the credit union is situated) if the subject individual is permitted to remain in his or her position in an insured credit union;

(d) Whether the individual is covered by the credit union's fidelity bond and, if so, whether the bond is likely to be revoked, or whether coverage under the bond will be affected adversely as a result of the information, indictment, complaint, judgment of conviction or entry into a pretrial diversion or other similar program; and

(e) The NCUA Board may consider any other factors which, in the specific case, appear relevant to the decision to continue in effect, rescind, terminate, or modify a suspension, prohibition, or removal order, except that it shall not consider the ultimate question of the guilt or innocence of the subject individual with regard to the crime with which he or she has been charged.

Subpart E—Local Rules and Procedures Applicable to Proceedings Relating to the Suspension or Revocation of Charters and to Involuntary Liquidations Under Title I

§747.401   Scope.

The rules and procedures set forth in this subpart and subpart A of this part are applicable to proceedings by the NCUA Board pursuant to section 120(b)(1) of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1766(b)(1)) to suspend or revoke the charter of a solvent Federal credit union, and to place a solvent Federal credit union into involuntary liquidation. To the extent a rule or procedure set forth in subpart A of this part is inconsistent with a rule or procedure set forth in this subpart E, subpart E shall control.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992]

§747.402   Grounds for suspension or revocation of charter and for involuntary liquidation.

(a) Grounds in general. The NCUA Board may suspend or revoke the charter of any Federal credit union, and place such credit union into involuntary liquidation and appoint a liquidating agent therefor, upon its finding that the credit union has violated any provision of its charter or bylaws or of the FCUA or regulations issued thereunder.

(b) Immediate suspension. In any case where the Board determines that the grounds set forth in paragraph (a) of this section exist and that immediate action is necessary in order to prevent further dissipation or credit union assets or earnings, or further weakening of the credit union's condition, or to otherwise protect the interest of the credit union's insured members or the National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund, it may order without prior notice the immediate suspension of the charter of such credit union, and if the circumstances so warrant, may take possession of all books, records, assets, and property of every description of such credit union.

§747.403   Notice of intent to suspend or revoke charter; notice of suspension.

(a) Upon its determination that one or more of the grounds listed in §747.402(a) exists, or that because of conditions described in §747.402(b) immediate suspension of charter is necessary, the NCUA Board shall cause to be served upon that credit union a notice of intent to suspend or revoke charter and of intent to place into involuntary liquidation, or a notice of suspension. Such notice shall contain a statement of the facts which constitute the grounds for this action, a recitation of the options available to the credit union under paragraph (b) of this section, and an explanation of the results that will occur if the credit union fails to exercise said options.

(b) Not later than 40 days after the receipt of the notice provided for in paragraph (a) of this section, the Federal credit union may file with the NCUA Board a statement in writing setting forth the grounds and reasons why its charter should not be suspended or revoked and why it should not be placed into involuntary liquidation; or in lieu of a written statement, request an oral hearing which shall be conducted in accordance with the procedures set forth in this subpart. This statement or request shall be accompanied by a certified copy of a resolution of the board of directors of the Federal credit union concerned authorizing such statement or request, such certification to be made by the president and secretary of the board of directors.

(c) If the Federal credit union concerned does not exercise either alternative available in paragraph (b) of this section within the time required, it shall be deemed to have admitted the facts alleged in the notice and may be deemed to have consented to the relief sought.

§747.404   Notice of hearing.

(a) Upon receipt of a request for hearing which complies with §747.403(b), the NCUA Board shall transmit the request to the Office of Financial Institution Adjudication (“OFIA”). Such hearing shall commence no earlier than 30 days nor later than 60 days after the date the OFIA receives the request for a hearing, unless an earlier or later date is requested by the Federal credit union concerned and is granted by the NCUA Board in its discretion.

(b) Except as provided in §747.405(b), the procedures of the Administrative Procedure Act (5 U.S.C. 554-557) and subpart A of this part will apply to the hearing.

(c) Unless the Federal credit union shall appear at such hearing by a duly authorized representative it shall be deemed to have consented to the suspension or revocation of its charter and to the placing of said credit union into involuntary liquidation.

§747.405   Issuance of order.

(a) In the event of such consent as referred to in §747.403(c) or §747.404(c), or if upon the record made at any such hearing as referred to in §747.403(b), the NCUA Board finds that the charter of the Federal credit union concerned should be suspended or revoked and the credit union closed and placed into involuntary liquidation, it shall cause to be served on such credit union an order directing the suspension or revocation of its charter and directing that it be closed and placed into involuntary liquidation. Such order shall contain a statement of the findings upon which the order is based. Additionally, the NCUA Board shall appoint a liquidating agent or agents.

(b) The NCUA Board shall render its decision and cause such order to be served not later than 45 days after receipt of consent, or written submissions as the case may be, or in the case of a formal hearing after service or the notice of submission referred to in §747.40(a).

(c) Upon the receipt of a copy of the order which provides that the Federal credit union concerned be placed into involuntary liquidation, the officers and directors of that Federal credit union shall immediately deliver to the agent for the liquidating agent possession and control of all books, records, assets, and property of every description of the Federal credit union, and the agent for the liquidating agent shall proceed to convert said assets to cash, collect all debts due to said Federal credit union and to wind up its affairs in accordance with the provisions of the Act.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992]

§747.406   Cancellation of charter.

Upon the completion of the liquidation and certification by the agent for the liquidating agent that the distribution of the assets of the Federal credit union has been completed, the NCUA Board shall cancel the charter of the Federal credit union concerned.

Subpart F—Local Rules and Procedures Applicable to Proceedings Relating to the Termination of Membership in the Central Liquidity Facility [Reserved]

Subpart G—Local Rules and Procedures Applicable to Recovery of Attorneys Fees and Other Expenses Under the Equal Access to Justice Act in NCUA Board Adjudications

§747.601   Purpose and scope.

This subpart contains the regulations of the NCUA implementing the Equal Access to Justice Act (5 U.S.C. 504), as amended (“EAJA”). The EAJA provides for the award of attorneys fees and other expenses to eligible individuals and entities who are parties to proceedings conducted under this part. An eligible party may receive an award when it prevails over NCUA in a proceeding, or in a significant and discrete substantive portion of the proceeding, unless the position of the NCUA was substantially justified or special circumstances make an award unjust. The rules in this subpart describe the parties eligible for fee awards, explain how to apply for awards and the procedures and standards that NCUA will use to make them. To the extent a rule or procedure set forth in subpart A of this part is inconsistent with a rule or procedure set forth in this subpart G, subpart G will control.

§747.602   Eligibility of applicants.

(a) To be eligible for an award of attorneys fees and expenses, an applicant must be a prevailing party in the proceeding for which it seeks an award and must be:

(1) An individual with a net worth of not more than $2 million;

(2) The sole owner of an unincorporated business who has a net worth of not more than $7 million, including both personal and business interests and not more than 500 employees at the time the proceeding was commenced (an applicant who owns an unincorporated business will be considered as an “individual” rather than a “sole owner of an unincorporated business” if the issues on which the applicant prevails are related primarily to personal interests rather than to business interests);

(3) A charitable or other tax-exempt organization described in section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 501(c)(3)) with not more than 500 employees;

(4) A cooperative association as defined in section 15(a) of the Agricultural Marketing Act (12 U.S.C. 1141j(a)) with not more than 500 employees; or

(5) Any other partnership, corporation, association, or public or private organization with a net worth of not more than $7 million and not more than 500 employees.

(b) For the purpose of determining eligibility, the net worth of an applicant and the number of employees of an applicant shall be determined as of the date the proceeding was initiated.

(c) The applicant's net worth includes the value of any assets disposed of for the purpose of meeting an eligibility standard and excludes any obligations incurred for this purpose. Transfers of assets or obligations incurred for less than reasonably equivalent value will be presumed to have been made for this purpose.

(d) The employees of an applicant include all persons who regularly perform services for remuneration for the applicant, under the applicant's direction and control; part-time employees shall be included on a proportional basis.

