About GPO   |   Newsroom/Media   |   Congressional Relations   |   Inspector General   |   Careers   |   Contact   |   askGPO   |   Help  
 
Home   |   Customers   |   Vendors   |   Libraries  

The Electronic Code of Federal Regulations (e-CFR) is a regularly updated, unofficial editorial compilation of CFR material and Federal Register amendments produced by the National Archives and Records Administration's Office of the Federal Register (OFR) and the Government Printing Office.

Parallel Table of Authorities and Rules for the Code of Federal Regulations and the United States Code
Text | PDF

Find, review, and submit comments on Federal rules that are open for comment and published in the Federal Register using Regulations.gov.

Purchase individual CFR titles from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore.

Find issues of the CFR (including issues prior to 1996) at a local Federal depository library.

[1]
 
 

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

e-CFR Data is current as of October 21, 2014

Title 36Chapter VIIIPart 801 → Appendix


Title 36: Parks, Forests, and Public Property
PART 801—HISTORIC PRESERVATION REQUIREMENTS OF THE URBAN DEVELOPMENT ACTION GRANT PROGRAM


Appendix 2 to Part 801—Special Procedures for Identification and Consideration of Archeological Properties in an Urban Context

A. Archeological sites in urban contexts are often difficult to identify and evaluate in advance of construction because they are sealed beneath modern buildings and structures. Prehistoric and historic sites within cities may be important both to science and to an understanding of each city's history, however, and should be considered in project planning. Special methods can be used to ensure effective and efficient consideration and treatment of archeological sites in UDAG projects.

1. If it is not practical to physically determine the existence or nonexistence of archeological sites in the project area, the probability or improbability of their existence can be determined, in most cases, through study of:

a. Information on the pre-urban natural environment, which would have had an effect on the location of prehistoric sites;

b. Information from surrounding areas and general literature concerning the location of prehistoric sites;

c. State and local historic property registers or inventories;

d. Archeological survey reports;

e. Historic maps, atlases, tax records, photographs, and other sources of information on the locations of earlier structures;

f. Information on discoveries of prehistoric or historic material during previous construction, land levelling, or excavation, and

g. Some minor on-the-ground inspection.

2. Should the study of sources such as those listed in section (1)(a) above reveal that the following conditions exist, it should be concluded that a significant likelihood exists that archeological sites which meet the National Register Criteria exist on the project site:

a. Discoveries of prehistoric or historic material remains have been reliably reported on or immediately adjacent to the project site, and these are determined by the State Historic Preservation Officer or other archeological authority to meet the Criteria for the National Register because of their potential value for public interpretation or the study of significant scientific or historical research problems; or

b. Historical or ethnographic data, or discoveries of material, indicate that a property of potential cultural value to the community or some segment of the community (e.g., a cemetery) lies or lay within the project site; or

c. The pre-urbanization environment of the project site would have been conducive to prehistoric occupation, or historic buildings or occupation sites are documented to have existed within the project site in earlier times, and such sites or buildings are determined by the State Historic Preservation Officer or other archeological authority to meet the Criteria of the National Register because of their potential value for public interpretation or the study of significant scientific or historical research questions, and

d. The recent history of the project site has not included extensive and intensive ground disturbance (grading, blasting, cellar digging, etc.) in the location, or extending to the depth at which the remains of significant sites, buildings, or other features would be expected.

B. Where review of sources of information such as those listed in section (1)(a) above reveals no significant likelihood that archeological resources which meet the National Register Criteria exist on the project site, no further review is required with respect to archeology provided the State Historic Preservation Officer concurs.

C. Where review of sources of information such as those listed in section (1)(a) above, reveals that archeological resources which meet the National Register Criteria are likely to exist on the project site, but these resources are so deeply buried that the project will not intrude upon them, or they are in a portion of the project site that will not be disturbed, a determination of “No Effect” is appropriate in accordance with §801.3(c)(2)(i).

D. Where review of sources of information such as those listed in section (1)(a) above, reveals that archeological resources which meet the Criteria exist or are likely to exist on the project site, and that the project is likely to disturb them, a determination of “No Adverse Effect” may be made in accordance with §801.3(c)(2)(ii) if:

1. The applicant and/or developer is committed to fund a professionally supervised and planned pre-construction testing program, and to modification of the project in consultation with the State Historic Preservation Officer to protect or incorporate within the project the archeological resources discovered with a minimum of damage to them, or if:

2. The applicant and/or developer is committed to fund a professionally supervised and planned archeological salvage program, coordinated with site clearing and construction, following the standards of the Secretary of the Interior issued pursuant to the Archeological and Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 469) and the applicant finds that this program negates the adverse effect, in accordance with the standards set forth in section X of the Council's “Supplementary Guidance for Review of Proposals for Treatment of Archeological Properties” (45 FR 78808).

E. When archeological sites included in the National Register or which meet the Criteria are found to exist on the project site or in the area of the project's environmental impact, and where the project is likely to disturb such resources, and where the adverse effect of such disturbance cannot be negated by archeological salvage, a determination of “Adverse Effect” is appropriate in accordance with §801.3(a)(2)(iii).



For questions or comments regarding e-CFR editorial content, features, or design, email ecfr@nara.gov.
For questions concerning e-CFR programming and delivery issues, email webteam@gpo.gov.