(e) The net worth and number of employees of the applicant and all of its affiliates shall be aggregated to determine eligibility. Any individual, corporation or other entity that directly or indirectly controls or owns a majority of the voting shares or other interest of the applicant, or any corporation or other entity of which the applicant directly or indirectly owns or controls a majority of the voting shares or other interest, will be considered an affiliate for purposes of this subpart, unless the NCUA Board determines that such treatment would be unjust and contrary to the purposes of the EAJA in light of the actual relationship between the affiliated entities. In addition, the NCUA Board may determine that financial relationships of the applicant other than those described in this paragraph constitute special circumstances that would make an award unjust.

(f) An applicant that participates in a proceeding primarily on behalf of one or more other persons or entities that would be ineligible is not itself eligible for an award.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 75 FR 34622, June 18, 2010]

§747.603   Prevailing party.

An eligible applicant may be a “prevailing party” if the applicant wins an action after a full hearing or trial on the merits, if a settlement of the proceeding was effected on terms favorable to it, or if the proceeding against it has been dismissed. In appropriate situations an applicant may also have prevailed if the outcome of the proceeding has substantially vindicated the applicant's position on the significant substantive matters at issue, even though the applicant has not totally avoided adverse final action.

§747.604   Standards for award.

(a) A prevailing party may receive an award for fees and expenses incurred in connection with a proceeding, or in a significant and discrete substantive portion of the proceeding, by or against NCUA unless the position of NCUA during the proceeding was substantially justified. The burden of proving that an award should not be made is on counsel for NCUA. To avoid an award, counsel for NCUA must show that its position was reasonable in law and in fact.

(b) An award will be reduced or denied if the applicant has unduly or unreasonably protracted the proceeding or if special circumstances make the award sought unjust.

(c) Where an applicant has prevailed on one or more discrete substantive issues in a proceeding, even though all the issues were not resolved in its favor, any award shall be based on the fees and expenses incurred in connection with the discrete significant substantive issue or issues on which the applicant's position has been upheld. If such segregation of costs is not practicable, the award may be based on a fair proration of those fees and expenses incurred in the entire proceeding which would be recoverable under this section if proration were not performed.

(d) Whether separate or prorated treatment under the preceding paragraph, including the applicable proration percentage, is appropriate shall be determined on the facts of the particular case. Attention shall be given to the significance and nature of the respective issues and their separability and interrelationship.

§747.605   Allowable fees and expenses.

(a) Except as provided by §747.604(b), awards will be based on rates customarily charged by persons engaged in the business of acting as attorneys, agents and expert witnesses, even if the services were made available without charge or at a reduced rate.

(b) No award under this subpart for the fee of an attorney or agent may exceed $75.00 per hour. No award to compensate an expert witness may exceed the highest rate at which NCUA is permitted to pay expert witnesses. However, an award may also include the reasonable expenses of the attorney, agent or witness as a separate item, if the attorney, agent or witness ordinarily charges clients separately for such expenses.

(c) In determining the reasonableness of the fee sought for an attorney, agent, or expert witness, the NCUA Board shall consider the following:

(1) If the attorney, agent, or expert witness is in private practice, his or her customary fee for like services, or, if he or she is an employee of the applicant, the fully allocated cost of the services;

(2) The prevailing rate for similar services in the community in which the attorney, agent, or expert witness ordinarily performs services;

(3) The time actually spent in the representation of the applicant; and

(4) Such other factors as may bear on the value of the services provided.

(d) The reasonable cost of any study, analysis, report, test, project, or similar matter prepared on behalf of the party may be awarded to the extent that the charge for the service does not exceed the prevailing rate for similar services, and the study or other matter was necessary for preparation of the applicant's case.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 75 FR 34622, June 18, 2010]

§747.606   Contents of application.

(a) A prevailing eligible party, as defined in §§747.602, 747.603, and 747.604, seeking an award under this section, must file an application for an award of fees and expenses with the Secretary of the NCUA Board. The application shall include the following information:

(1) The identity of the applicant and the proceeding for which an award is sought;

(2) A showing that the applicant has prevailed and an identification of the issues in the proceeding on which the applicant believes that the position of NCUA was not substantially justified;

(3) A statement, with supporting documentation, that the applicant is an eligible party, as defined by §747.602. If the applicant is an individual, he or she must state that his or her net worth does not exceed $2 million. If the applicant is not an individual, it shall state the number of its employees and that its net worth does not exceed $7 million as of the date the proceeding was initiated. However, an applicant may omit a statement of net worth if:

(i) It attaches a copy of a ruling by the Internal Revenue Service that it qualifies as an organization described in section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 501(c)(3)) or, in the case of a tax-exempt organization not required to obtain a ruling from the Internal Revenue Service on its exempt status, a statement that describes the basis for the applicant's belief that it qualifies under such section; or

(ii) It states that it is a cooperative association as defined in section 15(a) of the Agricultural Marketing Act (12 U.S.C. 1141j(a)).

(4) A Statement of the amount of fees and expenses for which an award is sought; and

(5) Any other matters that the applicant believes may assist or wishes the NCUA Board to consider in determining whether and in what amount an award should be made.

(b) The application shall be signed by the applicant or an authorized officer or attorney of the applicant. It shall also contain or be accompanied by a written verification under oath or under penalty of perjury that the information provided in the application is true and correct.

(c) The application and documentation requirements of this subpart are required by law as a prerequisite to obtaining a benefit under the EAJA and this subpart.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992, as amended at 75 FR 34622, June 18, 2010]

§747.607   Statement of net worth.

(a) Each applicant (other than a qualified tax-exempt organization or cooperative association) must provide a detailed statement showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates, as defined in §747.602(a), when the proceeding was initiated. The exhibit may be in any form convenient to the applicant that provides full disclosure of the applicant's and its affiliates' assets and liabilities and is sufficient to determine whether the applicant is an eligible party. The administrative law judge or the NCUA Board may require additional information from the applicant to determine eligibility. Unless otherwise ordered by the Board or required by law, the statement shall be kept confidential and used by the NCUA Board only in making its determination of an award.

(b) If the applicant or any of its affiliates is a Federal credit union, the portion of the statement of net worth which relates to the Federal credit union shall consist of a copy of the Federal credit union's last Statement of Financial Condition filed before the initiation of the underlying proceeding.

(c) All statements of net worth shall describe any transfers of assets from or obligations incurred by the applicant or any affiliate, occurring in the six-month period prior to the date on which the proceeding was initiated, which reduced the net worth of the applicant and its affiliates below the applicable net-worth ceiling. If there were none, the applicant shall so state.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 75 FR 34622, June 18, 2010]

§747.608   Documentation of fees and expenses.

The application shall be accompanied by full documentation of the fees and expenses, including the cost of any study, analysis, audit, test, project or similar matter, for which an award is sought. A separate itemized statement shall be submitted for each professional firm or individual whose services are covered by the application, showing hours spent in connection with the proceeding by each individual, a description of the specific services performed, the rate at which each fee has been computed, any expenses for which reimbursement is sought, the total amount claimed, and the total amount paid or payable by the applicant or by any other person or entity for the services provided. The administrative law judge or the NCUA Board may require the applicant to provide vouchers, receipts, or other substantiation for any expenses claimed.

§747.609   Filing and service of applications.

(a) An application may be filed whenever the applicant has prevailed in the proceeding or in a significant and discrete substantive portion of the proceeding, but in no case later than 30 days after the Board's final disposition of the proceeding.

(b) If review or reconsideration is sought or taken of a decision on which an applicant believes it has prevailed, proceedings for the award of fees shall be stayed pending final disposition of the underlying controversy.

(c) As used in this subpart, final disposition means the issuance of a final order or any other final resolution of a proceeding, such as a settlement or voluntary dismissal.

(d) Any application for an award of fees and expenses shall be filed with the Secretary of the Board, National Credit Union Administration, 1775 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-3428. Any application for an award and any other pleading or document related to an application, shall be filed and served on all parties to the proceeding in the same manner as other pleadings in the proceeding, except as provided in §747.607(a) for statements of net worth.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 59 FR 36041, July 15, 1994]

§747.610   Answer to application.

(a) Within 30 days after service of an application, counsel for NCUA may file an answer to the application. Unless counsel for NCUA requests and is granted an extension of time for filing or files a statement of intent to negotiate under paragraph (b) of this section, failure to file an answer within the 30-day period will be treated as a consent to the award requested.

(b) If counsel for NCUA and the applicant believe that the issues in the fee application can be settled, they may jointly file a statement of their intent to negotiate a settlement. The filing of this statement shall extend the time for filing an answer for an additional 30 days, and further extensions may be granted by the NCUA Board upon the joint request of counsel for NCUA and the applicant.

(c) The answer shall explain in detail any objections to the award requested and identify the facts relied on in support of counsel's position. If the answer is based on any alleged facts not already in the record of the proceeding, counsel shall include with the answer a request for further proceedings under §747.613.

(d)(1) The applicant may file a reply if counsel for NCUA has addressed in his or her answer any of the following issues:

(i) That the position of NCUA in the proceeding was substantially justified;

(ii) That the applicant unduly protracted the proceedings; or

(iii) That special circumstances make an award unjust.

(2) The reply shall be filed within 15 days after service of the answer. If the reply is based on any alleged facts not already in the record of the proceeding, the applicant shall include with the reply a request for further proceedings under §747.613.

§747.611   Comments by other parties.

Any party to a proceeding other than the applicant and counsel for NCUA may file comments on an application within 30 days after service of the application or on an answer within 15 days after service of the answer. A commenting party may not participate further in proceedings on the application unless the administrative law judge or the NCUA Board determines that the public interest requires such participation in order to permit full exploration of matters raised in the comments.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 75 FR 34622, June 18, 2010]

§747.612   Settlement.

The applicant and counsel for NCUA may agree on a proposed settlement of the award before final action on the application, either in connection with a settlement of the underlying proceeding, or after the underlying proceeding has been concluded, in accordance with NCUA's standard settlement procedure. If a prevailing party and counsel for NCUA agree on a proposed settlement of an award before an application has been filed, the application shall be filed with the proposed settlement.

§747.613   Further proceedings.

(a) After the expiration of the time allowed for the filing of all documents necessary for the determination of a recommended fee award, the NCUA Board shall transmit the entire record to the administrative law judge who presided at the underlying proceeding. Ordinarily, the determination of an award will be made on the basis of the written record. However, on request of either the applicant or counsel for NCUA, or on its own initiative, the administrative law judge or the NCUA Board may order further proceedings, such as an informal conference, oral argument, additional written submissions or an evidentiary hearing. Such further proceedings shall be held only when necessary for full and fair resolution of the issues arising from the application, and shall be conducted as promptly as possible.

(b) A request that the administrative law judge or the NCUA Board order further proceedings under this section shall specifically identify the information sought or the disputed issues and shall explain why the additional proceedings are necessary to resolve the issues.

§747.614   Recommended decision.

The administrative law judge shall file a recommended decision on the application with the NCUA Board within 60 days after completion of the proceedings on the application. The recommended decision shall include written findings and conclusions on the applicant's eligibility and status as a prevailing party, and an explanation of the reasons for any difference between the amount requested and the amount awarded. The recommended decision shall also include, if at issue, findings on whether NCUA's position was substantially justified, whether the applicant unduly protracted the proceedings, or whether special circumstances make an award unjust. If the applicant has sought an award against more than one agency, the recommended decision shall allocate responsibility for payment of any award made among the agencies, and shall explain the reasons for the allocation made. The administrative law judge shall file with and certify to the NCUA Board the record of the proceeding on the fee application, the recommended decision and proposed order. Promptly upon such filing, the NCUA Board shall serve upon each party to the proceeding a copy of the administrative law judge's recommended decision, findings, conclusions and proposed order. The provisions of this section and §747.613 shall not apply, however, in any case where the hearing was held before the NCUA Board.

§747.615   Decision of the NCUA Board.

Within 15 days after service of the recommended decision, findings, conclusions, and proposed order, the applicant or counsel for NCUA may file with the NCUA Board written exceptions thereto. A supporting brief may also be filed. The NCUA Board shall render its decision within 60 days after the matter is submitted to it. The NCUA Board shall furnish copies of its decision and order to the parties. Judicial review of the NCUA Board's final decision and order may be obtained as provided in 5 U.S.C. 504(c)(2).

§747.616   Payment of award.

An applicant seeking payment of an award granted by the NCUA Board shall submit to the NCUA's Office of Chief Financial Officer a copy of the NCUA Board's Final Decision and Order granting the award, accompanied by a statement that it will not seek review of the decision and order in the United States court. All submissions shall be addressed to the Office of the Controller, National Credit Union Administration, 1775 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-3428. The NCUA will pay the amount awarded within 60 days after receiving the applicant's statement, unless judicial review of the award or of the underlying decision of the adversary adjudication has been sought by the applicant or any other party to the proceeding.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991, as amended at 59 FR 36041, July 15, 1994; June 18, 2010]

Subpart H—Local Rules and Procedures Applicable to Investigations

§747.701   Applicability.

The rules in this subpart apply only to informal and formal investigations conducted by the NCUA Board itself or its delegates. They do not apply to adjudicative or rulemaking proceedings or to routine, periodic or special examinations conducted by the NCUA Board's staff.

§747.702   Information obtained in investigations.

Information and documents obtained by the Board in the course of any investigation, unless made a matter of public record by the NCUA Board, shall be deemed non-public, but the NCUA Board approves the practice whereby the General Counsel may engage in, and may authorize any person acting on his or her behalf or at his or her direction to engage in, discussions with representatives of domestic or foreign governmental authorities, self-regulatory organizations, and with receivers, trustees, masters and special counsels or special agents appointed by and subject to the supervision of the courts of the United States, concerning information obtained in individual investigations, including investigations conducted pursuant to any order entered by the NCUA Board or its General Counsel pursuant to delegated authority.

§747.703   Authority to conduct investigations.

(a) The General Counsel and persons acting on his or her behalf and at his or her direction may conduct such investigations into the affairs of any insured credit union or institution-affiliated parties as deemed appropriate to determine whether such credit union or party has violated, is violating or is about to violate any provision of the Act, the NCUA Board's regulations or other relevant statutes or regulations that may bear on a party's fitness to participate in the affairs of a credit union. The General Counsel and persons acting on his or her behalf may investigate whether any party is unfit to participate in the affairs of a credit union, whether formal enforcement proceedings are warranted, or such other matters as the General Counsel or his or her designee, in his or her discretion, shall deem appropriate. Such investigations may be conducted either informally or formally.

(b) Formal investigations involve the exercise of the NCUA Board's subpoena power and are referred to here as formal investigative proceedings. In formal investigative proceedings, the General Counsel and those to whom he or she delegates authority to act on his or her behalf and at his or her direction have augmented investigatory powers and need not rely on the powers available to them in informal investigations, and they may gather evidence through the issuance of subpoenas compelling the production of documents or testimony as well. In informal investigations evidence may be gathered ordinarily through the use of investigatory procedures or credit union examinations and through voluntary statements and submissions.

(c) The NCUA Board has delegated authority to the General Counsel, or designee thereof, to institute formal investigative proceedings by the entry of an order indicating the purpose of the investigation and the designation of persons to conduct that investigation on his or her behalf and at his or her direction. This delegation also extends to the NCUA Board's role as liquidator and conservator of insured credit unions. The power to issue a subpoena may not be delegated outside the agency. The General Counsel may amend such order as he deems appropriate.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992]

Subpart I—Local Rules Applicable to Formal Investigative Proceedings

§747.801   Applicability.

The rules in this subpart are applicable to a witness who is sworn in a formal investigative proceeding. Formal investigative proceedings may be held before the NCUA Board, before one or more of its members, or before any officer designated by the NCUA Board or its General Counsel, as described in subpart H of this part, and with or without the assistance of such other counsel as the NCUA Board deems appropriate, for the purpose of taking testimony of witnesses, conducting an investigation and receiving other evidence. The term “officer conducting the investigation” shall mean any of the foregoing.

§747.802   Non-public formal investigative proceedings.

Unless otherwise ordered by the NCUA Board, all formal investigative proceedings shall be non-public.

§747.803   Subpoenas.

(a) Issuance. In the course of a formal investigative proceeding the officer conducting the investigation may issue a subpoena directing the party named therein to appear before the officer conducting the investigation at a specified time and place to testify or to produce documentary evidence, or both, relating to any matter under investigation.

(b) Service. Service of subpoenas shall be effected in the following manner:

(1) Service upon a natural party. Delivery of a copy of a subpoena to a natural person may be effected by—

(i) Handing it to the person;

(ii) Leaving it at his or her office with the person in charge thereof or, if there is no one in charge, by leaving it at a conspicuous place there;

(iii) Leaving it at his or her dwelling place or usual place of abode with some person of suitable age and discretion who is found there; or

(iv) Mailing it by registered or certified mail to him or her at his or her last known address. In the event that personal service as described in this paragraph is impracticable, any other method whereby actual notice is given to the respondent may be employed.

(2) Service upon other persons. When the person to be served is not a natural person, delivery of a copy of the subpoena may be effected by—

(i) Handing it to a registered agent for service, or to any officer, director, or agent in charge of any office of such person;

(ii) Mailing it by registered or certified mail to any such representative at his or her last known address; or

(iii) Any other method whereby actual notice is given to any such representative.

(c) Witness fees and mileage. Witnesses appearing pursuant to subpoena shall be paid the same fees and mileage that are paid to witnesses in the United States district courts. Any such fees and mileage payments need be paid only upon submission of a properly completed application for reimbursement and in no event need they be paid sooner than 30 days after the appearance of the witness pursuant to subpoena.

(d) Enforcement. Whenever it appears to the General Counsel that any person upon whom a subpoena was properly served pursuant to these Rules is refusing to fully comply with the terms of that subpoena, then the General Counsel, in his or her discretion, may apply to the courts of the United States for enforcement of such subpoena.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992; June 18, 2010]

§747.804   Oath; false statements.

At the discretion of the officer conducting the investigation, testimony of a witness may be taken under oath and administered by the officer. Any person making false statements under oath during the course of a formal investigative proceeding is subject to the criminal penalties for perjury in 18 U.S.C. 1621. Any person who knowingly and willfully makes false and fraudulent statements, whether under oath or otherwise, or who falsifies, conceals or covers up any material fact, or submits any false, fictitious or fraudulent information in connection with such a proceeding, is subject to the criminal penalties set forth in 18 U.S.C. 1001.

§747.805   Self-incrimination; immunity.

(a) Self-incrimination. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a witness testifying or otherwise giving information in a formal investigative proceeding may refuse to answer questions on the basis of his or her right against self-incrimination granted by the Fifth Amendment of the Constitution of the United States.

(b) Immunity. (1) No officer conducting any formal investigative proceeding (or any other informal investigation or examination) shall have the power to grant or promise any party any immunity from criminal prosecution under the laws of the United States or of any other jurisdiction.

(2) If the NCUA Board believes that the testimony or other information sought to be obtained from any party may be necessary to the public interest and that party has refused or is likely to refuse to testify or provide other information on the basis of his or her privilege against self-incrimination, the NCUA Board, with the approval of the Attorney General, may issue an order requiring the party to give testimony or provide other information that he or she has previously refused to provide on the basis of self-incrimination.

(3) Whenever a witness refuses, on the basis of his privilege against self-incrimination, to testify or provide other information in a formal investigative proceeding, and the officer conducting the investigation communicates to that person an order of the NCUA Board requiring him or her to testify or provide other information, the witness may not refuse to comply with the order on the basis of his or her privilege against self-incrimination; but no testimony or other information compelled under the order (or any information directly or indirectly derived from such testimony or other information) may be used against the witness in any criminal case, except a prosecution for perjury, giving a false statement, or otherwise failing to comply with the order.

§747.806   Transcripts.

Transcripts, if any, of formal investigative proceedings shall be recorded solely by the official reporter, or by any other person or means designated by the officer conducting the investigation. A party who has submitted documentary evidence or testimony in a formal investigative proceeding shall be entitled, upon written request, to procure a copy of his or her documentary evidence or a transcript of his or her testimony on payment of the appropriate fees; provided, however, that in a non-public formal investigative proceeding the NCUA Board may for good cause deny such request or the NCUA Board may place reasonable limitations upon the use of the documentary evidence and transcript. In any event, any witness, upon proper identification, shall have the right to inspect the official transcript of the witness's own testimony.

§747.807   Rights of witnesses.

(a) In the event that a formal investigative proceeding is conducted pursuant to a specific order entered by the NCUA Board or by its General Counsel, then any party who is compelled or requested to provide documentary evidence or testimony as part of such proceeding shall, upon request, be shown a copy of the NCUA Board's or its delegate's order. Copies of such orders shall not be provided for their retention to such persons requesting same except in the sole discretion of the General Counsel or his designee.

(b) Any party compelled to appear, or who appears by request or permission of the officer conducting the investigation, in person at a formal investigative proceeding may be accompanied, represented and advised by counsel who is a member of the bar of the highest court of any state; provided however, that all witnesses in such proceeding shall be sequestered, and unless permitted in the discretion of the officer conducting the investigation, no witness or the counsel accompanying any such witness shall be permitted to be present during the examination of any other witness called in such proceeding.

(c)(1) The right of a witness to be accompanied, represented and advised by counsel shall mean the right to have an attorney present during any formal investigative proceeding and to have the attorney—

(i) Advise such person before, during and after such testimony;

(ii) Question such person briefly at the conclusion of his testimony to clarify any answers such person has given; and

(iii) Make summary notes during such testimony solely for the use of such person.

(2) From time to time, in the discretion of the officer, it shall be necessary for persons other than the witness and his or her counsel to attend non-public investigative proceedings. For example, the officer may deem it appropriate that outside counsel to the NCUA Board attend and advise him or her concerning the proceeding including the examination of a particular witness. In these circumstances, outside counsel would not be an officer as that term is used. In other circumstances, it may be appropriate that a technical expert (such as an accountant) accompany the witness and his or her counsel in order to assist counsel in understanding technical issues. These latter circumstances should be rare, are left to the discretion of the officer conducting the investigation, and shall not in any event be allowed to serve as a ruse to coordinate testimony between witnesses, to oversee or supervise the testimony of any witnesses, or otherwise defeat the beneficial effects of the witness sequestration rule.

(d) The officer conducting the investigation may report to the NCUA Board any instances where any witness or counsel has been guilty of dilatory, obstructionist or contumacious conduct during the course of a formal investigative proceeding or any other instance of violations of these rules. The NCUA Board will thereupon take such further action as the circumstance may warrant including barring the offending person from further participation in the particular formal investigative proceeding or even from further practice before the Board.

Subpart J—Local Procedures and Standards Applicable to a Notice of Change in Senior Executive Officers, Directors or Committee Members Pursuant to Section 212 of the Act

§747.901   Scope.

The rules and procedures set forth in this subpart shall apply to the notice filed by a credit union pursuant to section 212 of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1790a) and §700.2 of this chapter, for the consent of the NCUA to add to or replace an individual on the board of directors or supervisory or credit committee, or to employ any individual as a senior executive officer or change the responsibilities of any individual to a position of senior executive officer where the credit union either has been chartered less than 2 years; or is in “troubled condition,” as defined in §701.14 of this chapter. Subpart A of this part shall not apply to any proceeding under this subpart.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992, as amended at 60 FR 31911, June 19, 1995; 78 FR 4029, Jan. 18, 2013]

§747.902   Grounds for disapproval of notice.

The NCUA Board or its designee may issue a notice of disapproval with respect to a notice submitted by a credit union pursuant to section 212 of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1790a) and §701.14 of this chapter, where the competence, experience, character, or integrity of the individual with respect to whom such notice is submitted indicates that it would not be in the best interest of the members of the credit union or the public to permit the individual to be employed by or associated with, such credit union.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992, as amended at 60 FR 31911, June 19, 1995; 75 FR 34623, June 18, 2010]

§747.903   Procedures where notice of disapproval issued; reconsideration.

(a) The notice of disapproval shall be served upon the federally insured credit union and the candidate for director, committee member or senior executive officer. The notice of disapproval shall:

(1) Summarize or cite the relevant consideration specified in §747.902;

(2) Inform the individual and the credit union that, within 15 days of receipt of the notice of disapproval, they can request reconsideration by the Regional Director of the initial determination, or can appeal the determination directly to the NCUA Board;

(3) Specify what additional information, if any, must be considered in the reconsideration.

(b) The request for reconsideration by the Regional Director must be filed at the appropriate Regional Office.

(c) The Regional Director shall act on a request for reconsideration within 30 days of its receipt.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992]

§747.904   Appeal.

(a) Time for filing. Within 15 days after issuance of a Notice of Disapproval or a determination on a request for reconsideration by the Regional Director, the individual or credit union (henceforth petitioner) may appeal by filing with the NCUA Board a written request for appeal.

(b) Contents of request. Any appeal must be in writing and include:

(1) The reasons why the NCUA Board should review the disapproval; and

(2) Relevant, substantive and material facts that for good cause were not previously set forth in the notice required to be filed pursuant to section 212 of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1790a) and §701.14 of this chapter.

(c) Procedures for review of request. Within 30 days of the NCUA Board's receipt of an appeal, the NCUA Board may request in writing that the petitioner submit additional facts and records to support the appeal. The petitioner shall have 15 days from the date of issuance of such written request to provide such additional information. Failure by the petitioner to provide additional information may, as determined solely by the NCUA Board or its designee, result in denial of the petitioner's appeal.

(d) Determination on appeal by NCUA Board or its designee. (1) Within 90 days from the date of the receipt of an appeal by the NCUA Board or its designee or of its receipt of additional information requested under paragraph (c) of this section, the NCUA Board or its designee shall notify the petitioner whether the disapproval will be continued, terminated, or otherwise modified. The NCUA Board or its designee shall promptly rescind or modify the notice of disapproval where the decision is favorable to the petitioner.

(2) The determination by the NCUA Board on the appeal shall be provided to the petitioner in writing, stating the basis for any decision of the NCUA Board or its designee that is adverse to the petitioner, and shall constitute a final order of the NCUA Board.

(3) Failure by the NCUA Board to issue a determination on the petitioner's appeal within the 90-day period prescribed under paragraph (d)(1) of this section shall be deemed a denial of the appeal for purpose of §747.905.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 523, Jan. 7, 1992, as amended at 60 FR 31911, June 19, 1995]

§747.905   Judicial review.

(a) Failure to file an appeal within the applicable time periods, either to the initial determination or to the decision on a request for reconsideration, shall constitute a failure by the petitioner to exhaust available administrative remedies and, due to such failure, any objections to the initial determination or request for reconsideration shall be deemed to be waived and such determination shall be deemed to have been accepted by, and shall be binding upon, the petitioner.

(b) For purposes of seeking judicial review of actions taken pursuant to this section, suit may be filed in the United States District Court for the district where the requester resides, for the district where the credit union's principal place of business is located, or for the District of Columbia.

[56 FR 37767, Aug. 8, 1991; 57 FR 524, Jan. 7, 1992]

Subpart K—Inflation Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties

§747.1001   Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation.

(a) NCUA is required by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990 (Pub. L. 101-410, 104 Stat. 890, as amended (28 U.S.C. 2461 note)) to adjust the maximum amount of each civil money penalty within its jurisdiction by the rate of inflation. The following chart displays those adjustments, as calculated pursuant to the statute:

U.S. code citation CMP description New maximum amount
(1) 12 U.S.C. 1782(a)(3)Inadvertent failure to submit a report or the inadvertent submission of a false or misleading report$2,200.
(2) 12 U.S.C. 1782(a)(3)Non-inadvertent failure to submit a report or the non-inadvertent submission of a false or misleading report$22,000.
(3) 12 U.S.C. 1782(a)(3)Failure to submit a report or the submission of a false or misleading report done knowingly or with reckless disregard$1,300,000 or 1 percent of the total assets of the credit union, whichever is less.
(4) 12 U.S.C. 1782(d)(2)(A)First tier$2,200.
(5) 12 U.S.C. 1782(d)(2)(B)Second tier$22,000.
(6) 12 U.S.C. 1782(d)(2)(C)Third tier$1,300,000 or 1 percent of the total assets of the credit union, whichever is less.
(7) 12 U.S.C. 1785(e)(3)Non-compliance with NCUA security regulations$110.
(8) 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(A)First tier$7,500.
(9) 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(B)Second tier$37,500.
(10) 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(C)Third tierFor a person other than an insured credit union: $1,375,000;
   For an insured credit union: $1,375,000 or 1 percent of the total assets of the credit union, whichever is less.
(11) 42 U.S.C. 4012a(f)Per violation$385.
   Per calendar year$130,000.

(b) The adjustments displayed in paragraph (a) of this section apply to acts occurring after the date of publication in the Federal Register.

[74 FR 9351, Mar. 4, 2009]

Subpart L—Issuance, Review and Enforcement of Orders Imposing Prompt Corrective Action

Source: 65 FR 8594, Feb. 18, 2000, unless otherwise noted.

§747.2001   Scope.

(a) Independent review process. The rules and procedures set forth in this subpart apply to federally-insured credit unions, whether federally- or state-chartered (other than corporate credit unions), which are subject to discretionary supervisory actions under part 702 of this chapter, and to reclassification under §§702.102(b) and 702.302(d) of this chapter, to facilitate prompt corrective action under section 216 of the Federal Credit Union Act, 12 U.S.C. 1790d; and to senior executive officers and directors of such credit unions who are dismissed pursuant to a discretionary supervisory action imposed under part 702. NCUA staff decisions to impose discretionary supervisory actions under part 702 shall be considered material supervisory determinations for purposes of 12 U.S.C. 1790d(k). Section 747.2002 of this subpart provides an independent appellate process to challenge such decisions.

(b) Notice to State officials. With respect to a federally-insured State-chartered credit union under §§747.2002, 747.2003 and 747.2004 of this subpart, notices, directives and decisions on appeal served upon a credit union, or a dismissed director or officer thereof, by the NCUA Board shall also be served upon the appropriate State official. Responses, requests for a hearing and to present witnesses, requests to modify or rescind a discretionary supervisory action and requests for reinstatement served upon the NCUA Board by a credit union, or dismissed director or officer thereof, shall also be served upon the appropriate State official.

§747.2002   Review of orders imposing discretionary supervisory action.

(a) Notice of intent to issue directive—(1) Generally. Whenever the NCUA Board intends to issue a directive imposing a discretionary supervisory action under §§702.202(b), 702.203(b) and 702.204(b) of this chapter on a credit union classified “undercapitalized” or lower, or under §702.304(b) or §702.305(b) of this chapter on a new credit union classified “moderately capitalized” or lower, it must give the credit union prior notice of the proposed action and an opportunity to respond.

(2) Immediate issuance of directive without notice. The NCUA Board may issue a directive to take effect immediately under paragraph (a)(1) of this section without notice to the credit union if the NCUA Board finds it necessary in order to carry out the purposes of part 702 of this chapter. A credit union that is subject to a directive which takes effect immediately may appeal the directive in writing to the NCUA Board. Such an appeal must be received by the NCUA Board within 14 calendar days after the directive was issued, unless the NCUA Board permits a longer period. Unless ordered by the NCUA Board, the directive shall remain in effect pending a decision on the appeal. The NCUA Board shall consider any such appeal, if timely filed, within 60 calendar days of receiving it.

(b) Contents of notice. The NCUA Board's notice to a credit union of its intention to issue a directive imposing a discretionary supervisory action must state:

(1) The credit union's net worth ratio and net worth category classification;

(2) The specific restrictions or requirements that the NCUA Board intends to impose, and the reasons therefor;

(3) The proposed date when the discretionary supervisory action would take effect and the proposed date for completing the required action or terminating the action; and

(4) That a credit union must file a written response to a notice within 14 calendar days from the date of the notice, or within such shorter period as the NCUA Board determines is appropriate in light of the financial condition of the credit union or other relevant circumstances.

(c) Contents of response to notice. A credit union's response to a notice under paragraph (b) of this section must:

(1) Explain why it contends that the proposed discretionary supervisory action is not an appropriate exercise of discretion under this part;

(2) Request the NCUA Board to modify or to not issue the proposed directive;

(3) Include other relevant information, mitigating circumstances, documentation, or other evidence in support of the credit union's position regarding the proposed directive; and

(4) If desired, request the recommendation of NCUA's ombudsman pursuant to paragraph (g) of this section.

(d) NCUA Board consideration of response. The NCUA Board, or an independent person designated by the NCUA Board to act on its behalf, after considering a response under paragraph (c) of this section, may:

(1) Issue the directive as originally proposed or as modified;

(2) Determine not to issue the directive and to so notify the credit union; or

(3) Seek additional information or clarification from the credit union or any other relevant source.

(e) Failure to file response. A credit union which fails to file a written response to a notice of the NCUA Board's intention to issue a directive imposing a discretionary supervisory action, within the specified time period, shall be deemed to have waived the opportunity to respond, and to have consented to the issuance of the directive.

(f) Request to modify or rescind directive. A credit union that is subject to an existing directive imposing a discretionary supervisory action may request in writing that the NCUA Board reconsider the terms of the directive, or rescind or modify it, due to changed circumstances. Unless otherwise ordered by the NCUA Board, the directive shall remain in effect while such request is pending. A request under this paragraph which remains pending 60 days following receipt by the NCUA Board is deemed granted.

(g) Ombudsman. A credit union may request in writing the recommendation of NCUA's ombudsman to modify or to not issue a proposed directive under paragraph (b) of this section, or to modify or rescind an existing directive due to changed circumstances under paragraph (f) of this section. A credit union which fails to request the ombudsman's recommendation in a response under paragraph (c) of this section, or in a request under paragraph (f) of this section, shall be deemed to have waived the opportunity to do so. The ombudsman shall promptly notify the credit union and the NCUA Board of his or her recommendation.

§747.2003   Review of order reclassifying a credit union on safety and soundness criteria.

(a) Notice of proposed reclassification based on unsafe or unsound condition or practice. When the NCUA Board proposes to reclassify a credit union or subject it to the supervisory actions applicable to the next lower net worth category pursuant to §§702.102(b) and 702.302(d) of this chapter (each such action hereinafter referred to as “reclassification”), the NCUA Board shall issue and serve on the credit union reasonable prior notice of the proposed reclassification.

(b) Contents of notice. A notice of intention to reclassify a credit union based on unsafe or unsound condition or practice shall state:

(1) The credit union's net worth ratio, current net worth category classification, and the net worth category to which the credit union would be reclassified;

(2) The unsafe or unsound practice(s) and/or condition(s) justifying reasons for reclassification of the credit union;

(3) The date by which the credit union must file a written response to the notice (including a request for a hearing), which date shall be no less than 14 calendar days from the date of service of the notice unless the NCUA Board determines that a shorter period is appropriate in light of the financial condition of the credit union or other relevant circumstances; and

(4) That a credit union which fails to—

(i) File a written response to the notice of reclassification, within the specified time period, shall be deemed to have waived the opportunity to respond, and to have consented to reclassification;

(ii) Request a hearing shall be deemed to have waived any right to a hearing; and

(iii) Request the opportunity to present witness testimony shall be deemed to have waived any right to present such testimony.

(c) Contents of response to notice. A credit union's response to a notice under paragraph (b) of this section must:

(1) Explain why it contends that the credit union should not be reclassified;

(2) Include any relevant information, mitigating circumstances, documentation, or other evidence in support of the credit union's position;

(3) If desired, request an informal hearing before the NCUA Board under this section; and

(4) If a hearing is requested, identify any witness whose testimony the credit union wishes to present and the general nature of each witness's expected testimony.

(d) Order to hold informal hearing. Upon timely receipt of a written response that includes a request for a hearing, the NCUA Board shall issue an order commencing an informal hearing no later than 30 days after receipt of the request, unless the credit union requests a later date. The hearing shall be held in Alexandria, Virginia, or at such other place as may be designated by the NCUA Board, before a presiding officer designated by the NCUA Board to conduct the hearing and to recommend a decision.

(e) Procedures for informal hearing. (1) The credit union may appear at the hearing through a representative or through counsel. The credit union shall have the right to introduce relevant documents and to present oral argument at the hearing. The credit union may introduce witness testimony only if expressly authorized by the NCUA Board or the presiding officer. Neither the provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (5 U.S.C. 554-557) governing adjudications required by statute to be determined on the record nor the Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure (12 CFR part 747) shall apply to an informal hearing under this section unless the NCUA Board orders otherwise.

(2) The informal hearing shall be recorded, and a transcript shall be furnished to the credit union upon request and payment of the cost thereof. Witnesses need not be sworn, unless specifically requested by a party or by the presiding officer. The presiding officer may ask questions of any witness.

(3) The presiding officer may order that the hearing be continued for a reasonable period following completion of witness testimony or oral argument to allow additional written submissions to the hearing record.

(4) Within 20 calendar days following the closing of the hearing and the record, the presiding officer shall make a recommendation to the NCUA Board on the proposed reclassification.

(f) Time for final decision. Not later than 60 calendar days after the date the record is closed, or the date of receipt of the credit union's response in a case where no hearing was requested, the NCUA Board will decide whether to reclassify the credit union, and will notify the credit union of its decision. The decision of the NCUA Board shall be final.

(g) Request to rescind reclassification. Any credit union that has been reclassified under this section may file a written request to the NCUA Board to reconsider or rescind the reclassification, or to modify, rescind or remove any directives issued as a result of the reclassification. Unless otherwise ordered by the NCUA Board, the credit union shall remain reclassified, and subject to any directives issued as a result, while such request is pending.

(h) Non-delegation. The NCUA Board may not delegate its authority to reclassify a credit union into a lower net worth category or to treat a credit union as if it were in a lower net worth category pursuant to §702.102(b) or §702.302(d) of this chapter.

[65 FR 8594, Feb. 18, 2000, as amended at 75 FR 34623, June 18, 2010]

§747.2004   Review of order to dismiss a director or senior executive officer.

(a) Service of directive to dismiss and notice. When the NCUA Board issues and serves a directive on a credit union requiring it to dismiss from office any director or senior executive officer under §702.202(b)(7), §702.203(b)(8), §702.204(b)(8), §702.304(b) or §702.305(b) of this chapter, the NCUA Board shall also serve upon the person the credit union is directed to dismiss (Respondent) a copy of the directive (or the relevant portions, where appropriate) and notice of the Respondent's right to seek reinstatement.

(b) Contents of notice of right to seek reinstatement. A notice of a Respondent's right to seek reinstatement shall state:

(1) That a request for reinstatement (including a request for a hearing) shall be filed with the NCUA Board within 14 calendar days after the Respondent receives the directive and notice under paragraph (a) of this section, unless the NCUA Board grants the Respondent's request for further time;

(2) The reasons for dismissal of the Respondent; and

(3) That the Respondent's failure to—

(i) Request reinstatement shall be deemed a waiver of any right to seek reinstatement;

(ii) Request a hearing shall be deemed a waiver of any right to a hearing; and

(iii) Request the opportunity to present witness testimony shall be deemed a waiver of the right to present such testimony.

(c) Contents of request for reinstatement. A request for reinstatement in response to a notice under paragraph (b) of this section must:

(1) Explain why the Respondent should be reinstated;

(2) Include any relevant information, mitigating circumstances, documentation, or other evidence in support of the Respondent's position;

(3) If desired, request an informal hearing before the NCUA Board under this section; and

(4) If a hearing is requested, identify any witness whose testimony the Respondent wishes to present and the general nature of each witness's expected testimony.

(d) Order to hold informal hearing. Upon receipt of a timely written request from a Respondent for an informal hearing on the portion of a directive requiring a credit union to dismiss from office any director or senior executive officer, the NCUA Board shall issue an order directing an informal hearing to commence no later than 30 days after receipt of the request, unless the Respondent requests a later date. The hearing shall be held in Alexandria, Virginia, or at such other place as may be designated by the NCUA Board, before a presiding officer designated by the NCUA Board to conduct the hearing and recommend a decision.

(e) Procedures for informal hearing. (1) A Respondent may appear at the hearing personally or through counsel. A Respondent shall have the right to introduce relevant documents and to present oral argument at the hearing. A Respondent may introduce witness testimony only if expressly authorized by the NCUA Board or by the presiding officer. Neither the provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (5 U.S.C. 554-557) governing adjudications required by statute to be determined on the record nor the Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure (12 CFR part 747) apply to an informal hearing under this section unless the NCUA Board orders otherwise.

(2) The informal hearing shall be recorded, and a transcript shall be furnished to the Respondent upon request and payment of the cost thereof. Witnesses need not be sworn, unless specifically requested by a party or the presiding officer. The presiding officer may ask questions of any witness.

(3) The presiding officer may order that the hearing be continued for a reasonable period following completion of witness testimony or oral argument to allow additional written submissions to the hearing record.

(4) A Respondent shall bear the burden of demonstrating that his or her continued employment by or service with the credit union would materially strengthen the credit union's ability to—

(i) Become “adequately capitalized,” to the extent that the directive was issued as a result of the credit union's net worth category classification or its failure to submit or implement a net worth restoration plan or revised business plan; and

(ii) Correct the unsafe or unsound condition or unsafe or unsound practice, to the extent that the directive was issued as a result of reclassification of the credit union pursuant to §§702.102(b) and 702.302(d) of this chapter.

(5) Within 20 calendar days following the date of closing of the hearing and the record, the presiding officer shall make a recommendation to the NCUA Board concerning the Respondent's request for reinstatement with the credit union.

(f) Time for final decision. Not later than 60 calendar days after the date the record is closed, or the date of the response in a case where no hearing was requested, the NCUA Board shall grant or deny the request for reinstatement and shall notify the Respondent of its decision. If the NCUA Board denies the request for reinstatement, it shall set forth in the notification the reasons for its decision. The decision of the NCUA Board shall be final.

(g) Effective date. Unless otherwise ordered by the NCUA Board, the Respondent's dismissal shall take and remain in effect pending a final decision on the request for reinstatement.

§747.2005   Enforcement of orders.

(a) Judicial remedies. Whenever a credit union fails to comply with a directive imposing a discretionary supervisory action, or enforcing a mandatory supervisory action under part 702 of this chapter, the NCUA Board may seek enforcement of the directive in the appropriate United States District Court pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(1).

(b) Administrative remedies—(1) Failure to comply with directive. Pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(A), the NCUA Board may assess a civil money penalty against any credit union that violates or otherwise fails to comply with any final directive issued under part 702 of this chapter, or against any institution-affiliated party of a credit union (per 12 U.S.C. 1786(r)) who participates in such violation or noncompliance.

(2) Failure to implement plan. Pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(A), the NCUA Board may assess a civil money penalty against a credit union which fails to implement a net worth restoration plan under subpart B of part 702 of this chapter or a revised business plan under subpart C of part 702, regardless whether the plan was published.

(c) Other enforcement action. In addition to the actions described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, the NCUA Board may seek enforcement of the directives issued under part 702 of this chapter through any other judicial or administrative proceeding authorized by law.

[65 FR 8594, Feb. 18, 2000, as amended at 67 FR 71094, Nov. 29, 2002]

Subpart M—Issuance, Review and Enforcement of Orders Imposing Prompt Corrective Action on Corporate Credit Unions

Source: 75 FR 64860, Oct. 20, 2010, unless otherwise noted.

§747.3001   Scope.

(a) Independent review process. The rules and procedures set forth in this subpart apply to corporate credit unions which are subject to discretionary supervisory actions under §704.4 of this chapter and to reclassification under §704.4(d)(3) of this chapter to facilitate prompt corrective action, and to senior executive officers and directors of such corporate credit unions who are dismissed pursuant to a discretionary supervisory action imposed under §704.4 of this chapter. Section 747.3002 of this subpart provides an independent appellate process to challenge such decisions.

(b) Notice to State officials. With respect to a State-chartered corporate credit union under §§747.3002, 747.3003 and 747.3004 of this subpart, any notices, directives and decisions on appeal served upon a corporate credit union, or a dismissed director or officer thereof, by the NCUA will also be served upon the appropriate State official. Responses, requests for a hearing and to present witnesses, requests to modify or rescind a discretionary supervisory action and requests for reinstatement served upon the NCUA by a corporate credit union, or any dismissed director or officer of a corporate credit union, will also be served upon the appropriate State official.

§747.3002   Review of orders imposing discretionary supervisory action.

(a) Notice of intent to issue directive.—(1) Generally. Whenever the NCUA intends to issue a directive imposing a discretionary supervisory action under §§704.4(k)(2)(v) and 704.4(k)(3) of this chapter on a corporate credit union classified “undercapitalized” or lower, the NCUA will give the corporate credit union prior notice of the proposed action and an opportunity to respond.

(2) Immediate issuance of directive without notice. The NCUA may issue a directive to take effect immediately under paragraph (a)(1) of this section without notice to the corporate credit union if the NCUA finds it necessary in order to carry out the purposes of §704.4 of this chapter. A corporate credit union that is subject to a directive which takes effect immediately may appeal the directive in writing to the NCUA Board (Board). Such an appeal must be received by the Board within 14 calendar days after the directive was issued, unless the Board permits a longer period. Unless ordered by the NCUA, the directive will remain in effect pending a decision on the appeal. The Board will consider any such appeal, if timely filed, within 60 calendar days of receiving it.

(b) Contents of notice. The NCUA's notice to a corporate credit union of its intention to issue a directive imposing a discretionary supervisory action will state:

(1) The corporate credit union's capital measures and capital category classification;

(2) The specific restrictions or requirements that the Board intends to impose, and the reasons therefore;

(3) The proposed date when the discretionary supervisory action would take effect and the proposed date for completing the required action or terminating the action; and

(4) That a corporate credit union must file a written response to a notice within 14 calendar days from the date of the notice, or within such shorter period as the Board determines is appropriate in light of the financial condition of the corporate credit union or other relevant circumstances.

(c) Contents of response to notice. A corporate credit union's response to a notice under paragraph (b) of this section must:

(1) Explain why it contends that the proposed discretionary supervisory action is not an appropriate exercise of discretion under this section;

(2) Request the Board to modify or to not issue the proposed directive; and

(3) Include other relevant information, mitigating circumstances, documentation, or other evidence in support of the corporate credit union's position regarding the proposed directive.

(d) NCUA Board consideration of response. The Board, or an independent person designated by the Board to act on the Board's behalf, after considering a response under paragraph (c) of this section, may:

(1) Issue the directive as originally proposed or as modified;

(2) Determine not to issue the directive and to so notify the corporate credit union; or

(3) Seek additional information or clarification from the corporate credit union or any other relevant source.

(e) Failure to file response. A corporate credit union which fails to file a written response to a notice of the Board's intention to issue a directive imposing a discretionary supervisory action, within the specified time period, will be deemed to have waived the opportunity to respond, and to have consented to the issuance of the directive.

(f) Request to modify or rescind directive. A corporate credit union that is subject to an existing directive imposing a discretionary supervisory action may request in writing that the Board reconsider the terms of the directive, or rescind or modify it, due to changed circumstances. Unless otherwise ordered by the Board, the directive will remain in effect while such request is pending. A request under this paragraph which remains pending 60 days following receipt by the Board is deemed granted.

§747.3003   Review of order reclassifying a corporate credit union on safety and soundness criteria.

(a) Notice of proposed reclassification based on unsafe or unsound condition or practice. When the Board proposes to reclassify a corporate credit union or subject it to the supervisory actions applicable to the next lower capitalization category pursuant to §704.4(d)(3) of this chapter (such action hereinafter referred to as “reclassification”), the Board will issue and serve on the corporate credit union reasonable prior notice of the proposed reclassification.

(b) Contents of notice. A notice of intention to reclassify a corporate credit union based on unsafe or unsound condition or practice will state:

(1) The corporate credit union's current capital ratios and the capital category to which the corporate credit union would be reclassified;

(2) The unsafe or unsound practice(s) and/or condition(s) justifying reasons for reclassification of the corporate credit union;

(3) The date by which the corporate credit union must file a written response to the notice (including a request for a hearing), which date will be no less than 14 calendar days from the date of service of the notice unless the Board determines that a shorter period is appropriate in light of the financial condition of the corporate credit union or other relevant circumstances; and

(4) That a corporate credit union which fails to —

(i) File a written response to the notice of reclassification, within the specified time period, will be deemed to have waived the opportunity to respond, and to have consented to reclassification;

(ii) Request a hearing will be deemed to have waived any right to a hearing; and

(iii) Request the opportunity to present witness testimony will be deemed to have waived any right to present such testimony.

(c) Contents of response to notice. A corporate credit union's response to a notice under paragraph (b) of this section must:

(1) Explain why it contends that the corporate credit union should not be reclassified;

(2) Include any relevant information, mitigating circumstances, documentation, or other evidence in support of the corporate credit union's position;

(3) If desired, request an informal hearing before the Board under this section; and

(4) If a hearing is requested, identify any witness whose testimony the corporate credit union wishes to present and the general nature of each witness's expected testimony.

(d) Order to hold informal hearing. Upon timely receipt of a written response that includes a request for a hearing, the Board will issue an order commencing an informal hearing no later than 30 days after receipt of the request, unless the corporate credit union requests a later date. The hearing will be held in Alexandria, Virginia, or at such other place as may be designated by the Board, before a presiding officer designated by the Board to conduct the hearing and to recommend a decision.

(e) Procedures for informal hearing.—(1) The corporate credit union may appear at the hearing through a representative or through counsel. The corporate credit union will have the right to introduce relevant documents and to present oral argument at the hearing. The corporate credit union may introduce witness testimony only if expressly authorized by the Board or the presiding officer. Neither the provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (5 U.S.C. 554-557) governing adjudications required by statute to be determined on the record nor the Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure (12 CFR part 747) will apply to an informal hearing under this section unless the Board orders otherwise.

(2) The informal hearing will be recorded, and a transcript will be furnished to the corporate credit union upon request and payment of the cost thereof. Witnesses need not be sworn, unless specifically requested by a party or by the presiding officer. The presiding officer may ask questions of any witness.

(3) The presiding officer may order that the hearing be continued for a reasonable period following completion of witness testimony or oral argument to allow additional written submissions to the hearing record.

(4) Within 20 calendar days following the closing of the hearing and the record, the presiding officer will make a recommendation to the Board on the proposed reclassification.

(f) Time for final decision. Not later than 60 calendar days after the date the record is closed, or the date of receipt of the corporate credit union's response in a case where no hearing was requested, the Board will decide whether to reclassify the corporate credit union, and will notify the corporate credit union of its decision. The decision of the Board will be final.

(g) Request to rescind reclassification. Any corporate credit union that has been reclassified under this section may file a written request to the Board to reconsider or rescind the reclassification, or to modify, rescind or remove any directives issued as a result of the reclassification. Unless otherwise ordered by the Board, the corporate credit union will remain reclassified, and subject to any directives issued as a result, while such request is pending.

§747.3004   Review of order to dismiss a director or senior executive officer.

(a) Service of directive to dismiss and notice. When the Board issues and serves a directive on a corporate credit union requiring it to dismiss from office any director or senior executive officer under §§704.4(g) and 704.4(k)(3) of this chapter, the Board will also serve upon the person the corporate credit union is directed to dismiss (Respondent) a copy of the directive (or the relevant portions, where appropriate) and notice of the Respondent's right to seek reinstatement.

(b) Contents of notice of right to seek reinstatement. A notice of a Respondent's right to seek reinstatement will state:

(1) That a request for reinstatement (including a request for a hearing) must be filed with the Board within 14 calendar days after the Respondent receives the directive and notice under paragraph (a) of this section, unless the Board grants the Respondent's request for further time;

(2) The reasons for dismissal of the Respondent; and

(3) That the Respondent's failure to—

(i) Request reinstatement will be deemed a waiver of any right to seek reinstatement;

(ii) Request a hearing will be deemed a waiver of any right to a hearing; and

(iii) Request the opportunity to present witness testimony will be deemed a waiver of the right to present such testimony.

(c) Contents of request for reinstatement. A request for reinstatement in response to a notice under paragraph (b) of this section must:

(1) Explain why the Respondent should be reinstated;

(2) Include any relevant information, mitigating circumstances, documentation, or other evidence in support of the Respondent's position;

(3) If desired, request an informal hearing before the Board under this section; and

(4) If a hearing is requested, identify any witness whose testimony the Respondent wishes to present and the general nature of each witness's expected testimony.

(d) Order to hold informal hearing. Upon receipt of a timely written request from a Respondent for an informal hearing on the portion of a directive requiring a corporate credit union to dismiss from office any director or senior executive officer, the Board will issue an order directing an informal hearing to commence no later than 30 days after receipt of the request, unless the Respondent requests a later date. The hearing will be held in Alexandria, Virginia, or at such other place as may be designated by the Board, before a presiding officer designated by the Board to conduct the hearing and recommend a decision.

(e) Procedures for informal hearing.—(1) A Respondent may appear at the hearing personally or through counsel. A Respondent will have the right to introduce relevant documents and to present oral argument at the hearing. A Respondent may introduce witness testimony only if expressly authorized by the Board or by the presiding officer. Neither the provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (5 U.S.C. 554-557) governing adjudications required by statute to be determined on the record nor the Uniform Rules of Practice and Procedure (12 CFR part 747) apply to an informal hearing under this section unless the Board orders otherwise.

(2) The informal hearing will be recorded, and a transcript will be furnished to the Respondent upon request and payment of the cost thereof. Witnesses need not be sworn, unless specifically requested by a party or the presiding officer. The presiding officer may ask questions of any witness.

(3) The presiding officer may order that the hearing be continued for a reasonable period following completion of witness testimony or oral argument to allow additional written submissions to the hearing record.

(4) A Respondent will bear the burden of demonstrating that his or her continued employment by or service with the corporate credit union would materially strengthen the corporate credit union's ability to —

(i) Become “adequately capitalized,” to the extent that the directive was issued as a result of the corporate credit union's capital classification category or its failure to submit or implement a capital restoration plan; and

(ii) Correct the unsafe or unsound condition or unsafe or unsound practice, to the extent that the directive was issued as a result of reclassification of the corporate credit union pursuant to §704.4(d)(3) of this chapter.

(5) Within 20 calendar days following the date of closing of the hearing and the record, the presiding officer will make a recommendation to the Board concerning the Respondent's request for reinstatement with the corporate credit union.

(f) Time for final decision. Not later than 60 calendar days after the date the record is closed, or the date of the response in a case where no hearing was requested, the Board will grant or deny the request for reinstatement and will notify the Respondent of its decision. If the Board denies the request for reinstatement, it will set forth in the notification the reasons for its decision. The decision of the Board will be final.

(g) Effective date. Unless otherwise ordered by the Board, the Respondent's dismissal will take and remain in effect pending a final decision on the request for reinstatement.

§747.3005   Enforcement of directives.

(a) Judicial remedies. Whenever a corporate credit union fails to comply with a directive imposing a discretionary supervisory action, or enforcing a mandatory supervisory action under §704.4 of this chapter, the Board may seek enforcement of the directive in the appropriate United States District Court pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(1).

(b) Administrative remedies—(1) Failure to comply with directive. Pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(A), the Board may assess a civil money penalty against any corporate credit union that violates or otherwise fails to comply with any final directive issued under §704.4 of this chapter, or against any institution-affiliated party of a corporate credit union (per 12 U.S.C. 1786(r)) who participates in such violation or noncompliance.

(2) Failure to implement plan. Pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1786(k)(2)(A), the Board may assess a civil money penalty against a corporate credit union which fails to implement a capital restoration plan under §704.4(e) of this chapter, regardless whether the plan was published.

(c) Other enforcement action. In addition to the actions described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, the Board may seek enforcement of the directives issued under Section 704.4 of this chapter through any other judicial or administrative proceeding authorized by law.

§747.3006   Conservatorship or liquidation of critically undercapitalized corporate credit union.

Notwithstanding any other provision of this title, the NCUA may, without any administrative due process, immediately place into conservatorship or liquidation any corporate credit union that has been categorized as critically undercapitalized.



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